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The Butte daily bulletin. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1918-1921, June 17, 1919, Image 1

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WITH THE UNITED PRESS SERVICE AND A COMPETENT STAFF OF WRITERS, WE WILL SERVE THE NEWS AS IT REAlif HAPPENS
TELEPHONESSIPAE
Editorial Rooms ......12,750
_VOL. 1-NO. 250. ^ T I MONTANA, TUI' kSi.\Y.1 JUNE 17. 1919. PRICE FIVE CENTS
COSSACK A LE INVOKED IN CANADA
ALLIES PREPARED TO
DEAL GERMANY DEATH
BLOW, SHOULD SHE
REFUSE TO SIGN TREATY
(Special United Press Wire.-Copyrighted.)
Paris, June 17. - If Germany refuses to sign the peace
treaty, the allied armies will immediately launch one of the
greatest and most decisive campaigns in history. While the
general public is inclined to think of the allied advance into
Germany as little more than a triumphal parade, in which no
resistance will be met, Foch has been obliged to be prepared
for any emergency.
The allies will advance with every
detail perfected for a campaign ex
tending from the Dutch to the Swiss
frontiers, and designed to give Ger
many a death blow in the shortest
possible time, against a maximum
force which the unified allied com
mand knows, Germany might throw
into action in a crisis. The allied
command, according to the highest
French military critics and author
ities would embrace three routes of
invasion, designed to break down all
possible defense, seizing the most im
portant points in Germany and cut
that country completely in two.
The allies' left wing, consisting of
the Belgian army with the British
army protecting its right flank at
the Cologne bridgehead, would drive
wpstwer4 from *Duasehiol'ff into a -
network of railways, of which Essen,
only one day's march away, is the
center. With the British army in a
postion to execute a flanking move
ment from the south, should this be
neceesary,Germany would lose at the
outset not only the great Krupp
Ordnance Munitions works at Essen,
but the entire surounding mineral
basin.
This would open the way immed
iately to Minden, where Germany has
constructed a great fortress for dc
fending her plains from entrance
through Westphalia. Without doubt,
Germany would make her supreme
resistance against the allies' left wing
at Minden.
A. F. OF L. URGES
RECOGNITION
OF IRISH
Want Congress to Note In
dependence of New Re
public and Get Hearing
At Peace Table.
(Special United Press Wire.)
Atlantic City, N. J., June 17.--The
American Federation of Labor con
vention today adopted a resolution
urging congress to recognize' the
Irish republic and asking congress
and President Wilson to obtain from
the peace conference a hearing for
the Irish delegates.
THE WEATHER.
Butte, fair and warmer,
ASSERT AUTHORITIES ARE
PROTECTING JOE FABIAN
Residents in the vicinity of the 700
block on South Dakota street are
aroused over what they assert is the
signal failure of the city authorities
to make arrests in connection with
the attack on the little child of L. A.
Woolery, 717 South Dakota street, by
a vicious bulldog, said to be the prop
erty of County Commissioner Joseph
M. Fabian, 731 South Dakota street.
The people of the neighborhood are
in arms over the fact that although
the attack on the Woolery child was
made on Sunday evening, Mr. Fabian
has not been molested by the author
ities, presumably because of his of
ficial position.
The attack, according to witnesses,
was made by the dog without provo
cation upon the Woolery child. It
is also pointed out that despite city
ordinances which requires that all
CHIEF"DICK"
ASKED TO
RESIGN
Good Government Club
Makes Suggestion to Mor
rissey. Boosts Comfort
Station and Elects.
Resolutions commending the
mayor for his selection of the Rialto
building site for a public comfort
station and another suggesting that
Chief of Detectives Edward Morris
sey refrain from city employment
until such time as he either is dis
charged or exonerated as the result
of the serious charges that have been
filed with the police commission,
were adopted at the meeting of the
Good Government club last night.
The resolutions were adopted fol
lowing a business session at which
new officers were elected.
The resolution relative to the
public comfort station, as adopted,
calls upon the members of the city
council to extend immediate co
operation with Mayor Stodden in his
efforts to secure the use of the Ri
alto building basement for the pur
pose.
