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The Butte daily bulletin. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1918-1921, May 02, 1919, Image 7

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sport SP New
GOSSIP NOTES
SPORTOGRAPHY I
O 0
By GRAVY.
A game between the Giants and
the. Senators which was played at
* Newport News, Va., recently might
b 14b described as the biggest 10-cent
g°ame on record, for that was the
price of admission charged to all
men in unniform. More than 5,000
soldiers and sailors took advantage
of the bargain offer to see two ma
jcr league teams in action. The
grounds were so crowded with dough
boys and gobs, besides about a. thou
sand civilians, that it was necessary
to enforce ground rules. As both
teams furnished a fine brand of ball
the fighting men considered that
their dime was well spent, especially
when they took into consideration
the vaudeville show provided by
Nick Altrock, who performed as usual
on the coaching line.
Manager Robbie of the Robins is
jubilant over landing Lee Magee
from the Reds, and is now more con
fident than ever that his team will
be a dangerous contender for the
National league pennant. Magee re
ported to the club shortly before the
season opened, and as he has been
playing ball with the University of
Cincinnati, he was in shape to get
into the Itohins' bhatting order as
soon as he joined his new outfit.
With the infield composed of lMagee,
Schmandt, Olson and O'Mara the
clubh is greatly strengthened, both on
ithe defensive and offensive sides of
the glame. Magee's presence in thll
inner works also adcids inuch ne.ledl
pep to the team.
s o: .
A-nniversalry of Birth of John Ifeclian.
When Jess Willard won the cham
pionship title lie afforded one of the
few exceptions which prove tile rule
that giants seldom make good in the
ring. Willard is a good four inches
taller than the most altituttiinous of
previous American chamlpions. John
C. Heenan, the celebrated Trojan
who fought Sayers and King for the
wbrld's title in England half a cen
tury ago, held the record for height
and reach amlong American chullmps
until Willard's victory.
John Carmnel Ileenan, iinmortal
ized as "the Benecia Boy," was lbornt'
inl Troy, N. Y., 84 years ago tolnor
row. May 3, 1835. At the uage of 11
he hit the trail for California, and
was employed as a machinist a en
icia, where he got into the limelight
by licking the town bully. in 1858
lie fouglit John Morrissey for thle
American chamlpionship, and was
having a soft time of it. until he
stmashed his fists on a. post, after
which Morrissey put him out. John
Morrissey refused to fight again,
however, and in 1860 Heenan was
recognized as the American chainm
pion, and went to England to fight
'Tomli Sayers for the cht,nltiionshin of
the world. The fight ended in a
brawl, and both sides claimed the
victory, although Heenan was ap
parently entitled to the honors. Lat
er lie was defeated by Tom King, the
English chamlpion, but the friends
of the Benecia Boy insisted that he
had been drugged.
H-eenan was aidvertised as a giant,
being six feet two inches in height.
No other American champion reached
Ileenan in height until Willard ap
peared on the scene. Paddy Ryan
was five feet eleven inches, and his
conqiiuetror, lJohn L. Sullivan, half aill
inch shorter. Jim Corbett was six
feet one inch; hob Fitz.intmons
lacked a quarter of an inch of being
six feet. and .lin JefIfries is six fee'
one and a half inches, approaching
the nearest to Heenan's stature.
Johnson was half an inch over six
feet. Tommy Burns was the shortest
of niodern chalmpions, being only
five feet seven inches. The tallest
of the American contenders for the
title was Ed O'Baldwin, ti!e Irish
nlan who flourished half a century
ago, who was six feet five and a half
inches.
Gardtlnerl-Santriy Batltl es.
Oscar Cardner, known as 'th,
Ontaha Kid," knocked out Eddy San
try in the fifth round at Louisville
1l years ago tomorrow, May 3,. 1900.
Oscar was one of the best little fight
Iers the nlodern ring has had, al
lthough never recognized as cham
pion. At one timne or another, how
ever, he defeated several title hold
itrs. He whipped Solly Smith both
before and after the Californian was
featherweight champion, won from
Australian Billy Miurphy after the
latter had lost the featherweight title,
kInockced out Dave Sullivan only a
few months after the Hlibernian box
cr had lost thie chatmpionship, ant
put IHarry Forbes to sleep the year
before the Chicagoan succeeded to
Itle ttantantweight honors. The Oma
hIa Kid was twice knocked out by
Terry McGovern, and Young Corbiett
also turned the same trick, although
that was when the kIid was on the
downward liath. During his ring ca
reer of 10 years, Gardner imet the
best men of his weight, and was sel
dom defeated. Santry was also a
classy Iboxer, and since his retirement
from the ring has been elected to the
illinois legislature.
