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The Butte daily bulletin. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1918-1921, October 15, 1919, Image 4

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Isues a.7sy hreala, Ezept Sunday, by THE 5U8L4TIZ UDBLIsmING CO.
eed as See.Clae Matter Deaember 18, 1917, at the Postoeor at Batte, Maotsna
. ier Ast of Mareh 8, 2779.
PHONES: Dualness Ol.s, s2; Editorial Roio, In
UStmasu OPICEO AND EDITORIAL ROOMS. 101 8OUTH IDAHO STREET
SOB87TBfRTIPON RIATUs
One Month............................$1.00 Six Months ...........................$5.00
Three Months ....................$2.75 By the Year ....................$9.50
The Daily Bulletin in on sale every day at the following places in Butte.
Jacques Drug Co., Harrison and Cobban Depot Drn* Store. 8,8 East Treot St.
George A. Ames, Jr., 818 1 2 N. Main St. P. O. Newe 8tand, West Park St.
International News Stand, S. Arisona St.
Palace of Sweets. Mercury and Main Ste. Harkins' GOreery, 1028 Talbet Ave.
Everybody's News Stand, 215 S. Montana Helena Cofectioney, 7588 East Park SL
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1919.
A CONTRAST.
Eugene V. Debs, whose entire span of life has been devoted
to making the life of each individual precious not only for him
self but to his neighbors, who has struggled incessantly
through long years that the lives of the toilers might be made
more fruitful, happy and beautiful; D)ebs, whose voice has al
w\\ays spoken the truth simply and heartily, whose every word
and action has been in behalf of the oppressed and downtrodl
den; Pebs, whose interpretation of the tragic events of the la :t
four or five years has been given the stamp of approval by sub
sequent. events and by the utterances of those high in Ithe
world's councils; I)ebs, the friend of ALL' mankind, in the last
days and nights of life's autumn, is confined in a prison cell in
Atlanta, forced to work long hours at toil beyond his physical
capacity, placed there by agencies created and controlled by a
maker of empty phrases and glittering forms of speech, a mos
ter of rhetoric, both useless and puerile, the sponsor, it' not
the author, of a world afflicted today with the tyrannies of
Satan, hideous wars, horrible massacres, the arrogance of
wealth-history's monumental disappointment, the champion
grief giver of all time-Woodrow Wilson.
Debs-Broken in health, but undaunted in spirit and mind,
spends his nights and days behind prison bars, without that
kindly attention and loving care, which is the rightful heritage
of all. Unattended and unheralded, save by prison guards,
Debs' last. life chapter is being enacted beneath the shadow ol
prison walls because he dared speak the truth, at a time when
the world was filled with cowards; because he refused to com
promise with wrong, the body of the noblest Roman of them
all is confined, but his spirit, unconquerable and unyielding,
will live forever, and he an inspiration to a future world of d
freemen.
\'ilson-Broken bothl in body and mind, disappoinited ani
disillusioned himself, whose acts are execrated by millions of
miserable and grief-stricken people, is attended by a retinue of
specialists and given all the attention which unlimited money
and power can command.
Future historians will do justice to both, and designate
which is the MAN-the benefactor of mankind.
But we prefer to proclaim him now-Eugene V. Debs!
THE BRITISH STRIKE.
Considerqible disappointment is manifested over the outcome
of the Brit'sh strike which ended a few days ago. It was
thought by those who earnestly desire the coming of revolu
tion that the order to quit work was the trumpet call for the
onset which should forever end the capitalist system in Eu
rolpe. Particularly did they look a tn hope and pray for suc
cess, because, involvedl in the demands of the Britisli workers
was that clarion (call of international solidarity, "lland(s off
Russia!" The strike, however, closed without any of these I
Inng-wished for events, and the terms, not very clear at this
distance, seem to indicate that some sort of a compromise was
reached.
There is no need for, disappointment, however. The strike
committee seem to have understood the nature of the case very
clearly and to have acted with admirable skill and generalshil,
and whatever wails of rage may emanate from' those whose
pleasant task is to formulate the theoretical position only, it
seems certain that tihe destinies of the working-class of Britain
are in pretty safe hands.
