OCR Interpretation


The Butte daily bulletin. (Butte, Mont.) 1918-1921, June 23, 1919, Image 4

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045085/1919-06-23/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 4

U ht ttueWERM RIurlle
Issued Every Evening, Except Sunday, by THE BULLETIN PUBLISHING CO.
Entered as Second-Class Matter, December 18, 1917, at tile Postoffice at Butte, Montana
Under Act of March 8, 1879.
PHONES: Business Office, 52; Editorial Rooms, 292
BUSINESS OFFICE AND EDITORIAL ROOMS, 101 SOUTH IDAHO STREET
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
One Month ..................... .75 Six Months ..................... 3.75
Three Months ..................$2.00 By the Year ... ............... . $7.00
The Daily Bulletin is on sale everyday at the following places in Butte.
Jacques Drug Co., Harrison and Cobban Depot Drug Store, 823 East Front St.
George A. Ames, Jr., 316 1-2 N. Main St. P. O. News Stand, West Park St.
International News Stand, S. Arizona St.
Palace of Sweets, Mercury and Main Sts. Harkins' Grocery, 1023 Talbot Ave.
Everybody's News Stand, 215 S. Montana Helena Confectionery, 785 East Park St.
MONDAY, JUNE 23, 1919.
THE LIGHT BREAKS!
Pity the liberal in tllhee days \whell the iilperialistic lair
p ses of the greal powtver's slalk utinahimed behhre lhe world!
fIly\\ the liberals rallied I) the \\ilsont stttan(iarl dturinlg tlhe
ldays (of wrl: hlt tihe ' setld. -prIto)iel tl den(t'li.re(y wa's will'
h Ipled Ib, tChe pink-tea radical,. w\tho saw llie world savedl by
[hall vast ,nl-p,+louring of \verliage Ihal they iitrw realize muean
It lli ii .
.atne are awaketning fromt the tl'ance ailt which they were
thlortiw by the swveel mulsie of the prlesident s voice enuln.ialing
those hi~h xtrintaiples Ihl were Ill elevate lthe world to a high
atil spiriltul plane never he'fre reaclhed by mankindil.
Nie tnieiliters of the A.\iiei'itct, pfea e'e (tittllllllisillt recelly
rei,,ne thieir ,,,stis becaulse thIey ei ld no longer renatin si
li'it iin he lace ' , I' I tll I ite t i el'eelin ,Il ' \\'ilsio i I't ll t' Iie highi
.l-tiifl Ia keli when it was necessary ill have atl ideal flo' which
tlihe peopl' e culi be made In fight.
B tIle thes melthers. Walter C. Ilillitt , has written an
opera teller I(1 the lesident in which hle says:
1 can ctttviitce ltyself' Ili linger llthal efl'fectlive laori' for' a
'te«v x'il] orde'li'r' is possible is at .servanlil of this govel'menlllt.
uliss.ia, the neid test of g.,d will for ihie as for you, has niot
ever leel undterstood. tinjust decisiois regarlding Shiantaug.
Tyroul. Thrace, Hllngary, East Prussia, Dlanzig. a1d the N111r val
ley anld ahmullnienit of the principle of f'reedom ,I' fhe sels
make nett-"i ilern' tili ial coti licts meelain.
"]t is my co1nviclion the present leigie of nalins will be
lpow\erless to prevent these wars, and the Uniled States will be
itivolvedt in lthem by obligatiotis iltndertakeltl lthroigh lthe cove
natlt of Ithe leatgle atl ill ai sIpecial liludesltlimlilg wilth Frauee.
There'fore the dutiy of the gttver'llmetIl of' the Unlited Slates to
its own peoplfe nd Il mnllkilnd is to refuse Ito sign this lnjlust
Ireaty; refuse to guarantlilee ils settlllementls by entering the
lgliague o~f' nations, atlttl refltse to elntangle Ihe United States fIl'ur
ther by an ulerslntaliig with France.'
