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The Butte daily bulletin. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1918-1921, October 14, 1919, Image 1

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FOO V FAMIE IN N. _ /
Threatens as Result of Almost Complete Traffic Tieu
TELEPHONES l WE PREACH THE CLASS STRUGGLE IN THE INTERESTS OF THE WORKERS AS A CLASS I SUBSCRIPTION
Business Office-- ..2 2RATE
Editorial Rooms ...... 292 One Month$. 00
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Subscribers Will Confer a Fay- Six Months....... 00
orh by Calling 52 When Paper
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(iL. ..- ,.I'\ 1. ThlSI .1 PRICE FIVE CE 1NTS
GARY'S COSSACKS SHOOT AND BEAT WORKERS
YOUNGSTOWN STEEL COSSACKS
RUTHLESSLY CLUB WORKERS
(Special United Press Wire.)
Youngstown, 0., Oct. 14.-One man was shot, many
were beaten and several were arrested when the strik
ers and the police clashed at the plant of the Carnegie
Steel company here early today.
The rioting was precipitated when the police attempt
ed to disperse a crowd of men who were stoning work
ers attempting to return to work.
Youngstown, O.. Oct. 1 4.--Despite
expectations of trouble following dis
orders early yesterday, last night.
passed quietly in the Mahoning valley
district.
While the steel mill heads declared
many men had returned to work, Sec
retary J. F. 'McFadden of the strik
ers asserted his men were still hold
ing firm and backed his assertion by
showing that of 37,000 who had quit
in the district at Youngstown, East
Youngstown and Lowellville, only
6,000 had returned to work. Esti
mates place the number of aliens who
have left Youngstown since the,
strike began at 3,000. In order to'.
take their places the companies have
their places the companies have
started an influx of cheap negro la-'
hIon fromi the south.
Pittsburgh. Oct. 14.--Strike lead
ors today denied the assertions of the
steel companies that the strikers'
ranks were being depleted. All ofli,
the strike leaders expressed general
satisfaction with the situation and t
said they had had no reports of any
considerable number of men desert-il
ing to the companies. They statedit
instead. the reports showed that the l
strikers were presenting a practical-I,
ly unbroken front. !
Reports front throughout the
Pittsburgh district last night gave
evidences of no serious disorders.
BAILBOAD COMPANY IS
ROBBED OF $500,00
Chicago, Oct. 1.1.--Charged with
having stolen furs, laces, silks, shoes
and wearing apparel to the value of 1
more than $500,000, two formerj
employes of the Michigan Central
railroad were arrested here last
night. The Wmen arrested are Hler
burt Musseliman. 24, formerly a fire-.
man on the road, and Frank Durkel,
::It, formerly a brakeman. Six other
men already had been arrested in
connection with the alleged series of
robberies from the railroad company.
A woman, who is said to have dis
posed of the stolen furs, is still at
liberty.
It is alleged by the authorities
that the stolen goods were disposed
of through a fictitious firm oper
ated by the robbers.
AUSTlRALIAN LOAN IN D)OUBT.
Brisbane, Australia, Oct. 14.-
References to a reported loan of
£3,000,000 in the United States for
the benefit of the state of Queens
land mamde in the legislative assembly
list F:iday, have neither been denied
nor confirmed by the state treasurer.
TO SELL BIG BONID ISSUE.
Billings, Oct. 14.--Bids will be
received by the Yellowstone county
commuissioners on Jan. 1., for the
$250,000 bond issue voted Sept. 2,
for road purposes.
Blockade of Soviet Russia
Is Declined on Principle
(Special United Press Wire.)
Berlin, Oct. 14.-The allies have
proposed an international blockade
against soviet Russia. The sugges
tion was made to Germany in a note
which was also addressed to Austria
and neutral countries.
The note a ked what measures
Germany was prepared to take in as
sisting in the movement. At first it
was officially stated here that Ger
many was willing to co-operate, but
was incapable of extensive measures.
The feeling later, however, ex
pressed by responsible authorities,
was that Germany ought to decline
as a matter of principle.
It was stated that Germany would
likely reply that she could not be a
PALMER WILL
SUPPRESS THE
RADIC-ALS
Among Laboring Classes,
Maybe-A Six Months'
Truce Proposed as 61iii
tion for Present Unrest.
