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The Butte daily bulletin. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1918-1921, October 20, 1919, Image 1

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TWOILLGREE
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VOL. 2. --NO. 53. RUTTE., MONTANA, MONDAY. iLTiB-;' R 20, 1919. - : CENT
ALL PENNSYLVANIAWORKERS
RANKSS OF STEEL STRIKERS
INCREASE FIFTY PER CENT
(Special to The Bulletin.)
Pill: gh. Pa., Oct. 20.--\ speial conrvention of the Peun-
syl\ania State Federation of L. bor -will be held Nov. 1 and 2,
r Ilhe purpl)ose of calling out tl e entire organized labor move
So he sate of Plen iisy lv\an a in a general strike in support
,o Ilie steel strikers, accorditn to action takenl by federation
officials at a meeting of all imin0ortant central labor bodies of
Ilie PIittisbltrgh district held yes erday morning oni call of Pres
ihll .ilames ]. lMaurer.
Among the bodies in attenda uice at yesterday's meeting were
eprl'eles entativs of the Pittsbut igh Central, Iabo't council, the
raihroad brotherhoods of the dis
trict, 'he building trades council.and
delegates fromn district No. 5, United
Mine Workers of America.
The meeting unanimously adopted
resolutions which were forwarded to
the labor group in attendance at the
national industrial conference at
Washington, urging them not to
compromise on any of the funda
mental denmands of labor.
James H. Maurer was commended
for his prompt action in calling the
pIecial convention of the state fed
craltinil. ' ''
Plans for relief work among the
strikers were placed on an efficient
basis when Robert McKetchan. presi
rdent of the Central States Whole
sale Co-operative Society, consented
to take charge of the relief work.
Supplies, pz i 3oyfodeJo to be
furnished t6e strikers in cearloud -lots
at cost, according to the plan.
STRIKERS' IRANKS SW\ELL.
(Special United Press Wire.)
Ch!cago, Oct. 20.--The number of
steel workers on strike has increased
l.0 per cent since the men first
walked out five weeks ago, John
Fitzgerald, secretary of the Chicago
Federation of Labor and one of the
:trike leaders,. declared in an appeal
for funds. He urged labor organ
izations to aid the strikers and the
"hungry wives and children."
"Our workers will not be starved
into rubmission," he said.
In tclling of the efforts of the
companies to beat the strike, Fitz
gerald said: "Major General Wood
fell like a sheep for their propa
ganda."
GAZETTE DES ARDENNES
TREASON TRIALS ENDED
Paris, Oct. 20.-- rials of various
persons accused of h.vi g contribut
ed to the Gazette des Ardennes, a
publication printed in French by the
German general staff during the war,
have all been ended. Lieut. Roger
Herve, Louis Lavoigne and Henru
Crickel, all alleged to have given in
telligence to the enemy, were sen
tenced to death. Crockel, however,
is a fugitive and is thought to have
fled to another country.
Yvonne Viez, 18, charged with
having written three articles for the
Gazette des Ardennes, was sentenced
to serve three years imprisonment.
Seven others received sentences
ranging from five t6 seven years im
prisonment.
PRO-LEAGUE PREACHERS
ET REBUKE IN SENATE
(Special United Press Wire.)
Washington, Oct. 20.-Senator
l:herman announced in the senate
that he had refused to present a reso
lution from 300 clergymen of the
Rock River (Ill.) Methodist confer
Snce, urging the ratification of the
treaty and the league.
"I wrote them," he said, "that if
they know no more about the plan
of salvation than they do- about the
Ih ague of nations, their congrega
tions are in need of new spiritual
guidance."
Wilson Objects to Conferees
Quitting Before Job Is Done
(Special United Press Wire.)
Washington, Oct. 20.--President
Vilsoi will not permit the national
industrial conference to break up in
a disagreement, it was learned on
high authority at the Whitehouse.
If any delegates quit the conference
the president will name substitutes
or cause them to be named, it was
SOLrJNS ARE
ANXO US
TO QUIT
Domestic Legislation to Be
Held Over in. Order to Let
Political- Hurry Home to
Fix Fences.
(Special United Press Wire.)