Many people watched the comb)at with ardent expectancy
and no doubt looked for the full development of proletarian C
strength at the very outset, with the resultant spectacular con
flict beltween the political government and the economic pow- I
er of all the workers, regardless of Iie misery involved and the I
risks undertaken. That they were disappointed is indeed a
fortu nate thing. t
There seems to be a tendency among enthusiasts to overlook
vital points which remain hidden during time of peace, but
which become startlingly apparent to students the moment
hostilities are declared, and if the law ,i' combinations were as
well understood as the 1 i points are not, working class act'ion
and theory would be enriched thereby.
This law of combinations is unfailing in its effects, as it is
in its working out. For instance, one individual going.fortlh to
slaughter another is a common murderer, no matter tmiat.
other circumstances are involved. Increase the size o0 the I
group until it ranges between 10 and a few hundred ani. they I
become banditti still, however unlawful and proscribed. but
increase the aggregate until it runs to thousands or milli;ns I
and you have an army of heroes either dying or killing, for the
honor of their country or the everlasting existence of deioc- 1
racy. The activities of the one, the hundred and the mill ion,
are substantially the same, but, by mere increase in the urmu
ber of units involved the whole status of the case has been re -
versed and from ruffians of the deepest (ldye they have become
heroes of purest caliber.
This law applies with equal force to strikes. Let one mani
quit his job and he is exercising his alienable right to disp, se
of his labor power as he pleases. Let the number be increaseti
in combination to a few hundred or thousand or a number of
groups of the same size acting independently, and you have a
strike, which the supreme court of the nation declares to be a
right of the people concerned, but let the whole organized
labor movement of one country quit work and the status of t!;
thing is changed completely. By a mere aggregation of units
you have once more worked the trick, by an increase in quan
tity you have produced a change in quality. Your individual
quits, exercising his right to do so, your group of individuals.I
quit anrd you have a strike, but your whole working class quitst
and you have a rebellion.
You have changed your battle ground from the industrial to
Union Stock Holders in the
BUTTE DAILY BULLE TIA
UNITED MINE WORKERS OF AMERICA-Locals: Sand Coulee,
Stocket, Roundup, Lehigh, Klein, 'Washoe, Red Lodge, Smith
(Bear Creek).
FEDERAL LABOR UNION-Livingston, Great Falls.
MACHINISTS' UNION-Great Falls, Butte, Livingston, Seattle.
CEREAL WORKERS-Great Falls.
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION-Butte.
BLACKSMITHS' UNION-Butte, Miles City, Seattle.
ELECTRICIANS' UNION-Livingston, Deer Lodge, Butte, Anaconda,
Seattle.
BAKERS UNION-Great Falls.
SHOE WORKERS-Great Falls.
PLASTERERS' UNION-Great Falls.
RAILWAY CAR REPAIRERS-Livingston, Miles City.
MUSICIANS' UNION-Butte.
BREWERY WORKERS' UNION-Butte.
HOD CARRIERS' UNION-Butte, Bozeman, Helena, Seattle.
STREET CAR MEN'S UNION-Butte, Portland.
BARBERS' UNION-Butte.
METAL MINE WORKERS' UNION-OF AMERICA.
PRINTING PRESSMEN'S UNION-Butte.
MAILERS' UNION-Butte. I
STEREOTYPERS AND ELECTROTYPERS' UNION-Butte.
BRIDGE AND STRUCTURAL IRON WORKERS-Butte.
PIPEFITTERS' UNION-Butte.
BROTHERHOOD BOILERMAKERS AND HELPERS-Butte, and
Livingston.
STEAM AND OPERATING ENGINEERS-Great Falls.
BUTCHERS' UNION-Great Falls.
BAKERS' UNION-Butte.
INTERNATIONAL MOLDERS' UNION, LOCAL NO. 276-Butte.
LAUNDRY WORKERS' UNION-Butte, Seattle.
PLUMBERS' UNION-Butte, Seattle.
BROTHERHOOD RAILWAY CAR MEN OF AMERICA, LOCAL NO
224-Miles City.
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCTI--Miles City.
BROTHERHOOD RAILWAY CAR MEN OF AMERICA, COPPER'
LODGE NO. 430- Butte.