Philadelphia, Oct. 14.-Speaking!
at a Columbus day meeting here last
night, Attorney General Palmer is
sued a threat that all the power of
the department of justice would be
used to suppress "radicalism" in the
United States among the laboring
classes. He asserted the present la
bor unrest was "due to misunder
standing" and suggested that a six
months' truce would settle the un-I
rest.
He also reiterated his intention to
make war on the profiteers.
PASSPODT RESTRICTIONS
TO BAR OUT RADICALS
(Special United Press Wire.)
Washington, Oct. 14.----In order to
keep expected thousands of "radi
cals and other undesirable aliens"
out of the country, the house foreign i
affairs committee favorably reported
t.he resolution extending for a year
after the ratification of the peace I
treaty the war-time passport restric
tions.
The action was taken at the re
quest of Secretary Lausing, who pre
sented consular reports to the com
'nitte' showing that foreign agita
tors and others already were con
gregated at foreign ports to flock
to the United States as soon as the
wartime passport ban was lifteu by
the proclamation of peace.
The congressional plans are to
frame restrictive legislation before
the end of an extended period of
wartime ban.
AMERICAN STEAMER BURNED.
London, Oct. 14.-The steamer
Mount Hood, an American vessel,
was totally destroyed by fire in the
port of Montevideo, says a dispatch.
The Mount Hood was built last year
at Portland, Ore.
GETS $8 PER DAY.
Sacramento, Calif.. Oct. 14.
Carpenters in this city have nego
tiated a new wage rate, and they are
now paid $8 a day.
party to the action which would re
sult in a starvation blockade such as
she herself suffered. Germany is ex
pected to point out to the allies that
the anti-bolsheviki elements would
suffer as much under the blockade as
the bolsheviki.
WOODEN LEG FOR WEAPON.
(Special United Press Wire.)
New York. Oct. 14.-When some
people get bested they run away.
But -lot James Toulas. He pulled
off his wooden leg and smashed it
over the head of his assailant.
WEATHER FORECAST.
For Butte, fair.
AL DlERMAN WIL L
SHAVE LiVELY
SESSION
The Old Kelly Garbage Deal
to Come Up Again, Along
With Other Pets Favored l
by the Insiders.
A !ively session is predicted for
the city council at the next regular
meeting Wednesday night. '1 here
are a lot of important and vexing
questions to thresh out.
For one thing, the mayor will
seek confirmation of his recently
announced appointment of John Le
gare as market master. The ladies
of the Consumers' league will not
tell a reporter what they think about
the appointment---but they assert
that they will tell the mayor next
\Wednesday night.
The bids on ash and garbage are
to be olpenetl and considered. 'There
is the report to be received from
5, the committee which has been look
ing for winter quarters for the mar
8 ket.
There is to be an earnest attemnpt
upton the part of the local milk trust,
aided by the Butte Miner, to get a
new milk ordinance through thi
Scouncil which will pro\en the con
tig sumters from buying milk direct
from the farmers on the city mnarket
s- at 10 cents per quart. This council
of bill will be camouflaged as an honest
effort to ensure pure and ttundiluted
e milk to restaurast patrons. The
Ia hyprocrisy of that pretense is made
r_ anifest by a perusal of the present
ix- crdinatie, passed in 1915, which
n- endowed the officials with ample
power to achieve the purpose which
to they now claim is so dear to their
hearts, but which they never worried
about until after Mr. Krame' of
Belgrade wanted to sell his milk on
the city market.
TheI city milk inslpector does not
need a new ordinance to enable himit
. to compel the restaurants to sell
pure milk in individual, sealed bot
ties. The present ordinance, if it
were tnforced, would require that.
But the local milt trust does need
to a new ordinance to keep the farmers
di- from selling their milk on the city
gi tContinued on Page Two.)
COAL MINERS' STRIKE NOV. 1
WILL BE GREATEST IN HISTORY
(Special United Press Wire.)
Spokane, Wash., Oct. 14.--Charges
of "wilful and malicious murder,"
"suppression of the truth," "brib- l
ery of legislative and judicial branch
es of the government," "refusal to
arbitrate," "deceit and evasion,"
were hurled at the "American capi
talistic monarchy" by President
Short of the Washington Federation
of Labor, at a meeting of the labor
council last night. President Short
had just returned from the east.
