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The Butte daily bulletin. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1918-1921, October 17, 1919, Image 1

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RIGHT OF "MUNITIONS PROFITEERS" TO SHIP WAR MATERIAL
TO KOLCHAK TO BE TESTED IN FEDERAL COURT BY LAOR
TELEPHONES I WE PREACH THE CLASS STRUGGLE IN THE INTERESTS OF THE WORKERS AS A CLASS SUtBSPC1 PTI
Business Office .......... 52 .
Editorial Rooms ...... 292 One th.
L.O5TTThreTe M onths r......7
Subscribers Will Confer a Fav
or by Calling 52 When Paper Six Months.............
\ I Not Doeivo red. On YeaT,1.......T. (... IS
...........-.. . ... . ... ...... ... . . - 1.-. _ :- . .. ... . .. . . . . ... M O N T A N A . ..... .. .... --_ _ . . . . .,
S~....I .__I~~l-ZT=~_I~1T----r ·IfI__~~__1: _~___;___~t_-__ RC IT E~
MURDER AND ANARCHY
Enthroned in Pennsylvania by Gary's Hired Assassins
Seattle Longshoremen
to Stop "Gun Running"
(Special United Press Wire.)
Seattle, \\ash.. Oti.. 17.---Denouncing the shipment, of arms
t.n amnmunition to (General Kolchatk as ( .. 'le and simple gun
ruuning and against the internat.ional laws lan( the constitution
o' he tcUnited Slites.' Archic lIctlelrtsoi. Longsholnemetl's
inio(n delegate. has obtlined (,redoenial s fruImt11 the Sea.ttle (Cen
Inl Lab, or cIounc il to so'licit I'unds fronl locial unioins to nay tlhe
osts of makntg a test canse of fIilibulste'ilng in Ihe I'ederal
c Ioturl s.
Hltberlson said lie had retained lawyers to seek iljuncttlions
r'otti'ali in, Tun.titi.iins protiteeR's" 'from shiplping ~av mal. iterial
ic liKlchak, whom he described as
"a filibusterer against the peace of
;nations.."
COAL MINEHS PROCEED
WITH PLANS FOR STRIKE;
Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 17.----On
the. theory that colferences between
1he miners, oper t}'s and govern
ment officials at Washington wouldl
come to naught,. officials of the
United Mine Workers of America
proceeded with plans for the walk-;
out of all unionized bituminous coal I
miners in the country on Nov. 1.
Unless something was done to
avert the strike, it was stated, over!
400,000 members of the Unitedl
Mine, Workers and approximately
00,000 other miners not members.
iof the organization would quit work
on the date of the call. The only
thing that can avert the strike, it
was ::tated, would be the granting
of the complete demands of the
minlers.
USE HAINCED MAN'S CLAND
TO VITALIZE AGED FELLOW
(Special United Press Wire.)
San Quentin, Oct. 17.--After Toni m
lelloa, a murderer, was hanged at
the prison this morning, Dr. Kelker
p!erformed a simple operation, remov
ing the vitality giving glands fromn
his body and transferring them to the
body of a 60-year-old convict.
The operation has been performed
nine times before at the prison, but
has been given little publicity. The
prisoners receiving the glands have
gained in weight and vitality and
have been helped mentally, according
to the doctors.
EXPATRItTE AMERICAN
FLYERS FIGHT SOlIET
(Special United Press Wire.)
London, Oct. 17.-A Warsaw dis
patch reported that the "'Koslaiusko
squadron," composed of American
aviators serving in the Polish army,
will see its first service against the
holsheviki within a few days. Major
Fauntleroy, formerly of the Lafay
ette flying corps, American air serv
ice, has received orders to take his
squadron to the northeastern fron
tier immediately, the dispatch adds.
LEVINE A SC(RIE.
Washington, Oct. 17.---Dr. Louis
l.evine, formerly a member of the
faculty of the University of Montana.
is attending the industrial confer
ence in, the city as a representative
of the New York World.