BUTTE FOUNDRY WORKERS UNION-Butte.
PAINTERS' UNION-Butte, Seattle.
CARPENTERS' UNION NO. 1335-Seattle.
TAILORS' PROTECTIVE ASSOCIATION-Butte, Portland.
BOILERMAKERS, SHIPBUILDERS AND HELPERS OF AMERICA
-Tocamo, Seattle, Livingston.
INTERNATIONAL BROTHERHOOD OF BLACKSMITHS AND HELP.
ERS, LOCAL NO. 211-Seattle.
WORKERS', SOLDIERS' AND SAILORS' COUNCIL-Painters' Hall,
Seattle.
BTTILDING LABORERS' UNION-Seattle.
INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BRIDGE AND STRUCTURAL
IRON WORKERS AND PILEDRIVERS' LOCAL NO. 86-Seattle.
INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF MACHINIST HELPERS-Butte
BROTHERHOOD OF RAILWAY TRAINMEN, NO. 580, BUTTE.
MILLMEN'S UNION-Seattle.
CARPENTERS' LOCAL UNION, NO. 1172Billings, Montana.
TEAMSTERS' UNION-Local 135, Billings, Mont.
BROTHERHOOD CARPENTERS AND JOINERS-Local 1172; Bill
ings, Mont.
MILLMEN'S UNION-Seattle, Wash.
TEAMSTERS' UNION-Billings.
AND THOUSANDS OF INDIVIDUALS IN BUTTE AND MONTANA.
BAKERY and CONFECTIONERY WORKERS-Local Union 274
Anaconda, Mont.
INTERNATIONAL HODCARRIERS-Local No. 98, Billings, Mont.
,* '
Notice to Advertisers
Beginning Nov. 1, 1919, the advertising ratei of the
Butte Daily Bulletin will be Increased about 40 per cent.
Beginning today no new contracts will be entered into
at the old rate.
The new rates are not elastic.
The new rate cards will be ready Oct. 25.
Advertising men will be received at the office between
the hours of 9:30 and 11:30 A. M.
E The new rates are not only Justified, but a considerably
highqr rate would be in accord with the actual paid-up
subscription list of the Bulletin, WHICH CAN BE SHOWN
TO BE MUCH LARGER THAN THAT OF ANY OTHER
R DAILY PAPER PUBLISHED IN THE STATE OF MON
TANA.
-THE MANAGER.
the political, because a strike of sufficienit magnitude must
challenge the existing government and indeed usurp its powers
by taking over and running those administrative functions
which keep the fabric of social organization together. A folded
hand strike of national character is a dream of those who ,do
not understand. The battle once developed to the point of
usurping Ihe political functions drives the working class com
I atant.s onward, either to overthrow, tlhe stale or to suffer de
.fea.t and disintegration.
The IBritish leaders seemed to undelrstatld this clearly and.
Itherefore strove I.o defineethe character of the conflict by limit
ing the anumbers involved, and with admirable skill sent into
the battle zone one army corps only, while menacing the en
emy with the weight amid power .f' their reserves.
But there were o)iher and weighlier considerations, grave as
the former were. The world is fairly divided today on the
basis of the class struggle and the strike leaders knew they
would not only face the combined antagonism of''British capi
tal, but also that of America. It has been openly'said that they
\\ere notified that anly attempt on the part of the' British work
ers to achieve the rule of the proletariat would result in the
immediate withdrawal of all marine transportation of food
stuffs upon which the island kingdom depends for its very life.
Such a development would speedily threaten the life of a rev
olutionary government and indeed bring it down in disaster.
more so, if it could be shown that a return to the old al
legiance would bring a resumption of foreign supplies. Even
command of the British fleet would hardly save the situation,
for although the dreadnoughts of a workers' republic might
keep hostile armadas away, they could hardly force other
countries to load and dispatch across the ocean foodstuffs suf
ficient to overcome the blockade.
The situation in Britain, then, waits upon Russia. Soviet
Russia, finally freed from the steel ring surrouiding her, could
in a few years produce sufficient foodstuffs for exportation to
any of her neighbors who had by undertaking-a revolution, be
come threatened with starvation Iby an economic blockade es
tablished in the interest of capitalism, and would thus be not
only the most important card in the pack. but the actual salva
tion of tihe rebel cause.