Washington, Oct. 20.---All hope of
enacting the program of domestic
legislation which President Wilson
cutlined, has been abandoned 'until
the regular December session, be
cause of the anxiety of the senators
and representatives to hurry home
to see how the political land lies in
their respective balliwicks. It is ex-l
pected that the adjournment of con-,,
gress will closely follow the final.
vote on the ratification of the peace
treaty.
The house leaders and chairmen
of important senate committees are'
.,iill urging the necessity of passing
important domestic legislation. The
railroad reorganization bill which is
to be reported to the senate this
week is not expected to pass. Labor
legislation also has lost its momen
tum. The struggle over the ratifica
lion of the treaty was resumed to-1
day. There are several important
imuendments which remain to be
voted upon.
DE VAL[RA GIVEN B1G
RECEPTION YESTERDAY
St. Paul. Oct. 20.-President Ea
monn De Valera of the Republic' of
Ireland will leave late today for Des
Moines, Ia., where he is scheduled to
address a huge mass meeting in the
interests of recognition of the Irish
republic.
Yesterday De Valera attended
church services, a reception at the
University club and laid a wreath at
the foot of the statue of Nathan
Hale, revolutionary patriot. Yester
day afternoon thousands greeted him
at a mass meeting here and last night
he spoke to a large crowd af Min
neapolis.
MAUNA- OATIHlTEIENS
COVYENMENT HIGHWAY
Honolulu, Oct. 20.-An important
government road is threatened by
lava from the volcano Mauna Loa.
The stream of molten rock is now
less than eight miles from the road
and is moving steadily nearer, while
the lava continues to pour from the
crater's mouth at several openings.
made clear. Even should the entire
delegation walk out the administra
tion will make an effort to replace it.
The industrial conference is here
to "see the thing through," accord
ing to the attitude taken at thee
executive mansion. So much is at
stake that the government cannot
let the conference "go to pieces."
--LAV .....--~- ·
SLAVES MEET UNTIMELY END
John Sever and Jeremiah Holland Fall to Death in A. C.
M. Mine Cage. Former Leaves Widow and Two Young
Daughters, and the Latter Was Veteran of World War
As the result of the Anaconda
Copper Mining company's policy of
wringing every possible penny from
ieth operation of its mines. even to
the use of material in operation that
endangers the lives of its toilers.
twos men are dead, two families have
been lepriaed of.their providers, one
woman is made a widcw and two
young girls are rendered fatherless.
Saturaay ight in the East Colusa
mine,, the lives of John Sever and
Jeremiah C. Holland were snuffed
out when the parting of a frayed
cable, caused a skip and a cage on
which' the men were riding while
lowering waste, to drop 600 feet
from the 2.200 level of the mine to
the sump. Despite efforts of fellow
workers to recover the bodies, it
leqluired 18 hours' work before .the
mangled remains of the two sacrai
fices to greed and profits were re
SQI RCES
PETROGRAD
Latest Reports Show News
of Fall Last Week as False
as the Usual.News From
Russian Front.
(Special United Press Wire.).
Loadon, Oct. 20.-Various anti
bolshhviki forces are continuing their
pressure on Trotsky's armies on all
fronts. 'While the fall of Petrograd
was anofficially reported last weeki
it has not been officially confirmed:
The city, however, is said to be
completely isolated with Yuden
itch's forces in the outskirts.
A Helsingfors dispatch yesterday
stated that Yudenitch, by a rapid
movemlent, had succeeded in blow
ing up the railway bridge over 'the
river Tosna, cutting communication
between Petrograd and Moscow.
A Copenhagen dispatch said it
was officially announced that Gen
eral Tudenitch had taken Ligovo,
nine miles from Petrograd. Admiral
Eolchak is reported to have taken
the imnportant railroad junction at
Liski, commanding the comniunica
lions between the bolsheviki front
on the Don river and Tsaritzin.
WASHINGTO'(N SEEKS DOPE.
(Special United Press Wire.)
. 'ashington, Oct. 20.-The state
department is making efforts to ob
tain from its agents in Russia con
firmation or denial of conflicting re
ports About the' fate of Kronstadt
end Petrograd. Announcements of
their fall was made by the Finnish
general staff, according to a Viborg
dispatch to the state deliartment,
The message was very brief and was
dated .Saturday. American agents.
however, at different points nearest
Petrograd cabled under yesterday's
date that there was no corroboration
cf the Finnish announcement.