Bulletin Want Ads (k;
! ;Results. Phone 52
SPECIAL Chicken Mulligan
SUNDAY i; d 5' will please
DINNER am ck Cafe
From 11 A. M.to 7 P. M. Shamrock Cafe
MAY 4th 9 N. ARIZONA ST.
STANDING OF CLUBS.
NATIONAL LE.AGUIE.
\Von. Lost. et.
Cincjnnati ......... 7 1,00
Brooklyn ...........4 .800
Philadelphi ........ 2 .600
New York ............. a 2 .600
Chicago .................. : .500
Pittsburgh ....... . 2 .400
St. Louis ............ 1 7 .125
Boston ....... .. ... 5 to 090
AMERIC N .LEAGUE.
Won. Lost. Pet.
Chicago .........-- .. 6 t,
Boston .............. 4 2 .6;7
Cleveland ...... ... 2 .600
New York ......... : 2 .;0.2
Philadelphia .......... 2 : .4
V~ashington ........2 4 .
D etroit ................. .
St. Louis ......... I . 1
AM1ERICAN .'lO( I ATIO N.
\Von. Iost. Pet.
St. Paul ................. .533
Coluintbus ........... :3 1 .7;t0
Louisville ..... ....... 5 2 .714
Minn ap lis ....... 2 .(;67
Indliana olis .......... .423
Kansas Cit- ........ 2 :l ..] 10
M1ilw lukl ........... 1 ; .14
Tl'oledo ......... .000(1
('OAST 01A(E.
\ an. L,.,t. Pet.
Los Atngeles .--....18 i, .751
Salt aI1;t . 13 ....... . .61
Oakland --tl ......... .. 12 1 .54
.;lul ["rallciiou. ... I 1 I1 .t542
Sacr:l to .. ... 12 i i .,22
Verlll tl .... .... . . . , ] I .4 3
Seatt l .................. 7 1:
PI'oitlaind ...... .... - . 1 227
Yesterday's Games.
.\MEII '.IN ASSO(('IATION.
Kanrsas (.'it.-, 7; Loutei ilhe, 1 1.
Other gaties; ltlponed; ra:l.
('.-AST LEAGIE.
Strartnnttto, 2; Io.- Angeles, 2.
Oakland. 4; P'ortland, 2.
Salt Iake,, 5; Sai Franeiqco, 6.
Sealtil(-Vternon, tosi:;lp'len d.
DAVID THOMAS DIES
AT RIPE OLD AGE
David Thoas, native of \\Wales,
hut resident of Montana for it0 yoar.,
died yesterday lafternoon i Ol t hll;
home. 208 \est ('Copper slreet. i-h:
was 70 year:; of age and hold the dis
tinction of haiing built tihe first
natte or rev elrberatoryv furn1e:e' Ill
Butte at the old Colorado smelter. In
addition to his widow, he is suillrvet,
by two :ons. ()liver of Clartksd:lie,
Ariz., and John of Butte; two daugh
ters, ltMrs. I.1lly Anldrews of Beaver
ton, P'a., and Mrs. 1. E. Wilhire of
Butte, and llthre gralndchildreln.
O'BRIEN, BACK FROM
FRONT, BOOSTS ARMY
Corporal John O'Brien of the
316th engineers returned yesterday
after a year's service with I ill'le ary.
Previous to leaving Butte with the
first draft contingent, Corporal
O'Brien was emnployed as shift boss
at the Speculator mine. He was
plarticularly enthusiastic in his praise
iof the services rendered the so(ldierst
in France by the Salvation armllly.
A Bulletin reader, a Bulletin
hnoster.
GENERAL WOOD DECORATED
lnj. Gen. Leonard Wood photo
graphed in WVashington just after he
had been de(orated with the Distin
guished Sen ice M3edul.
O - ---) 0
I Today We Celebrate. i
o ---- -- 0
The Iiscovery of the ( rot,s.