Thus the British workers, face to face with their fate, or
ganized to the point where they may challenge the government,
find themselves up against the final obstacle of geographical
position. It is well that they seerm to realize that, after all,
capitalism is internantional in its resistance and that the world
situation must be kept in mind \\'hen dealing with .world af
fairs. The British workers must await the development of
actual productive resistance on the part of the new social or
ganism before they can successfully challenge the productive
inright of' capitalism. The British strike leaders show, not only
cnsiderable knowledge of the tactics of the class struggle, but
seem to possess the very rare quality of courageous resistance
to the enthusiastic, but unscientific demands of the uninformed
and impatient theorists.
IWhen Do We fat
Ug 1
S-- '
e.... .... ,. .
Today We Celebrate
GHOSTS.
No subject on God's round earth is
more absorbing than psychic phe
nomena. Every living human being
who has loved and lost yearns to get
into touch, if but. for a second, with
the loved one gone from human
night. The conviction of immortality
is deeper than even revelation, for
it is a demand planted in the breast
of being. The giant minds of an
tiquity believed in the spirits in "the
Shades," or in "Hades." Ancient
Egypt first taught ,the doctrine of
immortality. Active and well-poised
minds in England today have formed
a "Society for Psychical Research,"
and the society welcomes all well
grounded data on this solemn subject. I
Today we celebrate ghosts. Yes,
1 real ghost! October 15 a yet un- I
accounted-for ghost of 1785, a ghost
that appeared to two iron-souled 1
Englishmen not given to fancies or to I
flummeries of imagination, for they
were officers in His Majesty's George I
III.'s army, had seen hard life and e
had hard knocks in every quarter of 1
the globe, And the gentlemen were
sot drinking-men. Capt. John Sher
broke and Lieut. George Wellesley, I
subsequently Duke of Wellington.
The gentlemen in question were offi
cers of indisputable honor, and men I
of good sense; and the reality of t
their encounter with a "spirit," a dis
embodied spirit, was attested by a
remarkable circumstance that came I
later on. Every effort on their part
to explain it was in vain. They were
neither dreaming nor drunk when
the marvellous event took place.
The regiment was then on service
in Canada. Sherbroke and Wynyard
were good friends, and it was their
habit to spend their leisure time in
study while their brother officers
were indulging in revelry. It was
one afternoon when the two were sit- I
ting together, in Wynyard's sitting
room in his small apartment. Now, '
mark this: The room in which they
were had two doors .to it, one leadiiig
iilto a passage-way, and the other in
to Wynyard's bedroom. There was
absolutely no way of getting into.the
yitting'room but from the p'assage:
and no egress from the bedroom but
through the sitting-room. Any per
son 'going into the sitt!iig-room, and"'
passing into- the bedroom must have
remained there, in that bedroom, un
less hle returned" by the way he came.
The two officers were bending, each
over his books, deep in study, when.
as Sherbroke's eye happened to I
glance up, mechanically, he saw a tall
young man standing in the door that
opened into the passage-way. The
young man appeared to be extremely
emaciated. He did .not move, he did
not salute either of the two officers.
immediately, Sherbroke, half rising
from his chair, directed Wynyard's
attention to the' visitor, but as he did
so Sherbroke sank back into his seat,
for Wynyard's face that had lifted
upon the stranger intently looking
at the two had become pale as the
face of a corpse, his eyes half out of
his head as he stared .at the intrud
er, unable to get out a word. As the
two officers, frozen With surprise,
and deprived of the faculty of speech
kept their eyes upbn the stranger,
the visitor slowly moved through the
sitting-room, and (mark this) passed 1
into Wynyard's bedroom. As he
passed by the table on which the
books were heaped up, he cast upon
Wynyard a look of exceeding affec
tion. The visitoir disappeared into
the bedroom,
"Great God, Sherbroke, it's my
brother!" came from the ashen lips
of Wynyard, as he clutched ' Sher
' broke's arm.
