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The Butte daily bulletin. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1918-1921, August 04, 1919, Image 3

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GOSSP NOTES
I SPORTOGRAPHY I
o O!
MAY I NOT
* * * suggest that all questions
of disputed rounds be decided by one
time bar. tenders?
Sharkey Finds New Sport.,
Tom Sharky, once a Queensberry'
warrior of note, is one of the most
successful players at the race track
these days. Tom was all smiles as
he saw his sixth straight winner
get down in front. "Say, if I'd
known that this game was going on
in the old days, I'd never have been
a fighter." he said. Although Shark
ey is getting along in years, his
spread of shoulder is as great as
ever and his neck as sturdy. He
still punches the bag every morning
and takes long walks and runs just
for the pleasure of keeping in con
dition. Sharkey boasts that he can
run 100 yards in 14 seconds, a feat.
that many a lighter and younger man
could not accomplish.
August Fourth With the Pugs.
1846-h-ill Perry defeated Tass
Parker in 23 23 rounds at Lindrick
Common, England. This was the
third bout between these two aspir
ants for the British heavyweight
title, which Perry afterwards won.
Perry, the "Tipton Slasher," first
fought Tass Parker in December,
1843, and the battle was ended by
police interference after they had
battled 67 rounds, lasting one hour
and 35 minutes. The following Feb
ruary, Parker and the Slasher re
sumed hostilities, and after 133
rounds, lasting two hours and 32
minutes, had been fought, Tass de
cided that he had enough and laid
down. The third fight was the best
of all, although much briefer than
the earlier engagements. Tats fought
with great gameness, but in the sev
enth rounds two of his ribs were
broken in a fall. Although Parker
was often accused of being "yellow"
by the fight fans of that day, he con
tinued to fight valiantly for 16
rounds after he had sustained the
fracture of the ribs. In the "good
old days" a bruiser who stopped be
cause of a little thing like a few
busted ribs was considered decidedly
lacking in gameness. Perry became
champion of England in 1852, when
he defeated Tom Paddock, who quit,
just because his shoulder was brok
en, and was for a time in disgrace
because of his lack of pluck.
1880-Bob Fitzsimmons won the
amateur heavyweight championship
of New Zealand by knocking out four
PAT McKENNA 1
314 North Main St.
Cigars, Tobaccos and
Fruits
FINE LINE OF LUNCH GOODS
Soft Drinks and
Confectionery
Give me a call and you will
come again.
SAY YOU SAW IT IN BULLETIN
MEN'S HATS
NICKERSON
THE HATTER
112 W. PARK STREET
SAY YOU SAW IT IN BULLETIN.
Classic Chili Parlor
210 N. Main St.
CHILI, LIGHT LUNCHES
THE BEST WAFFLES IN TOWN
Open Day and Night
fiAY YOU SAW IT IN BULLETIN
The Progressive Shoe Shop
For first-class Shoe Repairing.
This is no second-hand cobbling
shop. First-class work only.
1721 Harrison Ave.
SAY YOU SAW IT IN BULLETIN
STEAM BATHS
Try our steam baths. They keep
you clean and healthy.
504 E. Broadway Phone 5688-W
Corner Oklahoma
'SAY YOU SAW IT IN BULLETIN.
PHILIPSBURG AND
ANACONDA STAGE
Leaves Anaconda every evening
on arrival of train from Butte at
6 p. m., arriving at Philipsburg
at 7:30 p. m. W. BELLM, Prop.
S4Y YOTT SAW IT IN RTILLETIN
REX CAFE
When in Great Falls visit the Rex
Cafe.
SERVICE EXCELLENT
Especially caters to the working clase
15 Third St. South
.. Rear First National Bank.
men in a tournament held at Timaru,
New Zealand. Freckled Bob, who
was then employed as a blacksmith,
was really a middleweight, but chose
ito enter the heavyweight division.
Jern Mace, one time heavyweight
champion, was referee.
1889-Kid Lavigne, commenced
his professional career by holding
George Siddons to a draw in 77
-rounds of fierce fighting, using kid
gloves; a little later the same men
fought 55 rounds, until neither was
able to continue.
