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Memphis daily appeal. [volume] (Memphis, Tenn.) 1847-1886, September 29, 1869, Image 2

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THE MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL - WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1869.
TO THE PUBLIC.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION :
DATI.T Armu on year "
HOIUI AfpKAL. one year 2 M
1a i ly awd Buhdat APPEAL, one year... II 00
M'bclt APPKAL,one year. 8.50
Vaai appkal, in club of two.. 00
Duxt, delivered In city by Carrier,
ssven paper per wee
Ihe Wnun.Y APPBAX U regularly dteeoniia
ued at the end of the lime subscribed aud
paid for unless renewed In advance. Thl
rule U adhered to without respect to per-
RATES OF ADVERTISING :
Transient advertisement, first Insertion, SI;
each subaeuueut Insertion SO cent per
Advertisements In Want or Bent column, iu
cent per line each luaertlon.
IXmiile column advertisement 25 per cent,
additional to ordinary rate.
Local notices, fourUi page, cents per line
for each insertion.
City Items, second pace, IS cent per line each
Insertion.
Special notice, third page, 10 cents per line
each Insertion.
Monthly ad venlsementa, for first, and for
each additional Square.
Advertisement Inserted at Intervals, to be
charged It. per cent, additional In propor
Announcing Candidates for State, County and
Municipal Offlces.JlO each, to be paid in ad
vance In every Instance.
tion
w.rrWM and Deaths are published a news
,t ,miIlmenUirv notices ul Man isiti-s.
Tributes of Respect, Obttoariea and r uueral
Notice, will be charged a other advertise
rs church Notices or notice of meetings
of Charitable or Benevolent Societies, will
be charged half price.
Bcxdat Appeal, Advertisement inserted
In the Br dat appeal will be charged one
sixth additional. , .
VmtLT Appeal. Advertisements inserted
In the Weeelv Appeal alone, oDehalf ot
Daily rate. In both Daily and Weekly,
one fourth additional to Daily rate.
In all case all advertisements are considered
due after first insertion.
A Square L- the space occupied by eight line
of solid nonpareil.
CORRESPONDENCE.
Correspondence, on Public Events, solicited
from every part of the United State.
KEATING. ENGLISH A CO.
MEMPHIS APPEAL
WEDNESDAY MORNING, SEPT. 29, 1869.
NEWSPAPER SALES.
On the 31st of March last, the closing
dsy of what newspaper men all concede
to be thebusieMt quarUtr of the Year, re
turns were made by the several newspa
per concerns of this city, showing the fol
lowing result :
Appeal f6192 86
Avalanche 4806 00
The Pre and lime publishes as a
warning to Andrew Johnson the
fallowing dream of a colored person,
which it denominates " reliable and
authentic." As Mr. Johnson believes
in omens and dreams, and used to be
somewhat of a climber on " Jacob's
ladder " and is still looking upward
and spreading his wings, this dream
may serve him as well as another, in
the way of warning, against coming
flat down on the " yearth." No allus
ion to the Senatorial election :
My brethren and my sistering, I dreamed
a dream. An' I dreaiiied dat I had de bery
identikle ladder dat Jacob went up to set
de Lord on. An' I put it up to hebben
an', by de help of laith, I
mounted aw ..
up to cie tap an ; an
it was ton xiorf ah.
An so I took it
down all; an' I splickd
it ah; an
I put it up to hebben de second
time ah; an it was too short .imm(
time ah; an' I put on
splice ah; an' I put it
a sm ashinu Bin
up to heblsjn de
tfiird time ah: an' it was too short de
third time! An' I spread my wiugte ah;
an' I gib an AL-MIUHTY jump ah; an'
I got de larnationlat fall dat ebberyousee
on (iod's vearth.
At the meeting of the lth, held at
Jackson, Mississippi, to ratify the
Dent nominations, a discolored ora
tor from Memphis was introduced,
whose name was Harris, and the
chairman in introducing, called him
"a gentleman so far as politic it con
cerned." That definition is quite
original in Mississippi, we should
think, though it has been practically
adopted in some other places. It is
rather difficult to tell at this distance
what our neighbors of that State are
doing, or how to class them, except
on the same rule they have adopted
as to Harris, that they are all gen
tlemen "to fur a pontic it cottcrmed.''
We are not able to distinguish them
very clearly Dy the nanus they adopt.
The Wttrt Point Hi raid, which is neu
tral among them all, describes them as
follows:
There are now three political parties In
the field, vir: The National Union Re
publican i or thoae w ho propose adopting
In full the State Constitution that was re
jected last year, aud also the adoption of
the Fifteenth Amendment) another party
consists of those who wish to defeat the
Ktate Constitution and to reject the Fif
teenth Amendment. This party is dia
metrically in opposition to the first in ev
ery respect. The third is called the Na
tional Conservative Republican party,
corn posed of those who propose to oocupv
a middle ground with reference to the
other two.
The first of these, or the National
Union Republican, is the Dm par
ty. It supjiorts negro suffrage, and
the Fifteenth Amendment, it bends
the knee to Congress and Oen.
Grant, and pledges them "unwaver
ing support," nominates a carpet
bagger r Governor, a negro for Sec
retary of State, and, in the Northern
district, a conflscator and Helper for
Congress. The Vaiden Timer
apologises for putting this
ticket at .us mast head on
the ground that "there is no
possible chance for a true couserva
tive white man's ticket," and tb
Grenada Sentinel is disappointed. The
situation Ls an ugly one, and we do
not much wonder there should be
some murmuring. What is gained by
taking the negro, Grant, and the
whole Radical Congress down at one
huge gulp, that Alexins and his party
will not concede you? We won here
with Sextlk over Stokes, but we
never avowed Sehtkk'h principles-.