STINGY WITH COIN; HE QUIT.
(Special United Press Wire.)
Hairisburg, Pa.. Oct. 20.--Thomas
Glivei', pastor of a negro church for
.5 years, was engaged in organizing
a new one here. But when the con
gregation refused to advance him
$25 of his first month's salary. of
$60, ne Jquit.
BUT LITTLE HOPE
FOR. "BOOZE"
IMBIBERS;
(iSpecial United Press Wire.)
iWashlington, Oct. 20.-There is
but a very slight chance that
President Wilson will raise the.
war-time prohibition ,ban at any
timne before the constitutional
anmendment becomes, effective on
January 1, it was ,learned today
from reliable sources.
covered from the water in the sump.
An examination disclosed the fact
that the cage in which the unfor
tunate toilers were riding had been
smashed into a nhaeg of jumbled steel
and that practically every bone .in
each of the bodies had been shat
te red.
Sevir was about 36 years of age
and was born in Austria. He il,i.
been a resident of Butte for 13
years tnd lived, at 421t. Watson av
enue. In addition to his widow he
is survived by two young daughters.
Holland was lborn in Ireland 2J'
years ago. He had lived in Butte
for seven years: During the war
for "(!elnocracy'Ut Holland served
with the Americ.n expeditionary
forces in France and suffered thb
hardships of that slaughterfest while
the Anaconda Copper" company di
tectors were rolligg- up profits of
$51,000,0,01) ,in one.year. SpFryiving
the war, Holland rdturL ed to Butte.
SOLDIERS TO BE USiD
AS- STIRWEAKERS
(Special United. Pres Wire.)
Ntw York. Oct. 20.--Deternmii
ati.o on the part of army authori
tics to use soldiers of the army
a:s strikebreakers during the
strike of longshoremen: at this
port, was expressed late Saturday I
by Major Power, representing
the department in its dealings
with the waterfront situation.
Power announced that he in
tended to man ev ery base at
Brooklyn with soldiers, as the
result of the walkout of 600 long
shoeroen at the army piers on
Saturday.
The soldiers will wear regula
tio: uniforms, but these will be
hidden under common blue over
'I he announced determination
of the shipping interests to oper
ate steamship lines whether' or
not the union longshoremen. re
turn to work. and the. arrival
here of 500 troops of the Twelfth
infantry to aid in moying con
gested transport cargoes, indicate
a crisis in the dockworkers'
strike.. .
MAN GARBED IN
GIRL'S DR&SS
MURDERED
Police and Victim's Folks in
Dispute Over the Cause of
Death. Wore Lingerie,
Corsets, Stockings,
(Special United Press Wire.)
New York, Oct. 20.-While the po
lice maintain that John W. Lemke,
21, committed suicide, his relatives
are equally sure that he, was mur-'
dered.
Lemke's body. (clad in woman'sj
clothing, a gingham house dress,
long silk stockings, corsets and lin
gerie, was found last night on the
deck of his power boat near his
home, off College point. His hat4ds
were'tied behind his back with ropes
and his legs were bound, A piece of
oilcloth covered his head and was
secured about his neck with a piece
of rope,
A 'bottle revtaining a virulent
poison was foum d nearby, but. there
were no burns about the face to in
dicate that he had swallowed -any.
An eximinatiou indicated that Lemke
had gdie- of strangulation.
I IEN-&V W A.T T4 FOOD ANI) F,'UEL,
(Special United Press. Wire.)
Vienna, O(ct. 20.-The stadtrat
adop~ad'a rso-lution - asking the
Americah congress to "aid the city
in its desperate plight." The short
age f 'food and fuel may be the
cause, of deaths of thousands this
winter, it was stated.
where he entered the civil struggle
for existencre and fell a victim to the
greed of the millionaire owners or
the Anaconda,
Holland is survived by his father
and mother in Ireland who, through
his death, are deprived of one of
their main sources of support. He
also is survived by a cousin, Mrs.
Mary Harrington. 1211 Gallatin
street. with whom he resided, and
an ;aunt elsewhere in the state.