1897---Jack Everhardt defeated
Spider Kelly in 20 rounds at San
Francisco. These names will bring
thrills of happy reminiscence to the
many old-time fans. The spider,
while not a particularly brilliant per
former in the ring, had quite a fol
lowing. Everhardt got into the:
limelight in 1893 when he fought
Andy Bowen, the New Orleans col
ored boy, in the Crescent City. Jack
was defeated, but not until after 85
rounds of battling, lasting five hours
and 38 minutes. This contest was
staged in the month following Bow
en's contest with Jack Burke, the
longest fight on record. Everhardt
defeated Burke a year or so later.
S1899-Joe Choynski defeated Pete
Everett in seven rounds, foul, at
Denver.
1899-Mysterious Billy Smith and
Andy Walsh fought 25 rounds to a
draw at New York.
1911-Eddie Sherman and Charlie
Harvey fought 10 round draw at
Rockaway, N. Y.
1811--Battling Nelson knocked
out Tommy Gaffney in fifth round
at Medford, Ore.
1912-Sam Langford defeated
Sam McVey in 20 rounds at Sydney.
This was the fourth bout between
the Associated Meal Tickets, Ltd.
The Boston "tar baby" and the Cal
ifornia cullud man first fought in
France, getting a draw. McVey de
feated the Nova Scotaan in Decem
ber. 1911.
1913---Bombardier Wells knocked
out Pat O'Keefe in the 15th round
at London.
STANDINC OF THE CLUBS
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
Won Lost Pct.
Cincinnati ................. 61 29 .678
New York .................. 57 28 .671
Chicago .................... 48 :39 .552
Brooklyn .................... 43 44 .494
Pittsburg ................... 43 47 .478
Boston ........................ 32 53 .376
Philadelphia ....... 31 52 .373
St. Louis ...... ... ...... . . 31 54 .365
AMERICAN LEAGUE.
Won Lost Pct.
Chicago .......... ..... 58 34 .630
Cleveland ........... .. 52 40 .565
New York........ ... ... . 50 40 .556
Detroit ................ 51 41 .554
St. Louis ................. . 49 40 .551
Boston ................ 40 49 .449
Washington ................ 39 54 .419
Philadelphia .............. 24 64 .273
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION.
Won Lost Pet.
St. Paul ............ ........ 58 34 .630
Indaunapolis ............... 59 38 .608
Louisville .......... ...... 55 42 .567
Kansas City................ 49 46 .516
Columbus .................. 48 46 .511
Mlinneapolis ............ 41 52 .441
Toledo ..................... 36 59 .379
IM ilwaukee .................. 36 61 .371
COAST LEAGUE.
Won Lost Pct.
Los Angeles............... 68 47 .591
Vernon ................ 65 49 .570
Salt Lake.................... 60 47 .561
San Francisco...6........ 60 54 .526
Sacramento ........... 52 56 .481
Oakland ...................... 54 61 .470
Portland ....... ............. 48 62 .436
Seattle .............. 38 69 .355
Yesterday's Games
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
New York, 4; Cincinnati, 0.
Philadelphia, 1; Chicago, 7.
Brooklyn, 1---8; St. Louis, 2-3.
AMERICAN LEAGU'E.
Detroit, 2; New York, 10.
Cleveland, 4; Washington, 0.
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION.
Columbus, 1--. ; Louisville.
10 ---3.
Toledo, 0--2; Indianapolis, 6-7.
Minneapolis, 4---5; Milwaukee,
7 ----3.
St. Paul, 4-22; Kansas City,
3-1.
COAST LEAGUE.
Salt Lake, 8; Seattle, 2.
Oakland, 7-3; Vernon, 2-9.
Los Angeles, 7-1; Portland,
6--3.
Sacramento, 2; San Francisco, 4.
THE KING OF HOGS
(By United Press.)
Algona, Iowa, August 4.
The king of porkers holds court
in Iowa. He measures seven
feet from nose to tail and his
weight is 1.100 pounds. James
Vipond, stockman near here,
announced that he refused an
offer of $26,000 for the boar
and that he wouldn't take twice .
the amount for him.
Careful watch is kept on the
royal hog by a retinue of at
tendants. The royal pen and
hog wallow are the best that
money and science can pro
duce.
TRAFFIC LAWS PUIrLISHED.
Thousands of copies of the new
city traffic ordinances have been
printed and are now being distribut
ed to every auto owner in the city.
A week's grace will be given the au
toists to learn the many and varied
regulations as to parking, speed and
other matters in connection with au
tomobile traffic, after which no ex
cuses will be accepted. Fines range
from 10 to $300.
