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The Butte daily bulletin. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1918-1921, October 09, 1919, Image 2

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THE MONIDAH TRUST WATER
PLANE IS IN LIVINGSTON
TO STAY
By reason cf crur reduceC corts of operation we
are ernabl-3e i o gjive lower rates than the city
plant. We halo ecimirnated the city contract
fcr fire p'otection, also the Fdorthern Pacific
contract; both of these contracts required con
stant operation of pumps and heavy operating
costs. Our customers are now given the ad
vantage of lower rates and better service than
could be furnished under the former con
ditions.
DON'T BE DECEIVED BY FALSE OR
MISLEADING STATEMENTS
Our plant is permanent and the city plant can
not meet our rates for service. The public
service commission finds our plant thoroughly
modern and efficient in every way. The service
is up to the standard and we are operating un
der the supervision and control of the public
service commission. Our rates established by
that commission are so much lower than the
city rates that it pays all water users to consider
this item in determining which service to
accept.
Any information regarding rates or service will
be gladly furnished at our office.
MONIDAH TRUST,
Water Department.
Why Worry About
the High Cost of
Living?
(Our' slw ess is dloe to he fa 't that we are
the origial price cuttllers in the restoi'ant
ganme in lItttle. 'T'his popular cafe is strictly
i utfe of the vw-\kiurg people, its business
del cltds euntirely !iurp n its ability to supply
y\' itlh yI our wlt lrti chealpe' r Ihan any cafe
ill the 'ily. In tonr low I tl calin \w e pjreo
pared to ser' vii littler than over, awl
iw prices W riL 'i riigjht. Special allnti ion to
miners' bucel'ls. Comle d.iwit and look uis
t\over, iI ' t i ll t t. is opoun for ill
r.: is n ut al itnoes.
ý J ý\?,i t: llN KII' NUlVFIF L, PROP.
LUNCH BUCIHETS (UR
S , / " SPECILTY--
U"-- ·17 SOUTH MAIN,-.
STEAM HEATED ROOMS IN CONNECTION
SAY 1,(t'i SA\W IT' I \ TIll IIhIt'EIT 1N.
SAFE AND
SOUND
We never forget that our
S (rs duty is to our depositors;
a tod handle every dollar so it
n be paid buack.
This bainlk haIs oe1 In n exist.
-fcnee for 15. years and has held
o a safe, progressive policy
hat insures a sound condition
tad a steady growth.
Its owners. have shlowin pru
kience in the management of all
i heir business affairs and are
men of integrity, good judg
mitent and ability.
You are invited to open an
(ount and to feel assured
zhey will safeguard your inter
ess. in every manner,
i PER CENT INTEREST ON
SAVINGS
YEGEN BROS. BANKERS
BUTTE, MONT.
CAPITAL $100000.O
acques Drug Co.
r'YE8SCITlPTION DRUGGISTS
e'hone 1109. 1057 Harrison r v..
v,.Rl Hall hr Preserlpttone
.VOTORCYCLE DELIVERY
Agency Webster's Home Remedies
,.,) "- w zt.a . m]tuil l. 4rtFi .eK
Patent Medicines, Ctgars
and Canitndi
t* .-tanatn Ktadesk' ndt *(iupitesa
- ve.lopine ar.t Prttsinag
Bulletin Want Ads Get
Result. Phone 52.
COIPERS ASKS
(Continued from Page One.)
The public group presented a roso-i
-:ion providing for a national arli
!ration board, appointed jointly by,
icngcrcss and r1h1 president, to in
clude all ex-presidents.
Secretary Wilson presented a plan
for a labor adjustment board in each
ilnlus ry. The resolution which the
'uublic group presented provides that
-iployers h;alli reco'n i on tbh richht
to organize. A report that the em
pl,,ye:rs' group \uwotuld noL be alole to
; resent any Iprlosals until tomor
iow, cu.us'd Unmilpors:to protest.
ie saidt the tolmm ittee of fifteen
'o.uld rot act intelligently until the
views of all groups were before it.
lembers of the employers' group
declaired the rules were responsible
or the delay. A. A. Landon, meim
her of the public group, proposed a
three months' national labor truce.
imllmediately terminating all strikes
and lockouts.