He declared "the coal miners will
no doubt be engaged in the greatest
strike in American history Nov. 1."
WOULD AVERT STRIIKE.
(Special United Press Wire.)
Washington, Oct. 14. - Steps to
avert the threatened bituminous coal
miners' strike are being considered
by the senate interstate commerce
committee. The senators explained
the unions have an agreement to
work under the present wage scale
until the war is officially ended. The
issue, said the senators, now is
whether the miners will stand by that
contract or declare it invalid by rea
son of the ending of the war.
Director General Hines of the
railroad administration says "the
railroads will be forced to stop run
ning within 10 days after the strike
is started."
('OAL MINERS WARNED.
(Special United Press Wire.)
Washington, Oct. 14.-The miners
in the bituminous coal regions who
have threatened to strike November
1, were warned that their contract
with the government is binding and
should be fulfilled, in a statement
iissued by Senator Freylinghausen,
SCRAF ISMEN 1
ON STRIKE
VOTING
Whether or Not Metal
Tradesmen Will Return to
Work, Will Be Known To
morrow at 10 a. m.
The unions comprisiing the
metal tr.adles of Anaconda, Butte
and Great 'Falls, this afternoon
are taking a vote on whether
the1' shall return to vorr oil the
tetlls of the m lingiu copanll.its.
The vote, the fourth to be
taken, was ordered by the statell
extecutiv\e board upon request.
The rcferenlttum is open only
to those who wtrel aff'cted by
the strike order.
T.Ie lotijng started at noon
tod;ty and will tot.tclude at N
o'clock this e.venlilti, and the re
sult will t)be attnnounced ,tt 1t1
o'(tiot k totIorrow morningIiili by
Prihident Jamens F. O'lBrien.
Owing- to the fact that Lab:or
C'o0 i:isione* Thomalls ('ohope,
speaking for the mining com
panies, ha .. guaranteed thei
statlle eXecutIivie board that there
will he no discriminat ion, the
view is expressed by somte of
t.ho:i active in the strlike that
the vote will be favorable to a
reinurn to work.
KING ,ALBERT. SIG NS
SCRAP OF PAPER
Paris, Oct. 14.-The peace. con
ference yestetrd'ay received a re
port of the ratification of tho
pelace tre.aty by King Albert of
I HlelgiHum. The internatJoild aerial
navigation agretnment was signed
yesterday by 12 states, among
them several South American re
- Ill)! ifs.
chairman of the senate committee in
vestigating the coal situation.
President Wilson's cabinet, with
Secretary Lansing presiding in the
HOUSE ILL, TOO, WHOSEI
IN CHARGE NOW?
New York, Oct,. 14.--Col. E.
M. liouse, President Wilson's
conl'idenltial advisor, who was
remocveid to his homne illunedi
ately after his arrival fromt
Europe on Sunday because of
illnes,. was reported this morn
ing to have improved consider
ably. Alnouncement was made
that Ithe colonel's illness was duC
to 'gallstones complicated by a
severe cold. The colonel expects
to recover sufficiently to visit
SWas:hington within a week.
WILSON'S CONFERENCE
IN CONFUSION
(Spr'ial United Press )Vire.)
laLiouington, Oct. 14.-The in
ductrial conference was thluuiow'
into confusion and compelled to
adjourn shortly after convening
this lftelrnoon by the proposal of
('hairman Thomas Chadbourne
of tih central committee of fit
teen, that six members of the
confeie nce be delegated to act
as an arbitration board not only
for Ihe .teel strike, but for all
big idlu-trial disputes now otn.
HOUUN TIABL
CONFERENCE
FUTILE
Wilson's Selections Do Not!
Wish to Offend Czar Gary
by Meddling in the Steel
Strike.
(Special United Press Wire.)
Washington, Oct. 14.----The cenutral
committe.e of the industrial confer
once today reported to the full con
lerence the resolution calling for mile
diation in the steel strike. The re
port failed to recommend the reso
lution.
At the opening of the conference
today it was expected that the reso
lution proposing mediation would
meet the samte fate before the fulll
confeencec as it did in the central
commnittee. The failure of the coin-i
mittee to report the resolution fa-1
uorably was caused by the deter
ninied opposition of a majority of
five mtmnbers of the employers'
group in the central- comrlmttee' .