We would as soon have avowed those
of Stokes. Indued, we would rather
take Stokes or Alcorn either, out
and out, whole hag, earn, barrel and
all, than be placarded Sentrr sen
tinels, or submit to be spurned by the
master at whose feet we had fallen.
What cat there may be in the Missis
sippi meal-tub we way not be able to
see. But if any good comes of avow
ing principles not believed, and fawn
ing in the face of power, It will be a
new thing under thesun. We should
as soon expect to asraiie the torture by
sniveling before a council of Comanche
braves. So tar as men are concerned
Dent is no better than Aitin, and
their principles are all the same, ex
cept that the former conceals his, and
the latter is frank and outright
enough to lot every body know
what be thinks and intends.
The Convention seems not to have
been very critical in examining the
character of its candidates, or it would
not have been caught by Mr. Carpet
KELLooorMr. Mulatto Sinclair.
The Mississippians have not been ac
customed to obey the rod of a master
in electionfinatters, and they are rath
er awkward at it. If it was not too
cruel, we should like to see the chiv
alry of 'il voting the " nigger," Fif
teenth Amendment, reconstruction
acts, and such other trifles, and pass
ing resolutions in self-defense that an
untried, undefended, and unconYlctefl
fellow litia-n was guilty of murder,
that we might know whether these
things were done with naturalgrimaces
or on somehitherto undiscovered prin
ciple. We suspect, however, that a
clique not very large, has done more
than the State desired, and what the
people may find it right to correct.
We take from the Cincinnati Gazette
the following account of the great
railway bridge over the tWilo at Louis
ville, which is expected to le ready
for trains by the 1st of November:
A bridge was projected over the Ohio at
this place in 1&5. in 183d a new charter
was granted, but it was not until 1S6J and
MSB that the charter was obtained under
which the present company acts. In De
cember, ISbu, subscriptions were solicited,
aad by the following February $1)22,500
had been obtained. The largest stock
holders are the Louisville ana Nashville,
and the Jeftersonville and Indianapolis
Railways. The total cost of the bridge is
set dow n at a million anil a hall', and one
hundred thousand more for right or way
and depot ground. The length of the
bridge is "20 feet, or nearly a uule. It
supported by twenty-nvr massive piers
The lonzes; snanis over the middle chute,
and is :i70 feet. At this point the bridge
is HOW feel atiove low water mark. There
is a draw bridire over the canal of 114
feet clear snan. The irrade from the Ken
tuckv side is 82 feet to the mile, the trade
on the Indiana side being nearly 79 feet
A long and heavy embankment is neces
sarv on the west side of the river, and thi
is nearly done. This bridge, in addition
to its railroausos, is built for street cars
and wagon, the supposition heinrr that at
certain times of the day only one-eighth
of the twentv-fur hour the railroad
trains will occupy the bridge, leaving i
freetherest oft lie" time for ordiunv travel
The estimates of this grand structure toll
the story of what it is. Ihe masonry o-.i
rlTb.Mui," the iron superstructure 77t.UWO
etc., etc., the whole amounting to $1,000,
ouo.
The German astrouomer Mr. Talr
predicted some time since that
the west coast of South America
would be destroyed about 1 869 or 187
by some frightful convulsion, earth
duakc or deluare of waters. The conse
quence is that many of the towns on
the coast are beintr deserted, and the
people retreating inland for safety. A
gentleman who arrived from alpa
ralso on the 29th ult., on the steanu
Limena, has furnished the following
interesting notes of his voyage, whirl
we take from the Panama Star and
Herald, of the 13th inst.:
The Limena left Valparaiso on tne 10!h
of August and arrived at t'aldera on the
1:1th, where upon inquiry we learned that
some verv severe shocks o! cartlriuaKc had
been felt at t'opiapo, within the few days
preceding-, causing much alarm. On til
evening of the Mill the steamer arrived at
T'sapilla. here we found the same fear
prevailing, and learned that on tho night
the 1.1th. at lit1., o'clock, a severe shock
was felt ; most of the residents had move,
to the interior. On arrival at Iqi.iouc, oi
the afternoon of ttundav ti. ",ili, the
same distressing tWf u c- told ot the an
ticinated destruction of the' coast, most of
the people had left, and the city wasquitc
deserted.
On the 14th at US- a long rolling sound
was heard, which lasted same seconds.
but there was no apparent motion of the
earth, but at i a. m. on the 10th a severo
shock wa felt. We arrived at Arieaon
the Hith at 7 o'clock; at 4 a.m. a severe
shock was experienced at sea. which wits
perceptibly felt on board the Limena, and
caused those who were awake to imagine
the vessel had struck. On arriving at Ar-
ica we learned that the shes'k had lieen
terribly severest 'i past 4 a.m.: at i a.m.
a second shock occurred; and at H a.m
third; hut both of the latter were much
lighter than the preceding one at M a.m.
During the days of the Uth, 12th and l.'ltli
the time at which the tirst great calam
ity was to take place the people being
much Irisrtitenc I at the prophecies ot Hit
wise ones, left the place and went back
u iKtn the hills, but during these davs no
t roubles were felt. The whole coast ii
rapidly losing its inhabitants, aud in con
Requeues business of all descriptions is at
a s land still.