The discovery of the relss, the!
symbol of Christialnity, will he cele-I
brated tomorrow, Maay 3:. the date
annually set aside by the hurich for
this celebration. It is laid that
through the zeal of the Empress Htll
ena, mother of Constantine the Great,
the cross, upon which the S;avior w\as
crucified, was discovered. T'he soryl
is told that IHelena went to .iertlsal
lem, where the cross was hidden,
together with similar crosses, and
that the true one was revealed to
her by a miracle, the body of a detad
man being placed on each cross and
when the true one was reached the
dead man immediately (icam'e to life.
The cross was entrusted to thte
charge of the bishop of Jerlusalemn
and soon became the objiet of pil
grimages. Stall pIicer's of tih cross
were given to the pious who it iodeIo
liberal offerings. On the capture of
.lerusalem, ill 614. lthe tre cross
is said to have been carried to Persia
where it remained for a few years
until it was recovered by Heruclills.
who carried it into Jeruisalem on his
back in solemn procession, an eventt
which is today celebrated in the
Catholic church on Sept. 14, com
mIonly known as Holyrooid day.
Jerome K. Jerome ('elebraltes Ilis
Sixtieth Hirlhdly.
Jerome Klaplka Jerome is the fuli
name of that delightful English au
thor who 30 years ago, set tlie
tiongue of the literary world v wagging
with words in praise of "'dle
Thoughts iof an idle Fellow" and
"Three ,Men in a loat." i Mr. Jerome
was buorn 60 years ago today. May 2.
S159, anid was a clergyman's anto.
His first boolk, "On the Stage and
Off," was publishedi n 1888 and
iachieved only fair succetss, but ill
1889 IMr. Jerome leaped into lhe
front rank of English writers by lpub
lishing "Idle 'thoughlts of an Idle
Fellow" and "Three Men in a IBoatt."
These works won for lthe aluthor an
arnly of :admlnirers throllughout the
English-speaking worldl, and thist
unrtly was largely increased whien
"The Hiouseboat on the Styx" lp
peared sotiie years later. MSr. ,erolme
later becanme associated with IRob)ert
arl'r in the editoria' l manatlgemlntl of
T'he idler. .More than 30) volunmes
ha:lv issueitdt frotin his penl aindl soinle
of his; pl]ays have been1 highly suc
cs, fti1
The .llAmerli('anll Ilible Society.
The first president of Ihe Ameri
cnn Iible society, which was foundllllled.
103 years ago, was Elias Boudinot,
whlo wa: bolrn in Philadelphia 179
years ago todlay, Maty 2, 1740. He
was descended f'rol a famllily of
French Hluguenots who t x n''it to
Almerica after the revocation of the
edict of Nantes. tie was given the
best edllcationalll ,advantages the col
onies afforded, and afterwardl stud
ied law\ and comllmenced its lprailtice
in New Jersey. He \wasl ailn early ad
vocate of independentce for the Alnel'
ican colonies, and ill the revolution
he was commnissarly genieral of pris;
oners, and a mnemlber of congress. In
1782 he was nlitde president of con
gress and as such signed the treaty
of peace. For several years there
after he was superintenldent of I he
mint, butt in 1805 he retired fromt:
public life and settled in lBurlingtlon. I
N. J. He was prominent inll educa
tional and religious activities, and
when the Amnerican Blible society was
founded in 1.816 he was choseil as
its first president. Boudinot wrote
a numlber of books, including a curi
ous little volume with the title, "The I
Star of the West, or all Effort ito
Discover the Lost Tribes of Israel,"
in which he sought to show that the
Anlerican Indians were Jews. 1le
died in Burlington in 1821.
**r!
Johnl Gallt.
John Gait, Scottish novelist and 1
founder of the city of Guelp, Onl..
was born in Irvine. Scotland, 140)
years ago today. Hle entered conm
mercial life at an early age an.d later
studied law. !le gave up the legal
profession, however, to devote hinm
self to literature, and in that domain
was highly successful. He camle to
Canada in 1826 as commissioner of
the Canada company, which was
formed for the purpose of disposing
of Canadian crown lands to tlhose
Canadians who were seeking to ob
tain compensation for losses incident
to the last war between the United
States and Great Britain. His efforts
were not entirely satisfactory to the
stay-at-home members of the conm
pany, and he was soon relieved of his
office, bhut not until he had laid the
foundation, in 1827, for the now
flourishing city of Guelp. The future
city was christentel by Galt in honor
of the royal family. The novelist
died in Greenock in 1837, in his 6oth
year.