It is a source Iof regret that these well-meaningii idlividluals
were utable to analyze. lhe ectnonlic causes of thle greatl
struggle in which thlie \wtorld'tl was enllgaged hefort e they gave their
twhole-hearted slliupport to a inatilt who raped detlmocraey ill this
nalilon, while 'urging the pteoIle to give unsprintigly, that its
bilessitigs ni6gti dtescenld t utttt beiigihtled Europt'le.
(tf' ciourse, had llthey had this klnovwleJge ialil vilh it tlihe iollu'
tage' of their co(lvi('litnls, \Vilsonii cu1ld ne'ver have secured lihe
illtegiinee of vwhich they alre oly ashi.ied.
THE SPREAD OF BOLSHEVISM.
A .' iend oi ' ourl, ,ijust lba k l ,from a trip Ito New ' ttlk, tell.,s .Is
that the way hlslhevisn. is sprelintg back there is something
Ii he dllreaded by ill liorty-loviig' .Americans. "\Why.' lie says,
the girls iback there go to work witlh silk stnklalg's on. Ait.
if' you coutld see tlhem \w'lien they are dressed tip on Sludays or
lholidays with their line shoes ail dresses aild hats, anld their
beliatifl geirget erle bloeuses. , yvou wouid thinik they lived
on Fifth a\venue. .\A i tllhev are not ..c lented with the m \Vies
alny iiore: they 'go I the est heal er."
Now, whaI do y. 'i k ini w aIln ut thal? I· ii' lthal .iju t ts o fiil?
r ul'nly tlhisi is a daligeroisl state ol' affairs. And it is al lihe rie
ul of' this daniiahte holshevist propagaila.
Altd these. minidl you. are tjust 'onlnitot working girls. to --
girls who work ill silk il'ories, anl d shoe I'nu ories andl dress
making anld nilliiiery estahlishnimenils and lilniry girls, who
ilever id Ianllylhilg bill starlcllllhig all irol tilig, mil \wailltesses
ini the c(ies where the ainlots eat. None of them are edicatel,
lnone f them ever wenit to college, lnone oi' themn go ll the hest
s.l iety- tlie liiost that lan le sa.i of l if Ihien is thiat they
lire just simply uiseiful an kinid-healirted intl geinerous-aiiih
yet, they think they are as giood Is iyh ai n and are i entilled to
the best there is going.
Well, . f ili as Oswe are collcl erlte , we'e iio glallal hlate the giluls'
on it till, exceptl heiig suspe.el d of living oil Fil'th iVlulenue.
THE FLEAS ON SPECIAL PRIVIELGE.
'Thle slliement that there are 'le ill n the fle~u oni the dog.
finds a close lpaUrallel in the lew brald ol 'l slharlpers 'who are
preying on the special inlteests l whol prey on the people ot the
land. As the issue betweeni the l.rospierity of the commioll
lpeople and iontiipoly, i i)wert amol plrofits heloniies a seriouis po
litial atnd indntistrial struggle, ailiiy ae makinig hig imoiey ib
utlling the legs' of frightened pldocratls.
Almost every onle who goes to Wall street with alliy kinid of
ta plani for fighting farmer anid labor oirgailizatiolis. coimes
away well laden with flndis. (. lie rapidly growitig organiiza
tioni is pulling dlowln hig money by stamtpeding e.i ilo)yers into
taking out strike inisurtalce. The iinsuin'ianice conlipay evi
detilly promises to fight lthe strikers ntili lilpay all dlamages inll
reltll'rn for a tat preliiiini. The politiciilils and newspaiipers.
who are regularly ainl loniig-establishedl floeas, are playinig upil to
the fears of the specialo iinterests an iare r ing greterll sup
port funds than ever before.
