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The Butte daily bulletin. (Butte, Mont.) 1918-1921, March 21, 1919, Image 5

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SUOF INTEREST TO AUTOMOBILE _FANS °e whsPe i
See this Page Mr. Advertiser
E APPROPRIATIONS
JVE BOOST TO UNITED
FORESTROADSYSTEMS
riculture Is Empowered to Build Trails
Where He Deems Them Necessary.
Available for That Purpose.
el'l 1 ,,.---The development of the national
is 'given great impetus by the terms of the
clii ins a('l w'hi('h the president has just
m'rc;iasiiig tby $200,000,000 the total fund
,fedl'tlera. l id roadl act, the new law makes
rlliiturle Ib the secretary of agriculture
lis ndl Iraiils wilhin or partly within the
eZs t he secre
to) he secre
terials, equip
ablel for high
11(ol needed by
While most of
(1 aillioig the
.if the states
road projects,
lt niay be re
y of agricul
national for
s conistlucted
iioin.
mllay be) used
.1 as survey
new legisla
:ii road act,
of roads and
use and de
forset re
r the l)proper
ion and im
st where co
Itions can bet
,n it contains
Silmportance.
re Necessary.
nits the see
thout the co
ials" to build
'oad or trail
:st which he
1 p)roper ad
In and in.
,01or which in
ollal inlpor
" forestry of
)st importaint
1pid develop
st roads sys
:iniablo lne
s us much
ily developed
had before,"
chief of the
inting on the
t federal aid
lds within or
, $1,000,000
1 expended.
:h practically
i'0 all aCCuli
.!.00i unex
$1,0011,000
lable Juily 1.
for Comaing
)ri .ln. $3,-.
Iy available,
ntiie available
l e available
ithe 10 per
receipls. Al
nave in sight
out $10,000it,
SOils
I 11 111' i;
iobile
r
il ' i
$1.30 gal.
$1.25 gal.
e
$1.15 gal.
gtll., 85c
cill. 25c
.. $2.50
(1se buying
lic ation to
in reasing
,t. at . a
ito you..
4; I nu11 1d.
Htardware
Tools
ctri'eal
E. Park
000, if we Can use it advantageously. 1
Whatever we can't use advantage- c
ously so soon will be added to the t
$4,000,000 of new money that be- i
comes available the following year.
"We already have our plans for
approved road projects sufficiently e
shaped up so a prompt start will he ,
possible as soon as the weather per- 1
mits. In some cases, however, these t
plans must necessarily be suspended I
on account of pending proposals for
the creation of national parks af
fecting national forest lands. It
would be obviously improper to ex
pend the funds intended and voted
by congress for the development and
protection of the national forests on
areas which may soon cease to be
national forests.
This legislation will not only make a
it easier to protect the forests with
out costly expenditures to fight bad t
fires in inaccessible localities, but al- a
so will help enormously the many a
small communities and scattered set
tlers in and near the forests who now t
suffer for lack of roads. It will al- f
so enable the construction of im
portant trunk-line roads crossing the
mountains, with suitable provision c
of subsidiary roads. One result un- t
questionably will be a marked de
velopment of recreational use of
these great national plavgrounds
with their wealth of too little known
attractions. Altogether, the opening
up of the forests to more complete
and varied use by the public, which
is the fundamental object of their
administration will be tremendously
advanced."
Under the law preference is given
to the employment of honorably dis- I
charged soldiers, sailors and marines
for the required labor.
TUBE WEAKNESS
DOES NOT IEAD TO
TIRE BLOWOUTS
A widely held belief in connection
with tire usage, that weakness in the
tube causes blowouts, is held to be
false by A. M. Richardson, manager
of Denver Tire Service, Inc.
"Motorists are often urged never
to use an old tube.with a new casing,
because the former being weak will
be the cause of an expensive blowout.
This argument shows a misunder
standing of the basic principles of
tire construction.
"The casing, not the tube, holds
the pressure of the air. The tube,
unreinforced, would blow out to a
size greatly beyond that of the. cab
ing, and, if the pressure werfpif
ticiently strong, woulu explod. ,-The'
mission of the tube is not to s.lngth
en the tire, but merely,,.ts an air
proof bag, to hold th qr' inside the
casing. It is made .Yubber so that
by virtue of its e ticity it may give
before the blog in the road. When
the tube is ehictured all that hap
pens is thls: the air seeps out into
the casi n, then between the beading
and the liim out of the tire.
