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Memphis daily appeal. [volume] (Memphis, Tenn.) 1847-1886, November 26, 1869, Image 2

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THE MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL.- FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1869.
TO THE PUBLIC.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION:
Daily appeal, one year , J10 00
Bcttdat Appeal, one year 2 50
TJAILT A aCKOAT APPEAL, our -h." . 12 00
Wexklt Appeal, one year. 2.50
Wiiilt appeal, In club of two p, 4 00
Diilt, delivered In city by Carriers,
ven papen per 25
Jne Wekelt Appeal la regnlarly dlseonttn
ned at the end of the time subscribed and
paid for nnleaa renewed In advance. Thla
role 1 adhered to without respect to per-Ma
RATEjg OF ADVERTISING :
Transient advertisement. Drat insertion, fl ;
act) subsequent Insertion M cents per
Ptosis. ,
Advertisements In Want or Rent column, 10
cent per line each Insertion.
Double column Advertisements 26 per cent.
additional to ordinary rates.
Local notices, foorth page, 20 cants per line
for each Insertion.
City items, second page, 15 cents per line each
Insertion.
Bpeclal notices, third pace, 10 cents per line
each Insertion,
jlonthly ad vertlsementa, IS for first, and 4 for
each additional Square.
Advertisement Inserted at Intervals, to be
charged 26 per cent, additional In propor
tion. Announclnersndldates for State, Connty and
MnnlclpalOfflces. (10 each, to be paid In ad
vance In every Instance.
Marriages and Deaths are published as news;
hl Ann. n' i m .11 1 u r nnt'rHi of M n Prf BBBSI
Tributes of Respect. Obituaries and Funeral
Notices, will be charged as other advertise
ments. All Church Notices or notleee of meetings
of Charitable or Benevolent Societies, will
be charged half price.
BryDAY Appeal, Advertisement Inserted
in the So pay Appeal will be charged one
sixth additional.
Viiilt Appeal. Advertisements Inserted
In the Weekly Appeal alone, one half ot
Daily rates. In both Daily and Weekly.
one fourth additional to Daily rates.
In all oases all advertisement are considered
due after first Insertion.
A Rquare Is the space occupied by eight lines
of solid nonpareil.
CORRESPONDENCE.
Correspondence, on Public Events, solicited
from everv part of the United states.
KEAT1NU. ENOLIrtH A CO.
MEMPHIS APPEAL
F. A. TYLER,
EDITOR.
FRIDAY MORNING,
NOV. 26, 1869.
Desiring, on the part of the Ap
FEaL, to maintain an attitude of dig
nity and respect for our readers, we
are nevertheless driven by the late
attacks of the Aralanche.&nd especially
by an article of yesterday, to say, that
paper has become disgracefully abu
sive and indecent. That article contain-
an assertion bo infamously and
deliberately false that we can think
of but one word in the English lan
guage well suited to describe the true
character of the author and that is a
word of two syllables and four letters.
Whatever else may be the faults of
the editors, publishers, employees or
writers for the Appeal, of this at
least we are sure that no one of
them has ever violated the confidence
of toeial life, or betrayed a woman!
Ax effort is proposed to be made to
decrease e ratio of representation at
the next meeting of Congress, for the
purpose of increasing the number of
representatives. To what extent this
will increase the evils suffered by the
country in consequence of the exist-
i-rt,f of i4uch st Iwviv in res of thi
adoption of the measure, remains to j
be seen. The argument used for it is
that th. ronstir.tiuir-Un aro so Ihiw as !
to prevent members from attending
to ail their demands without employ
ing clerks. They have little time for
the public business any way, it being
necessary to spend the larger half of
their time In gambling, speculations,
frolics, and in dealing with lobbyists
for their own pecuniary profit. We
rather think it would be cheaper to
pay the clerks than to manufacture
any more of those gentry.
The
Northern Radical press pro
nounces the vote of Mississippi and
Texas for the XYth Amendment
"morally certain." It would seem to
be both morally and ph.'-sically cer
tain that States under military control
would obey orders. Congress and the
Executive thus have full 9way. But
will not a free people inquire whether
compliance with the mere forms of the i
Constitution, and a result obtained by
dureas and force is obligatory? Was
It intended by the framers of the Con
stitution that it should be amended iu
any instance whatever.except through
the unconstrained will of a majority
of the people, expressed through the
independent action of the Legislatures
of the States? Without that, can the
Constitution be amended and the peo
ple of the United States or any one
State be lawfully bound?
It is to be doubted, in the first place,
whether the amendment will carry,
even with the use of all the forcible
and fraudulent means devoted to that
purpose. In the next, it is not to be
believed the people of the Union will
permit an amendment of the Constitu
tion by force, even if that amendment
was one so good that under other cir
cumstances they would freely adopt
it. If it is adopted in the shameful
manner proposed, the subject will be
agitated and fought so long as there is
a Democratic party in this country ;
and they who go for it will be classed
with the Badical party. Yet there are
those in Tennessee, even professing to
be Democrats, who favor the mon
strosity of negro sufftage, and pro
pose to fix it firmly and forever as the
organic law of the State! Many of
them confess that negro suffrage in
the abstract is all wrong. And yet
they are w illing voluntarily to tlx it
on the State! Our street-corner poli
ticians used to be better statesmen
than that. But the times are out of
joint. An idea prevails with many
that opposition to negro suffrage is
pernicious agitation, and that we had
better consent to it for the sake of
peace. We tell these men that so
timid a policy will only make agita
tion of that matter eternal. Nothing
but the doctrine that white men shall
rale the Amer can domain will ever
go down with American citizens.
And until that is effected or an em
pire established agitation will never
cease.
How are men or journals of the
country which advocate negro suf
frage to be classed as either Demo
cratic or anti-Radical? Looking to
the next Presidential election, and the
existing issues between parties, of
which the New York Times (Radical;
regards the XYth Amendment as
chief, that journal says:
" It were useless, in such a struggle,
for the Democratic party to pretend
that the great work of the war is com
plete without this amendment. The
ptKopie are not to be hoodwinked on
any such pretext. The Republican
party, with President Grant in the
lead have planted themselves upon
this measure as the essential capstone
to the great work of universal free
dom, equal civil and political rights
and equal suffrage, without distinc
tion of race or color, and the perpetu
ity of the Union against the possibil
ity ot future agitation. State or N li
OI iusuic ofciuaLiuu, ""t til
tional. on the negro sDituss. In brief,
j
thin amendment in part and parcel of
the old iasues 1860 to lt6o between
the two parties."