The Cincinnati Chronicle (Radical)
boasts that "the adoption of the Fif
teenth Amendment will crown the
labors of the Republican party, and
settle the questions evoked by the war,
giving us a true, honorable and endur
ing peace." If we desired to invent
something by which to prove how all
altsurd and bosh are Radical preten
sions, we could not find an utterance
more significant for that purpose
Every one must see it is an after
thought. BO far from being any
crowning victory, negro suffrage for
all the states was not contemplated or
desired by the Republicans at the
dose of the war. They have only
stumbled on it now. Mr. Greeley
first insisted on "universal suffrage
and universal amnesty" three years
ago, whom the body of his ftUow-i:ir-
tizans vehemently opposed. The war
itself was not carried on even for the
abolition of slavery, much less for
universal suffrage. But unforeseen
circumstances have made it the main
party slogan. And so it is now bla
zoned in Ubio, not as new party ism,
or third partyism or Liberalism, but
as Radicalism, pure, naked and unal
loyed. And that Ls precisely what it
has become all over the country, as
well as here. He who stands on that
platform stands on the Radical plat
form, out aud out, be he whom or
what else he may. He may have ticon
a Democrat, a Conservative, a Whig,
a Unionist or a rebel it is all the
same he is a Radical now, if going
for the main thine, negro and white
suffrage, made alike universal over the
whole country, and on which theRadi
eal programme hinges for success, is to
be a Radical. The VhroniHe says:
As it is the last, so it seexns to be Ihe
most difficult step in all the great strug
gle. Ohio, ever foremost in Hie tight in
battle or in legislation seems to I-.-...kcl
to Bow to crown her many sets of patri
otic devotion bv promptly ratifying the
aiiirimiueoi. iier vote is atwolutelv
needed; without it, much of what onr
crht years' struggle has gained will tie
lost.
Of coarse the vote of Ohio depends neon
iie result of the October elect ion, and the
political complexion of the next Legisla
ture will, without doubt, settle the ques
tion of the rati rteat ion or rejection of the
amendment by the Slates.
While the country at larfe Joolta to Hiio
to be true to her past history, and to the
memory of her noble dead in this crisis
we of Ohio narrow the contest still more
and throw the responsibility entirely upon
the Republican part v of Hamilton county
Here w ill is. decided the political cii
plexion ot the next legislature. If we
carry tu.s county
the Legislature must h I
very evenly divided, but He re will still :
be a working Republican majority; bill if
we lime the count v, tl
itishiture is lost
bevond peradveni nr(
uid osjnt the t.e,- j
islatoretlm amendment is 1
t.Hndree.v,i-'
StraCUon IS Still UIlai-.-oli,lisllMd. These
are sell-evident truths, ami r oim will
gainaay I In in.
Ho the result depenrls on Ohio, anil
that in Ohio tivi mi, uu liainUtnu
county, and Hamilton county g to
determine for thlrtysseven State, and
tor weal or woe, whether the Constitu
tion of the United States shall te still
further marred on the pretense of
amendment! And now that it is ad
mitted that the vote of Ohio is "ab-
solutcly needed," and that Hamilton
county will determine the question
whether that absolute need will be
supplied, we are glad to say that the
signs indicate an adverse result in that
county. Mr. Pendleton bids fair to
have the eyes of the tax-ridden people
fully opened in duo time to the tact
that negroism is quite too expensive
and an aggravation of their burdens
It is neither likelv that Ohio will vote
the amendment, nor that the amend
meut will carry if she should.'
Andrew Johnson.
Editors of lite Memphis Appeql:
Soon we shall have the solution of thi
question. I'ntil definitely settled, it wil
continue to agitate discussion inour.Stati
and throughout the I'nion. Our opinions
as to who should be the man differ, an
our Judgments are doubtless influenced
bv our urelori in .-.
Amiarentlv the contest will he between
Mr. Johnson and Mr. Ktheridire. The
names of other distinguished gentlemen
have been suinrested. The Hon. Milton
llrown. iu West Tennessee, and Hon. E
KwiiiL'. ill Middle Tennessee, have? warn
friends and supporters, ami either would
irraoe the uosition aud render good service
to the State. But could either take his
seat if elected, without an enabling act
Is it wise to experiment upon such a pos
sibilitvf This, combined with other con
aiderutiona, will operate to place them in
the back around, and leave the first
named gentlemen the prominent contest
ants.
Permit me, Messrs. Editors, to assign a
few reasons whv I am satisned that Mr
Johnson will and bhould be -successful ii
such a contest. In the tirst place, his own
division of the Slate is almost a unit in
his favor, whilst in each of the other di
visions of tho State he has warm and nu
merous supporters. I speak now of the
members elect to the im-oming Legisla
lure. The idea that the opposition of the
old Whig party will be revived against
I mi. will. 1 am persmuled. be found falla
cious. East Tennessee was the Gibraltar
of the Whig party in Tennessee, aud he
has more strength there to-day than any
one whose name has been canvassed lor
Senator. Mr. Etheridge, though an old
line Whie. was sever a favorite in that
section, nor indeed was he so with the
uartv outside of his own District. It is
unnecessary now to enumerate the cause:
whv this was so, but it is well known he
was not fully trusted bv bis party in the
State at large. Therefore, it other reasons
did not exist, he cannot array the ele
ments of the old Whig party in his sup
port. erv little of the HflilH zeal o
the old Whig party survives. They had
seen their party gradually disintegrate
In the North it had been, in a large meas
lire, absorbed by the Abolition or Repub
lican party, its advocacy oi tne uitctnne
of interna"! improvements by the General
Government, uau ceased to oe a disiin
miishiuit characteristic. The great Democ
racy of the West had adopted and utilized
this theory for their own advancement
and aggrandizement. Thev had likewise
settled, in a great measure, the question
of the distribution of the proceeds of the
public lands, by appropriating the lands
llieillsei.es joi . ie i omu .Kiirui. i oe
bank question wasolisolete. The protect
ive policy of the Whig party was about
the old v article of their creed surviving.
and it must lie confessed that there had
been a wonderful revolution of sentiment
in the Mouth, at least, on this question.