It was understoi.t-that. W-ttrong i
majority of the employers' groupli in
the full conference was oppostled to
imediti ion and it was consitdered
probatbl that the group representing
the public would also be against in
rervetion fromlll the fact that, so
many members of that group are in
reality large employers thefmselv:s.
It was learned that "out of dletf
crence to their chairman, Elbort ti.
tle y. chairtman of the, execulive
board of the United States Steel cor
poration." the conference groupi
'representing" the public had never
discussed the steel strike at any of
the grotup conferences, It was ex
pected, however, that thie "public
group" including Mr. Gary. Jiohn D.
l.ockofeller Jr., Thomas C(hadbourlner,
and others, would consider the
strike during a reaess period today
and would probably align themselves:
with the employers' group againsl
the mediation proposal.
It was pointed out that in the em
ployers' group only the agricultural
replresentatives favored the mtdia
lion proposal.
Chairman Chadbourne of the coun
tral committee, in mtaking the report
(Continued on Page Two.)
- ausencel 01 tI1 presiuent. today tir
cussed the threatened strik. of coal
It illers, the sugar shortage and the'
general labor situation. It was de
(ided lhat Secretary of Labor Wilson i
should handle any federal action
looking toward the prevention of the
miners' strike.
The matter of the sugar shortage
was referred to Secretary of Agricul
ture Houston.
ONE-DAY STRIKE WINS.
Los Angeles, Oct. 14.--The union
cigar makers won their strike for an
increase in just one day. As a re
sult of their brief battle they will re-!
ceive an increase of $3 per thousand
for 10-cent cigars and $2 for 5-cent'
cigars immediately. After Nov. S
:an additional $2 will be added on
every thousand 10-cent cigars and $1
on every thousand 5-cent cigars.
THIN(GS TO WORRY ABOUT.
Vienna, Oct. 14.--Coalition parties
have reached an agreement as to the
Austrian constitution,, according to
official statements issued by Chan
cellor Renner. Under the terms of*
the agreement, Austria will, comprise,
one federal state, while the German
parts of West Hungary will be recog-I
nized as an autonomous state.
PEASANTS OPPOSE TROOPS.
Paris, Oct. 14.-Dispatches from:
Rome indicate that the armed resist-'
ance of peasants of Sicily to govern-'
ment troops is increasing. Armed
bands of peasants are said to be,
roaming about the rural districts en
gaged in guerrilla warfare with tihe
troops. Reports state that 30 deaths
have occurred in the fighting.
EXPRESS WORKERS GO OUT IN
LONGSHOREMEN'S WAGE FIGHT
New Y, rk. Oet. 14.-. T-he intention of the striking long
shoremeni to remnairn l strike was made so.evident by thou.
sallnds of the strikers who had crowded into Cooper Union hall
last nilght that internatiunal oflicers who had called the meet
ing to have thie men \vote 1on the question of going back to work,
abalndoned their pla.ns for taking the ballots.
The \walkout yesterday of 11,000 teamsters. motor truck
drivers and helpers employed by the American Railway Express
company caused the compaIny to place an embargo on all ex
riess packages entering or leaving New York. The addition of
GERMINS' 1 EN
AlIDING THE
BILSHEVIKI
I n t e rnational Capitalists
Quarreling Over Antici
pated Spoils in, Soviet
Controlled Russia.
Berlin, Oct. 14.-Official denial of
allegations contained in the Lettisll
appeal to the entente that German
troops were supporting the Russian
bolsheviki in the Baltic lprovinces and
thiat the Germans had attacked the
I etts in the rear, has been made.
The German denial declares em
phatically that while the German
troops in the Baltic region have done 1
! nothing to hinder the Letts or to as-:
sist the bolsheviki, the Lettish troops,
f on the contrary, have delayed and h
- lindered the return to Germany of
Sthe Germans by hostile and overt
Sacts. The denial asserts the Lettish
j appeal to the entente is contrary to
' the truth and that it was made ap-I'
parently with the intention of ex
Sciting agitation against Germany.
SPAR LAKE TROUT
INCREASE RAPIDLY !
Libby. Oct. 14.---Trout in Sparl
-!lake have multiplied so rapidly that
Ifood in the lake is insufficient to
' feed ihem properly and the fish are
suffering from malnutrition. Because
of this condition the state game and
fish ,lepartment has issued permis
sion :o the Troy Rod and Gun club
to seine a certain quantity of the
trout.