The resolution concerning Detec
tive Morrissey is as follows:
Owing to so much adverse criti
cism and the serious charges made
against the present chief of detec
tives the Good Government club
deems it best that Chief Morrissey
resign his position until such time
as the police commission can de
termine its action on the charges
filed against him by reputable citi
zens of Butte. Then, should Mr.
Morrissey be proved innocent he can
be reinstated.
The new officers of the club are
Miss Mary O'Neill, chairman; Mrs.
Joseph Lutey, first vice chairman;
Mrs. H. N. Carman, second vice
chairman; Mrs. W. S. Mitchell, sec
retary-treasurer; Mrs. Elizabeth
Kennedy, Mrs. Edith Clinch and
Mrs. August M. Penny, members of
the executive board.
The newly-elected officers will be
installed at the next meeting of the
club on next Monday evening. The
new committees will be appointed
at that time, it is announced.
dogs, vicious or otherwise, be tied
up at all times, the Fabian dog was
running at large. The child suffered
serious gashes about her throat and
arm, caused by the teeth of the vic
ious animal. Scalp wounds also were
sustained. It was found necessary
to remove the child to Murray hos
pital for surgical treatment.
Residents of South Dakota street
declare that following the attack on
the child, Commissioner Fabian'a dog
was removed front the Fabian resi
dence in one of the county automo
biles in which it was presumably
taken to some place where it will be
kept until the furore caused by its
viciousness blows over. A demand
,will be made on the authorities, it is
said, to have MIr. Fabian brought to
book in police court just as any
other citizen who keeps a vicious dog
and to have the dog killed.
STRIKE LEADERS JAILED
SOME KICKER, BUT HE PAYS JUST THE SAME
NOUO IZoNO Toe uTýTR, eNg
c I (E t o S' Go THE so \ (Rep S sTTi
- ~ 5oM 3 sov,5y
0-1
IELLO GIRLS IN FRISCO STRIME
PRESS WIRES ARE AFFECTED
(Special United Press Wire.)
San Franeisco, .1 ine 17.-
Telephone operators here have
struck for $2 to $+i a day in
crease and recognitioi of the
METHODS OF "KEPT PRESS" TOLD
BY WAR LABOR REPRESENTATIVE
"The most remarkable develop
ment in the labor world that I can
see," said I. K. Russell, who has
travelled from one strike zone to
another during the war, as field
representative of the national war
labor board, "is the way the work
ing people are developing a real la
bor press. They are reading their
own news and at last they are get
ting it straight. They can't do any
better than keep on developing
newspapers owned by the unions and
individuals in the labor movements."
Mr. Russell was formerly a re
porter on the New York Times and
other New York papers until Frank
P. Walsh took him over in organ
izing the field staff of the war labor
board. He is a visitor in Butte to
day en route east from the Pacific
coast.
Reporters Suppress News.
"In the old days of reportorial
work," he said, "the newspaper re
porter was usually unsophisticated
as to industrial matters. He was
hired right out of school and was
given his assignments with a few
curse words from the 'boss' towards
everything that savored of labor.
So be knew it was either a case of
coloring the news against labor or
getting fired, or playing foxey and
shutting up. The record of New
York journalism as I have observed
it is simply that the honest reporter,
on industrial issues, could not sur
vive.
"I have seen the Park Row gut
ters flow with their blood, so to
speak, as they showed a flash of
honesty and then were thrown out
of the big metropolitan dailies. Lin
coln Steffens and the great 'muck
rakers' of the era before the maga
zines fizzed out as centers where in
dustrial truth could be set forth,
made themselves in just one way.
Lincoln Steffens' Method.
"Lincoln Steffens himself ex
plained it to me. It was to go into
a town, catch the reporters off duty
and get from them by word of
mouth all the things they could not
print, or would be fired for printing
if they slipped over a disguised para
graph or two to disclose their point
of view.
"We are not building up any more
stilke w~oiii Sjhead[ to ushter
ci ties t1(1 Ita. Loit At geles
girls iie aireadty ouit.
\\tu (iite elect ijial %voik
1.15 Mtliietk iii syiiinathiy wvitti
men of the public place of Lincoln
Steffens simply because today the
working people are reading plenty
or stuff--and the plutocratic boss
has had his hands pried loose from
absolute control of the news.