That it was operating to the aggrandize
ment of the manufacturing North, at the
expense of the South, was becoming daily
more and more apparent. In short, there
was little enthusiasm or vitality in the
Whig party at the outbreak of the rebel
lion. The party lines were maintained
more through the personal antagonisms
of party leaders, than iroin a Hearty ad
herence to the old party platforms. The
great issues of the war completed their
disruption and created new associations
ind combinations. While it may be true
that there is still lingering some of the old
party animosity toward Mr. Johnson. I
am satistn d it i- greatly overestimated,
and can exercise little influence against
him.
I lie great Question will lie. who can l-st
serve the Slate in the present emergency T
This should control legislative action.
No name can Is' presented to which ob-
tectlona will not be urged. Mr. Johnson
was never a lavorite will! your corres
pondent, who was an old line Whig. His
course iu the beginning of .and during!
the war, especial ly while acting as military
overnor, was regarded lv the writer as
treasonable to his State, and ungrateful
and tyrannical to a people who had lav
ished upon him a wealth of political pre
ferment. His co-operation iu foisting the
amended t'oiistnution upon thoL.ate, in
the exceedingly irregular and unauthor
ized manner of its adoption, even hi
warmest friends cannot vindicate, nor has
he ever attempted it himself.
1 heard it asserted at the close ot the
war, tiiat when a Iriend remonstrated
with Mr. Johnson against the action of
the so-called Constitutional Convention
his reply was to the following effect: He
acknowledged the whole proceedure to be
irregular and revolutionary, out it was
important to have a representation in
Congress belore the collapse l the rebel-
ion, which he was salistied was near at
hand. He well knew the temper of the
Northern iteople, aud was conv inced that
they were intent upon reducing, fora time
it ieasl the seceding Slates to a territorial
condition. His great object was to defeat
this action, as to Tennessee, after which
all irregularities and objectionable fea
tures in the new Constitution could he
remedied. This, if true, might, under the
circumstances. ! regarded by many i
an extenuation, if not a justification of
the part he took in the adoption of an in
strument -prolific of so many evils to the
statsv, Aiti'M.'tU him rtfthj
His rejection of the Sherman-Johnston
terms of capitulation, his merciless course
towards Mrs. Surratt, and his early iol
icy iu the matter of amnesty, are serious
counts in the indictment we might frame
against Mr. Johnson.
These were great and grievous errors.
We should, however, consider the circum-
si jiucs under which, and the Mines in
which he acted. Let us rememlivr the
temper of our owu and of the public
mind during the fierce days oftliewar,
arid iinmediatel v after its t Jo-. . Who
doos not remember how he first Itegiin to
tolerate, then to palliate, then to justify.
and finally to applaud things which at
tirst he deemed anil openly denounced as
monstrous? Men's uiinds ant) actions
arc influenced by surrounding circum
stances; and In estimating conduct and
character, due consideration should be
given to these influenees.
Time mollified and modified Mr. John
son's feeling and views. Sympathy for
his section and tne people or fus section
resumed its asoendency. As a mighty
breakwater against the angry waves of
Northern intolerance and persecution, he
stood during his adniinist ration, interpos
ing every obstacle he could to prevent Us
; in !:.. completely overwhelmed. Ii
not successful to the extent of his w ishes,
it must be coulees, d that he displayed a
perseverance, pertinacity and courage de
serving greater success.
It cannot lie ip nied that the South is
mder oiil igat ions to Andrew Jonnson.
More than Imperial power was tendered
him bv Cougreaii, by tile aceeptenee an d
exercise ,,t which he iniirhl have held her
prostrate, bleeding and suppliant at his
feet. He rejected it and espoused the
woa ana opprc-s-i 'l, and
IV
luiiiiiirv party "l
In tile unequ il crfnfliet which ensued
he was not victorious, nut tie never
yielded, lie had and atill has faith in
public justice, and in the ultimate tri
umph of the pacrhc policy he so earnestly
- uldlt to establish.
And to-day clothed in Senatorial robes,
he wonid Is- more potential than any rep
resentative Tennessee eonlr! send to that
august body, in still further protecting
tin interests of ourdowii-trodden section
and State. The idea, that he should be re
turned to the Senate n uiply to assail Gou.
(jrant and worry Republican leaders, or
that lie aright have an opportunity of
aviiiclnp his own real or fancied wrongs,
is a poor plea for liis election. The people
are n nder no obligations to espouse hia
IMTSoua! quarrel ur to ailord hiiu an op
uortUTlitv to vindicate himself His ail.
metes desiro Ilia Alaclloo ft i , t ii 1 1 , . I., r
and nobler motives. The fearful breadum
1U our republican system of iroverninenl
are to .ho repaired; Uae ejtorittou ouriiens
ret-ulUng ironi tlie war are in hu allevia
ted, and the i Jov eminent to be restored
once more to it am-wut proapenty is rap
idly as possible. Mr. Johnson's friends
believe him eminently fitted, by his sue
rior mental endowments, his intimate ac
quaintance with all the hidden workings
at the Government, both iu its domestic
and foreign relations; his indalatigabte
enemy in the pursuit of his ends, aud
above all hi masterly defense of the co
ordidate branches of government against
the usurping policy of Congress to rep
resent them in the present perilous state
of public .afTairs. They desire to place
him in the Senate that he may serve them
aud not himself. They desire his election
not as a reward to Mtn, but that all his
il--; ot tut)
11, lis arrived ;
high abilities may be made subservient to
their political prosperity, as tbey hjelieve
ho will honestly endeavor to make them.
Mr. Johnson is an ambitious man. His
ambition is to merit and secure the ap
plause of posterity, which he believes can
only be done lv an unswerving devotion
to the interests of the people. Therefore
we say, let Andrew Johnson be Senator.