FAVORABLE REPORT ON
ANTI-INJUNCTION BILL
Springlield. Ill., May 2.- The com
mittee on judiciary of th, Illinni:
house of representatives hast made a
'avorable report on the Sodersirolt
anti-injinction bill. The :unthor of
the bill--fP. G. Soderstrom-- is ai
mnember of Streator Typographica:l
union and was elected by a nonparti-]
san movement of trade unionists and
sympathizers to replace a weil
known reactionary.
In urging the committee to fivorr
his bill, the printer - lawmaker
showed a thorough grasp of this
judge-made weapon that is so ef
fectively used against the worlkers.
lie declared that trade unionists in-i
sist that the injunction be used fur
purposes originally intended--where
statutory law does not apply. It
nroperly used, he said, the writ may
be useful and necessary. Trade
unionists object when it is used by
a judge in cases that can be reached,
through statutory law, that is de
nied workers by a judge who acts asI
a lawmaker, judge and executioner.
"Fr-om the decision there is no
appeal, and even if appeal is taken
•toOn the question of the jurisdic
tion of the court issuing the injunc
tion, it is possible that the active
men of the union may lie in jail dur
ing the appeal:" .
The Bulletin is here to stay.
TO THE
BUSINESS MEN
OF BUTTE
Y OUR, firm name in tlhis list will be seen and discussed by every mem
ber of the family. If you seek the patronage of the workers, make
sure of first getting their good-will by advertising in their paper-the
only paper in Butte that is published in the interests of your customers.
NOT THE LARGEST CIRCULATION
BUT THE LARGEST PROVEN RESULTS
Wage-Earners' Shopping Guide
AUTO RIthPAi R
SHOPS
Lacey Auto Repair and Service
Shop,
1126 Utah.
Grand Avenue Repair Shop,
Corner Harrison and
Grand.
Auto Repair Machine Shop
M. G. SMITH, 401 S. Wyoming
South Side Auto Garaga,
C. C. Dahn, Mgr.
2124 Cobban.
AUTOS BOUGHT
AND SOLD
E. H. Rupert,
228 S. Arizona St.
BANKS
Yegen Bros., Bankers,
Park and Dakota streets.
BATI S.
S Steam Baths,
504 E. Broadway.
BUTCHERS
Schumacher Meat Co.,
18 E. Park St.
Western Meat Co.,
121 E. Park St.
Independent Market,
203 South Main.
BAKERIES
Manhattan Bakery,
205 W. Park.
Dahl's Bakery,
107 N. Montana Street.
Royal Bakery,
20 South Main.
Home Baking Co.,
Olympia St.
BARBER SHOPS
Con Lown('y,
309 N. Main.
Pastime Barber Shop and Pool
Room,
210 North Main St.
Pare Barber Shop,
86 E. Park.
BATTERIES
REC IARGED
Montana Battery Station,
224 S. Arizona.
r Butte BaatIry Co.,
119 S. Montana St.
CLOT II I:S CLEANING
AND PRESSING
Ser nrd .I acoby,
19 r/ S. Dakota Street.
The Suit:i c'inlm,
415 Nurth Main.
8- -------- -
T()]B.\(CCO AND
SCON VECTIONS
S Pat McKenna,
314 North Main.
i
I ,.- · I i
. .. ...... ir
CO1,TH1..INO ANID TI
LORING FOR MEN
Big 4 Tailor,
17 West Par .Street.
Alehn & I)arnell,
207 East Park.
Shirley Clothes Shop,
14 North 1Main.
CHIROPRACTIC
F'lora W. Emery
Room 9. Silver Bow Block.
C(11 1.P'ARILO)I-1S
Classic Chili Parlor.
210 North Main.
DAIRIES
Blost Yet Hutter Shop,
322 S. Main St.
Blue Bird Butter Shop,
2090, WV. Park St.
Crystal Creamery,
459 B. Park street.
DRUG G ISTS
Jacques Drug Co.,
1957 Harrison avenue.
DENTISTS
Union Dentists,
Third Floor Rialto Bldg.
FURN.'I'URE
Shiner's, Furniture,
75 N. Park street.
B. Kopald Co., Furniture,
68 West Broadway.
0 ROCERIES
Anger Grocery,
Harrison and Harvard.
J. R. Becky,
2701 Elm St.
Allen's Grocery,
1204 E. Second street.
Kermtode, Groceries,
421 East Park street.
Poyntor's Cash Store,
1854 llarrison.