LUCILLE OIADD FILES
SUIT FOR DAMACES
Lucille HIoward this morning filed
suit against five Butte men for the
s;um of $13,215-the estimated val
ue of the liquor stolen from the cel
lar of 219 North Emmett street, on
the night of April 11. She also wants
an additional $1,000 to cover the
expense she has been put to in her
ati.mpts to recover her property.
Miss Howard valued her booze at
$75 per case of whisky and $5 per
bottle of Burgundy. She had rented
storage space in the cellar under the
residence of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur
(!lhapell and had placed the liquor
there until she would be ready to
cLhip it to Wyoming. she claimed But
on the night of April 11, she alleges
in her complaint. Joe D. Kelly, H. ri.
-Krause, W. L. Bacon, Matt Bilboa
and F. W. Miller .unlawfully seized
her property and made away with it.
Hence, the suit.
SAY YOU SAW IT IN BULLETIN
o ---------------- -
LABOR ENLISTS
MOVIES TO HELP
IN "CAMPAIGN"
e-
London, --By Mail.)-Labor prop
agetl(la pills with Charlie Chaplin
'jam to tickle the palate. is the scheme
of the Liverpool electrical trade un
ion and the local trade council, which
propose calling the movies to their
aid in electioneering.
The two bodies are considering the
(conaltrtion of a trade u0nioll moviei
p;,i 'a, at a coat of. $125.0i00, in which
ec,~oniiic tcxt-bhooks and the powers
of dl'bate will be tiinforced by filmr
(dIll ogling technical t:ndes, and the
,ive,ltolnent of lie labor inovement.
'IThe promloters . rccognize that prou
i,;anda alone will not fill the build
:ng, but with the assistance of
ic'hrlie Chaplin films. and other
tllt!tlar "movie st5ars,'" it is considl
cl :d a sound busiless proposition.
METAL TRADES SCAB
DIRECTORY
Cl'IY)E GILL, Silver Bow street.
sclabbing on pipefitters at the
Colorado mine.
E:I WELLS, former shifter. now
sharpening steel at Colarod mine.
-.-- BRENNEN, doing electrician's
work at the Spec.
CHET LAWERIENCE, 714 West
Broadway, scabbing on the ma
chinists at the Elm Orlu.
AL McCLAIN--Scabbing on black
smiths at the Black Rock.
FRANK SABLE--Scabbing on pipe
fitters at Black Rock, also scabbed
all during the miners' strike in
1917.
JIM SKIDD-Doing machinist work
at Timber Butte mill; 3100 block
Placer st.
JOE WATSON-Shift boss, doing
machinist work at Timber Butte
mill; 3100 Busch street.
BOB SLATER-Working on repair
gang at Black Rock mill.
J. C. STEPHENS--Working on re
pair gang at Black Rock mill.
D. E. YOUNG---Working on repalt
gang at Black Rock mill.
H. THOMPSON-Working on repair
gang at Back Rock mill.
ZUHAL-Working on repair gang at
Black Rock mill.
PAUL BESSO-Sharpening steel at
Black Rock mine; 52 Atlantih
street.
WILBUR VIVIAN-Working as pipe
fitter at Leonard mine; 1925 Flo
rida avenue, Butte.
STEWART WRIGHTSON--Scabbing
on pipefitter at Leonard mine; Mc
Queen addition.
JOSEPH BICHARDS-Shift boss.
doing blacksmith work at Paulin
mine; 49 Missoula avenue, Butte.
ALBERT CLARK-Shift boss, help
ing blacksmith at Paulin mine; 56
Missoula avenue, Butte.
aU. . QleU LtriLl Y -Doig macninist
and electrical work at Timber
Butte mine; 1145 West Antimony
street, Butte.
IR. McGILVARY-Doing machinist
and electrical work at Timber
Butte mill; 3041 Bush avenue,
Butte.
BERT CLARK-Sharpening steel at
Buffalo mine.
FREDI) MERRYAN - Shift boss,
sharpening steel at Tramway mine.
FRED BROCKLENS-Boilermaker
and machinist work at the Stewart
mine; lives at corner of Dakota
and Gold.
IIUG H GIBSON-Sharpening steel at
Never Sweat mine; 2537 Harvard
avenue.
JOE McNiULTY-Doing plumbers
work at the School of Mines; 2000
Utah avenue.