That in the great issue for the people.
It is the issue between Radicalism
and it opponents, and men must
range Ukamselves on one side or the
other, who will not stand neutral.
We stand with the Democratic party
on this issue for two reasons: One i9
that we hate Radicalism and all its
infamous works. The other is that
we desire to stand up for what yet
remains of the rights of the South.
As exchange insists that some con- j
straint ould le placed upon Con- j
gress in the matter of legislating I
money into their own pockets. Meas
ures often come tiefore them in which ;
they have a direct or indirect pecuni
ary interest. Two-thirds of the Rad
ical members are said to be either j
stockholders, or officers of national '
bank.-, or owners of manufacturing j
establishments of one description and
another. As they have no shame, it j
would be well for the country If j
means could be devised to place them j
in strait jackets. It might save some j
millions of the public money.
A New York special to the Phila- j
delnhia Aae says: " Every day the
question of n-suming specie payments
is now the leading topic of conversa
tion in Wall street. The World, this
morning, has a double-leaded special
from Washington, professing to give
the programme as agreed upon by
Boutwell and leading financiers, and
which is to lead the wav to redemp-
L. . . ..
tion The points are well l .
gether and I have reason to believe
that before many weeks have Pl
tneso same points wun some siignt
variation- will be officially placed be
fore the country. They are first, the
redemption of National Bank notes
for greenbacks by July 1, next.
Second, the redemption of greenbacks
in gold after January 1, MBh Third,
I t i...,- . V 1 , 1
a 1 1 i Mil iv i u ; mw ujpihi wuui mmr-
ing interest at four per cent;, in gold.
Fourth, no smaller bills to be issued
than five or ten dollars, the United
States or the tanks to take charge of
the circulation. In the United States
the plain will be somewhat similar to
that of the Bank of England. Ot
course it is impossible to say that this
Is exactly Mr. Boctwell's pro
gramme, but I know from well in
formed Wall street bankers that this
plan is the only one that can possibly
be accepted, and which is likely to
satisfy both East and West."
There is an idea existing in the
minds of some that the success of dem
agogues, the giving out of huge eon
tracts, and immense profits derived
from them by contractors, and the pec
ulations of party leaders benefit the
laboring population. But there can
be nothing more untrue, and those
connected with labor unions should
carefully inquire into the matter. A
few laborers may gain some small and
temporary reward and day wages
from such a cause, but the ultimate
result is the injury of themselves and
families, and the whole body of the
poor. If in New York the compara
tively small taxation compared with
that of this city is ruinous, how must
the te here? We subjin the foI"
lowing the New York Time:
ut? tuiiucurai uy
what seems an immediate Rain from
a corrupt proceeding of one of his
leaders. Thus, if a courthouse is built
for tive millions which ought to have
cost two and a half millions, the work
men ot the city see the profits of the
undertaking to their class in supply
ing work, but do not see that this ad
ditional expense, pocketed by jobbers
and raised from taxation, is at once
charged to them by capital in the
siiapeoian advance in rents. And " Bill Arp " for the following enttour
w hat is worse, capital mast charge , aginy and characteristic report oi the
more than the extra taxation, because reunion of the Army of the Tennes
of the risk of similar future jobs. It see. It will be read by the friends of
is not the wealthy who pay for such the Appeal with the " laughter fol
plundering contrac ts and useless ex- ; lowing arter" that alwavs waits upon
pemlitures, but the poor and middle
classes. ;
Somekind' of corrupt administra- i
tion the laboring slass know and feel .
at once. Thus, if the streets are to be
t.v.sl at a certain HMHa uml rh
contractor onl v half does his work and way frum Georgy just in time to see
IHX-kets half the cost, all the cartmen the grate Convenshun, the grate Ree
i and drivers of the city suffer the loss ! Unnion uv the Army uv Tennessee " j
! to their dailv business in damage to i and " the Cavalry uv the West," they
teams
and wear and tear of horses. !
Mr. Peter Cooper, in a recent address
... -
to workmen, said that the loss to cart
men alone for this city from this
source is equal to a thousand dollars a
day. Most of the losses, however, to
the latoring class from the jobbery of
our city governors is indirect. It'ap
pears in increased reut of tenements
and shops, in the consequent higher
price of commodities, and also in the
withdrawal of capital from the city.
It any intelligent laborer desires to
see what effect unequal taxation can
have on an important branch ol busi
ness, let him go around our docks and
ship-yards and iron-works at the pres
ent time. He will not find in all S'ew
York, with its immense wealth and
boundless commerce, more than one
ship in process of building to-day.
He will see melancholv lines of aban
doned shipyards, iron-works without
business, docks that are einptv; and i
if he will go to the tenement houses
near by, he will meet with the more
i melancholy sight of room after room
; inhabited by strong men, caulkers.
I ship-wrights, dockyard laborers and
j iron-workers who are sitting idle, eat
ing the bread of poverty, and hasten
i ing toward a terrible future of want
: and suffering.
The causes of this calamity, as any
j one will inform him, are not alone the
heavy national taxes on the raw ma
terial entering into the structure of
j ships, but also the heavy local taxa
i tion of New York, as compared with
European cities. This taxation weighs
upmi every part of a shipbuilder's
work. It adds to his rent, to the
wages he must pay, and to the cost of
I all his material, as compared with a
foreign rival. He must pay for all the
jobberies of the City Fathers in all his
expenses. If he should undertake to
run a line of American steamships to
Liverpool, he would start with a local
j tax of nearly three per cent, to com
pete with an English company, who
barelv oav one Dercent. All his labor
on board ship, his provisions and ma
terial would, in one shape or another,
be paying proportions of this tax.
The result of this complication of tax
es, local aud national, on a branch of
business which must compete with
foreign branches, comparatively un
burdened, has been to drive capital
away from it, and almost to bring it
to an end.