':The true history of a blowout is,
itiTs. When a casing is badly injured
or worn it can no longer resist the
pressure of the air which, straining
against the shoe, breaks through its
weakest spot.
"This explanation should hot, how
ever, destroy the feeling against us
ing an old tube with a'new casing. An
old tube is much more likely to
spring a leak than a new one. In ad
dition to the weakness of age, it is
apt to become stretched, and thus be
subject to pinching. And running on
a tire when it is flat injures it be
yond recovery."
Opinions may differ as to the best
means of getting agriculture repre
sented in our legislative ,~jalls, but
there can be. no t-wo opiniops as to
this-that agriictlture, stands in need
of more legis!ltors' who'a'e working
farmers with their first inf0rest the
problems of the man on the land.
To suggest that the run~ting of farm
er c ndidgtes is a mildiformn of bol
4hevl m, asentimen{ expressed by an
()nt .(c etai inistererecently, .i.
sbsurd .t~T '1ei r4met--Farm ani
D1airy ('ITiront9, '.an.).
HE DIDN'T CARE
Camel-The..country Goes dry Jul"
kL .""
THINGS TO
WORRYABOUT
End play in the crankshaft is apt
to be noticed first when the car is
throttled down to about five miles an
hour, when there occurs what is coim
monly called bucking, accompanied
by knocking. If the play is excessive,
the knocking will be heard as the
speed increases. This condition may
be caused by the end of the main
bearing becoming flattened or worn
so much that the shaft can move
back and forth, and as it. does so it
pounds against the bearing ends still
more. In many cars with four bear
ing crankshafts the second bearing
from the rear is designed to take the
thrust, and so replacement of that
one bearing will remedy the trouble.
In three bearing shafts the center or
rear bearing usually is the one're
quiring replacement. In the four
bearing shafts it is best simply to
change the one bearing instead of at
tempting to remove the play by us
ing two or three bearings with thick
er flanges.
In ,some cars a loosening of the
engine bolts, those which hold the
motor in place, may cause a misalign
nent of the engine, with serious
trouble as a result. Even though the
looseness be slight, it may allow the
motor support to hammer and thump.
In time this may result in an actual
breakage of the supporting arm.
The inside of copper wire of the
sort used for battery connections fre
quently corrodes until it is complete
ly eaten through, when it parts and
a short circuit results. This trouble
is caused by the sulphuric acid gas in
the cells, accentuated by the damp
air about the battery. If the wires
are coated at and around the term
inals with cup grease the copper will
be effectively protected from the acid
fumes.
If the doors on one side of the
car have a tendency either to bind or
to swing too loosely, so that the lock
does not catch, with the result that
there are squeaks and rattles when
ever the car is in motion, the trouble
may be remedied by placing a piece
of loather under the body.
The holding down nuts of the cyl
inder head should be tightened peri
odically. If the cylinder head is tak
en off for any reason, in replacing the
part should be tightened up again by
screwing down opposite nuts. Each
nut should be turned a little, then its
opposite should be screwed (town
somnewhat, and so on, working
around the cylinder head. If one nut
is tightened all the way there is dan
ger of springing the part.
Instead of filing in a vise, it is ]
recommended that connecting rod t
caps be rubbed on a sheet of emery i
paper, tacked on a board. This in
sures that the cap will be smoothed
down edenly. something very difficult €
to accomplish in filing, except by an
expert workman, who is also extreme
ly careful in gauging as he goes
alon"
A nut that refuses to be moved in
the ordinary course may generallyy
started by 'heating an open_-and
wrench which fits the nut a..tl'ting
it rest thereon for a few, rif.utes. The
wrench may, be hgag6ed with a blow
torch, but do fot heat the nut with
the torch,/'bQcause this expands both
nut an'byolt, thereby defeating the
objecrof the operation.
When kerosene is used as a fuel In
the motor tractor it will be found
necessary in many cases to change
the oil in the crankcase after each 20
hours of running. This is because of
the tendency of kerosene to condense,
when it is not properly heated.
whereupon it mixes with the oil and
destroys its lubricating qualities.
HIGH PRICES PAID
FOR SECOND-HAND
AUTOS IN BRITAIN
An illustration of automobile con
ditions in England is revealed in the
Morning Post of London of Feb. 1,
which says that cars are beginning to
appear. on the roads in increasing
numbers, but away from the vicinity
of certain factories there are few, it
any, signs of new vehicles.