TWELVE REMAIN IN
BIG AERIAL DERBY
(Special United Press Wire.)
New York, Oct. 14.---Twelve ofe
the 63 aviators in the air derby have!
completed the first half of the;
: "across the continent and back"
t aerial derby. Seven have landed at
.e San Francisco and five at Mineola.
-Ninet,,en are out of the race, eight
i having crashed.
.o BESS TiRIAL BEGINS.
Columbus, Mont.,. Oct. 14.--The
atrial of Elijah Bess, charged with
l; the murder of Jake Lyons, a well
known local stockman at Nye, was
scheduled to begin in district court
here Iis morning. Lyon's body was
Ln tounlll last spring near a fence sepal'
n ating the Lyons and Bess ranches.
a- It is charged that Bess shot Lyons
"- in a dispute over the fence locations.
di
SSuggestions That He Step
Aside Resented by Wilson
(Special United Press Wire.)
Washington, Oct. 14.-Investiga
tion by the United Press in an effort
;to ascertain just how ill President
Wilson is and whether the many rumi
ors regarding his condition have any
foundation in fact, shows the follow
ing results:
Officials close in touch with per
sons who frequently see the presi
dent declare they believe he will be
back at his desk in a month or six
weeks.
No matter what may have caused
his illness he is getting well now and
has been Showing steady improve
mnent the last week, according to best
information at the White House.
Senators in good standing at the
viug VNtW OrK. 'Tile addition Of
the railway express workers to 50.
g 00) longshoremen, and other thou
Ssands of ferry boat workers and
tugboat men; has tied up New York
harbor tightly and the city faces a
serious food shortage.
EXPULSION DEMANDED.
New York, Oct. 14.-Heads of
three international -unions affected
by the lockout and strike of the
printing trades here have forwarded
letters to President Samuel Gompers
demanding the expulsion from the
American Federation of Labor of the
Central Federated Union of New
York, unless the latter organization
withdraws its "sympiith.y and sup
port" from- the "outlawed" press
men's and pressfeeders' unions.
COPS HAVE NO RIGHT.
Washington, Oct. 14.-Under, the
itterms of a bill passed by the house
n yesterday, members of the District. 'if
n Columbia mettopolitan police are
I forbidden to join labor unions. The
e policeinen last week voted to return
the chliarter , granted them by the
-American Federation of Labor.
.C STRIKE WHILE KING IS ABSENT.
Brussels, Oct. 14.-The strike of
street car employes entered on its
i third day today with no cars in oper
Si ation. Demonstrations by the strik
h ers have taken place. Hundreds of
motor cars are being used in efforts
to relieve the situation.
MORE WORRY FOR GOMPERS.
Jersey City, N. J., Oct. 14.-Eleven
hundred employes of Swift & Co,'s
local plant last night voted to strike
('this morning to enforce demands for
a 25 per cent wage increase. Nearly
half the strikers are women.
ENGLISH SOCIALISTS JOIN
THIRI INTERNATINALE
London, Oct. 14--By an over
whelmning majority the British
socialist party has decided to sever
connections with the international
socialist bureau and to join hands
with the third communist interna
i tionale, established by the commun
ie ist congress held at Moscow last
le January.
'" The program of the communist in
at ternationale, as reported from
a. Zurich, is to convoke a congress of
t a new revolutionary internationale,
based partly on the ideals of the
Russian communist and bolsheviki
parties and the German spartacans.
ie
Ph STUMP, SPLINTER, SHOCK, DEAD.
rt (Special United Press Wire.)
as Spokane, Oct. 14.-William Sloley
r- dynamited a stump two weeks ago.
±s. A splinter struck him in the leg.
as He died, due to shock, physicians
. Iav
White House and who are presumed
to have free access to information
there, say he is now handling some
executive business.
Reports that he will never cq~i
pletely recover and suggestions that
he step aside .and let the vice .pes
ident act, are condemned in admitis
tration cirQles as political torpedoes
designed .to shake the faith of :his
supporters in the league of nations.
Although, there has been no tfl
cial dental of( eports that he suffer
ed a lesion of the brain, a blood clot
or apoplexy, the impression givena is
that what;caUsed the illness ie-t not,
the main Consideration now; that he
,Contihued on Page TwO,)

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