OLD WHIG.
DRY GOODS.
DRY GOODS
Direct Importat'n
FROM THE LEADING
MARTS OF EUROPE
We wonld respectfully Inform onr patrons
and the public generally, that we are now in
receipt of an immense new stock of
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Dry Goods
As we arc now importing most of our Foreign
Goods DIRECT from the
EUROPEAN MANUFACTORIES
We are enabled to, and will
SELL THEM AS LOW
As any house In
3J"oxv York. :Oity.
Having recently greatly enlarged our lnlM
ing, we have largely added to onr already IM
MENSE STOCK OF
Staple Goods
Which we
propose to sell
as will
at such figure
DEFY COMPETITION
AT HOME OR ABROAD.
B. Lowenstein&Bros
242 & 244 MAIN ST.,
ENTRANCE TO
WHOLESALE DEPARTMENTS
244 Main Street.
STOVES, ETC.
CHARTER OAK STOVE
CATECHISM :
CMetrfcm. Who made the first Charter Oak
Mlove?
AnmvT. U. Y. Killey. of St. Louis.
(J. When was II first mile?
t. I n the year is&i.
,'. Are they good Stoves?
A. The " best in the world."
How are they made?
-I.-Krom the beit quality of Iron,
tt Who says they are good Stoves?
A. All those that use them?
Q. How many were sold In 168?
t.-There were lSW sold,
y. How many out oi that number failed?
A. Not one. '
O.-Who sells the inline Charter 0k in
Memphis?
A. -J. F. SCHABKL . CO., 37 MA IX ST.
C.Aretliere Imitation stove ofthal name?
A. Ye; plenty of them-
y. How can purchasers tell the genuine?
A. liy sceina the name of G. F. s'iUev on
each stove.
V- -How should parties order them?
A. Tell your inerchaat to get Kllley's.
C Does J. F. SCHABEl. & Co. have a pood
stock ?
A. ) eg; thru tell them at U'Wcja.Y and 12--
Ulil. an,l k.;t) TX U'AKK I AST1XGS. elc.in
yvud tupply.
J. F. SCHABEL & CO.,
NO. 227 MAIN STREET, MEMPHIS,
, Solo Agents.
MEAT STALL.
Let Epicnrw Remetubcr that
CHARLES FRANCE
Always has on hand at his Meat Store
On IVIill St., Ohelaea.
DITWEKN Third mid
Fourth, Steaks,
Eeirs. ihlckens.
JJ Chops. Roasts, flutter.
the best
sold In Memphis, at the lowest
prices.
seat
NOTICES.
KTotioo.
Office Memphis Cit R. r. Ce.,1
SgcKKTAHV AM 'l'KEASCKKB'S 1K1CE
Memphis, Tk.nn.. September 2f,l8e. I
COUPONS ot the bonds of this company,
maturing on the first or October uex't
Will le paid at this office, til Main street and
the office of P, M. Myers & Co., lit Pine
street, Sew York, at maturity.
seW J. Q. SMITH, Treasurer.
Mississippi aki Tkskkoejc Railroad "i
Secretary and Treasurer's Offiee, y
Memphis. Tenn., Sept. 20. ItitW. I
pui liSof th. K I rst Mortgage (7 per cent.)
w v r it pvr crui. iiopes oi ims
company.
awuui o
at this oflici
aturltv.
si a;
S. H. UK MB, Treasurer.
NOTICE.
'IMIK TocniToi.firas ok m MrHvnm AlVB
I Sr. Locis TRAicsroKTATios Company are
DCreiiy notified that tne second lastnlraent
of twenty five per cent, upon tne capital
stock ot said company has this day becti de
clared due. and payable at the office of the
Secretary and Treasurer, 27li Front street, ou
or liefore the 1st October.
By order of the it, mid of Direr tufa j v M s
5 TU f ' A. LCUMUlM, t
set Secretary and Treasurer.
BANKRUPT SALE.
BANKRUPT SALE.
In the District Court of the United Btatea,
for the Eastern District of Arkansas.
In the matter of i"elix ... McUavock, Bank
rupt. ON MONDAY, OCTOBER 7. l!l, at 10 o'clock
a.m., at the hall of the Chamber of Com
merce, In tne city of Memphis, I wlllorfer for
sale, to the best and highest bidder, fur eush
the etjultable right title and Interest of
me aisive luenuoneu Hsnkrupt In certain
uuies, uw& account anu cnoe in action
W. a PICKETT,
ea Assignee In Bankruptcy
GROCERS AND COTTON FACTORS
W. B.UALBUEA11,
I -ate of Meachem A Ualbreath.
Andrew Stewart, Wm. Stewart
ljile or Stewart A Bro., lie Arc, Ark
Jobs C. Pizek, late of Panola county, Mlsa.
Galbreath, Stewart & Co
WHOLESALE
GROCERS
ASD
COTTON FACTORS,
NO. II UNION STREET,
Stonewall Block, - Memphis, Tenn.
HAVKcn hand, and by constant additions
keep up one of Die largest and beat se
lected slocks of Groceries In the Southwest,
which we oiler to the trade on the most fa
vorable terms. Our stock comprises a full
and complete assortment of every article
kept in our Hue, together with BAOUINU,
TIES, etc, etc.
Consignment of Cotton solicited, and libe
ral cash advances made. Our Mr. Ualbreatii
gives this branch of our biudneas his'exelu
sive attention. Webaveourown Warehouse
and reel safe In guaranteeing satisfaction as
to weights
All o ton and other produce Insured while
In transit, or in store, aides contrary instruc
tions are given.
We return onr thanks for the liberal pat
ronage of past years, and from our friends
and the public a continuance of the same.