Private deteclive agencies whI ich supply deteclives and gun
meni to frame-lip aml ulli to jail ior assauill leaders of farmer
utid labor organizations, thrivie as niever bIefore. The IGierman
spies clever enough to escape detectioln here, Iand now thrown
o.li, of their regular jobsil, iarei fi lling protitabile eiipllliy enti
for their talents.
So far as these fleas bleed the special intereslts of their ill
gotten viar profits, few lprobhlyl would feel any concern, but
the public danger from thenm. iifjact, is great. Their profits
depIend on the fears of special privilege. Consequenitly they
have a strong motive for increasing this fear. Their business
demands that they concoct bomb plots, imaginary revolutions
by violence, and destruction of property, twheni they cannot dis
Union Stock Holders in the
Butte Daily Bulletin
UNITED MINE WORKERS OF AMERICA-Locals: Sand Coulee,
Stocket, Roundup, Lehigh, Klein, Washoe, Red Lodge, Smith
(Bear Creek).
FEDERAL LABOR UNION-Livingston.
MACHINISTS' UNION-Great Falls, Butte, Livingston.
MACHINISTS' UNION-Great Falls, Butte, Livingston, Seattle.
CEREAL WORKERS-Great Falls.
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION-Butte.
BLACKSMITHS' UNION--Butte, Miles City, Seattle.
ELECTRICIANS' UNION--Livingston, Deer Lodge, Butte, Anaconda,
Seattle.
BAKERS' UNION-Great Falls.
SHOE WORKERS-Great Falls.
PLASTERERS' UNION-Great Falls
RAILWAY CAR REPAIRERS-Livingston, Miles City.
MUSICIANS' UNION-Butte.
BREWERY WORKERS' UNION-Butte.
HOD CARRIERS' UNION--Butte and Bozeman.
STREET CAR MEN'S UNION-Butte, Portland.
BARBERS' UNION-Butte.
METAL MINE WORKERS' UNION OF AMERICA.
PRINTING PRESSMEN'S UNION-Butte.
MAILERS' UNION--Butte.
STEREOTYPERS AND ELECTROTYPERS' UNION-Butte.
BRIDGE AND STRUCTURAL IRON WORKERS-Butte.
PIPEFITTERS' UNION-Butte.
BROTHERHOOD BOILERMAKERS AND HELPERS-Butte and
Livingston.
STEAM AND OPERATING ENGINEERS-Great Falls.
BUTCHIERS' UNION-Great Falls.
BAKERS' UNION-Butte.
INTERNATIONAL MOLDER'S UNION, LOCAL NO. 276-Butte.
LAUNDRY WORKERS' UNION, NO. 25-Butte.
PLUMBERS' UNION-Butte, Seattle.
BROTIIERHOOD RAILWAY CARMEN OF AMERICA, LOCAL NO.
224-Miles City.
TRAI)ES AND LABOR COUNCIL-Miles City.
IIOD CARRIERS' UNION-Helena.
BROTHERHOOD RAILWAY CARMEN OF AMERICA, COPPER
LODGE NO. 430-Butte.
BUTTE FOUNDRY WORKERS' UNION-Butte.
PAINTERS UNION--Butte.
TAILORS' PI1OTECTIVE ASSOCIATION-Butte, Portland.
BOILERMAKERS, SHIP BUILDERS AND HELPERS OF AMERICA
-Tacoma, Seattle, Livingston.
INTERNATIONAL BROTHERHOOD OF BLACKSMITHS AND HELP
ERS, LOCAL NO. 211-Seattle, Wash.
WORKERS', SOLDIERS' AND SAILORS' COUNCIL-Painters' lIall,
Seattle, Wash.
BUILDING LABORERS' UNION-Seattle.
INTERNATTONAL ASSOCIATION OF BRIDGE AND STRUCTURAL
IRON WORKERS AND PILEDRIVERS' LOCAL NO. 86-Seattle.