This is only one instance. If our
intelligent laborer could take an ex- j
cursion of a hundred miles around
New York, he would see everywhere 1
springing up in the comparatively
untaxed rural districts, huge factories,
sugar refineries, breweries, sewing i
machine factories and hundreds of
similar establishments. The cause of ,
this exodus of capital he would dis
cover to be the desire to escape the i
local taxation of New York city, j
Again, if he would inquire further, j
he would discover that a great deal of
the printing and book-making of New I
York is done in distant districts, even
in Ma-isachusetts. on mronni ,.fth.
i cneaper moor there; the cause of this
! greater cheapness being the lower
rents and less uersonal expenses of the
operative, these again being reduced
i by an honest local administration,
j He would find also that numerous
branches of other manufacturing,
whose products are sold here, are car-
ried oil in New England, though this
city has more facilities for them, be
j cause of the heavy taxation and higher
jnt.-e oi moor nere
... .
ine workiutr vlasm shnniii timlcr. i a
sni that re8ult 0 this increasing :
under and ..rw.rm. 4o..4in K
our city authorities, i BUre to be most
disastrous to themselves. There will
re nosts oi unemployed men in the
city this winter. Many branches of
production will be closed. The masses
of poor will suflfer with want, but the
leaders they have chosen and the
demagogues who represent them will
be reveling in wealth, wrung from
them.
The Nashville Union and American
answers in the negative the question
whether the XFVth Amendment dis
qualifies ex -Confederates from hold
ing seats in the State Convention.
The section of that amendment af
fecting this question is as follows :
" No person shall be a Senator or
Representative in ( 'ongress, or elector
of President or Vice-President, or
hold any office, civil or military, un
der the United States or under any
State, who having previously taken
an oath as a member of Congress or
as an officer ot the United States or as
a member of any State legislature or
as an executive or judicial officer of
any State, to support the Constitution
of the United States, shall have en
gaged in insurrection or rebellion
against the same or given aid or m
fort to the enemies thereof. But Con
gress may by a vote of two-thirds of
each House remove such disability."
Our cotemporary denies that to be
a delegate to the State Convention is
to " hold any office, civil or military,
under the United States or under any
State." It regards oflftees as the crea
tures oi tne constitution, out a uor.
j vention as the creator of the Consti
tution itself, and as deriving its
power from that always inhering
in the people, and which is
set forth in every American Dt clara-
tion of Rights. It says: " As an evi-
i..fi-. lit f-Hiu ir i. hi.ii" Li- till. Kiasjf
. . ...
authorities that a person, holding an
i offlce under the UniSlsiteH or under
. a at the
: membw of a 8tate Convention to
make or amend the State Constitu
tion. Chief Justice Marshall, while
Chief Justice of the United States, was
a member of the Virginia Constitu
tional Convention. Judge Peck,
while Judge of the Supreme Court of
this State, was a candidate for the
i Convention of 1S34, which formed our
present State Constitution."
The same ground was taken in an
article published by us some time
since, from the pen of a distinguished
citizen of the city. But he made a
further suggestion, which we regard
as also conclusively -settling the whole
i question. That was, that no man was
to be presumed to " have engaged in
insurrection or rebellion," or to have
"given aid or comfort to the enemies"
of the United States, but all to be in
Ml until the contrary appeared by
due trial and conviction by a jury, ac-
cording to all the rights, privileges
and forms of the law of the land. All
not so convicted are held innocent by
our law, and such also as are the sub
jects of the amnesties, are in the pre
cise position they were before the war,
because the amnesty blots out the
crime, if any has been committed, as
well as the punishment; and convic
tion after the amnesty is as impossible
as it could be if no crime had ever
been committed, or color of reason for
placing the citizen in jeopardy, ever
given.
BILL ARP.
His Letter to the Appeal About the
" Ree-Union uv the Army uv
the Tennessee."
What the Great Generals Spoke
About and What They Did nt
Say Anything About.
We are indebted to our old friend
Hon. C. W. Smith's racy and original
productions :
Lkwikvillk Kentucky Nov ntih lso
Muter Kditur up Ms Heieal
1er
I arruv heerawl the
was several uv em; sum tellers with
maggnyfyin specks, thunk they ,vas
l ..11 i J rat : . . 1 f
about 2 hundred and 50 in awl, frum
dinerent parts uv the cun try ; 1 w:ent
to the Wiseacre Hall, to see 'em min
gle together, and heer Uinrul Shur
man spekeapeace, Uinrul Pope also
spoked, but did'nt reach as fur as he
did when the " Boys in Gray " was a
helpin him up behind; tiinrul Wilson
spouted for the Cavalry, and several
other small fry spoked uv battles their
friends wus in ; but they awl forgot to
say anything about Bu.ly Run and
several other runs whar they bore a
extinguished part ; Ginrul Grant did'nt
cum. but sent his blessin by Ginrul
Sherman, he's the feller what made
the march to the sea, as there wasn't I
anything else in partiklar to march
agin jist then, while they wuraspeek
in, i sed to a feller who wur a takin
notes, rather a lank lookin cuss, ses i,
is this the full strength uvthe kumpny
ses he nothings will be much stronger
wnen uie cuiiuu uretnnn cuius m,
and ef you want to see em out in full
force, jist go to the bankwet at the
Gait House, akkordinly i went to the
Gait House at 9 o'clock, and when
they awl kums in, i seed the same
hungry lookin feller with his note
book ; i ses to him ole feller, i see you
ar on hand, ses he, yes i am always
on hand at sich ockashuus as this, and
he amejuntly put up his notes, and
went into things on the table tolura
ble promiskusly ; arter a while, when
he stopped to take breth, ses i, ole fel
ler, whar ar you frum, ses he i am the
currier uv of the Journal, ses i to my
self, he must be a strong feller, a neer
relashun uv Grant, then ses i, old
feller, did it ever okkur to
you that things is lookin a little de
lappadated about this ere eonsern, yes
says he, they was orfully thinned out
while they was a travellin down
South, some years ago, in the times
what tried mens soles, they was oust
about IM thousand stroug but now
they cant muster over hundred and
"lOorso; poorfellows, i felt sorry fur
'em, and the thought was so mellon
kolly we left as soon as the wine gin
out, and Currier, with teers iu them
eyes uv his'n told me Butler was thar
in disgise, and advised me to go im
mejuntly to my Hotel, and keep my
hand on my PocketBook, but as i lost
mine endurin Wilsons rade on Selmy,
i was'nt much skeered.