EXPOSE OF METHODS OF NATIONAL
.DEFENSE COUNCIL IN CONGRESS
Charges, On Floor of House, That This Body, of Whom
Julius Rosenwald Is a Member, Allowed Interested
Parties to Fix Prices of War Materials and Bought
From Themselves. Turn on all Lights.
Fo'lo the CHICACGO RlEPUBIICAN.
On February 26, 1917. Woodrow t
Wilson, president of the United States
appeared before a joint session of
congress and solemnly declared, that 1
he was not now proposing or con
templating war, or any steps that I
need lead to it.
His exact words then were as fol
lows:
"It is devoutly to be hoped that
it will not be necessary to put armed
force anywhere into action.. The
American people do not desire it, and
our desire is not different from
theirs. I am not now proposing war
or any steps that need lead to it."
Only five weeks later, or on April
2, 1917, President Wilson suddenly
convened congress in extraordinary
session, and warmly advised an im
mediate declaration of war.
Sensational Change by Representative
Graham.lll
On Monday of that week, Hon
William .1. Gralham, who represents
the Fourteenth Illinois district in
congress, startled the house ot repre
sentatives, by declaring on the floor
of that body, that for weeks, and
even mouths, prior to the declaration
of war against Germany, a body of
seven men, constituting a "secret
government of the United States,"
designed practically every war meas
ure which congress subsequently en
acted.
The seven men named by Represen
tative Graham were Hollis Godfred,
Howard E. Coffin, Bernard 1I, Ba
ruch, Samuel Gompers, Franklin H.
Martin, Julius Rosenwald, and Dan
iel Willard.
Secret Government by Seven Men.
Continuing his sensational remarks
Representative Graham said:
-"They, these seven men, devised
the entire system of purchasing war
supplies, planned a press censorship,
designed a system of food control,
selected Herbert Hoover as its di
rector, even determined on th-. day
light saving scheme, and discussed,
the draft before war was declared.-I
"Conceived within the law, but
brought into existence in absolute
violation of law, it is not surprising
to find that this secret government
of the United States, itself, persis
tently ignored and even violated the
law; that it allowed interested par
ties to fix the prices of war supplies;
that it put the people of the country
to incalculable, unnecessary expense,
and car'ried thilgs with a high hand."
Our Own Julius Rosenwald Involved.
The Julius Rosenwald referred to
above is our own Julius Rosenwald
of Sears, Roebuck & company. He
is the same Julius Rosenwald who
spent so much time, money and en
ergy trying to defeat Mayor Thomp
son. The same Julius Rosenwald
who through his man Friday, "Jake"
Loeb, imported Chadley from De
troit to assist him (Rosenwald) in
running the public schools of Chi
cago. Whether he is responsible for
the 10,000 rifles with bayonets, and
100,000 rounds of loaded cartridges,
recently found in,the Washburne pub
lic school, The Republican does not
know, but as he thinks in dollars and
cents, it does not doubt that he is.
;Ie is also the same Julius Rosen
wald who has been accused of shame
less tax dodging here in Chicago.
With the power to fix prices of war.
supplies, and to buy from himself. asa
charged by Representative Graham,
is it any wonder that Julius Rosen
wald's excess war profits, in 1917,
amounted to nearly X11,000,000? Is
it surprising that lie bought govern
ment bonds, the safest of all invest
ments, in one million dollar lots?
Anyone, too, could afford to make
occasional donations to charity, and
have them given wide publicity in
the Chicago Daily News, if Represen
tative Graham's accusations be true,
and we do not doubt that they are.
Spirit and Lette-' of Law Violated.
As authorized by congress, the
council of national defense, according
to Representative Graham, was to be
composed of six members of the cab
inet, who were to be the real execu
tives, and seven civilians to be select
ed by the president, who were to act
in a purely advisory capacity. Instead
of doing this, Representative Graham
asserted, the president made the ad
visory commission the real executives
,"clothing them with unprecendented
and almost illimitable powers."
Eminent lawyers advised the com
mission that it was operating in vio
lation-of the Sherman act, the Clay
DESIRES ONLY
(Continued From Page One.)
' As a temporary government out
first task is to establish order and
safety," said Peidl. "At the same
time we must organize an election
based on universal suffrage and call
an assembly which will decide Hun
gary's new form of government. We
will do everything on our power to
safeguard the life and property of
Hungarian subjects as well as for
eign subjects.