Lumber Trust Gunmen Fail
To Stop Spread of Strike
I)espite intimidation by gunmen
in the employ of the lumber trusts
and tespite the further fact that the
eel vice of the Lumber Workers In
ternational union has been subject to
tampering and delay, the unionized
lulnmbrjacks through the northwest
and in every corner of Montana,
Washington and Idaho where lum
bering operations are carried on,
have been reached by the strike call
and are out and determined to stay
out until the strikers' demands are
won, according to a communication
received from the publicity commit
PETROGRAD
IS AGAIN
TAKEN
Allied Replorts Claim Cap-!
ture of Capital and Kron
stadt. Allies Squabble
Over Spoils Division.
(Special United Press Wire.)
London, Oct. 17.--]t was
stated at the admniralty that no
information had been received
of the reported capture of Kron
studt. Admiralt4 officials are
inclined to doubt the truth of
the report.
W ASHINGTON GETS TIP.
(Special United Press Wire.)
Washington, Oct. 17.-Petrograd
and Kronstadt are reported to have
fallen, according to state department
dispatches from consular sources on
the Swedish border.
(Special United Press Wire.)
London. Oct. 17.--Unofficial and
unconfirmed reports from Helsing
fors report that Petrograd has fallen
and that Kronstadt, the great bol
sheviki naval base, capitulated to
the British fleet after an all-day
bombardment with heavy guns.
According to Helsingfors dispatch
es, the bolsheviki leaders at a meet
ing held Oct. 6, decided to evacuate
Petrograd and issued orders for the'
withdrawal of the communist troops
and all workmen. Previous dis
patches from the same source had
stated that General Yudenitch had
occupied Gatchina, 30 miles from
Petrograd. Tuesday night. The dis
patches state that the naval fortress
of Kronstadt fell last night, after
the British fleet had bombarded the
place all day yesterday.
The British attack was directed
from Kuporia bay, it is reported,
and the concussion of the heavy
guns shattered windows in Finnish
villages.
SQUABBIING OVER SPOT[,,S.
f Special United Press Wire.);
London. Oct. 17.-As the result
of reports from the various Russian
and Siberian fronts of the gradual
defeat of the bolsheviki forces, the
main question confronting the allied
diplomats now is "what will be the
new Russian power?
The collapse of the holsheviki
l Continued on Page Two.)
tee of the strikers. The communi
cation follows:
The strike of the lumberjacks in
Idaho. Montana and Eastern Wash
ington has already reached great
proportions. Ninety-five per cent of
the workers in the logging camps
in the strike district have responded
to the strike call. Greater solidarity
and determination has seldom been
sbown in any strike. The way every
worker in all corners of this vast
strike area was reached in such a
short time, was a good demonstra
(Continued on Page Two.)
"TO HELL WITH AMERICAN FLAG!"
SHOUTS A STEEL CZAR COSSACK
(Special to The Bulletin) I.3."
Pittsburgh, Oct. 17.-James H. Maurer, president of the Pennsylvania State Fed
eration of Labor, in a letter addressed, to Governor W. C. Sproule, made public here
tonight, recited the atrocities by members of the Pennsylvania state constabulary
in the steel strike. The charges were supported by affidavits and contained a de
mand on the governor in the name of 500,000 organized workers of the state to re
store civil liberty in Pennsylvania.
'Icallt upon you as the chief mag
istrate of th1t commonwealth and as
commander-in-chief of the state con
st.abulary, to protect our rights and
restore to us our constitutional guar
'antees of peacenble assemblage and
Sfree speech-, and to compel impartial
enforcement of the laws," Maurer
demanded.
The evidence submitted to the gov
ernor of the outrage upon strikers
and non-strikers in the steel districts
committed by the state cossacks, ha.d
reference in particular to the cities
at.d t.ow L'o Pittsburgh, Braddock,
Butler, Cltirton, Donora. Glassport..