"Indeed," it adds, "the price of
. used cars in anything like good run
t ning order is as high as the actual
t cost of the vehiclts new in pro-war
I days, somnetiimes'hither. This points
to the fact that th'e native industry
a will not get going properly for sever
al months."
British motorists, like many., i
- owners here, are .having diffi
s with low grade f~fels, and in or e
-gprovide a better trade a plan ltaf.p
i tb 'tiix the highest grqde ,avft"
spirit; of which there is' more thaf
sufficient store in the countty, with
the lower grades that have been
available.
The mixture, it is stated, will be
sold at about three shillings nine and
one-half pence a gallon, cquivalent
to 90 centse indicating that gasoline
is still a high priced commodity in
England.
We do not claim the government
owes us a living, but we do claim It
owes' us the opportunity to earn a
good living.-Arizona Labor Journal.
t_.i.ir . r" l " rn..a
FARM TRACTOR TRADE SHOWS
A REMIRKABLE AND PERMANENT
CROWTH IN THE LAST SIX YEARS
In 1912 There Were Only 11,000 Manufactured in the
United States, But by 1918 the Total Output Approx
imated 150,000, Says a Kansas City Official.
"''The rpv\\lli (II' the Amll(- eriiltl Inlr tor indnusltY has lleM r'e
mnirkable. Iii 1912 there \were i'tlV" 11,01) I'ilno,lrs ma -lll
t' rteAied iI lie l ni tel Slt ailes. 1i\ 19!)18 Ihe ,.ii liilpil Up
Ipr xi atiii iit I. ),i 00,t wrile (ii y 11 II. haill, 'retarlly I' tlie
"Fromn present indications it is
predicted that in 1920 more than
300,000 tractors will be in use in
America. The potential tractor mark
et in this country exceeds 1,250,000.
By this is meant that there are farms
in the United States which can be far
better and more quickly worked with
less labor and greater returns with
tractors than without. The number
of tractors to meet this demaitnd
would total over one and one-quarter
millions, not including replacements.
This staggering figure does not in
clude the demaiiinds of Europe, Asia,
Africa or South America. These es
timlates seenm all the more remarkablet
when it is considered that they are
the outgrowth of only a few year.s
development.
QUANTITY PRODUCTION
WAS IREIAC(HEI) IN 1914I.
"So-called quantity production of
the one-man tractor, pulling a two
bottom gang plow, was reached it:
1914.
"Anlerica has attained hier emlinelnt
position among the nations of the
world, because her system of agricul
ture releases two-thirds of her popu
lation to other activities, while Euro
peans-exponents of intensive farm
ing-are, ill a measure, serfs to the
soil. Expansion of acreage per man
has been the mother necessity behind
the evolution of the farm tractor. As
the agent of extensive farming, the
farm tractor performs its greatest
function, placing the farm on the
;natne economnic basis as other indits
tries when mlechanical efficiency is
substituted for obsolescent hullman la
bor.
"As a result of his quick adapta
tion to power farming mnachin.ery, thel
American farlmer standls today the
greatest individual food prodhucer in
the world. When we speak of power
farmling machinery, our minids nat
urally revert to the tlractorl' which iin
reality is the farmers' portable pow
er plant, easily lperforming all niature
of work hitherto left to man or beast.
The most striking characteristic of
the tractor is its efficient versatility.
The enormous quantity of work of
varying nature it can do at , speh
small cost makes the trac6r the
greatest farm machine of?-aT time,
and an economic neceasit.t whiere in
creased produ c4gn is desired at a
saving in aoetril labtor and expense.
"At pise. t Illinois leads the Un
ion,.; ý essing nlore than 6,000 trac
Kansas is a close second, with
You See This
Ad---Others
Will See Yours
W E can make your
ad as attractive
as this one with
effective cuts and copy.
Our contract with the
Bonnet - Brown Sales
Service brings you the
opportunity of putting
your advertising on the
highest plane of attrac
tiveness and efficiency.
Have our Ad Mala call
and show you cuts
ihl ou rline of
his service is supplied
without extra charge to
our advertisers. Tele
phone 52 for Advertis
ing department.