"The evacuation of parts of Hun
gary now held by the entente forces
would improve the situation immedi
ately. Our government, which will
strive to create normal and orderly
conditions, counts upon the epipport
of the allied governments and peo
ples."
h be food situation in Hungary is
grave. Peidl said, declaring the en
tente's greatest help now would he
the sending of food supplies. This
would e~able the establishment of
order, he said. He declared Hun
gary also must have coal and raw
materials.
Budapest is under a strict state of
seige and perfect order is prevailing.
!1 ltIANIANS OCCUPY BUDAPEST.
t Special United Press Wire.)
Paris, Aug.. 4.-The Vienna corre
- spondent of the Agence Radio re
ports that Rumanian forces have ad
vanced on Budapest, despite Bela
,On law and all other statutes that 0
ire supposed to regulate business. t
'But," declared Representative Gra- C
tam, "W ten the attorney general was d
called upon to reply, he answered r
that the matters referred to, as vio- s
lations of law, were matters of na
tional policy, rather than a legal a
question.."
Members of Council llought Fromnt
Themselves.
"Afterwards," continued l)rCeesen
tative Graham, "when there was evi
iently a discussion in congress, as to
the legality of members of cointmit
tees, of the council, buying from
themselves, the council discussed
this general policy, and it was sug
gested that this embarrassment
might be removed by the plan of corn
nuittee reorganization, the council
had under consideration.
"The minutes show that. on ac
count of this so called embarrass
muent, the war industries board was
created, and committees were ap
pointed by the national chamber of
commerce, so the letter of the law
might be complied with, but, by
which scheme, no part of the method
of buying was changed, in the slight
est degree, so far as I canl obselve.
Making It Easy for Manufacturers.
"About the first thing the com
mission did, was to take up the mat
ter of arranging an easy method of
communication between the manu
facturers and the government. In
several meetings held long before war
was declared, the commission met
with representatives of the manufa.c
turing industries, and formed an or
ganization of them, for selling sup
plies to the government.
"This method consisted of having
the representatives of various busi
nesses, producing goods which the
government would have to buy, forml
themselves into committees, so they
might he able to sell to the govern
ment direct. When war was de
clared this machinery began to move.
Malde Flagrant Profiteering Possible.
"Although this scheme was sup
posed to enable the industries to teal
with the government as one man,
the government, at no time, was able
to deal with the industries through
one man. On the contrary, through
out the war, numerous federal bur
eaus were bidding against each other
for the same supplies, with greatly
increased cost to the government.
U:nder the ministrations of the gov
ernment, big business was highly
organized, while the government re
imained wholly disorganized and in
ca pable of protecting itself against
flagrant profiteering."
To Representative Graham The
Republican desires to say, so far so
good. You have made a good start
and deserve great credit for it. Your
job, however, will not be complete
unless you hale the seven members
of this council before the liouse of
representatives, and, by a rigid ex
amtination, give the people an oppor
tunity to decide whether they are
patriots or profiteers. If any of the
men bought war supplies from him
self, or allowed interested people to
fix the prices for them, the people
have a right to know it. If they
Ibought war supplies from them
Iselves, the people have a right to
know how they were bought and
how the prices charged compared
with the market which then pre'
vailed.
Turn on All the Lights.
Turn on all the lights, Mr. Gra
hatm. The people want you to go to
the bottom of this matter, and in
ourt opinion, you will be derelict to
your duty unless you do. The people
of Chicago are particularly anxioust
to know whether Julius Rosenwald
is a patriot or a greedy profiteer.
Throughqut the war he attempted to
"corner" all the patriotism in this
community. In addition to this, he
has been offensively active, political
ly. He has not only tried to get his
clutches on Chicago's public schools,
but, also, by the lavish use of money,
made a desperate effort to prevent
the reelection of Mayor Thompson
Very naturally, therefore, Cnicagoans
are anxious to know upon what meat
this modern ,Julius Caesar (Rosen
wald) has fed, that he has suddenly
grown so great, and you, Mr. Gra
ham, will confer an everlasting favor
on them by furnishing this informa
tion, which you are in a.position to
do.
Kun's overthrow, occupying the city.