.Dn ttu.-alpe -.'lo Keesport, Monessen,
Homestead, Newcastle and Wood
lawn. Among the most striking ref
erences were the following:
Tearing down of the American flag
by troopers at Clairton and the tram
pling upon the colors with horses,a.
while one of the constabulary shout
ed: "To hell with the American
SENATE LEAVES SHANTUNG
,CHINESE AT MERCY OF JAPS
(Special United Press Wire.)
Washington. Oct. 17.--.-'The defeat
(,f the Shantung amendment yester
day means the rejection of all tex
tual amendmcnts to the treaty. ac
cording to administration supporters.
They rointed out that the republican
Sotes against the amendmient were
alno"t entirely on the ground that
it is inexpedient at this late hour to
attempt to change the text of the
peace pact, which had been agreed
to by three of the great powers of
the allies.
The purpose of the Shantung
amendment, however, was approved
by practically all republican. voting
against it. This, declares the ad
ANGRY MOB OF JAP
LABORERS SEEK
MATSUMOTO
(Special United Press Wire.)
Tokio, Oct. 11.-When Japan
ese delegates to the international
labor conference departed for
Washington, Delegate Matsumo
to was forced to approach the
steamer F'ushimi Maru in a pri
vate launch from a distant pier
in order to avoid an angry mob
of laborers.
'tlhe demonstration was the
culmination of many protests over
what was termed the irregular
method of selection of delegates.
Anger centered particularly upon
Matsumoto because he is not a
laborer.
WASHINCTON WOUID MESS
IN LITHUANIAN MIX-UPS
(Special United Press Wire.)
Washington, Oct. 17.-That the
United States is about to send a bri
gade of troops to engage in the in
ternational embroglio in Lithuania,
was declared by Senator McCormick
in the senate today. McCormick said
the sending of a brigade to Lithuania
had been determined upon and said
he had information of the fact from
"reliable authority." He did not
state details.
flag."
The dragging of innocent people
out of their beds at Homestead and
herding them, half-naked, to jail to,
be kept there for several days.
The arrest of an attorney and oth-I
ers at McKeesport for taking depo
sitions to be laid before the senate
investigating committee.
The clubbing of men, women and
children coming out of a church at
lBraddock.
The arming of negro strike-break
ers at Donora. who shot down strik
ers without provocation.
The terrorizing, of the town of
Monessen by indiscriminate sniping
and clubbing ..,y co tabulary and
steel comparny strike yeakers and
guards.
The invading of plapes of business
i at Butler by troopers who beat the
storekeepers into insensibility.
Refusing attorneys in P]ittsburgh
the constitutional right to consult
ministration senators, shows clearly
that the rejection of the amendment I
is largely a vote against sending theI
treaty back to be negotiated upon
furth,:r.
The Shsantung amendment, inuch
heralded as the supreme test of the
treaty fight in the senate. resulted
yesterday in its defeat by a vote of
55 to t5. In the voting 14 republi
cans swung over to the pro-treat.y
forces and three democrats lined up
with the Shantung amendment ad
herans.
The roll call, while on the Shan
tung amen(dment only, in reality
put the quietus on six amendments
instead of one. The vote swept
IRISl PATRIOTSI
MEET AFTER
MIDNIGHT
Irish Revolutionists Hold
Convention, Despite Pres
ence in Dublin of British
Bayonets and Guns.
Dublin, (~t. 17.--Evading . the
trme.l troopl and machine gunnere
who had flocked to the city in re
sponse to governmental orders, the
proscribed Sinn Feiners held their
nationul con ention, here and Arthur
Griffith, foutler of the movement,
cddreised :a ,onclave of 500 dele
gates.
The con~cention had been planned
icr the Mansion house, but through
c.rders of tl,. British government
suppressing the Sinn Fein, the Gaelic
league and h'l Irish Volunteers, the
conventioni w;s held at a place, the
location, of which is still unknown
to the authorities after 'he hour of
midnight.