AND THOUSANDS OF INDIVIDUALS IN BUTTE AND MONTANA
r.ver isolahiled (va k-I)rl illed individlals here anal there f'ool
:sh enulIglh tI, aIdvoel('t these thlings.
pri\'ilege. ,,\Iid \V eIe0l IlIlig'essIliilli JiililtllI o ITex.iaS tries Io
it'l eiI(,t these hlll iiugr s willti lr.gallized labor lie is simpllly ii
flea, e llhl hvorin'lg Ito et speCill privilege alltienition politiially
i l l financia'lly.
DO YOU WANT WEALTH?
0)1' c'uli'se '4 lli lo. See how \\ (lick l ith t heIlCt line caullght yourl'
eye. Like everybodyl else ,y(il wani t to get rich. I' Iheire is any
ilisile ill'dl'lIit lij.ul 1 hloW i geo l riell you Walilt To get, it.
Theni, let s give you a poinilterl'. (iGo Ip to the ulitte public
libirairy il get tIhe "'lIistolry o the Great Ainlericilll Fortuneslli
-three vo(Illies of it, by (ilIstRvIs Myers. II is llthere o11 the
shell'. W'e sw' i t te otlier' lay----iit ias well Woni 11 ' yOll woul(
eXpert onisiderin. h Ile anilllll (I' inlrl'liatli(i ill how to ao
litii'e weilllh. It tells vyoi tIlhe ICtolill(s emplloyed ill ilmiassing
iie bit'l'tIles iof Vii anderblol, Astori' Gulld, Moi'glanl, Velit
wot' h, Elkinis, Hill, Arl ui ll anl otiiher A iOier ilt i famiies. Ilea' i
il and1 see how easy it is to get rich it' you no about it, the right
%'Ill"
MODERN DEFINITIONS.
Emmntl'iialig it'h e s'eorking class one at. a. time-giving Ia
l)44'-I'allki's \'elll-paidl j()1)bs i ('a lpiltalist government..
01 course, lthe hIlshe\viki soldliers pilt lip a, go4ond fightl. 'lThey
are fi'ighliig f' their e ti I lhand, while Ihe soldiers of the allied
rnliies are Iighling I'r the otlher fellow's land.
TIhereC is gellinug tI he atn awl'ill l oi' unlreasonable working
mllell i ll e I o IIl',\. ''le "reas hon le" \\'t'lkilgmllll is one
\\h l ks at the lalb' lwpr4leim l'rn1m lhe saillnpoint of the em
piIyer. \e coil'ess lo a liking 14',r tIle iuntreasniuable kind.
\ Ve w'odl like Ito call Ihe allentIion ol' Iho editor oi' "Sue
'ess" magazilie 144 the islendlidl examples 4lr Ihe rewards of)
,erseveraic'e a ''aortiell liv i''gauizedl (lllor lay. Fine chaince
Ii inspire the realier's iI Success by showing tlhe results oh
iiiietld by the rleceint strikes.
The girealtesl clog iin tile 'wheels 41 prig('ress is the reait whose
ii gh est a4 biltii 1 i is 14 holl "4 a g e')l4 .job" with nn responiisihililty.
Slranage that lhe fellow \whse l Itiisn) is "0look 111l 1for nummher
4ill'",. nev'er picks a man \ Will lthe same n ,l'lo 1 '4 r l f'riendl.
"i'u can'tl blllla e llte ilnlll'allnce C llllpalllies I' anlllill) n In
dhstr' y the \inipa tisin league. II' lhey don't dtestriy tlh'
leagune, the league will dles'lriy them.
Thle li'4icee4lings at the A\. I. of L. cn\.-eition at Allaiulic City
w\111 illicil le that i inie Ill t' "leaders" are also juel ly good
4,llo\wei's of iorporatioti lemalerls.
An.illier l'laise iii stalary .Iniisedt for Saullny. Stij'e lie be
Iings In the working class-- lint is, they ayli his salary.