ED PLANAPH-Shift boss, sharpen
ing steel at the Pennsylvania mine.
MORII1S--)oing machinist work.
TIRUCE W ILLIAM-Doing machinist
work at the Elm Orlu.
('H-RIS WALKER-Sharpening steel
at the Elm Orlu.
L. A. SINKS--Sharpening steel at
the Elm Orlu.
JACK HODGE--Sharpening steel at
the Elm Orlu.
[AUDEN-Sharpening steel at the
Elm Orlu.
iO'NEIl--Convicted of murder in
Madison county; doing electrical
work at the North Butte mine.
LEW CARR--Shift boss, of the dia
mond drill workerg; repairing ma
chines; gunman in Deer Lodge in
1917; lives at the southwest cor
nor of Gaylord and Mercury.
-DAN McINTOSH--.Doing machinist
work at Southern Cross; this Tnan
a member of' the Typographical
union,
.IERRELL WILKENS-Doing ma
chinist work at the Mountain Con
mine.
WM. SEX--Sharpening steel at
Speculator mine; 1414 Schley ave
lle.
L. M. CORREL----A scab, Anaconda.
KENNETFI McKENZIE - A scab,
Anaconda.
IM. R. McIKENZIE-A scab; Ana
conda.
I. LEE WEISII-A scab; Anacon
da.
WILLIAM MITCIHELL-Shift boss
at Pittsmont. repairing machines
MARSHAL TULFORD-Scabbing on
the metal trades at Elm Orlu mine.
WILLIAM WAFSTEAD -- Scabbing
on machinists at Elm Orlu.
BURT' BRATTLUND-Stuart mine,
scabbing on machinists.
OLIE NORIFF- Scabbing on metal
trades at Mountain Con mine.
I. ,MAGNUSON--Scabbing on ma
chinists at the Pittsmont smelter.
I Lives in McQueen addition.
E. BIECKERE-Scabbing on machin
ists at the Pittsmont smelter.
Lives in McQueen addition.
SI-. C. PEALOW-535 West Silver
st rect, scabbing on the electricians.
This man worked a continuous
shift in 1917 at the Butte hoist
compressor. He stated to trial
board that he stayed on the Jqb
to keep the engineers from taking
the jurisdiction.
J. J. McGRATH-1156 West Silver
1 street. Another good scab;
worked during 1917; not satisfied
with scabbing for A. C. M.. he is
also scabbing at the Davis-Daly.
t ED DE MARS-125 West Galena;
commonly known as "Nig" De
I Mars. The electricians are sur
t prised at this man, as he was al-.
A ways considered a good fellow.
A JAP. name unknown, repaired
t hoisting engine on the 2,100-foot
level at the Stewart mine on
Oct. 7.
W. S. GUTHRTE-1106 West Plati
num street. scabbing at the Butte
hoist and compressor plant on the
electricians and mahlinists.
JOHN lHAMILTON---Lives on the
west side. Scabbire on the elec
tricians at the L.,unard. Com
monly known as "Hog Island
John'; :says he nel,-r had a card
and never will, and ,e guess he is
right.
The 'following shift bosses are
scabbing. at the Tramway:
CHAS E. POWEL, - Scabbing on
the ,horseshoers.
FRED MERHTING-Scabbing on the
blacksmiths.
CON ELBERT AND JACK GONI
NON-Scabbing on the machin
ist s
WARREN COLLIER. Harrison av
enue; scabbing on the black
smiths at Neverswna~i.
\NDREW ANDERSON is sharpening
steel at the Speculator..
'ING CONSION, alias "Tennessee,"
is scabbing on the machinists at
the Grey Rock.
TIM CONNELL and LETIIGH, both
shifters,. are scablbing on the
blacksmiths at the H.ll and Dia
mlond.
ODGER YOUNG, oiler. is scabbing
at the smelter in Anaconda. This
is the only one of the men on
strike who deserted the ranks and
went back to work.
PAT DOHERTY is scabbing on the
engineers, (the engineers are on
strike in Anaconda, not Butte-
Oh, no!), in the smelter in Ana
conda.
CHRIS STRAKAL -- Scabbing on
blacksmiths at Anaconda smelter.
WES'TLEY HAYS-Scabbing on en
gineers at Anaconda smelter.