"Your brother? He's in the Med
iterranean service, man, There must
be some deception. Follow me!"
now shouted Sherbroke hoarsely, im
pelling Wynyard.toward the bed
room--from which, let the reader
remember, there was no exit save by
the door into.the sitting-room.
The two men leaped into the bed
roollm. -
The bedroom was untenanted.'
Neither of the men could speak as
they stared at one another.
"I can't explain it," breathed hard
j Wynyard, the sweat dropping down
his face as the two returned into the l
sitting-room, and sank back into i
f their chairs. But-the tvo men noted 1
carefully the day and hour and min-I
ute-hand of the clock, neither daring t
3 at that moment to '.disclose his E
thoughts to the other. Each took ;
his oat', to the other pnt to mention a
t the matter. - I
1 For 10 days the strain of.the unex-I
Splained incident continued. l
In two weeks' time; exactly the 9
hour in which the silent visitor had t
glided into the sitting-room - into e
OPEN FORUM
NOTE--People are invited to use these columns a a mediuip of
publicity upon the questions of the day-anything that is for the
good of humanity. Your copy must be legible and upon one lside of
the paper or.ly; also be as brief as possible, Articles appearitu under
.his head will not necessarily carry our editorial endorsemett, azdi
the right is reserved to accept or reject any communlcatioq which
may be submitted. Your correct name and address mrst accompany
your communication, but will not be used if you request.--pditpt i
To Bulletin Readers: Frequently
contributions for this column are ea
ceived by the Bulletin, but cannot
be published because of the fact that
the writer has signed an anonymous
┬╗ignature. but has withheld his true
name and address. Oftentimes these
communications bear oi pubjects of
grave importance that are of great I
interest. ,
It may be stated here that no com
musicatipps which do not bear the I
signatures of the contributors will be
accepted for this column. The fact
that we require all contributors to
sign their contributions with their
true names and addresses does not
necessarily mean that the signature 1
will be printed. An anonymous sig
nattre for publication of the Bulletin
and as an indication of good faith
we require that the writer make his
or her identity known to us.-The e
Editor.
AT THIE JOHNSON MEETING.
Butte, Oct. 12, 1919.
Editor Bulletin:
Did you notice among those who
are "dqad" ones the club members
who had seats on the stage at the
Hiram Johnson meeting? Nerny, the
old time tool of the Anaconda cop
per gang, who has been rewarded for
past performances by receiving the
Lucrative position of timekeeper at
one of the said company's mines?
Certainly he was there. Who do you
suppose was the first man . on the
stage who arose to his feet when the
band .played,. "My Country, 'Tis of
Thee?" Why Malcolm Gillis, to be
sure. Good old patriotic (?) Mal
'colm; and why should : he not be?
Who had a better right? Were not
the and "Sandy" Cturrie"leaders of the
flag-wavers in seeing the boys off on
their journey 'across the water? Was
it not the same beloved '(?)' Malcolm
who fought so hard in company with
Andy Davis, our esteemed ('?) bank
president, against the local exemp
tion board,.that their 'sons might not
have to accompany the other boys on
the same journey.
Of course, Malcolm and Andy pre
vailed. Malcolip's son stayed at
home, became a company gunman
and made an "enviable" record by
killing one of the wage earners.
Andy's son was given a job in the
ship yards at Seattle, that mothers of
boys who had to go might not be
tantalized by seeing Andy Jr. around.
And who was that sitting' in the
large chdir in the center of the
front row? Mayor Stodden, natur
ally. Everyone was. holding his or
her breath for fear he might be
forced, to attempt a speech. It was
laughable to see the mayor clapping.
his hands every time that Clinton
gave him the signal to. do so. He
really acted human at times, al
though his appearance on the stage
was the signal for subdued laughter
and jests:
Of course the gathering could not
be coinplete without the inimitable
Mr. Ruhle, the near A. C. M. gunman
and member of the Rotary club and
another of the 'patriotic (?) flag
wavers.
Ye Gods! If. Hiram had only
known by whom he was surrounded,
what a calamity it might have been!
Not only would Wilson have caught
Hall, Columbia, but others also ,pos
sibly.