Well i bev arruv at my Hotel, and
write you this ere hurried e Pistol,
and no more at present from your'n
BILL ARP
what used to live in the cuntry neer
Rome Georgy.
SINGULAR. DEATH.
A Mother is Seized with a Fainting Fit,
Falls Upon and Kills Her Child.
anil
From the Xew Albany i Ind.) Ledger, jut h.
One of the saddest accidents we
have been called upon to record for
many months, ix-curred yesterday fore
noon at the residence of Mr. Adolph
Jergens, on State street, between Oak
and Elm. Mrs. Jergens had seated
herself, with her child in her arms,
for the purpose of nursing it, in front
of the grate. While thus occupied
she was suddenly seized with a faint
ing tit, and fell forward striking her
head against the iron fender.
How long she remained man insen-
ihlo oonrlitinn -ihi. firtdni nut L-.w...-
v v nuirt , uus
hi-n iiinrini;ncs minmui . t...
found herself lying upon her child
and her head bleeding profusely from
a deep cut made in it by her fall, she
placed the child in the cradle, not sus
pecting that it was hurt, and in her
stunned and half insensible condition
not noticing it particularly, and ran
into the residence of Dr. Fischer, next
door, for medical aid for herself. With
the Doctor she soon returned to her
own house, when to her horror she
discovered that her child was dead.
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
30
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DRY GOODS.
WHOLESALE
DRY GOODS
B Lowenstein&Bros
HAVE JUST RECEIVED
200 cases beautiful New Prints,
100 cases Bleached Domestic.
100 cases Cotton Plaids,
100 cases Jeans,
50 cases Linseys.
50 cases Flannels,
20 cases Shawls,
5 cases Cloaks,
50 cases Breakfast Shawls,
5 cases Arabs,
20 cases Balmoral Skirts,
10 cases Boulevard Skirts,
100 bales Osnaburg,
100 bales Brown Domestic,
50 bales Blankets,
25 bales Kerseys.
Also, an Immense New Stock of
Dress Goods,
Hosiery,
Gloves and
Notions,
WHICH WE OFFER TO
Country and City Merchants
As LOW as can be shipped from New
York City. Close buyers would do
well to give us a call before making
their purchases.
B. Lowenstein & Bros.
242 & 244 MAIN ST.,
Entrance to Wholesale Department,
244 Main Street.
N.B. We are the excliulve Agent lor
WARD'S PAPER COLLARS.
LIQUOR DEALERS.
A.V AOCAKO, B. VAOCAJK), . B. YAOCAJM)
A. VACCARO & CO..
Importers and Dealer In
WINES, LIQUORS, CIGARS,
ETC., ETC., ETC.,
324 Front Street. Memphis. Tenn.
NOTICE.
ALL persons are hereby cautioned against
trading for eleven promissory notes for
" each, dated September 28, 188M, made liv
the undersigned, payable to the order of
Menken Hroihers, at, respectively. 2. a 4.S.8
7.8,,10, 1! and ft monftw from date T&
consideration having been received lor said
notes, the same will not be paid.
no A. M. SMITH.
HIDES AND LEATHER.
SCHEIBLER & CO.,
dealers in
FOREIGN GOODS,
SHOE FINDINGS
AND MANUFACTURERS OP
LEATHER
No. 203 Main Street,
The Highest Prices Paid lor
HIDES, PELTRIES, BEESWAX,
TALLOW, WOOL.
ASHBROOK & WHITE,
Successors to Geo. Philleh A Co,,
DEALERS IN
Hides and Peltries
Highest Cash Prices Paid for
! v1es,
Turs,
Deer Skins,
Beeswax,
Tallow,
Wool, Etc.
Constantly on Consignment,
Harness, Bridle, Skirting and
Sole Leather,
ADAMS STREET,
Between
sel
Front Row and Water St.,
MEMPHIS, TENN.
D. B. THOMAS.
B. F. GROSS
THOMAS & GROSS
MANUFACTRUERB OF
LEATHER
AND DEALERS IN
Leather & Shoe Findin's
Foreign and Domestic Calf and Kip
Skins, Tanners' and Curriers'
Tools, Tanners' Oils, Etc.,
366 Main St., Memphis, Tenn.
ovCaah paid for Hides and Leather In the
muitti. h19
STOVES, ETC.
CHARTER OAK STOVE
CATECHISM :
QueMion. Who made tlie Unit Charter Oak
Stove?
Aniir.G. V. Fllley, of rtt. Louln.
When was It Hurt made?
A. In the year 1852.
Q. Are they good Stoves?
4. The " bent in the world."
Q. How are they made?
A. Krom the beat quality of Iron.
Q. Who aayH they are good Stoves?
A. All Hume that aae them?
y. How many were sold In 1868?
A. There were 13,347 sold.
How many out of that n m her failed ?
A. Not one.
Q. Who sells the genuine Charter Oak In
Memphis?
A. J. r. axjtiAliKLi t t:U., -JZJ mJLLa ST.
Are there imitation Htoveeol that name?
JX.
Yen: plenty of them.
U. How can purchasers tell the genuine?
A. By aeeiUK the name of U. rTFUley on
each Stove,
Q. How should parties order them?
A. Tell your merchant to get Fllley'.
Q. Does J. F. Hchabel A Co. have a good
stock?
A I'. . " ihrt ttrll fhrm fit XThtitrittl nnsl ttr-
tail, and keep TIX WARE, CAtiTiytiU, etc., in
good wpply.
j. f: schabel & co.,
NO. 227 MAIN STREET, MEMPHIS,
Solo Agents.
I anl7
THE FAVORITF
Is guaranteed to be In all respects a
FIRST-CLASS COOK STOVE.
Call and examine them. For sale hy
1. S. JTJKES,
328 Second Street
SV Roofing, Guttering and Oenernl
Work solicited and promptly executed, oc
ECONOMICAL FUEL.