IONATHAN SEWELL - Formerly
sup"rintendent power house, now
scabbing on engineers at Ana
conda.
IIM ALLEN-Repairing machines
on 1,200 level at Black Rock.
formerly worked at Travonia
imine; Centerville.
IH. W. U'NEII--Boss over all scabt
at Speculator; formerly boss nip
ner: East Second.
HARRY NORTHL-1412 4th street.
Walkerville; scabbing on black
smiths at the Elm Orhlu.
SAM 'SIE KOLMAN-- HIelping scab
Fullford at the Travonia mine:
this man was at the Elm Orlun, but
could not make good.
JIM WHITE-Still scabbing at the
Col rado.
AL ASIHIBURN-Scabbing on the
electricians at the Badger mine.
TIM HARRINGTON--Apex hotel;
this man scabbing on the elec
tricians at the Badger. We would
advise the electricians to take no
tice of this man as he has hopes
of being a journeyman some day.
AUBRY STEPHENS-209 Watson
avenue; scabbing on the elec
tricians at the Leonard mine. This
bird had a bright future ahead of
him before the strike.
AL CASTLE-Wall street: also
scabbing at the Leonard mine,
Plays bass in thin A. C. M. band.
and is a member of the Musicians'
union.
PAT DEVANEY, 110 Locust street,
at Neversweat; GEORGE DUN
CAN. 427 Hopkins street, Never
sweat, both scabbing on black
smiths.
LEO BENZ, 1548 Phillips avenue
scabbing at the Anaconda.
PAT LEARY, Centerville, scabbing
at the Anaconda.
KARIi. KRAFT, who lives on Second
street, is scabbing at the Moun
tain Con.
HIARRY SENNECK, 917 Nevada av
enue, scabbing at Pittsmont.
JOHN BALL. 153 East La Platte
stre.t; scabbing on the elec
tricians at the Gray Rock mine.
ANACONDA LIST
FAT C. DOUGHERTY-This man is
not scabbing, so he says, but is
scab instructor at the Anaconda
smelter, telling the ordinary scab
how to be a real scab.
D. R. GRUSH and LYNN LARSON
are ecabbing on the electricians at
the Anaconda smelter.
ST. G ERMAIN-Scabbing on the
engineers; WALTER ATKINSEN
scabbing on the electricians.
FRED ENGELMEN and JOE IVAN
KOVICH are scabbing on the pipe
fitters. Ivankovich was fired on
account of being an alien at one
time.
ARTHUR HALFERDAHL -- Scab
bing on the engineers.
MAI'I IN COPUNIS, FRANK OLD
ILAUDBER, and JACK SMITH, fire
chief, are scabbing ,on the elec
trieians.
The .'ollowing are draftsmen, but
are scabbing in several ' depart
nients of the smelter: YOUNG
I1AUlS. BASIL ELFORD, AL BIU
MEN, BERT FLEMMING, FAY
MILLER, VESTA SIMCOX. DOR
GAN, AL O'BRIEN, KLEPTKA
and PETE WALNER.
CARIL IORDAN, 933 W. Granite
street, Butte, son-in-law of Judge
Winston of Anaconda, scabbing on
electricians in the smelter in Ana
conda.
GREAT FALLS LIST
GEORGE EVANS, foreman of scabs
in the electrical shop and would
be 'trictrician.
GEORGE BATES, here-to-fore chem
ist at the laboratory, now doing
electrician's work at the wire mill.
JACK (Haywire) FINLEY--Secab
bing on the machinists in the shop.
JAMES BERKEY-Scabbing on the
blackl:miths.
JOE HANAHAN was a foreman in
the zinc plant but now thinks 'he
Is .in operator.
ED TitOMPSON---Trying to immi
tate a boilermaker.
DOCK MILLER-One of the lowest
scabs on the job, jack-of-all trades
and showing the company how the
men laid down on the job.
GUS i, .UMDAHL, blacksmith fore.
man, that has to do all the work
himself as Scab James Berky can't
S cut it.
b. t. QUIGGIN, the great B. & h
athlete and football star, now a
scant machinist.
CHARLES GETCHELL - Another
ehltetrician.
AND LAST RUT NOT LEAST, is
DI)A) YOUNG, the farewell engin
eer, that is preaching safety first
to the scabs and telling the public
how the company can operate
without the metal trades.