BUTTE DAILY
BULLETIN
,t~- 7.i· ~' i
'Texas, Iowa, Nortl th akota, Ohio 4and
Iissouri following in their reslpective
order. Tlhese seven states have a '1
total crop valuation of $4.12.,8941.- 1
000, using over :3l0,nI0 ractors on 22 t'
pI( r cent of their entire l'acreagl. C41in
there be any doulbt is to the fItlure
of the tractor indu11ry aft4er the pIo
telltial market offer:; such opporluni- 1
ties; in only .even 4tah144? Tle total
crolp valuation for 1918 i!s estilmated
at $21,000,000,000; the total live- a
,stock at $8,000,000.000 for the sae41'
p)eriodt . 1-Here is a total of $29,0440.
0010,)00, reprosenting the nloney vaIl
liet of one year's outpult of Alericanl
farms. Is farmnlllg otIr biggest busi
ni4is Let the above figures answetr.
"Considering theit cos:t of horseflelsh
--Ce\(n with the demobilization of
horses used for war pulrptose's Callsing
a lowering of the prices-- t11he tractor
has it ll over tile one-time old reli
able of the farm. It requires five to 1
six good horses and two two-bottom n
ganlg plows to accontIlish as ImuIch as
a light, onle- an tract ILitor. B1ut it is
nIot thell primary co(':t that coullnts so
much, for there is the bother and
trouble that horse, mlean, that is
saved when a trlcltor is substituted
and the farnl is Motorized.
"Amlerican tractors were favorably
known in Europe before 1914, but
the warl resulted in thousanllds of trac- -
tors being thipl ed to England, I
Franlce, Italy atd other counlltries of
the old world. 'omiains llnd estahtes i
of the gentry were '1cultivat4d1 day and l
night to defeat the German I'-buoat
program.. The ,late Lord thonhdda.
lood coltroller,'of l-M4lglandl.;is quoted I
as sa1;lying thaIt Aiellicall tractlor1
s:aved Engtland froln stavUation.
"We all f~no'w bow trtidlor: as ar
moredl lanik: e.tbled tie l ritish to
break thewl Iindehburg line before
(Camallll' nd lter broul ght alo(tll theil
debacle which hasteiiedI thie r(etr1ak1,i"i
the kaisedr's tr1 ies' rom Frl'enh soil.
In far-oft M4esopotanmia, the Am1eri
ci-lllmade ,U tr wlctor s aLn ilnportantLI
factor of mnilitary valuel' in dtefteating
the Turk .1' ]
"Now with ,i'ce00 assul'red', 1.he anll
cicnt granaries of the near cast will
see tractors frtlll Amnerica in pracli.
cal, every-day use in their fields
where for centuries the primitive
wooden plow was the only imllplement
used. A mn'rchiant frot Bangdad is 1
now represelnting several Almerican
manufacturers. At Ba3sra, thile port of I
Bagdad on the Persian gulf, facilities e
are ready to handle immense ilUpol
tations of American-made farm nia
chinery, principally tractors. In Asia
Minor, the tractor is helping the de
sccendants of tile prophet garner mlore'
wheat than pIrayers and oxen ever
mnade possible before. In Mesoplo
tamnia, where the lalnented Genleral
Maude blazed the trail for de(m1oc
racy, tractors are sOelte in ever in
creasing numbers.
"American lianufactirers, in orde0
to meet the export demands efficient
ly, are studying foreign conditions---
eliminating certain parts, adding oth
er features, so the American tractor
can be used satisfactorily under the
1arying climatic and topographical
conditions of the different countries.
As a result, American-made tractors
are being used as efficiently on the
uneven Piedmlontese ground of Italy,
the lava lie(lds of Hawaii, the sandy
wastes of Algeria, or the barren
steppes of 4Russia as on tihe fertile
prairies of Kansas, in the cultivation
of grains, cotlton, sugar cane, vinlle
yards, rice- pra'ctically every form of
vegetation cultivated in civilized
countries. At. the present time eco
nomic necessity is forcing the use of
the tractors, but by the time the pres
ent crisis is past American-made
tractors will be firmly established
throughout the world.
MEN WO(RTH WHILE.
"I give Ipreference to unionists,
: 5 ;::: b'because I am convinced
that tlh man who gives a considel
able portion of his time each we-l:
and a consliderable portion of hi.,
earnings each week to try to illprove
the condition in which be lives, ia
justly entitled to more consideration
than the oman who remiains outsid,
and will not give a portion of his
time or a fraction of his money t1 :
better the conditions of himself and
tlt).er who aret dependent lupon lhi.'
arnings.- Judti. Cussen, Australian
Arbitratiton Court.
. . . .