During th,. course of his address
Mr. Griffitin declared that despite
the British gon.%rnment's attempts
at stippressii,. the Sinn Fein would
not falter :n its efforts to firmly
establish a, :,rpublic in Ireland. He
(Conti:r:ed on Page Five.)
with their clients.
New evidence showing that l Mrs.
Fannie Selling and Joseph Stresz
licki were wantonly slain by mine
guards on steel company's property
at Brackenridge in contraditidn to
the coroner's verdict.
The slummnary of Maurer's charges
deals with the collusion between the
state, county and city officials andi
police with the steel trust in order
to break the strike of the steel work
ers. Those allegations include the
denial to union men of the right to
assemble, Ilhe dispersal by police of
meetings, espionage o f r.
ion meetings not conne.d
strike, the .,orruption of"siitiltrctie's
courts which under the guise of judi
cial power attempt. to force the strik
ers back to work, and in general,
charges of wanton disregard for the
constitutional guarantees both of the
United States and the state of Penn
sylvania.
away .amendmets proposing to sub
stitute the word "China" ftor
"Japan" throughout. sections refer-.
ring ;o the Shantung settlement.
Senators Walsh and Myers of
Montana were among those who
voted for delivering the province of
Shantung with its inhabitants to the
Japanese.
WAN''TS NIGHT SESSIONS.
(Special United Press Wire.)
Washington, Oct. 1 7.--Senator
1-lale demanded that the senate hold
night sessions in order to speed up
the senate's action on the peace
treaty.
WILSON'S PRIVATE
WAR CASUALTIES
REPORTED
Washington, Oct. 17.----Official
reports of the war department
announced yesterday places the
total casualties of American
f'oces in Siberia at 553. The
casualties are divided as follows:
Deaths in battle....................109
Died of wounds.................. 35
Died of disease.................. 81
Accideis and other causes.. 19
Total wounded.....................305
The forces sent to Archangel,
says the report, conmprised the
::::9th infantry and the 310th
engineers. which arrived there in
August, 1917, and were with
drawn in June, 1919.
MARCH LOSES OUT ON
HIS FULL GENERALSHIP
(Special United Press Wire.)
Washington, oct. 17.--The senate
military affairs committee voted to
report favorably the bill conferring
the rank of Lieutenant general on
General March. Major General Bul
lard and Major General Liggett.
The committee voted unanimously,
after it was informed that Secretary
Baker, who formerly recolthlended a
full generalship for March, now con
sents to the measure.
"Radical Plots" the Bink
Declares John Fitzgerald
Chicago. Oct. 1 7.-Terming as "bunk" all the talk of "radi
icl plots" to overturn the government. John Fitzgerald. sec
reta ly o the Chicago Federaiotion of Labor, declared he had
heeni tld hat. Major Gteneral Wood had said "there is not. a
sctrap o evidence to connect any' of the men arrested at Gary,
Ind., \\ith any plot' of radials." Fitzgerald declared he in
tended to demand of the war department the publication ,of
the inames of every alleg.ed radical member of the federatio)i,
suspected of' fmenting disorder in connection with the steel
strike.
CANADIANS
HERDED TO
RUSSIA
ea Aboard Ships for ..Si
beria at Point of Bayon-i.
ets, Says Man Just Back
Home.
. Special United Press Wire.)
San Francisco, Oct. 17. ---''Ca
nadian soldiers said they were forced
into Siberia at the point of bay
onets," declared Benjamin Opdyke
of Stockton, Cal., in a statement
published here. "They told us they
were herded aboard ships with guns;
prodding them in the back."
Opdyke, who has just returned
from Siberia, declares there are 75,
000 Japanese troops there. He as
serted his teeth are all gone and
his gums diseased as the result of
being forced to drink Siberian water.,i
He is quoted as saying he refused an
invitation to stay in a hotel follow
ing his return two weeks ago, fear
ing that he would be ejected if he
screamed during the night.
HUOBY OF MYSTERIOUSLY
ODfOWNED WOMAN FREED
(Special I:nited Press Wire.)