Hollann's funeral will take place to
morrow morning from the Sherman.
Reed chapel. High requiem mass
will be. sung at Sacred Heart church
at 9:30 o.'clock. interment will be
madei in Holy Cross cemetery.
Sever's body is at l)uggan's un
dertaking parlor. Arrangements for
the funeral have not yet been com
pletedl.
Inquests into the deaths of, the
two men will be. held by CoHhee '
Holland within tle next week:',:
PACKERS FEWR
SLEUTHS ARE:
SOCIALISTS
Senator Asks Quiz of Charge
That. Trade Commission
Agents Are Doing Propa
ganda Work for MVarxianrf
(Special United Press Wire.)
Washington, Oct. 20.-An investi
gation of charges that, employes of
the feder'al trade commission are.er
gaged in "socialistic propaganda" is
called for in a resolution that Sena
tor Watson introduced.
Watson said he was not asking for
the investigation in an effort to aid
the "Big Five" packers, who have
been under fire of the federal trade
commission, but said he was seek
ing to learn the truth about state
ments that members of the commiq
sion were engaged in socialistic ac
tivities.
KILLS WIFIE AlN SU lIDOES
WHEN. CHARiGEOWITiHIIME
(Special United Press Wire.)
San Francisco, Oct. 20.---On the
morning that John Boggs was to ap
pear in court on charges involving
a. 10-year-old girl, helkillcd his wife
and then committed suicide.
WILSON'S DIGESTION GOOD.
(Special United Press Wire.)
Washington, Oct. 20.--"The presi
dent's digestive disturbance has sub
sided almost completely," said the
physicians' bulletin posted at the
White House this morning. "After
a fairly good night he is comfortable
this morning."
HATED EXPATRIATE DIES.
London, Oct. 20.-Viscount Astor
of Hever castle (William Waldorf
Astor) is dead. He died Satprday
after an illness of long duration.
Abeeeding to the viscount's wishes,
his body will be cremated and the
ashes placed in the private chapel at
his former country home, Cliveden.
WEATHER FORECAST.
Fair.
BAKER REFUSES TO
WITHDRAW
TROOPS
(Special United Press Wire.)'
Wasldngton, Oct. 20.--Seele
tary of War RBaker has refuli
the request of Mayor Hyla ot
New York for the withdrawal of
the troops from the New Y"Xc
waterfront, sent there to replace
the striking longshoremen sopj t
army transports can be unlodided,
PALMERWLL PROSECUTE
SUGAR HOGS OF COUNTRY
(Special United Press Wire.--Copyrighted.)
W4Vashin . toi, O. 20.- \Atorney General Pulinerl Jts threat
ened prlosreiicwiins against beet slugtr relihers who,' ask higher
prices thlii Ihose set by the suga.r eqtgtlization board. The
wholestle price fixed by the board, Pa.ltner's announcement
revealed, is 10 cents. less 2 per cent for cash. on a seaside
Ibasis.
Palmºier warning, telegraphed to the beet sugar refiner.
yest.erdav. showed (hot the sugar equalizatiton, board and the
depdrrtri.ent of justice had been co-opelrating to get the beet
sugar: stippl . on the market at a f'ai price in order to relieve
STATES
SEIZEALL
_HO1ARDS
The Ugiýpd States Supreme
oQtit 1..eides Cold Stor
age Stuff May Be Taken
and Sold to Cut Prices.
(Speein United Press Wire.)
'Washington, Oct. 20:.---The United
States supreme court today held ,in
effect that the various states can
Beize and sell-food held in cold stor
age for lieriods longer than provided
in the statd's laws.
The decision settles the constltu
tionality of the Smith cold storage
act of Ohio, which limits the period
in which foodmay be held in storage
to six months. It was the first ap
peal of the packing interests against
new laws passed in several states,
limiting cold storage as a means of
helping-reduce the high cost of liv
ing.
'BRITAIN TICKLEDiOQER
SENATE'S SHANTUNG ACT
(Special United Press Wire.)