GREAT FALLS STRIKE COM.
WORKERS VS. CAPITALISTS
.STRIKE SNAP SHOTS
(Continued From Page Une.',
visit the Homestead mills by coi'
pany officials on the ground that it
might have a "demoralizing" effect
on those at work.
"Char" and old newslapers make
an awful smoke, we'll tell the world
* *
A sample of Steel Trust justice
was the recent "hearing" of com
plaints of riot and inciting to violence
against 17 strikers arrested the day
before the strike began at North
Clairton, Pa.
Burgess Thomas William, a com
pany official, was judge, the chief: of
police, the prosecuting attorney, and
the state Cossacks the complainants.
Despite the fact that all the 17
men were merely attending a mase
meeting before even a strike had
gone into effect, they were all held
in $1,000 bail each.
If not for William Brennan, a lo
cal attdrney and a former Working
man, they would still be in jail. He
furnishcd bail and they were re
leased.
The following one-act comedy took
place in --".-- alley, in Pittsburgh
noner (the dialogue is in Polish):
Villain........................ boss foreman
HIeroine....... ....A...... striker's wife
A milk bottle.
Cops ...............Pittsburgh's "finest."
More heroines.
A boss from Jones and Laughlin's
plant appears in the alley, it is early
morning, and asks two laborefs in
the court yard in a threatening voice:
"Why don't you go to work?"
A window opens, the heroine leans
out, shouting:
"We're all white men here, mister.
We won't go back to work until the
strike is won."
Boss looks up, sees the wife, and
shouts:
"You - ----- of a -- -, take
your head in!"
He reaches back to his hip pocket.
A milk bottle descends, hits him
and cuts his hand.
More windows fis open. More
white caps appear, more bottles de
scend---a.nd other utensils.
Boss beats a hasty retreat and goes
to nearby police station.
Returns in 15 minutes with two
policemen and explains the situation.
r...........
D -L IS WANTED
WITHOUT FAIL FOR THE
SMEN WHO ARE IN JAIL
Hundreds of workers are literally rotting in the jails of this country
because of their activiy in the cause of Labor. Many of these victimsun
of the world-wide class war are awating trial-and have been waiting
for many weary months for the speedy trial guarainteed them by the
United States Constitution. Others were tried and sentenced to terms
ranging from one to twenty years during the period of war hysteria,
and appeals in their cases are now being taken froin King Capital drunk
to King Capital sober.
Some of the prisoners have escaped by death, others are dying, mans
have contracted tuberculosis and other loathsome diseases, and all are
suffering untold agony from close confinement in the fetid atmosphere,
from insanitary and unhealthy surroundings, from poor and insufficient
food, and from inhuman treatment accorded them by brutalized guards.
Past attempts to secure bail for all of these workers in jail have not
been attended with great success because of the lack of system. In
dividuals sought to secure bail for their personal friends, and failing to
get the necessary amount they returned what had been collected, thus
making tlihir entire efforts fruitless. This was the condition facing the
delegates from all, the western district organizations of the Industrial
Workers of the World when they met in conference on July 3 and 4 in
Seattle. The delegates solved the problem by an unfailing means
Organization.
A Bail and Bond Committee was elected to systematize the work of
collecting bail and a nation-wide drive has been started to secure the
loan of cash, Liberty Bonds and property sufficient to gain the release
of all class war prisoners. With practically no advertising Six Thou
sand I)ollars were raised in the first five days. More than Two Hun
dtired Thousand Dollars are needed to release those now being held for
their Labor activity.
Stuns of Five Dollars and up are accepted as loans. and all cash, Lib
erty Bonds or property is tabulated in triplicate, one copy going to the
person making the loan, another being retained by the Bail and Bond
Committee, and the thiird being filed with the Trades Union Savings
and Loan Association of Seattle, with whom all funds, bonds and prop
erty schedules will be banked.
only those who have been proved loyal and trustworthy are being
sent out as collectors. Everything possible has been done to safeguard
tli's bail and bond fund, from the selection of the committee to the
choice of the bank. A portion of the fund is being set aside to return
loans on demand in case persons who have made them are forced to
leave the country or have other reasons for making a withdrawal.