We make no pledges, but for the future Judge
us by the pant. Liberal cash advances made
on consignments to our New Orleans Mouse.
Stewart, Galbreath & Fizer,
COTTON FACTORS,
AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
No. 46 Union Street,
sel 2 New Orleans, La.
A. B. I'KEADVV KM.. B. D. TREADWELL,
Late Price s Tread well. Memphis, Tenn.
R. A. Tbeadwell, late of Marshall Co., Miss
Tread well Brothers,
WHOLESALE GROCERS
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
No 15 UNION STREET,
LEE BLOCK, - MEMPHIS, TENN"
H
AVE FOR SALE AND KEEP CONSTANT
ly on hand a lull supply, lu part as fol
lows:
100 casks Bacon;
200 barrels Mess Pork ;
250 kegs I.ard ;
100 hhds. Louisiana Sugar;
200 barrels Hard and Hetined Sugar;
200 package Molasses;
500 pieces Kentucky Bagging;
100 tons Iron Ties assorted ;
500 kea Nails all sizes;
500 barrels Flour;
500 barrels Salt ;
200 barrels Whisky all grades;
150 lioxea Cheese;
300 bags Coffee ;
Kxtra Sugar-cured Hams, and numerous
articles not mentioned. sel2
to
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WJt M. FARRINOTOS.
HENRY B. HOWELL
FARRINGTON & HOWELL,
Cotton Factors,
GROCERS AND COMMISSION
MERCHANTS,
266 Front Street, Corner of Court,
MEMPHIS, - - TENN.
tirK will be ready for business In our new
V store on 1st st utember. and will have a
good stockof Plantation Supplies to meet the
wants oi onr irienns.
4T Particular attention paid to sales of
Ontton, which will be stored in ourown ware
house, mid sampled stid weighed with care.
r ( oil on l.i slore will lie covered bv IBM
tsnot unlet otherwise Instructed: aud all
shipments by river Insured nnder our open
policy.
I'lJ r-Attivimivtts .v nu r.LU
LDWARM! CLARK. THAPDKt'S S. KLY.
wilsos x HABVEr.
CLARKE, ELY & CO.,
WHOLESALE
Grocers, Cotton Factors
-AND-
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
No. 302 Front Street, Memphis, Tenn.
KEEP constantly on hand a lare anil well
selecttsl Stock of Orocerles and Liquors,
-vnlrh we sell at lowest markets rates. Con
signments by river Insured unless otherwise
Instructed, vv e solicit eonsigumemw vi vui
ton, to which we devote special attention.
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NEWTON FORD & CO.,
WHOLESALE
Grocers, Cotton Factors
- AND -
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
17 UNION STREET,
Lee Block, Memphis, Tenn.
se? d W
BOOTS AND SHOES.
jOODBAR & GILLILAND,
Exclusive Wholesale Dealers in
BOOTS AND SHOES
HATS AND CAPS,
5X11 MAIN STREET, WEBSTEK
Memphis, Tennessee
BLOCK,
We are now receiving onr fall stock, the
largest we have ever offered to the trade.
M tm ii a nts will find It to their Interest to
examine before buying. angtl
500,000 TaTRS
OF
Boots and Shoes
AHEAD OF ALL COMPETITION
FRIEDMAN BROS
Wbolesalo
BOOTS AND SHOES
29S MAIN STREET.
1I"E solicit of Merchants only an inspee
v v tlon of the largest stock In our Hue ever
offered in the Southwest.
We can and are determined to orrvr such
Inducements that Memphis shall not be sec
ond to any other market for Boots aud Shoes.
KKIEDMAN BRU0-,
e 316 Main street. Memphis."
rB00T8&WESi 1870
JOSEPH S. LEVETT & CO.,
(The Oldest Shoe House In Memphis),
Defy Compotltion,
Respectfully invite Dealer and Planters to
call and examine onr new stock before pur
chasing. JOS. 8. LEVETT CO.,
e9 336 Main, corner Union S'reet.
INSURANCE.
810,000 For SIO
Premium when the Classes are Complete,
which are now being rapidly filled up.
MASONIC MUTUAL
Life Assurance Association,
OF MEMPHIS.
OFFICE NO Bt, FRONT ROW.
OFFICERS.
D. C. TRADER, President.
H. M. RAOAN, Secretary.
H. U. TRADER, Treasurer.
Board of Directors.
Hon. P. T. Scut'oos, of Hecrugs Du nean.
A. Vaccaro, Esq., of A. Vacearo ft Co.
J. 8. Stanton, Esq , ot Htanton Moore.
A. Hatchbtt, Hsu., of Rnsby A HutrheU.
Ed. Pieva-rr, jr., Esq., of Messlck A Pickett.
ADv.v stages. The advantages of this As
sociation over ordinary Life Insurance Corn
pan itis are: No panics can break it; the fee
are so small, and required to be paid at such
long intervals, that any man can secure to
his family a competency upon his death.
augStdaw
PLANTERS'
INSURANCE COMPANY
OF MEMPHIS, TENN.,
Office : Cor. Madison ana Second
J. 6. LONSDALE, President.
0. H. T0WNSEND, Vice-President.
WALTER A. GOODMAN, Secretary.
J. G. LONSDALE, Jr., Ass t Secretary.
MKKCTORS :
D. H. Towwikxd, J. J. Btsbt,
J. O. Lonsdale, K. Meyek,
O. V. Ram salt, 8. K. McXctt,
D. T. POETEK, J. K. FK.tXK,
C. W. Uoria, K. K. Hakuert,
A. Vaci ako, J.C. Neklv,
M. i. Wicks, E. J. Tavlob,
N. R. Sledoe.
Tills Company is prepared to do a general
r ire anu .vi.iriiic nasine. suits
CARPETINGS. ETC.