"For instance, in Washington re
cently a colonel of aviation accosted
me for my view of what the discon
tent in the world was all about and
how these labor issues suddenly
came into such dramatic focus out
of apparently a clear sky.
Colonel Gets New Idea.
"We went together to a bookstore.
There were on sale all kinds of
'conservative' magazines. He thought
these magazines with their harmless
fiction and suggestive tales, were
what all people read because they
were the only literature open to him
and his class.
"We went aceross the street to a
'radical' hook shop, so-called. and I
was able to hand him literature al
most by the bushel of a kind he had
never encountered in his life. About
a dozen of the papers, expressing the
after-the-war hunger of labor, were
marked volume 1. number 1.'
"This good colonel read the new
papers and the new magazines
through and was staggered by the
collision with ideas he never knew
were in the war.
"Nothing the writers in the labor
press whose articles go from paper
to *paper I note the names of many
friends who a few years ago were
plowed down and turned under and
seemed crushed beyond hope of per
sonal recovery in the world. They
were 'blacklisted' as writers just as
miners v.,e blacklisted fromu the
mines.
Labor Press Alert.
"But they have all come back. I
tested out his new alert labor press
a few mttu ths ago. I had an item
of news s hich I knew would never
see the light of day in any regular
newspape or nmagazine. So I wrote
it and 5av' it to the Labor Herald
in Readine. l'enn. I saw it copied
in the N-w York Call the next Sun
day and in the Bridgeport Labor
Leader 114 following Saturday. It
has cit tied to go the rounds and
with it hla' gone the rounds of hun
dreds t other articles that are
Swakine ths people up to the neces
cede'. (PijI1\ ujie inaut was left
to lake (care ail IIOLIy leased
Vire where 15t~i Int wer O1U CtU
diuuarity kept) tbusy.
sity for them to meet together and
consider rights that they hardly
considered were theirs a few years
ago.
"The old press is not winning its
game. It built Richard Harding
Davis up as the greatest recognized
author of his day-because he laid
off 'industry.' Then one day the
press that made Richard Harding
Davis the most famous author of his
time thought it would crucify a la
bor leader. James P. Maurer of
Pennsylvania spoke in New York
about the atrocities of the constabul
ary in Pennsylvania. He told how
one constabulary officer forced a
miners' union to take down the flag
in a funeral procession of a dead
striker who also happened to be a
Spanish-American war veteran. The
constabulary man claimed the flag
constituted a 'parade without a per
mit' and when the miners tried to
explain, the constabulary officer
yelled back, 'to hell with you and
to hell with the flag. Down with
it. You can't parade without a per
mit.'
Death of R. H. Davis.
"Whereupon all the stupid and
corrupt press canie out with scream
ing headlines, 'To hell with the flag,
says 1\laurer.' His attack on the
brutal capitalistic police force of
Pennsylvania was written up as an
attack on the American government,
upon patriotism and on decency.
There were loud calls for the 'hang
ing' of Mlaurer and the throwing out
of the Labor Forum. where he spoke
from the Washington Irving high
school.
"Richard Harding Davis, favorite
child of the press, fell for this take
harder than anybody else. He went
to a telephone and called up the
mayor of New York and demanded
the arrest of Maurer in thename of
patriotism. liut he got so heated in
his appeal to the mayor that he was
suddenly attacked by apoplexy and
he fell dead at the telephone in his
country home at Mt. Kisco.
Gets Square Deal Now.
"Thus the press, in striking at a
labor leader. killed its own favorite
child. Jim Maurer is still alie and
thriving and still heads the Penn
(Continued on Page Two.)
CHIEFS OF WINNIPEG
LABOR MOVEMENT ARE
HELD INCOMMUNICADO
(Special United Press Wire.)
Winnipeg, June 17.-Wholesale arrests of leaders in
the general strike were made here. The Royal North
west mounted police raided the Labor temple, seizing
quantities of literature. The authorities refused to an
nounce the names of the prisoners, but claimed that all
prominent leaders of the labor forces were included.
WOMEN GET
VOTE IN
OHIO
Other States Takes Action
Favoring Women's Suf
frage Amendment to U. S.
Constitution.