THEV'RE LOTS OF 'EM
Frog--Aw, everY! kes me
Sick. . :.", - .
SataW***CI4)akln .
SPORT
NEWS HERE
and THERE
HOPPE AND SUTTON
TO PLAY IN BUTTE
1t
Ilutte billiardists will havi( an ol p
portunlity of S(eeing \VWilliam F'.
lloppe, chatnilpion, anld lt .g- 1lll
lor Sutton., formllt r chainlitp itl, in ex-.
hibitioni laatches at. tlie ltarluette
parlors next week on Wedsdalllt y itand
'Thursday. Iloppe Ilhas not l.eti here
ior 10 years, but his playing is wetll
'remnemltered and he will receive i
'war' welcolme from his adlmiriers.
Sutton never has been. here belfore.
Tlheir lirst match will be in Wednes- ll
day nlight at, 8 o'clock alll the oth
o.s at 3 iand 8 p. ili., Thursday. They
will play a:ilkliine, thlree-cushlion iand
fanicy shots.
Sutton has ;some enviable records i
that stack utip alongside of those Wil
lie holdls. 11te heat praictically every a
good player in Ar erica it lthe tourni
inent hetld by the Ililliard Players'
league, Yamadita, ('octhr.n. Schaeffetr
and i numbllllle'r of others includd.l(
SEATTLE CAPTURES
HOCKEY MATCH
Seattle, March 21.-- Seottle's hoc- t
key teati, holder of the western
chamnpion;ship, defeatedtl Les Ca naldi
otns, etastern chalunllions, of Alolllntrell,
here tonight, 7-)), in the first of a
series of games held to determl. ilin tlhe
world title.
AGREE SPIRITUALLY
SPLIT MATERIALLY
(Iiy United Prs.s.)
San Francisco, Mlarch 21. (1George
.Joseliph Taylor, wtol knows wheire
heaveli n in, and hor is a.t utitl lto itell
the world its exact location in a wool;,
is seeking a divorce from \lari' lent
grn.t Taylor, his mtilion dollar Nn-wv
York bride,
Afte;r 1es,; th:an a year of ntarrii el
life Mrs. Taylor has returned to '114
RIiverside IDive homeit in New York.
wliere she will continue stidying
spiritual subject.; and preparin• hl -
oi l nii ;tI the two lived ill he :-tpir
ital worlt , iin whiiih ithey wati , i ,
-grossed, they were happy log0wlhu
Tal' sait) d. i liil hli yi I lit.
down to material things Ihey le irnidI
tiey \vwer no, t oiiledl .
HIGH SCHOOL GETS
GOVERNMENT FUND
Helena, Malrch 20. BIoulder high
school get. $316.tll. ; PIowell high
$353.20, and Galliatin high, $3:57.72.
under distribution of the state's
share of the cost of vocational traiill
ing, given in conjunction with fed
eral governmelntll under the Snlith
Hughes act.
Tile officte of the state lsuperin
tenldent oif educatltionll here is imailinlg
these allotnmelnts.
PLACED THEM IN JOBS
Waslthington, Mlarch 21.--- ork for
57,000 dischargedi soldiers was found
by the federal emplltoyment service itl
February, Assistant Director Smith
announced today. Abloutl 75,000 to
250,000 discharged in tlhat nionth
sought the bureau's assistance.
---IHINK IN IN'rEIIST--.AV---
IT ISN'T THE TOWN-IT'S YOU
"If you want to live In the kind of a
town
Like the kind of a town you like,
You needn't slip your clothes In a
grip,
And start on a long, long hike.
You'll only find what you left behind,
For there's nothing that's really
new,
It's a knock at yourself when you
knock your town;
It isn't the town-it's you.
Real towns are not made by men afraid
Lest somebody else gets ahead,
When everyone works and nobody
shirks,
You can raise a town from the dead.
And if while you make your personal
stake,
Your neighbors can make one, too;
Your town will be what you want to
see,
It Isn't the town-it's you."
S--- i1i. i II I" ERE;i -AV --
SBUY
$~iiirr /1
NEARLY MILLION SPENT
IN STATE BY UNCLE SAM
Washi iugton, March 21. F"iguroe
made public today by tie war lepart
ment shows that between .July 1 and
Dec. 1I, 1918, the depart tant made
war lpur. hlses in Mont.la I to the
amollllullnt of !959.30. This does not
include purchases of coplyr or any
technical or ltordnance supplies-m. Total
purchaises in western states dluring
that periodl amountllted to $119,286,
GS2.