GLEN ECHO MILLS,
GERMANTOWN, PA.
NrCallum, Crease & Sloan,
Manufacturers, Importers and Whole
sale Dealers in
CARPETINGS,
Oil Cloths, Mattings, Etc.
7 K invite the attention of the trade to oar
T extensive stock of Domestic QuMtkM
both of our own and otber makes, as well as
a large assortment of Foreign Uootis.
WAREHOUSE,
No.
509 CHESTNUT STREET,
Opposite the State Honse,
set od rlxil.cioll3lii.
EDUCATIONAL.
Saint Mary's School,
CORNER of Poplar and Alabama. Mrs.
Maky K Poce, Principal. Will open for
HonraniK ana nay rcnoirs iMrva!
DAT I! SKFTSHSER.
No txiys over ten will
b receiTsl. No pupils are taken ry the
month. snKl)
THE MISSES BOWERS
0
PKNEP
the Fall Session of their
H0htl
On Monday, the 6th of September.
In future no boys will be admitted. A bill for
the the lncoruoration of the school will be iu-
rrodneetl at the next meeting of the LeclMla-
rure, wut n an opporEunuy oi pursuing a ci
legiate (
OOOIN Will I
beoffered to those desirous
f embracing it. Korclrculars apply at book-
swr-s, or im jjonroe sxreei.
sT0
BRINKLEY FEMALE C0LLE6E
South Terminus of DtSoto St.,
MEMPHIS, TENNESHEK
Will Opea its Second Session 1st September
Term for Five Month, Potitntly in Advemct:
For all branches of English. Latin,
Ureek. Kreneh, Hpnlsh, Urmn and
I tt-11 an t 30
For Harp, Uultar and Piano llnsic. Vo
cal and Instrumental 30 00
For Board, with Furnlalinl Room, Fol,
Mailt, u ashing ana rwei ud w
No Incidental or deduction..
No Book or Stationery furnished except
for cah. Bet. J. D. MipUH IH,
jyJ5 N rreMat.
KIT. VERNON INSTITUTE,
ENGLISH AND FRENCH
Home School for Young Ladies,
NO. 46 MT. VERNON PLACE,
BALTIMORE, - - MARYLAND.
MRS. MARY J.JONES, PRINCIPAL, AS
Hlstcd by Professor and Teachers of
great, ability. Thi (chool 1 situated in the
moat elevated and beautiful part of the city,
and offer to the paplLi all the comfort ot
home, t.igettier with the bost influence for a
good, useful and Christian training. The
tenth annual session will commence SEP-
TKMBEK WTH. For Circular address the
PrlnctpaL
rvE. ERRNrss Messrs, woodward, Baldwin
Co.. Baltimore: Baldwin Flemina. Xat-
clu- : Tho. S. Dugan, Em.. New Orleans: P.
Bethel!. Eso.. Memohix: Kred I.. Curteu
Tallehaee; Oen. R. E. Lee, Lexington, Va.;
Oeneral Francis Smith, Lexington, Va,: E.
Meyer, Memphis. augi
STORAGE FOR COTTON.
TTNTERWRITER'S WAREHOUSES.
(J SiurHK, Hepteraber 1, VMt.J
Merchants M e i h, i .kv n hmkn : The
above Hnoe are now open to receive and
dUiliarge cotton. Every facility to seller and
buyer will be given. To my old patron I re
turn yon my thank; for the future, I refer
you to the past long experience In the busi
ness. I hope to merit your patronage-.
" Safety, capacity and convenience uue
qualed. Rate same a flrst-claas house.
se!7 A. I. WHITFORD.
CAROLINA LIFE
OF MEMPHIS,
J. WICKS, President.
F. BOYLE, Secretary
Assets over ::::::: $600,000 00
Annual Income over : 500,000 00
" It Is with mnch pleaaare the Managers of this Company tender to 1M Policy Holder
and the public their cowgratnlatloaav on It aucceas for the past two years, lis present condi
tion and future prospect. Policies issued on all the Improved plan of Lite Insurance. Wo
refer the general public to onr policy holders.
S. 30. BUZjKXjH7, XJ. T. W AXITE, J"r-..
Spooial iVsoxit. State Agont for Tonn
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MAXUFACTUREKS AND DEALERS IN
TINWARE, STOVES. GRATES, MANTLES
HOllow Waro and Castings.
Jobbers in Tin Flate, Sheet Iron, Wire, Etc. Sole Agents for BUCK S PAT
ENT BRILLIANT COOKING STOVE the Best in the World.
EVAN'S
Slate & Marble
MANTLES
AND
ENAMELLED
GRATES. I
WOur stock U very large and complete, aud we are determined not ne undersold tn
any market. No. 806 IVIVX3J" JSTn 33 3511.
Opposite Peabody Hotel, Memphis. T.-mii.-
DISSOLUTION NOTICES.
DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP.
'I'HE firm of Eo
ster.
Trezevant Co., is i
Jl this ilny. by mutual acre
rr cement dissolved.
J. C. Mi Manas withdrawing. Ill bnstncM
of the lte Arm will be ajpaad bv tlie remaju
lng partner. F. W ROYSTER,
John p. trexe v a nt.
J. C. Mc.MANUS.
Memphis, Angnst 31.
CARD. In withdrawing from the Arm of
Royster, Trezevant Co., I deem 11 e
my friends anil thuse of our house, lo return
my warmest acknowledgments for past con- '
ndenee, hoplmr that my humble scrvtee I
may be placed successfully before them In a j
different sphere, while I trust a renewed and
Increased patronage may be extended to ray
old partners. j. C. McM.VN CS.
NEW FIRM.