Bela Kun, the fornier soviet dictator,
arrived at. Vienna where he has been
interned, the dispatch said.
PROFITEERS FLOCK
(Continued From Page One.)
implements, much of the farm ma
chinery and small hardware sold in
the state, sounded the attitude of the
profiteers when he appeared before
the general committee and declared
that no merchant would object to
the legislation provided the "vicious
parts were eliminated." Mr. Holter
explained that what he meant by the
"vicious parts" were those which
fixed a penalty for profiteering.
He followed this up by demand
ing to know if the question of who
was profiteering would be settled by
the amount of profit the merchants
made on their invested capital.
"If. for instance," asked Mr.
Holter, "a man bought. a jackknife
for 75 cents and sold it for $2. would
that be profiteering?" He did not
seem to think that it would be.
Chairman Higgins of the conm
iiittee stated that the question of
what amount of profit should con
stitute the line between legitimate
profits and profiteering would he
settled, under the proposed law by
the state market commission
When asked if he was aware that
cases had come to light before the
legislative investigating cuntmmtittee
wherein concerns have been making
from 80 to 100 per cent on their
capital by "robbing the consumers on
one side and the producers on the
other," Mr. Holter declared be did
not believe such cases existed. He
was informed by the committee that
such cases do actually exist and that
absolute proof had been obtained.
M.' W. Eich, representing: the
Stone-Ordan-Wells company, stated
with much heat that he had found
hostile sentiment against the whole
salers among the people on the sub
ject of excessive profits and high
living costs.
"Did you go out and suggest these
things to the people to stir them up,
or were you neutral in your atti
tude? heatedly demanded Eich.
Whereupon Chairman Hliggins in
dulged in some heat himself as he
replied that it was unnecesi:ary to
stir the people up to a belief that
they were being robbed; that they
already knew it.
MUST DECIDE WHO
Will BE BENEFITTED
ISpecial United Press \\Wire.)
Washington. Aug. 4.-- -'Th repara
tions committee must decide whether
the refusal of the United States to
accept indemnity fromn Germany will
benefit Germany or the allies, Iler
nard llaruchl, economic ad\isor of o
the American peace delegation, told
the senatl foreign relations com
Inittee.
COMPLETE TIE-UP
(Continued From Page Une.)
received indorsement of our grand
lodge presidents, although they now
are getting ready for a strike Aug.
24. But we are going ahead and are
receiving many messages telling of
manity mlore men oult or to go out."
ST'lliKE IEtKMAINS IN EFFECT.
(Special United Press Wire.)
Atlanta, Ga., Aug. 4.--Although
instructed by international officers
to postpone the scheduled walkout,
union leaders declared tuie railway
shopimen's strike throughout the
southeast ren(mains in effect until
"substantial progress has been mnade
townards a settlement" of their griev
anctes. Union officials said there
were Ieltween 25,000 and :30n.,00 out
in a1 southeastern states.
DE(II)E TO S''111KE.
Great Falls. Aug. 4.--Railroad
shop employes at IS. Paul, Suplerior,
Havre. Great Falls and Cutbank
have decided to strike in sympathy
with eastern railroad employes to
enforce their demands for wage ad
justments.
i Today We Celebrate.
0
A GRllEAT "WAR GOVERINOIl."
Oliver Perry Morton was born 96
years ago today, August 4, 1823, in
Salisbury, Wayne county, Indiana,
and died in 1877.. He was a political
leader in America, and best known as
the war governor of Indiana. In his
youth be attended the Wayne Coun
ty Seminary, spent two years at Mi
ami university, studied law, and in
1847 was admitted to practice. He
soon becamne a prominent member of
the Indiana bar and in 1852 was
elected circuit judge. He entered
politics as a democrat, but. opposition
to the Kansas-Nebraska bill led hiin
on May 2, 1854, to withdraw from
the democratic state convention, and
ultimately he assisted in the forma
tion of the republican party, to whose
first national convention he was a
delegate.