The Best
AND THE
Cheapest Fuel
IN THIS MARKET!
TMIAT IT MAY
BE MORE OESEltALLY
tin urtlcle uf FITKI. lnr
L Ititroduretl rui an urtlcle of
household purpoeN, the
Memphis Gaslight Co.
Will contfnuethesaleofcOKK fortwo weeks,
at the very low price of
10 Cts. Per Bushel,
At whleli rate It 1 cheaper than
PITTSBURG COAL
AT
Fifty Cents Per Barrel!
It Supplies Greater Heat, without
Smoke, Soofor Dust.
Try II, he convinced, and
SAVE MONEY!
For Sa e at the Company's Office, and by
Coai Dealers generally.
no9
W FIRST WEMIUM J.
OF A BXXiTBS X1D4L f
WAS TO
V
V-
BARRETT'S HAIR RtSTORATIVE
Utt X. H. Stat a grlcuilurm, Sooietj. at in
BARRETT'S
Vegetable Hair Restorative
ammt Qrj Hair to m n alarm) roim. Pr.
ft mm urn nib oi the Umtr CbtiM tu. d
i rMUUr.tfccirertfUit.' ornate action. Eradl
eatei 1 tudrvff ajul Uiaof l'rtMii
a. Heir Lit. i ox out. ! a Sprior Dreamg jC
Hesftie tac m wjarteaa titreaawaj,
J. R. BARRETT & CO., Proprietors,
SiKWin '. H.
Wholesale Agents, -Mom pis is.
W For sjtle ro lidrugslsU. cl
COTTON FACTORS.
THOMAS TROUT & SONS,
COTTON AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
204 Front Street,
MEMPHIS,
TENNESSEE.
sw I.lbernl advances made on consign
ment of Cotton to our correspondents,
Hi'BAfiUK. SOULS A Co., Boston :
Williams, Bih.nik A Co., New York;
Mohdkcai A Co., Baltimore;
H. Sloan Hoxs, Philadelphia. oeSI
W. L. Stewaet.
Of Shelby Co., Tenn.
J. H. - K i I.I.HI s
Late Madison Co., Tenn.
STEWART & SKILLERN,
Cotton Facto i
AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
NO. 300 FRONT STREET,
Memphis, Tennessee.
w 111 attend promptly to the sale of Cot-
ton and Produce, and
mi
orders for supplies
TUT OUHtOlUlT'-
sex
SHANE, HARRIS 8l CO.,
COTTON FACTORS
A!D
General Commission Merchants
2M Front Street, Memphis.
r- We confine ourselves strictly to the
elllna of Produce, and hazard nothing by
speculation. see
R. W. Price, late of Eastport, Miss.
J. C. Terby, late of Henderson, Terry Co.,
New Orleans.
PRICE 8l TERRY,
Cotton Pacto x-s
AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
No. 9 Union Streets,
Over Meacliam
MEMPHIS, - -
si
Troadwell'fl.
- TKNMES.SE.
T. A. NELSON & CO.,
Cotton Factors
AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
No. 8 Jefferson Street, Momphia, Tenn.
Liberal cash advances mode on con
sign merits to them, or to their New Orleans
house, N K1.S0N . Lan en 1 er . Co. sea
E. B. Webber,
Fayette Co., Tenn.
John W. Webhcb.
Fayette Co., Tenn.
E. B. WEBBER Sl BRO.,
COTTON FACTORS
AND
G e n I Commission Merchants,
230 Front St., Memphis, Tenn.
V Consignment uf Cotton flollcited. Lib
eral adv.'uu'P maduon ronlKuimnt.slu.ture
BaKKi'm, anil Plantation Supplies fur-
nlahed at the lowest market rate. auiM
"Robert Black, Z. X.-Estks
Jam. W. Anderson, Jackson, Tenn.
BLACK, ESTES Sl CO.,
Huceesaors to ITorton, Kstea A Co.,
nflTTflN FAHTflRS
and commission merchants,
No. II Monroe St., Memphis, Tenn.
4 Consignments of Cotton, Tobacco and
Urain xoltcited. Bugging, Hope and all Hup
piles furnished at the lowest rates. Liberal
cash advancements made on Cotton in store
or in transit. sel
OUR 30TH YEAR IN MEMPHIS.
TRADERS,
OOTTOKT FACTORS
AMD
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
No. 324 Front Street,
COIWIONMKNTS to as hy river ln.nred In
mir open policy. Onlern promptly tilled,
and liberal csuih advanoeRon produce. A con
tinual tncreaee of oar buHlueea is the beat evi
dence of nnllKfactlon given. ael !.tw
WAMH. It. TAYIAIK.
W
W. L. KAIirilKD
'aura.
TAYLOR, RADFORD & CO.,
COTTON FACTORS,
AUD
General
Commission
Merchants,
I - MONROK HTKKKT. tie! ween Main and
YD Front, Memphis, Tenn. Bagging, Rope,
Ties and Mupplleti furnlnbed on reasonable
terms. Bpeeial attention given to tilling cash
orders.
All consignments insured, unless other
wise Instructed. i
CHAS. H. D0RI0N, Jr.,
(Late of MohIiv 4 Porlou),
Cotton Factor,
Office, No. 15 Mosby & Hunt's Building,
(TJP-8TAIRS),
304 Front St.. B04
MEMPHIS, - TKNJf.
r Haiaimn. Rope, Tl
nlslitMl cUNtomerH.
and Huppll
for-
nolS
J. F. DOWDY,
Cotton. Factor
AND
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
No. 264 Front Street, Memphis, Tenn.
V Liberal caah advances made
RlKnmenU.
on con-
W. W MII.AM.
B. BOWI.IKO.
MILAM, BOWLING
CO.,
COTTON FACTORS,
General Commission Merchants,
2W Front Street. Memphis.
oclB
J. JLm. verse
COTTON FACTOR
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
314 Front Street,
Memphis, : : : : Tennessee.
V Bagging anil Ties famished to custo
mers at lowest market rates. Ml 'iAW
P. B. J ON KB.
J . t). JliNi
JONES BROTHERS,
Commission Merchants,
COTTON,
TOBACCO AND PRODUCE FACTORS
No. 8 Madison St., Memphis, Tenn.