W\\heni we heinl e tl' thise inldividualisls--onie who ("owes
I tll.,hii jg to s(cie ly"--bra·ggiing a111; t \\111hat lie has ui''conm
plis1hed by ''is 4i\\n unaided el'I'irls. ' we ('eel like takiigt him
Iyv lhe utmenlp tel' lhe lneck l n etting him hdo\vn on some island in
lhe Srn1 Pacific ocean ll o111. the line ni navigation. Sonme
nice island where there is blreal-fruit and iates and bananas
dl lfish and l gaine--all untili'al l'esolt'rces 4to sustain life. Give
him all the best of it f'i'r a starler; give him fishing tackle,
'whichli he did nlt .1n4l(n'e by l"his ,own un.aided efforts;" give
him at gun and anmuniuition, whlich hlie did nit, get by "his own
I.utlidl l etl'l'ui'ts:' give him matches and salt. resullt. of co-oper'a
alive effollrt. and llhen say It, himin. o ' go .o it, society will .int
hltlher yin much oti' a period of 11i yearis, at the end of' tluJ
time \we will come back 1a.l see hl\\- inuch you hiiiave necom
plished lby your 'ow \\'n iulmidledl eliotls.'
What a relief it is to miss the ''seed co'rn" chorus of tho
(14cal commercial chluhs. the "plant potatoes'' song of tlie side
walk farmers, and the "mlore wheat and more hogs" slpeech;a,
of lihe t'elliws anxiousI I get ltheir latriolisnm on record in tlhe
.ity press! Let the peaceflul stillness reign forever more!
O Waitingorthel~'hurch)SIotion I~
aGa~Dh~~"
::-···' -----`
·· .~·~·:·
·:::··::: ~-=
':::::::::: ····
.···-.l·;·r
·:.:~y~;%C~C~iltlllLY/~~I'`I·:·:·:
:~:i::'DTc~ ~ tt14~r L ;r
.....·. ··:·.·:.. · ·~. ···.
·····.;·:::::~i ::~i~i~
.;..., o~I
i ·'·''ii
1····· ··:· ~rE
.....:·::: ::~~: ·~:·~
...:···.
.·;....:. IDE
::::
- ·"::·:·:: i
~~~ii,........: .;.....;... :i.,:.,.I. ·~~
···:.·.·.;·.~~;:;:::::·I· .:-.·:1::::::1;:1:.~:.·: ···....;...
··;·i;~:~:~:~~. II·:··;·;·
r~::.· ;:.·::-:;~:~;;.::::~:·:::;.:-::~,11~;'~. :·':··:··~:·~::·
··.· ;··;;·· ·;:~ C//U·/. -~31% )
:'.;··'.·;·.·;:1· :~ :
·;··: ·.·I;··.~. · ~~ :::~
.s~~l. :;::d -·····''-'
...... ;e
·;·.····.·:;-··
~Xl~i~.
11~ :::·:·.·.::~~·':'~.:';':''::. :-:.....·
.. ..:..~-.~...
ii~ ::.·:.....`:.·.·.··;t
rf:·j: :j:
·~2~:·:- :::f:':
,,
::·:· '
i:::
~:: c; ~ ,j~~:·:~l.
,......i:·
ly.o, ·~i~~·.I· :·:·:i::i iji
p3 ~Yi~S
:il ';·;'··
o~J,
··;:~:- ':~::':: ·*aDc
::::::':::I::I':~: '''';:': ';:~
:·.·::· ··;·;··-····· ····:· ·::):l::i
.·'.·.··-.;·-"·:.::::·':·' ;:·.-:~:·;..~
~,::~1·:-····..:· ···":'···:·.·.:::.·
:.··:·:-·····
·:;::.·:~:··~· :·i:::::i:
;I ~IIBP
i::l.::liii:;:i::~:::::::::::·:: :;·~
..:··:: :::::·:·:':::::::
~:··;·
:
·~·-:~·:~:·:-·.;
····-..;·;··:·.·. ""·:.:1
··;··,·r.··.···.·· .··..· ::::I::·
:·::~; ·I:::::j~:: ....-:..::.:.I;·;:::i :::·
::: ::::::':"'
···~::::.:;: ::~~:::·1:~ ~r;·;~
"··::;::::::.·:;..t·.;:· L·.'~
..;;....~;; ..-..:.1..:...~.1.1..