In 1856 the People's party, as the
republican party in Indiana was at
first called, nominated him for gov
ernor, but after a close contest he
was defeated. Folr years later he
was elected lieutenant-governor, and
on January 16, 1861, he became gov
ernor. Upon the outbreak of the
Civil war he threw himself with ex
traordinary energy and success into
the work of raising troops. His
task was greatly complicated by the
presence in the state of a large sec
ret society called the Knights hrl'
the Golden Circle, which resisted the
(draft, encouraged desertion, and even
plotted the assassination of the gov
ernor and the carrying of Indiana
out of the union. But Morton tri
umphed over all difficulties. He
borrowed sufficient moiey on his
own personal responsibility to meet
the exigencies of the situation; put
down the treasonable associations.
and brought the leaders to trial, and
he secured his own reelection in
1864. In the opinion of such men
as Chase and Stanton, his services
during this period were greater than
those rendered by any other of the
great war governors.
MAT' OF CHlCAGO RECORDEIID.
The first official map of the town
of Chicago was recorded 89 years
ago today. The town site had been
surveyed and laid out by the canal
comrnissioners---not a difficult task
since the village, incliidirig 'sullurbs,
covered but three-eighths of a square
mile. Tile population at that time
was about a hundred. Most of the
inhabitants were traders in furs and
skins and all of them went armed.
with due regard to the scalp raising
habits of some of the neighboring
indians. The tavern was the social
center of the village, and here o'
nights the hunters and tile trappers
UNDERTAKERS
DANIELS & BILBOA
Undertakers and Embalmers
125 East Park St., Butte. Phone 883
Residence Phone 4817-W.
Auto and Carriage Equipment.
LARRY DUGGAN
Reliable Undertaker and Embalmer
822 North Main Street
Phone 770.
Candidates for Office
OF THE
Montana Federation of Labor
ENDORSED BY
SILVER BOW TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL
HELENA TRADES COUNCIL
CASCADE TRADES AND LABOR ASSEMBLY
AND VARIOUS LOCAL BODIES,
For President-Steve Ely, Sand Coulee, Mont.
For Vice President-J. C. Whiteley, Butte, Mont.
For Secretary-Treasurer-J. T. Taylor, Lehigh, Mont.
For Executive Board Member, Cascade District-Charles
Heximer, Great Fails, Mont.
IF YOU WANT WHAT YOU WANT WHEN YOU WANT IT
USE
BULLETIN WANT ADS
CENT AWORD NO AD 1 CT
1 CENT N AoNC . THAN 15 CENTS
IN ADVANCE LESS THAN
MALE HELP WANTED
WANTED-Ambitious men to pre
pare for promotion. Apply In
ternational Correspondence School,
basement, No. 1 West Broadway.
ARE YOU SICK OR CRIPPLED?
A few treatments of CHIROPRAC
TIC will relieve you. At any rate
give it a trial. Quit drugs. Avoid
the operation. See Flora W. Emery,
Room 9, Silver Bow block.
FOR SALE
ONE 5-RtOOM FRAME HOUSE, all
beaver board inside; big cellar
and shed; sidewalk and sewer all
paid. 1026 South Gaylord. Price
$1,000; terms.
GROCERY and meat market with
two living rooms in connection,
good location. Inquire Iulletin of
fice.
ORCHESTRA SNARE AND BASS
drum; first-class condition. A
bargain. Call at Bulletin office.
JEWELRY and second-hand cloth
ing for sale at Uncle Sam's Loan
Office, 11 S. Wyoming street.
MAJESTIC RANGE, HEATER AND
other furniture, cheap. 513 Wat
son ave. Call evenings.
THE Butte Bullctin is sold by Victor
Mattila at Miners' IHome rooming
house, Southern Cross.
4-ROOM house with furniture. 1408
Jefferson st., phone 5775-J.
CHIROPRACTORS
What is Chiropractic? Newest and
greatest science for removing the
cause of disease. l)r. J. I). Long and
Dr. B. W. Long, 126 Pennsylvania
Building. Phone 4077-W.
FINANCIAL
DON'T TRADE your Liberty bond
for stock of worthless security. We
will pay you cash. Sarles & Co.,
458-60 Phoenix Bldg.
*'11 I THLOUIsAND WORIUK1hi
wanted to buy $5 worth of stoel
to The Bulletin Publishing Co.
LOST
IOS'I'---PAI R NOSE GLASSES with
chain at the Orphetum. Reward.
Phone 3045-J.
FOUND
FOtUNI)--A LITTLE GOLl) RING-
Owner can have salume by paying
for this advertisement at Bulletin
office.
TWO KEYS-- One Roo, one Miller.
To be had by paying for this ad
at the Bulletin.