Seattle. Oct. 17.-Walter Miller,
held since Monday pending an inves
tigation of the mysterious death of
his wife while on a launch trip across
lake Washington, is at liberty. He
was released on orders of Deputy
Prosecutor Patterson after Coroner
Tiffney had reported that in his opin
tion, Mrs. Miller's death was due to;
drowning. An analysis of the stom
ach showed no trace of poison, and
there were no marks of violence on
the body.
ASK PALMER WHAIHE
WILL 00 TO RADICALS
Washington, Oct. 17.-The senate
this afternoon adopted the Poin
dexter resolution calling upon At
torney General Palmer for a state
ment of his policy toward radical
agitators.
Spokane Jury Hold I. W. W4
Membership Is Not Unlawful
(Special to The Bulletin.)
Spokaue, Oct. 17.---As the result
of a verdict of a jury in superior
court here, returned last evening,
the wearing of the insignia of the
Industrial Workers of the World is
held to he no crime and the organiza
tion Itself, in effect, is held not to
be antagonistic to the United States
government.
The verdict was reached by the
jury which had been sitting in the
trials of the 13 members of the In
c'ustria; Workers of the World,
which lasted throughout the week,
"The reports that radicals are run
ning the steel strike," said Fitzger
aid, "are absolutely false.. Ninety
five percent of all the suppo.ed
'bomb plotters' arrested at G.ry by
the war intelligence department aie
men who were discharged from the
steel mills because of their activities
in the unions 1 believe all this talk
of radical plots to overthrow the
government and establish soviets is
the bunk."
Secretary Baker has been asked, by
organized labbr to send a persdhal
representative:,to Gary to in Qtigate
the charges '.,iiinit "r ,ii,
Cincinna , 17.
1shet andr e
slightly wunned in a battl t
occurred late yesterday bdt n
striking steel workers and stt.e
breakers and guards who attenated
to leave the plant of the Allt,.ds
Steel company., at Newport, IK ,,a
Suburb of Cincinnati. .Rifles,: S'ot
guns and revolvers wer8,freely used
during the fight and spre than p1,0
shots were exchape ` :Among the
wounded was formef' l e of Detec
tives William L. Nig b
-ILSON'S GLANItIGIN
SWELLS; MAi OPtiRAIE
(Special United' Press Wire.)
Washington, Oct. 17,--President
Wilson is again suffering from:swell
ing of the prostate 'gland, hbi .phy
sicians announced in a bulletin;. Stat
ing that his condition is not as e8t
isfactory as yesterday' and is check
ing the general improvemehlt' f ttHe
past two weeks.
Dr. Grayson announced that Di.
Hugh Young of Johns Hopkins uii
versity had been called .into, cop
'sultation. Young is a well-known
specialist on disorders of the'prostate
gland. Grayson declined to. express.
an opinion regarding the seriousness
of the swelling before the arrival of
Dr. Young. He also declined' to say
whether an operation would be nec
essary.
WANTS U. S. TO PLAY
GODMOTHER TO ThfKS
(Special United Press Wire.)
Sheffield, England, Oct. 17.
Lloyd George, in an address here,
urged the United States to accept a
mandate for parts of Turkey. ,
"They are appealing to America
for help," he said, "and I hope not
in vain. Unless America listens, I
don't know what will happen to parts
of the Turkish empire."
The premier added that it would
be important to ask the United States
to accept a Turkish mandate unless
Great Britain were undertaking aimi
lar responsibilities. "We find we
are coming to the limit of our
strength," he said.
in which the workers were charged
vwith c:iminal syndicalism for having
worn Luttons of the I. W. W., "em
blems of an. organization antagon
istic to the United States govern
ment," and is far-reaching in its ef
fect.
The verdict of the jury clearing
the men is held to establish the fact
that the Industrial Workers Of the
World is not an organization "an
tagonistic to the. United Sta ts govw
ernment;" thAt the.dlsplay otfZ. W.
W. insignia is iot' a brime and that
(Continued on Page FiVe.)

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