·:~::·;·;···.:; ·······; ;:::'~:::iiil:lliiilii·':;'
·:::.:..·.·:· ..·:I·::::::·:·I···:.;:.:::.~.::t
1;rre EjDt~
.:·i:::::~~:.:: 'i-:i~~;;I'::' :·.···: (X
.~·.··.·:.· ·'·.··'··'
;::j·:l:·::.:: :::.:l:::·:;.i-I: ::::::. :'.::::::.· :·.·.- ··;.:.'·::::·'·
:::-::::::i::::
::I::;·:·I.:'-'-: ··`·""······
;..:. SglP E
.:::,::::::::~~ ·.·;:··::·::
·.·.:·.:;::::::i L::.··:: ·:-:· ~~:::::
~"'.'::.·:.::':·1.··.···
:::;·:·
···.·.··.
:···::::·:·.::;·
:.:: j
···.··, ·:::·.ii::,
:I:.·.·.·:
·:::::
:·····r··;; i
JUSTICE TO RUSSIA
Tell Thousand D)cemalnd ,Justlice
for illsia.
(For the next week the Bulletin
will publish under this head the ad
dresses made by prominent men at
a mass-meeting held in New York
to demand justice for Russia. Today
we publish the speech of Frederick
C. Howe, immigration commissioner
of the port ofNew York, whose works
on economic subjects have attained
an international reputation.---Ed.)
On Sunday evening, May 25, 1919,
the People's Council of America con
ducted a "Justice for Russia" mass
meeting in Madison Square Garden,
New York city, which will long he re
membered as one of the most remark
able demonstrations of its kind ever
held in that historic meeting place.
From the moment that the chair
man of the People's council, Louis P.
Lochner, called the enthusiastic gath
ering to order and presented as the
chairman of the evening, Dr. Frederic
C. Howe, United States commission
er of immigration, there was scarcely
a reference to the soviets that was
not punctuated with thunderous ap
plause.
At times it was difficult. fpr the
speakers to resunme their discourse,
for the audience, carried off by somnic
particularly eloquent passage, would
Scott Nearing's Special Article
MUTU AL A)ID.
Tecccnt newspaper stories from
Argentina give the impression that
the workers, in that far away coun
try, know how to stand together in
defense of their rights. One of the
explanations of this solidarity is giv
en in the latest monthly labor review
of the United States department of
labor under the title "Mlutual and Co
operative Associations in Argentina."
The co-operative movement of Argen
tina dates back to 1825. It has been
growing rapidly since 1S52. At the
present time there are over 600,000
members of the various co-operative
associations. The city co-operative
Eugene V. Debs' Daily Message
From NEW YORK CALL.
'The pigmy workers, as they are
regarded by their masters, are de
veloping out of their own flesh and
blood and consciousness a giant of
herculean proportions whose tread
is even now making capitalism quake
to its rotten foundation.
"The name of this modern giant,
the greatest that ever trod the earth,
great enough to smash the plunder
bund at a blow, is Solidarity.
"Iehold him, this brave and
brawny and brainy'giant of labor,
this towering colossuis of the work
ing class, whose breath is life, whose
name is power, and whose goal is
emancipation!l
"The workers of all the world are
converging their strength, their hope
and their aspiration in this giant
Solidarity and the very earth is be
o 0
Today We Celebrate
ii --o
('Cuirious ('ustolis of St. John's Eve.