FURNISHED ROOMS
DESIRABLE, modern rooms, all out
side; every convenience; rates rea
sonable. 419 W. Galena. Phone
4800-M.
gathered to eat, drink and be merry.
There were also two general stores,
a school house, a church, and a group
of log cabins. Within three years
the village grew into an incorporated
"city," with a population of 550. a
townsite of 500 acres, and nearly 200
buildings.
ENCGLAND'S FIRST I)IEMOC('RAT.
The first great democrat in Eng
land was Simon de Montfort. Earl of
Leicester, who was slain in battle
654 years ago today, August 4, 1265.
As a leader of rebellious barons,
Simon de Montfort was also the
spokesman for the great masses of
the people, and he held that it was
the duty of the nobles to stand be
tween the people and the monarch
as guardians of their liberties, to
watch over the exercise of the royal
p)ower and prevent its abuse. In the
great battle of Lewes in 1264 the
larons, under the command of de
Montfort, completely defeated the
king and the royalist party. In the
battle of Evesham on August 4, of
the following year the tables were
turned, and the democratic earl was
killed and the barons sustained a
ruinous defeat. During the brief
period of Simon's ascendancy, how
ever, he had lain the foundation for
the house of commons and had in
spired in the breasts of the people
a devotion to liberty and democracy
never to be stamped out by royal op
FOR RENT
P'ItVATE garage, will hold from one
to four machines; $1.0 per month.
Inaouire 28 t/ E. Park st., phone
"'401-J.
LARGE. well-furnished room, tele
phone; all modern conveniences.
$20 month for one, $30 for two. 14
S. Jackson, Tel. 5459-R.
MONEY TO LOAN
GET YOUR MONEY at 3 per cent on
diamonds, watches, jewelry, Lib
erty bonds. Mose Linz, Upstairs
Jeweler. Two entrances-Main and
Broadway.
MONEY LOANED on, diamonds,
watches, jewelry and Liberty bonds
at a reasonable rate of interest. The
Old Reliable. I Simon, 21 N. Main
St.
Furnished HRusekeeping
Rooms
FOIUR t FURNISHED IIOUSEKEEP
ing rooms; sunny and modern.
219 West Copper.
TONSORIAL
HAVE your children's hair cuat at
E. J. Swaldner's barber . shop,
133% W. Broadway.
Second Hand Goods Bought
and Sold.
H-IGHIEST prices paid for second
hand clothing, shoes, tools, jew
elry, etc. New and second hand
goods for sale. Globe New and
Second Hand Store. Phone 5140-J.
4 South Wyoming.
HAT CLEANING
THAT old hat-Make it look like
new at the Nifty Hat Shop, 861/
East Park St.
PAPER CLEANING
CLEGG; $1.50 per room. 6458-W
before 9 a. m.
TRANSFERS
EJXPRESSMAN'S headquarters. Ex
pressmen when you want them.
Phone 6404-J.
SECOND-HAND GOODS
WANTED
WANTED to buy, second-hand fur
niture and stoves. Union Furni
ture Exchange, 248 E. Park, phone
2783-J.
HIGHEST PRICE paid for old cloth
ing, shoes, hats, trunks, tools.
Phone 36557-W.
CLEANERS AND DYERS
AMERICAN Dyeing & Cleaning Wks.
1241 Ra"risnn ~-v Phnn 151
pression. "Every king is ruled by
the laws." declared Simon de Mont
fort, and he held that "the general
ity" should have a hand in the mak
ing of the laws by which they, as
well as the monarch, were to be gov
erned.
Simon de Montfort's immortal
place in history is indicated by the
reverent title historians have given
him--"The Father of the English
-lHouse of Commons."
LEGAL NOTICE.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
Estate of Carl Smegel, deceased. ,/
Notice is hereby given by thi un
dersigned administrator of the estate
of Carl Smegel, deceased, to' the
creditors of and all persons having
claims against the said deceased, to
exhibit them, with the necessary
vouchers, within four months after
the first publication of this notice, to
the said administrator at the office
of Harrison J. Freebourn, at room
510 Phoenix building, Butte, Mont.,
the same being the place for the
transaction of the business of said
estate, in the county of Silver Bow1
state of Montana.
HENRY SMEGEL,
Administrator of the estate of Carl
Smegel, deceased.
Dated, Butte, Mont., this 12th
day of July, 1919.
(First publication July 14, 1919.)

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