THE undersigned respertfulL announce
to the public that tbey bave tills day en
tered into partnership, under the name and
style of
ROYSTER, TREZEVANT & CO.,
For the purpose of conducting the bfXnessof
REAL ESTATE BROKERS
ASD
-A.TT O T IONEE3RS
At the stand heretofore occupied by them
. at the
N. E. cor. Main and Jefferson Sts.
They beg to return their grateful acknowl
edgment of psst favors, aud sotleit a con
tiuiianceof public patronage.
THE RENTAL DEPARTMENT
Will be, as heretafnre, under the efficient
management of H. I. OCION. Enq., who will
attend to all rental matTr. Ustinz property
lor taxes, payment oi ti,xes. etc.
F. W. ROTSmit,
JOHN P. TREZEVANT.
bnjjhjetomrriawi
MEDICAL.
DR. RUSSELL'S
DISPENSARY.
THE LARGEST -VNIi OLDEST INSTITITION
wme Ki.Mi i.n I'M KHOLTM WEST;
ESTABLISHED NINE YEARS
And the only reliable place for the
Cure of Private Diseases.
Dr. RrsSEIX, No. !3 Norm Court Street,
uunumuK ut tour. rquAre, znempnis.
S vuu, an lv i n lf.l UI ffj
1 auknowlerured bv
parties Interested as by Ru
The Most Successful Physician
I
IT'
N the treatment of Private and secret dis
ease. Uulck. thuruutfh and uermntint
cores guaranteed la every ease, male or fe-
e. necent case or unoiiorrnea or SyphV
Uac ol
business. Se-ndiiryMriMaUBlat
eradicated without th ise of mercury. Suf
ferers from lBpteuey, or loa of Sexual
Power, restored to free vigor In a few week.
Gleet brObonorrhea of long standing, when
aH Internal remedie have failed, peruiacent
iy and speedily cured by a new treatment.
icuws oi seii-aouse ana excessive venery,
iffertng from six-rmatorrhea and Total tif nhv-
sirui wiu mi-ONU powe:
neatly cn red. arAll
er, apee lily ami pernta-
cousuilalloQS strictly
oonfldei;iiHi.-i
)T"Ofllce hours from f a.m. to 1 p m., and 3
to p.m. m? i '
1R. J. R RU88KLL, Consulting Physician.
L.G. WARRAJf.retry.
Treaties on Chronic Disease furnished free
on application. apIS diw
TO THE AFFLICTED.
DR. J. B. SCARBOROUGH
HAM PERMANENTLY LOCATED IN MEM
phis for the purpose of trestiux VENE
REAL DISEASES, SCItOFrTEA. DROPST,
DYSPEPSIA and CHRONIC DISEASES, of
every description. SVPHILLS especially he
ena-aaes to care effectually, without the use
of merenrr. and In much less lime than U
irenerally rutnad ; pkxiRln Ulm-.eif to pmar I
to effect a cure In cas.wherc his direction 1
lmnliritlv followed. All communication
by letter promptly answered.
MNi Mi. 227 Secwad Street, Up-stalre.
Jy7 daw
INSURANCE CO.
TENNESSEE.
J. T. PETTIT. Vice-President.
J. H. E0M0NDS0N. General Agent.
WALLACES
PATENT
COMBINATION
CRATES.
BANKS AND BANKING.
MERCHANTS'
NATIONAL BANK
OF MEMPHIS.
Doe a General lion king and Exchange
Business.
fhlectiojis made at all points and
Promptly Remitttd.
DIRECTORS :
AMOS VnnDRCFF, A. T. LACEY.
! , 7. 7, !?!
, tislts.
THUS. R MMITII,
A. J. WHITE.
II. A. PARTEE. J. R W ATKINS,
W. H. CHERRY.
W. H. CHERRY.
President.
AMOS WOODRUFF,
Vice President.
H. A
PARTEE.
C shier
J. FREEMAN.
Ass't Cathier.
HERNANDO
INSURANCE COMPANY
OF MEMPHIS,
OFFICE
No. 17
MADISON STREET.
w. s. Galbreath.
VIce-PmldeBt.
F. M. NELSON.
Ass't Secretary.
S. H. DUNSC0M8.
President.
BEN MAY,
Secretary.
OIRECTORS :
R H. DTN8COMB, JOE BRI CK.
E. K. RISK W. R UALRREATH.
K S. JONEk A. VAtr AHfA
I). H. TOWNSEND, LOUIS UANAUER,
N. FONTAINE.
IX3PRES AOAIXST LOSS BY FIRK. MA
JylD RIXK A .P RIVER RI9E7L
BAIMKIIMG HOUSE
OF
MEMPHIS LIFE
And Gen'l insurance Company,
Cor. Front and Madison Sts.,
0. B M0LL0Y, President.
8 FEBDIMAWD M0LL0Y, Cishier.
FIRST
NATIONAL BANK
OF MEMPHIS.
DIRECTORS:
B. EISM AN,
F. 8. DAVIS.
NEWTON FORD,
W. W. THATCHER'
J. T FA
SON, W. P. PROUDFIT,
U. U. Jl'DAlI
. W. TUOU,
W. R MOORE.
J. W. J EFFERSON,
CC. PARTEE.
J. N. OLIVER,
C. F. SAIITli,
F. S. DAVIS,
President.
NEWTON FORD,
Vice-President.
W. W. THACHER. Cashier.
CANDLES, OIL AND SOAP.
Cornwall & Brother,
LOUISVILLE, KY.,
M An u fact u rent of
Candles, Oil and Soap
Jw Onr CArnileH are f&refnUy weiiehett.
ma tner snjnor .tiartries are nneualed
by any in the trade.
p&- All wholesale
filled.
or icre
promptly
aeltt
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