While St. John the Baptist is still
widely commemorated on the festi
val of his nativity, which falls on the
24th of June, most of the quaint old
customs connected with the observ
ance of St. John's Eve are now almost
extinct, except in the remote rural
sections of Ireland and England and
parts of Eupore. In those districts
which cling to the old traditions,
many curious rites will be enacted
tonight. In England the popular ap
pellation of the feast is midsummer
Eve and Midsummer Day, and the
observance dates back to pagan times
although for many centuries it has
bet E combined with the festival of
the Nativity of St. John.
Thousands still fondly cling to
the old belief that o.n.the night pre
ceding St. John's day the souls of
all people leave their bodies and visit
the spot where they are destined to
give up the ghost. This not alto
gether pleasant superstition accounts
for the fact that many peasants al.
ways make a "night of it" and refuse
to go to bed, while their wives and
thildien also keep open-eyed vigil
iise to their feet, cheer, rave hand
kerchiefs, thrdw hats into the air. and
for minutes at a time continue to ap
plaud.
The speakers, bhesides Dr. Howe,.
were Rev. John Haynes Holmles of the
Church of the Messiah, Dr. Judah L.
Magnes. chairman of I lle Jewish
K(ehillah (ommunnity). r. Ir. incoln
Colcord. one of the editors of "T' he
Nation," and Mr. Amoe: I'inchol. It
was generally remarked that the
speakers, all of whomi enjoy enviabl|eC
replutations as platform orators, ouit
did themselves on this occasion, alnd
rose to heights seldom equalled even
by themselves.
The meeting throughout embodied
that mingling of solemnity and fer
vor which to sympathizers seems to
have characterized tile whole of the
Russian social revolution.
Without a dissenling voice the ten
thousand participants in the demon
stration passed the resolutions print
ed elsewhere.
The addresses of Messrs. Howe,
Holmes, Magnus and Pinchot are,
with the exception of the first half
of Dr. Howe's remarks, printed fraom
prepared manuscript. In the case of
Mlr. Colcord's speech, as well as the
first half of Dr. Howe's opening ad
dress. we have used the verhatiml
stenographic reports furnished by the
Convention Reporting company.
associations include banks, building
and loan associations, producers' co
operatives and distributors co- opera
tives. The country co-operatives in
clude hail, fire and crop insurance;
co-operative banks and co-operative
purchasing and selling associations.
Year by year the workers of Ar
gentina are learning the truth of
the good old adage--"If you would
have a thing done well, do it your
self." Year by year, through their
co-operative undertakings they are
helping to bind together the people
upon whose labor depends the or
ganization and progress of the word.
ginnig to tremble beneath his pon
derous tread. He bodes no ill to
toiling humanity and no good to toil
ing humanity's greedy expioiters and
heartless oppressors.
"He is the implacable foe of la
bor's age-long enemies, the blood
sucking vampires and their vast
brood of mercenaries and microbes;
his great orbs flash with the fires
of wrath as he looks upon the priest
craft and superstition which have
kept the workers in blindness and
slavery for ages, and he has grimly
sworn to wipe these blighting and
withering curses from the face of the
earth.
"All hail to Giant Solidarity, the
revolution of the working class in
carnate, the towering champion of
industrial freedom, and the sun
crowned herald of the coming day."
until the dawn of St. John's day, hav
ing a natural prejudice against per
mitting their spirits to make so dub
ious a journey. Another supersti
tion, now happily extinct, was that
those who sat up fasting in the
church yard through the night would
see apparations of all those who
were to (lie in the following year.
Wild tales of these nocturnal ghost
ly visitations were spread over the
neighborhood every Midsummer day.
and many people worried themselves
into their graves because of reports
that their "spooks" were among the
visitors to the graveyard.
No festival of this sort is complete
without providing ways and means
for the maiden to discover the iden
tity of her future husband. The par
ticular rite to be followed at this time
is to go without the evening meal,
and at midnight, to lay a cloth and
place upon it bread and cheese, then
sitting down as if to eat. If the out
side door is left open, the future
husband is supposed to enter the
room, drink to his bride-to-be, and
then, with a gallant bow, to retire.