W Consignments made as hy river are cor
ered hy open policy of Insurance. se7 .saw
8. Mai mi k Wf.iib.
J. F. MKLLKR8.
S. M. WEBB CO.
COTTON FACTORS
A.1D
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
No. 9 Stonewall Block, Up-atairs,
Union Street, bet. Front Row and Main St.,
s7 dAW MEMPHIS, TENN.
HUGH TORRANCE,
Cotton Factor
AND
General Commission Merchant,
No 10 lefferson St., Titus Block,
OPPOSITE COMMERCIAL HOTEL,
MEMPHIS. TENNESSEE.
nol8 w
Wm. McUck,
Memphis, Tenn.
R. P. Hbskrok,
Late of 8hane, Bell A Co
M'CEE 8l HERRON,
COTTON FACTORS
AM
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
264 Fbont Street,
Between Court and Jefferson, Memphis, Tenn.
r Bagging, Rope aud Iron Ties furnUhad
at lowest market rates. se4 daw
STORAGE FOR COTTON.
UNDERWRITER'! WAREHOUSES. )
Memi-h is. September lit, 18W.J
MEsCHAsTi Memphis-Uzjrri.BMBN : The
above Houses are now open to receive and
discharge cotton. Every facility to seller and
buyer will be given. To my old patron I re
torn you my thanks ; for the future, 1 refer
you to the past long experience In the busi
ness. I hope to merit your patronage.
r Safely, capacity and convenience une
qual ed. Rates same as first-class houses,
self A. ft. WH1TFORD.
INSURANCE.
PEOPLE'S
INSURANCE COMPANY
OFFICE :
16 MADISON ST.. MEMPHIS, TENN.
TAKES
Marine and River Risks.
Fire.
CAPITAL STOCK, $300,000 00
ASSETS :
Casta Assets,
Stockholders Notes Secured,
$(79,l 82 t 2
150,000 00
$329,182 12
No Liabilities whatever, except amount
necessary to Reinsure Outstanding
Risks, say $25,000 00.
W.B.GREEWUVWJAMES ELDER,
President. Vice-Pres't.
J. A. SIMMONS, Sec y.
DIRECTORS:
W. B. (UlEfLAir, W. M. Fabrixotoh,
James Elder, C. W. (Ioyee,
John Overton, Jr.. N. H. Bruce,
OOH EUGBKK MaUEVNBY.
GROCERS AND COTTON FACTORS.
Ed. J. Taylor",
Uf DeHoto Co., Mlaa.
W. C. Bptland.
Of DeHoto Co., Ml
TAYLOR II RUTLAND,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
Grocers, Cotton Factors
AND -
commission merchants
NO. 304 FRONT STREET,
Monny and Hunt'H Block, - Memphis, Timr,
w Comlirnmenta xollctted. nuM
M. L. MSACIIAM.
A. C. Trkadwki.l
Meacham & Treadwell,
Wholesale Grocers
AND
COTTON FACTORS,
NO. 9 UNION STREET,
Stonewall Block, - Memphis, Tenn.
WE are now receivings complete and care
fully selected stock of UHOCEU1KS.
Our kcmkIh wore shipped at very low rates ot
freight, and we offer them to the trade at low
prices. Call aud examine.
VMpeclal attention given to the sale of '
mi. and oonHigluneni solicited. se6dw
NEWTON FORD & CO.,
WHOLESALE
Grocers, Cotton Factors
AND -
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
17 UNION STREET,
Lee Block.
se2 daw
Memphis, Tenn.
9 HILL.
S. FONTAINE
HILL, FONTAINE &, CO
Successors to Willi amsou, Hill A Co.,
WHOLESALE GROCERS
COTTON FACTORS
A.VD
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
326 FRONT STREET,
MEMPHIS,
TENNESSEE
HAVE for sale, and keep constantly on
hand, a full assortment, comdstiug In
part as foil wh :
100 casks Bacon ;
SOU barrels Mess Pork:
100 barrels Jowls and Rumps:
300 kegs Lard:
100 hhds. Louisiana Hugar;
ax) sacks Toffee;
300 pkgs. Moiassen hhds.. bbls.. hits 4 tts.
1000 pieces Kentucky Baggins M. it M. Ky.
pv, Landemau, and J. .v D. Flax.)
100 tons celebrated " Arrow Tlea,'
600 kegs NallK assorted Rlzea;
500 barrels Flour ;
North Carolina Hoe cat and gross Herring
100 bbls. pure, copper-distilled Whisky ;
100 barrels rectified Whisky;
50 barrels Koblnson County Whisky.
Calling your attention to the above, we re
spectfully request acontlnuatlon ot your pa
tronage, and promise, by strict attention to
business, with the interest of our patrons
ever before us, to merit It.
aug!8 dw HILL, FONTAINE A CO.
J. T. KAHUAHON.
C C. CLAY
FARGASON&CLAY,
Wholesale Grocers,
A!D
COTTON FACTORS,
330 Front Street,
Terms Cash.
Memphis, Tenn.
WE are now receiving one of the largest
and tMsst selected stocks of goods Unas
ever been our pleasure to offer to the trade,
and to nrst-class buyers we are prepared to
offer inducements that cannot be surpassed.
600 aacks Klo Coffee all grades :
500 barrels Refined Sugar all grades;
50 hhds. Louisiana Sugar all grades:
500 packages Syrups and Molasses all
grades;
100 kegs English Soda;
200 boxes English Soda;
1000 packages New Mackerel ;
500 packages Virginia Tobacco;
50 barrels Robinson County Whisky;
100 " Bourbon Whisky;
100 " Rectified Whisky;
50 " Tennessee White Whisky;
100 boxes Layer Raisins;
50 boxes assorted Nuts;
100 cases Sardines;
100 oases Brandy Cherries and Peaches.
For sale by KAROASON A CLAY,
se8 330 Front Street.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
T. L. Ai.THtN.
Memphis. Tenn.
L. F. Ovkrtos.
Little liock.
ALDEN & OVERTON,
Gen ! Commission Merchants,
For purchase of Cotton, and sale of every
description of Western Produce,
No. 57 Main Street, Little Rock, Ark.