Bail will be used to release specified persons where that is desired,
but otherwise the release will take place by a blind drawing of names,
thur insurina fairnecss to all prisoners. By common consent the men
in Wichita, Kansas, jail will first be released, as they have been held
the longest and jail conditions are worse there than anywhere else in
the entire country. This bail has nearly all been subscribed, and the
men will hbe made accredited collectors when released, and their speedy
release will help to set olhers at. liberty.
No necessity exists for argument. Your duty is clear. If your ears
are not deaf to a call from your class, if you feel that an injury to one
is an injury to all, if there burns within you the faintest spark of human
ity. ynu will see that the men do not remain behind the bars an un
necessary minute because you withheld your support.
THEY ARE WILLING TO lIVE THEIR LIVES FOR YOU!
ARE YOU WILLING TO LOAN YOUR DOLLARS TO THEM?
Send all cash, checks and bonds to John L. Enodaht, Secretary of Ball
and Bond Committee, Box W, Ballard Station, Seattle.
Property schedules should he filed with Attorney Ralph S. Pierce,
Room 607 Central Building, Seattle.
Butte Office, 318 N. Wyoming St., A. S. Embree, Bond and Rall
delegate.
CASUALTIES ON THE
VARIOUS FRONTS
WORKERS.
Killed Wounded
Farrell ...................... 4 11
Buffalo ........................ I
Newcastle ....-...... ........ -
Pitt ,burgh ........... 9 2
Gary ..... .... ........... .. 2
San Francisco 1
Oakland ................... 6 18
CAPITALISTS.
Killed. W'nded.
None. None.
Note:--The wounded column
contains only those seriously in
jured, some of whom will die.
There are many hundreds suffer
ing from minor wounds.
First Bluecoat: "Say, Mike, this
looks like business."
Second Bluecoat: "I'll say it
does."
Both grin, take tne boss by the
arm, and walk out.
Windows open, heroines appear.
"---- ? !!$&.,.. ::;:?(*£* *)??"
Curtain.
Michael Mestrovich, organizer for
the steel strikers in Clairton, Pa.,
whose life was threatened by Vigil
antes in an anonymous letter, is still
on the job, despite the fact that he
has been arrested 10 times and is
under $2,500 bail. The letter he re
ceived was written on a typewriter
in red, and reads as follows:
"While our boys were risking their
lives fighting the kaiser, what were
you doing?
"You were an alien enemy then
and you are an alien enemy now
We don't want any of your kind
around here.
':"If$ 'ou want to save your worth
less hide you had better leave this
place before sundown tomorrow.
"VIGILANCE COMMITTEE."
Mike is a Rumanian and one of
Ihe best speakers the International
Mill, Mine and Smelter Workers
union has. Being a Rumanian, he
could not be an "alien enemy," but
that cuts little figure with the steel
trust gunmen.
Recently the state troopers con
fiscated the automobile with which
Mike had been supplied in order to
cover the district, and they used it
for patrol work any gave it up only
when legal proceedings were threat
ened.
Franik P. Walsh looked in on the
situation when he came to Pittsburgh
in the party of Pres:aent De Valera
of the Irish republic. He has volun
teered his services to the national
committee.
EACH WINNING PLAYER
WILL RECEIUE S5,513
(Bulletin's Special Service.)
Chicago, Oct. 9.--The players'
share of thel receipjts of the first five
games of the world's series reaches
the grand total of $360,349.66, ac
cording to the unofficial figures.
The winning team will divide $117,
157.35. while the losers will split
$78,104.90. The New York Na
tionals and the Cleveland Aniericans,
who finished second in their respec
tive leagues will divide $39,052.45.
The Chicago Nationals and the New
York Americans will split $26.
034.96, for having run third in their
leagues.
Provided that each of the 23
I players on the team will share
equally, each of the winners will
take down $5,093.79, while each of
the losers will replenish his poke
r with the sum of $3,395.86. The
players on the New York Nationals
r and the Cleveland Americans will
e °ach receive $848.96, while each
ilayer on the Chicago Nationals and
.1 he New York Americans will have
$565.97 to spend.
3 Yesterday's game was the last in
which the players will share.
TWO MORE WORKERS
(IContinued From Page One.)
e the ban on peaceful picketing and on
t peaceful mass meetings for address
I ing strikers.
The strike leaders say they intend
to wage a strong fight for The right
to hold mass meetings where they
h now are barred.

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