For once in their short, crooked
lives the company's cohorts had to
applaud a man who did not believe
in Wilson's policies, British. rule in
the bedroom-and disappeared, at
mess-hour' the mail came in from
England. It brought a letter to
Sherbroke from Malta. "On board
His Britannic Majesty's Ship Vali
ant." The letter read: "Dear Sher
broke, old man, break the news
gently to Wynyard, his brother is,
dead." He had died on the very aft-ji
ernoon, and at the very hour on 1
which the two' officers had seen his -
spirit glide through the room, and i
'pass out of sight.
"Sherbroke," were Wynyard's f
broken words that 'night amid "a
strong man's tears for his favorite 1
brother. "I saw Joe's ghost that aft
ernoon." - . {.
Ireland, or. the league of pations.
Though at the same time the copper
representatives back in Wa hingtOn,
Walsh and Myers, were dol.g the op
posite. However, you know the rea
son the octopus will need #iirain's
aid in the future; hence the good Will
displayed, but the fact, the ultimate
fact, remains, that whether the dem
ocrats 'or republicaii are -in' office,
so long as the'Comp&ny can wield its
power over them, the common pe6ple
can never profit.
One funny incident occurred when
someone dropped a, wad of sticky
chewing gum into Lieutenant (cov
ernor McDowell's hat. When. the
honorable personage placed his hat
on his bald pate, the gum 'found a.
resting place on one lone hair there
on, from which it refused to be dis
lodged, and althqugh his' highness
coaxed' and pleaded, the gupm tead
fastly maintained it~ positiop, a. if it'
was pleased to be aispng-r rien.ds, be
cause it, too, was " besmlpcheq and
sticky.
JOHN MiACINTOSH IAMAT.
THE LU1JB9R HOeS.
Spokane, Wash., Oct. 11; 1919.
Editor Bulletin: After giving con
siderable thought as to why the
lumber hogs of the northwest have
cut the lumberjacks' standard of liv
ing still lower by raising the price
of board' in the camps, and have also
devised a way to rob them while
they sleep as well' as when they work
by charging $1 a week for bedding,
I can't arrive at any other conclusion
but this: '
,Of course, profit is the first rea
son. But there is something mor:e
than that; it is an ultimatum, a chal
lenge, to the lumberjacks which is
further evidence of .their ignorance
and greed. Which, bears 'out the
approipriateness of the above, term,
"lumber hog."
SWell, fellow workers,, there wps a
day when they, could 'dictate to us
how much we would pay for board
and who would pay fdr the, bedding,
but that day went the same rbute as
the 10-hour day went in the logging
camps of Idaho and Washington.. All
that is necessary how is that'we im
press it more firmly upon the bosses'
minds, if they happen to have any,
and .that is the very. thing we are
about to do.
Now, if there is any worker who
thinks more of bosses' interest than
hb does of his own, let him go around
advocating that just those camps that
are directly affected by this new sys
tem of robbery go out on strik'e and
those that are not affected at present
stay on the job and help the boss to:
lick: the fellow workers, as it would
be impossible to do it if. we make a
stand tbgether.
Fellow workers, we should rebuke
all such advocacy.. We ipust bear .hlb
mind our grand old slogan, "An in
jury to one is an injury to all:"
The solidarity of the 'workers is
what the boss fears most; that is
why he tries so hard to keep us. di
vided. Whenever we hear a thing
advocated we should give it thought.
We should not consider, how it is go.
ing to affect us individually, or how
it is going to affect" our pocketbook,
but how it will affect Us as an or
ganization. Solidarity means joint
interests, and. only by taking a joint
interest in everything- pertaining to
the.Job will we succeed:-'
JOE BRENNAN.
Spokane, Wash..
"HOP" PURVEYOR JAULD..
Charles A. Roberts was given 30
days in jail by Judge Grimes in po
lice court yesterday when it was
shown by the arresting -fficers that
he had been in the habit of obtaining
"holi" for a woman on South Mon
tana street with whom he visited fre
quently..- A letter alleged to have
been written by Roberts to the wom
an, in which the writer urged her
never to reveal the fact that he had
obtained dope for her, was intro
duced in evidence.
Bulletin Want Ads Get
Result. Pihone. 5o.

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