S. F. T. A. Cash Grocery,
627 East Galeua Street.
T. J. McCarthy,
64 E. Broadway.
1VIcCarthy-Bryant & Co.,
317-319 East Park Street.
Bishop Bros.,
180 Walnut St.
White House, Grocery,
50S West Park.
0(ýiNTS' FURNISH
ING S
lMurphy Money Back Store,
15 E. Park St.
IOM E FI'IN'ISHIERS
Natiocal, Supply Co.,
10 \V. Mercury.
. . -
HABERDASHER
Dollar Shirt Shop,
Rialto Theater Bldg.
HATS FOR MEN
Nickerson, Theo Hatter,
112 W. Park street.
HARDWARE
Sewell's Hardware,
221 East Park street.
Shiners, Furuiture,
75 East Park Street.
JEWE IERS
Montana Jeowlry Co.,
Opticians, Etc.,
73 East Park street.
People's Loan OftUce.
289% East Park street.
Brodie, the Jeweler,
40 East Park street.
Powell Jewelry Co.,
112 N. Main St.
I. Simon,
21 North Main.
LAGER BEER
EXTRACT
lager Beer Extract
A. GRAP', 726 S. MONT.
LADIES' TAILOR
J. Durst.
Ladies' Tailor and lHabit
Maker.
Phone 2764 Room 436
Phoenix Bldg.
E. Zahl,
504 W. Park
LADIES'
GARMENTS
Popular Ladies' Garment Store,
63 East Park Street.
The International Store,
210 E. Park.
MEN'S OUTFITTERS
Emporium Clothes Shop.
34 E. Park.
Fashion Tailoring,
47 W. Park.
Palace Clothing & Shoe Store,
63-55 E. Park St.
Montana Clothing and Jewelry
Company,
103 S. Arizona.
O. K. Store,
24 E. Park St.
Bouchers,
27 W. Park St.
MEAT MARKETS
Ed's Market,
500 East Park.
PHOTOGRAPHY
Thomson's Park Studio,
217 East Park Street.
POOL IIALLS
Golden Gate Pool hall,
272 East Park.
OPTICIANS
Montana Jewelry Co..
Opticians. Etc..
73 East Park St.
Powell Jewelry Co.,
112 N. Main St.
OUTFITTERS
Francis J. Early,
715-719 E. Front St.
POOL ROOMS
Lambro's Pool Hail,
42 E. Park St.
RESTAURANTS
Leland Cafe,
72 East Park street.
Spokane Cafe,
17 South Main St.
Moxom Cafe,
29 W. Broadway.
Crysltal Cafe,
69 East Park Street.
Golden West Cafe,
227 S. Main.
HIandley's Cafe,
3126 N. Wyoming.
Sham rock Cafe,
9 North Arizona.
Savoy (ale,
84 East Park.
SHOES
Chicago Shoe Store,
7 S. Main street.
Walkover Shoe Co.
46 W. Park Street.
Golden RIule Shoe Store,
Peter llrinig. 39 E. Park.
SECOND-HAND FUR
NITURE
Charles Noland,
105 West Galena St.
SPECIALISTS
Dr. W. 1-i. Ilaviland,
71 West Park St.
SHOE REPAIRING
McManus Shoe Shop,
5 S. Wyoming.
Progressive Shoe Shop,
1721 Harrison Ave.
SECOND HAND
CLOTHING,
JEWELRY, ETC.
Uncle Sam's Loan Office,
11 S. Wyoming.
TAILORS
Fashion Tailoring Co.,
47 W. Park St.
Bernard JTacoby, Tailor,
19% S. Dakota street.
Montana Tailors,
425 N. Main street.
E. Zahl, Tailor,
504 W. Park street.
Dundeo Woolen Mills,
62 West Park Street.
Butte Tailoring Co.
116 S. Main St.
W. Oertel,
431/ S. Arizona St.
Big 4,
17 W. Park St.
UNDERTAKERS
Larry Duggan, Undertaker,
322 North Main street.
Daniels & Bllboa, Undertakers.
1.6 East Park street.
VULCANIZING
J. L. Mathiesen, Vulcanising,
40 East Galena
Butte Vulcanizing Works,
1942 Harrison Ave.
WELDING
Vulcan Welding Works,
116-118 S. Wyoming

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