Columbus, Ohio, Jnoe 17.--The
Ohio general assembly has ratified
the federal woman's suffrage amend
ment and then passed a bill giving
Ohio women the right to vote for
presidential electors in 1920. in case
the federal amendment is not in ef
feet by that time.
KANSAS FAVORABI&E.
Topoeka, Kans., .1 ono 17. The
Kansas legislature unanimously rat
ified the woman suffrage aouodnment
to the United States constitution, at
the special session.
CERTAIN OF APPROVAL.
Bismarck, N. I)., June 17.--Goy'.
Lynn J. Fraizer says he will not call
a special session of the state legisla
ture for the sole purpose of ratifying
the national suffrage amendment. He
told Miss Alice Paul of St. Paul, that
the North Dakota legislature will ap
prove the amendment "at the first
reasonable opportunity.,,
NO I)ATE SET.
D)enver, Colo., June 17. Governor
Shoup hlts announced his intention of
calling a special session of the legs
nlature to ratify the woman's suffrage
amendment. No date has been de
termined.
WILL I)E('[I)E JULY 2.
Jefferson City, Mo., June 17.
Governor Gardner has called a spe
cial session of the state legislature
for July 2, to act on the constitu
tion al amendment, enfranchising
wonmen.
APPEAL FORI EMPIRE.
(Special United Press Wire.)
Paris, utte 17.-The Turkish
peace delegation in their first meet
ing with the allied representatives,
appealed for a continuation of the
empire and the retention of Col
stantinople.
WASHINGTON FEDERATION
CONVENTION OPENS TODAY
Bellingham. Wash., June 17.-The
Washington State Federaiton of La
b0r opened its 18th annual conven
tion here this morning.
Many important matters of vital
interest to the working people of the
state will be considered at the fed
eration's session. A proposed political
amalgamation of the state federation,
the farmers' organizations and the
Railway Men's Welfare league is ex
pected to result in a warm fight.
Many of the delegates think the time
has come for the federation to enter
state politics.
"Never before has organized la
bor had such an opportunity, and we
may not have it again," declared
President William Short. "We can
not afford to miss it."
TRANSPORTATION CRIPPLED.
Winnipeg. June 17.-Further crip
pling of the transportation lines en
tering into Winnipeg was caused yes
terday when additional railroad
workers, including firemen, engine
men and switchmen joined in the
general strike. Efforts of the rail
way companies to secure strike
breakers continued.
The Metal Trades Employers' of
fers of a modified collective bargain
ing plan so far have not been con
sidered by the strikers, it was re
ported. Minister of Labor Robert
son declared that the unions should
accept it as it was "entirely in accord
with the established practice on our
Canadian railways.,
"SUN" IS DAftKENED.
Vancouver, B. C., June 17.-The
Sun, a morning newspaper here has
not appeared since last Saturday, due
to the publishers having refused to
grant a demand from the local Typo
graphical union, that the paper stop
asking union printers to handle news
and editorial matter which was con
sidered objectional to union printers.
TIE CAN TO BEER.
(Special United Press Wire.)
Washington, June 17.-The repeal
of war-time prohibition as it affects
light wines and beer was voted down
by 10 to 1 by the house judiciary
committee.
AMERICANS IN
MEXICO ARE
ATTACKED
El Paso Mine Owners Fear
Reprisals on Property in
Chihuahua By Villista
Soldiers.
(Special United Press Wire.)
Laredo, Texas, June 17.-A party
of American refugees who were held
up and robbed of everything, includ
ing their clothing, by Mexican band
its near Jiminez, Mex., have arrived
here. The Mexicans also beat mem
bers of the party with rifle butts, it
was stated.
Miss Isabel Maley and two other
Americans escaped into the desert
and finally reached Chihuahua where
Americans assisted them to the bor
(Continued on Page Two.)
A bitter fight between the so-called
radicals and the conservative element
for control of the federation is ex
pected to break out early in the ses
sion.
gEDMANS "ASTOUBOEO"
AT CIEMENCEU NOTE
(Special United Press Wire.)
Weimer, Germany, Juno 17.-The
German peace delegation is astound
ed at the tone of Clemenceau's note
accompanying the allies note on the
counter proposals, according to of
ficial advices from Versailles to the
government. The note is character
ized as "harsh," "smashing" an4
"gruff."

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