W Refer to Thos. H. Allen 4 Co., Guy, Me
Clellan A Co., Meacham 1t Treadwell, stchoul
ileld A Hanauer. se2
J. A. TJSTITNT.
EYANS, GARDNER & CO.
IMPORTERS
Jobbers of Dry Goods, White Goods,
Notions, Etc.,
Have removed to 537, 539, 541 Broadway,
New York, a few doors above BL Nicholas
Hotel. novH
J. LEE FINNEY,
I..-ite of St. Louis aud Vlcksbarn Packet Co
BEN. W. CLARK,
Late Treasurer Memphis it St. Louis Pkt. Co,
FINNEY & CLARK,
Commission and
Forwarding
MERCHANTS
ND GENERAL PURCHASING AGENTS,
No. 301 and :WI North Commercial Street,
corner of Olive. T. LOUIS, MO. no
U. DEHAVEN.
J. B. CRUSH.
W.D. WARD.
O. CARSON.
DeKaven, Cross & Co.,
GENERAL
Commission Merchants,
No. 412 NORTH LEVEE,
no!3
IjQTJII
Carolina Life
OF MEMPHIS,
Hon. JEFFERSON
M.
W.
J. WICKS, let Vice-President.
F. BOYLE, Secretary
Assets over : :
Annual Income over
PRINCIPAL OFFICE
r It 1 with ranch pleasure the Manager of this Company tender to lta Poller Holders
and the pnblle their congratulations on lu success for the paat two rearm, lta present condi
tion and future proapecta. Pol Idea laaned on all the Improved plana of Ufa Insurance. Wa
refer the general public to our policy holders.
B. U. BTJIil
ajJocinl Afont.
THE
SOUTHERN LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANY,
General Office, 17 Madison St., Memphis, Tenn.
ASSETS 1st NOVEMBER,
0
Dividends to Policy-Hoiders,
BOARD Or
MEMPHIS,
R. C. BRINKLEY. Pres't M. and L. R. R. R.
W. H. CHERRY. Pres't Chamber of Commerce
F. M. WHITE. President. M. and T. R. R.
AMOS WOODRUFF. Vice-Pres't. Memphis.
F. S. DAVIS. Pres't 1st Nat. Bank. Memphis.
C. KORTRECHT. Att'y-at-Law. Memphis.
T. A. NELSON, President. Memphis.
OFFICERS
T. A. NELSON. President.
AMOS WOODRUFF, First Vice-Presf.
c. t. Patterson, Asst secretary
THOMPSON 8l CO..
General Agents for Tennessee and North
J. T. PETTIT. Wm. SIMPSON.
PETTIT SIMPSON,
Cotton Factors and Commission Merchants
No. 15 UNION STREET, MEMPHIS. TENN.
Liberal Advances made on Consignments.
Instructions Strictly Obeyed.
COMMERCIAL HOTEL
CORNER JEFFERSON AND FRONT STS.,
1ST CENTHAI, PART CD IP CIT
M. ALLEN, PROPRIETOR.
TRANSPORTATION.
QUICK TIME
EAST ! !
Louisville Route
Always Ahead
SUMMER SCHEDULE,
Commencing May 2, 1869.
DOUBLE DAILY THROUGH TRAINS
will. Ririr as roLi.ows the
Memphis and Louisville Railroad Line:
Leave Memphin ctty tlme)4:oua.m. 2:45 p.m.
Morning train from Memphis does not run
on Hunday.
Leave Memphis, city time, 4 :00 a.m. 2:4p.m.
Arrive at NaasbvlUe 11 :45 p.m. 5:tiua.iu.
Weeping Cars on K ven ing Train from Mem
phis to Louisville and Memphis to Nashville.
Through Tickets at Reduced Rates
Can he procured at the Company's ofBce,237 1-2
Main street, and at Depot, head of Main nt.
sVRAggae checked at Depot, or by the
Memphis City Transfer Company; at Hotels.
Private ReHbifnct-s, or n hoard boats, to ail
principal points Kast itnd North.
SAM. B. JONES, SnpL
SCLX, Howfii. Passenger Agent. se30
Memphis and Ohio Railroad.
LonlavtlleA Nashville R. R. Co., Leasees.
FRFKJHT oKKICE.
Memphis. Tenn., October 10. ISB9. (
"VN and after this dme. all KrelKhts tor tills
F fftMl fiTranl CotlMt. will lw rc'-eived at
road, except
the Navy Yard Warehouse, foot of Market
Ktreet.
Delivery of Freights, as heretofore, at head
of Mulls street.
A. J. KNAPP. Agent.
A. A. Paton. g. F. A. ix3t)
Tri weekly Stage Line.
U. S. Mail and Passenger Coaches from
Gaines' Landing to Camden, Ark.
LEAVES GAINES" LANDIN6
Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays
AT 7 A.M.
POPE A MITCHELL.
!l(Ult
Mississippi and Tennessee R.R.
CHANOE OF TIME.
ON AND AFTER SITNDA V, NOV. 14, 1SH,
until farther notice, trains will run as
follows:
Nkw Orleans Maii,, Daii.v Leaves Mem
phis at U in., making direct connections
lor New Orleans, Vlcksburg and all points
South.
Kipoxi, Daii.v Leaves Memphis 4:15 p.m..
making direct connection for Coffeevllle;
Water Valley. Oxford, Hully Springs, and
all points North of Orenada, on Mississippi
Central Kallroad.
Baggage checked through.
Procure tickets at a?1 Main street, or at the
Depot. Omnibuses will call for passengers
and check baggage, by leaving orders at iltT',
Main street.
A. !. I.I V h.lt.Ml Kr
('. P. Oaklky,
G. T. A. (noil (ien'lsop't.
MEMPHIS & LITTLE ROCK R.R.
- inly 22 hours to Little Rock,
w The only safe and certain mute to Little
Rock.
Never failsio make connections ciury
Inic the United .States .Mail.
' Round trip can tie made iu 3 days, suid
spend all day in Little Itoek.