London, Oct. 20.--The last fear of
British officialdom that the United
States would repudiate the peace
treadty appears to have been dispelled
by .the rejection of the Shantung
amendment. In official quarters as
well as in a section of the press, this
is accepted as the final proof of the
administration's strength. The adop
tion of the covenant, it is believed
here, is virtually assured.
Declaring that the vote on the
shantung amendment was satisfac
tory, the Daily News says the fate of
further amendments eliminating the
Shantung clause are altogether im
material. "If America prefers to dis
associate herself from that particular
provision, iao serious harm will be
done," says the paper. "It is of the
first importance that the American
representatives be in their place on
the day the, league; of nations starts
active work."'
GRAN[ 0DUKE NICK LIVES
ON ISLAND IN MARMORA
London. Oct. 20.--Grand Duke
Nicholas Nicholaevitch, former coin
mander of the Russian armies, since
last February has been living in re
tirement onf the island of Prinkipo in
the Sea of Marmoi'a, according to
advices from Constantinople. The
Grand Duchess Anastasia and her
fat.ep,. the king of Montepegro, are
with the grand duke..
May Prevent Approach of Old
Age by Using Glands of Apes
(Special United Press Wire.)
San Quentin, Cal., Oct. 20.-Dr.
Kelker, who.recently performed the
operation of transferring energy
giving glands from the body of a
Irecently-hung convict to that of an
I aged life-termer, in an interview
Iwith the United Press predicted
wonderful results from the simple
the present shortage.
Palmer's warning, telegraphed to
the beet sugar refiners yesterday,
showed that the sugar equalization
board and the'department of justice
had )een co-operating to get the beet
sugar supply on the market at a
fair price in order to relieve the
rIreseat shortage.
Attorney General Palmer in his
telegram to the producers, quoted a
telegram which teh equalization
board also sent to the refiners. This
message revealed the fact that beet
sugar factories are failing to sell
their products as produced, because
of an uncertainty about prices.
While Palmer's warning dealt
with wholesale pricey, retall prcee
also are affected. P.ir Vrlo e6i...t
mittees now being formed throu~b
out the country, will know exactly
what price at which sugar-should be
sold to allow a fair margin_ o profit.
WANT GOVEIINMENT CONTROL.
(Special United Press Wire.)
Washington, Oct. 20.--If the
sugar :.upply is taken from the ct-(
trol of the governments of .thh
world, a severe shortage will be flit,
accotdilng to Dr. Alonzo Taylor, 'who
nappeared before the senate sif-b
committee investigating the sug~ r
situation: Dr. Taylor declared 'tht
if governmental control. of the sugar
supply was stopped prices: would be
come very high.
The doctor said Europeans . were
protesting against govertitriental re
strictions, but said Americens weri
consuming what they pleased, rq
gardless of price, The comrtlttee is
conside.ring a .bill to; continle. the
operations of the sugar equalizatiop
board for another year.
D)r. Taylbr is a fortiit;':tpember of
the war trade 'board.
HO11000 PROYES htWELCOGME
GUEST ON KING'S COACH
(Special United Press W(re.)
Aboard King Albert's Train, La
Junta, Colo., Oct. 20.-Jack Wallace,
26, hobo, claims, the World's ,hobo
record. Wallace rode the. king of
Belgium's special from Albuiquerque,
N. MI., to a point five' miiles out,
where the train was stopped and he
was put off.
"I guess I'm the only guy that ever
beat his way on a lking's train in the
United States," said Wallace. He
was quite unimpressed, however.
"'Now that I know I was on the
king's train I can understand why
so many detectives combed the top
and the rods of the train at Albu
querque so carefully," he said. Wal
lace rode the "l'lind." He was not
arrested.
ENDORSE CHEAT STRIKE
OF RAILROAD WOIIKRS
Boston, Oct. 20.-Three hundred
members of the express dtvision of
the Brotherhood of Railway Clerks
yesterday endorsed the proposition
of a r.ation-wide strike of the rail
road trotherhoods next month un
less wage demands before the rail
toad administration are granted on;
or before' Nov. -2.
operation. He said he was basing
his prediction on the nine successful
similar operations performed by Dr.
Stanley, the p rlson physiciasn and
himself.
"Ten men have been givena thbos
glands," said the doctor. "In ealr
(Continued oa Page Two.)

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