These visitors were supposed to be
apparitations, conjured up by super
natural power, but there was often
ground for suspicion that they were
flesh-and-blood young men who thus
sought to impose upon the creduli
ty of the lady of their love. And of
ten they succeeded.
Mankind has always sought for
some means to make the body in
visible, and it was long firmly believ
el that he who went forth on St.
John's Eve and at midnight succeed
ed in catching some of the seed of the
fern in a plate, would possess the
magic power of making himself in
is.ible. The seed of the fern was so
!;mall as to be not easily visible, and
Sh:''tap;S this accountlll for the occult
p,ropelticrs they were thought to con
::illi. Tales of young men who had
iucc('eeded in their quest for the mag
i( seod, and had thus been able to
witness sights not intended for other
eyes and to penetrate into places
closed to prying persons, enjoyed a
great popularity, and the engaging
young liars who manufactured such
farcical accounts of imaginary exper
iences found many ready to believe
their ingenious yarns.
Mrs. Williamson
.10 Years Old Today.
One of the most famnous firms in
litelature is that romance-manufac
turing concern which markets its
output under the name of C. N. and
A. M. W'illiamson. The partners do
more than write romance-they live
it.
Alice Muriel Ljvingston, the .jun
ior partner of the house of William
son, was born at the old manor
house of her parents on the Hudson,
near Poughkeepsie, fifty years ago
today, June 23. 18G9. She was giv
en a private education, and at a ten
der age decided that she wished to be
an actress. Being a determined as
well as talented young woman, she
,ootl got what she wanted, and at
the age of twenty-one made her de
but with Daniel Frohman's company.
Later slhe starred with a company of
her own.
Deciding that the stage was not all
it was "cracked up to be," Miss Liv
ingston abandoned the theatrical
profession for journalism, with an
eye to a future as a novelist. She
wvent to England as the correspond
ent for several American newspapers.
Obliging editors on this side had
given her letters to their colleagues
in London. One of these was ad
dressed to Charles Morris William
son, editor of Black and White. le
canse of illness in his family, Mr.
Williamson did not call on the visit
ing American woman, a courtesy de
manded, an dshe dismissed the slight
acquaintanceship from her mind. The
English author and the American
writer met again, however, and were
married in 1894.
They always visit the scenes of
their stories, and each makes copious
notes of the surroundings. When
they conceived the plot of "The Gol
den Silence," which has the desert as
a stage setting, they went to Al
giers, and thence inland by automo
bile and camel cavaran, to the heart
of the Sahara. For several months
they lived in a desert oasis village,
forming many friendships among the
Arabs and getting their point of
view.
o o
I Today's Anniversary
0o i
Lord Clive.
One hundred and sixty two years
ago today witnessed an event that
was the real beginning of the Brit
ish empire in India. On the morning
of June 23, 1757, Robert Clive, a
young East India Company clerk, at
the head of a small band of English
men, faced a native army of 68,000.
Clive's force was made up of about a
thousand British soldiers and 2,000
Indians. Against the overpowering
odds of twenty-three to one, the Eng
lish cause seemed hopeless. The
Britishers, however, had the cruel
tragedy of the Calcutta "Black
Hole" to avenge, and on the field of
Plassey they fought with a despera
tion and valor scarce equalled since
the defense of the Greeks against the
Persians. The battle was short and
decisive. Before the determined
-barge of the Britishers, the Moslems
broke and fled. The victory laid the
foundation of the British empire in
India.
0o
Morsels From A
Sage's Scrap Book
n n
What Queen of England Twice Set a
Frice on the Head of Her Brother?
"Good" Queene Anne (1664-1724.)
Her brother was known as James, the
Chevalier St. George.
-Tl'INtE IN INTEREST--SAVE-

xml | txt