W Always go with Cm tod stales Mall ; it
never misses.
f Train leaves dal ly. at o'clock a.m.,
Sunday Inclnded. U. D. WILLIAMS,
ii'iU General Aitt-nl :iml superintendent.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
T. WL JLUOWOOD. T. B. X1COC. W. C. POLKEB.
Logwood, Micou & Folkes,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
15 Union Street,
M E M PHIS, - - TENN ESS E K.
W. C. FOLKES. Commliiiloner for Ar
kannas. T. W. Mhown. O. P. Lyi.es.
B. C. Brown.
BROWN, LYLES & BROWN,
LAWYERS,
office, Mo. 19 west court st,.
Corner 01 Alain,
MEMPHIS, TENN.
mm
Edward L. Hamlin,
Attorney at Law,
OFFICE : 332 SECOND STREET,
noS
MEMPHIS. TENN.
VALUABLE PROPERTY FOR SALE
1
fHE undersigned desires to sell his entter
Interest In the business and property of
tne Menipms cotton iTe.v. Association.
ThU Interest will Insure an active business1
man a very lArge Interest on the Investment.
Terms
OB.
one half i-ash, balance as may be agreed
noHJ
THOMAS Uft.lv
Insurance Co.
TENNESSEE.
DAVIS, President,
I J,
I J
T. PETTIT, 2d Vice-President.
H. E0M0NDS0N, General Agent.
$654,000 00
500,000 00
---No. 291 MAIN STREET.
f. WHITE, Jr.,
Aaent for Twnn
ito
1869. OYER
$600,000
July 1, 1869,-40 PER CENT.
DIRECTORS :
TENXESSEE.
HUGH TORRANCE. Cotton Factor. Memphis.
J. WELLER. Merchant. Memphis.
C. W. FRAZER. Attorney-at-Law. Memphis.
J. W. McCOWN. Merchant. Memphis.
H. A. PARTEE. Com. Merchant. Memphis.
C. C. SPENCER. President. Louisville. Ky.
JOHN 8. GORDON. President. Atlanta, Ga
BEN MAY. Secretary.
F. M. WHITE. Second Vice-Pres't.
F. S. DAVIS, Treasurer.
Mississippi.
Orders for Supplies filled at Lowest Rates.
no24
MILLINERY.
FALL FASHIONS
Sonthern Emporium of Fashion
3VXx-s. IVX. C HTJNTEn
W Desires lo call the attention of her lady
friends and the public to the fact that she I
NOW RECEIVING HER FALL STOCK
Of the latest styles of Millinery, Fancy Good
and novelties in DRESS TRIMMINUB.
W Dress and Cloak Making, In all It
branches, nt 247 Main Rtreet. sel
CANDLES. OIL AND SOAP.
BUY THE BEST
STAR CANDLES & WASHING SOAP
Manufactured by
Cornwall & Brother.
LOUISVILLE, KY.,
FOR. SALE BY ALL GROCERS.
These Candles Have no Superior
For Burning Qualities, and are
Ca-reFiaJXy W cigliod.
DISPENSARY.
A LKN'H HEAD DISPENHAKY
VJ Jetleraon street, tetwpeu
Third ritrtH-ts, LonUTlIIe, Ky
StH'ond Rim
i--k ana riiart4rea hv Tht Licmlatarettf Ken
tucky, lwi, "for the treatment of all diseases
of the urinary and (generative onjans of tolh
sexeK," inelui'llUK npermatorrhea or seminal
weaknesut from early i-rrorn. gonorrhea, gleet,
stricture, varicocele, svphtlls In all It staeest.
airections oX the kidney a and bladder, and
the diseases of wnam
A medical pamphlet, containing sixty largo
raethcMl uf tr-atln)
Lnts .iii'i uiiiiierons iiium r;ti ions on a ne
anove llseaes with
rtant advice on mar
al for 2i uenu.
ted to cure varicocele
sent to any address.
's Female Kegalaiing
uve I rregnlartt i ea, etc ;
ul. A full assort
ussei al ways on hand.
nut mercury, and I
riage, etc., sni und
A varix clasp, wa
in fourdaya; price
Also agents tor t
Pills, warrantel to
price at utfice, r b
ment of baudaices ai
Male sheaths, tnperlfj
uaiity; single one 51,
r r,S tier ilfzen. Ahlre
GALEN'S HEAD PISPENSAUY.
no!8 Louisville, Ky
ORLEANS INFIRMARY,
142 CANAL STREET,
NEW ORLEANS,
ooxnrtTKD
LOUISIANA.
HY
Ors. Choppin, C. Beard, Brickell and
Bruns.
This Institution is now Open for the
Treatment of Medical and
&iirtfical Diseases.
DR.. SAMUEL CHOPP.N,
General Surgery, and Diseases of the Rec
tum, Bladder and I'n-thra; all operations for
Deformities, such aa Liub-foot, Hare-hp,
Cleft-palate, etc,
DR. C. BEARD,
Diseases of the Eye and Rar.
DR. D. W. BRICKELL,
Diseases peculiar to Women Operations for
the relief of Ovarian Turners, Iryiunencrhoa,
Vesicovaginal Fistula, Laceration of th
Perineum, etc, etc
DR. I. DICKSON BRUNS,
Diseases of the Heart, Lungs and Throat.
The best nurses are provided. Fare and
accominodatiuna equal to those uf first-class
hotels
Postofflce Box 67, New Orleans. oeZ2
To the Stockholders of the Memphis
Gayoso Gas Company.
T'HOSE that have neen sned will nlr
X come forward promptly, and pay tbe calif
that have been made, and suits will be dis
missed. Office southwest corner of Main and Jefler.
son streets
oral JOHN DONOVAN. President.
The foietal Witt Ct,
OF ELGIN, ILL.'
PrsassBces ky Wstck
akeia, BaUraad ass Ex.
press nea. East sad Wnt,
AvaU martin was as.
vrrtlse t was Wales
- .OJI." PlKPOaTlVII
te be ef oar sake. We
furnish ma that
para. Thsreare UsU
tatiss la mark. Ts
nt r.rarin! euii.i
WT( HI'S,
. sssir to
ta rear ova leeauiy ot
ts Us asssrasl.,
, wassi yea a:
I aiOT, tatnaet UL
16VA1C1 Laks

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