FIGHTING MEN
DISABLED IN CAMP
(Uy Ioiited Prone.)
Washington. March 21. ---- Claitmi
pIresentel Ito the war risk insurance
bultreau by disabled soldiers show that
only a, small Iportion of them were
dtisabled in lbattle a. comllparedl with
those remiaininig in camip.
Of the first 6.(96 claims sent into
the blurmeu only 1 :i-10 per ceniit---83
nien--- received their disabilities in
battle, while 6R.9 I ier cent were dis
abled in camp, eithtr in this country
or overseas.
This percentage will, of course, be
greatly alt red as thli men, ret urning
fromii Franee, turn ill tlhir clainls, yet
officials of the bilureau predict that
thie Iimajority of claims will comne
from men disabled while in traiiining.
As the soldier becomeiis more thor
oughly trained in the I imetlhods of
warfare anId canimp life, the danger of
being disablhed is lessened, it was
pointed out.
SAY tYOU SAW IT IN BI3L1,LE''TIN.
AUTOMOBILE
FIX-IT
BUTTE VULCANIZING WORKS
1942 Harrison Avenue
CASINGS AND TUBES REPAIRED
DRY STEAM CURES
Bring in your old tries for retreading and save from one
third to one-half.
Local Agents for the Famous
RACINE TIRES
Telephone 3090-W.
MONTANA BATTERY STATION
PREST-O-LITE STORAGE BATTERY
EXPERT BATTERY SERVICE
Batteries Recharged, Repaired, Rented and in Stock.
We Specialize in Recharging Ford Magnetos in Cars.
224 S. ARIZONA ST. PHONE 5536-J
South Side Auto Garage
EXPERT MECHANICS
Any Make of Car-General Repair Shop and Supplies
PHONE 4460-W 2124 COBBAN STREET
C. C. DAHN, Manager
PATTERSON & CURRIE
MONTANA, CORNER MERCURY PHONE 2263
Entrance on Mei\cury. Look for the Sign.
STORAGE AND REPAIRING
PHONE 251
Vulcan Welding Works
Welding Cast Iron, Steel,
Brass, Bronze, Aluminum
and Copper
We Also Burn Carbon From Auto
Cylinders
116-118 S. Wyoming St.
All Work Guaranteed.
GRANt) AVENUE REPAIR SHOP
Automobile Repairing, Lathe
Work and Mill Work.
All Work Guaranteed.
Storage.
Phone 30S1-J.
I Corner Harrison and Grand.
SButte Battery Co.
EXIDE DISTRIBUTORS
Up-to-Date Auto Electricians.
We Repair All Makes n .tteries.
!' Phone 91.g,ý . St,
SOULIEt'S BO[iYB[il .
THIRTY-SEVEN SCARS
Whitehall March 20.--Peter Pia
zolla of Basin visited Whitehall last
w cek. He recently received his dis
c(harge from the service. He spent
six imonths in France, going over the
top sev(en times. lie carries 37 wound
scars; 34 were caused by shrapnel,
ani three by machine gun bullets.
tie was in the Three Hundred Sev
enth regiment of the Seventy-seventh
diuc sion.
SOLDIERS APPLY FOR
GOVERNMENT HELP
(By United Press.)
Washington, March 21.-Not every
wouneded American soldier is entitled
to retraining by the federal board for
vocational training. uTnder the law,
the soldier must first have been
awardeltl compensation by the war
risk insuralce bureau.
To date the bureau has awarded
payments for injuries to only 3,655
men who are now receiving special
training, but many thousands more
have their applications under consid
eration by the bureau at this time.
MANY TROOPS
NOW AT HOME
Washington, March 21. - Troops
returning from France during the
week ended March 14 numbered 59,
454, the largest total for any week
since the armistice was signed. Up
to March 14, 414,278 men had been
brought home.
1126 Utall Ave. Phone 2179
LACY
Auto Service and Repair Shop
Get a spark intensifier attached
to your Ford and forget the
worries of cranking it.
WRECKING CAR AT YOUR
SERVICE.
SUPERIOR
VULCANIZING
we have a large assortment ,o.
used and retreated tires at rea,
sonable prices.
Agents for Racine Tires.
J. L. Mathieso
0 E. Galena St. Phone 50
Bulletiha ..$ . . I4¢tr
Bulfltinu- ltn t ,._,·-:: ._.."

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