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Memphis daily appeal. [volume] (Memphis, Tenn.) 1847-1886, May 04, 1878, Image 2

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TELE MEMPHIS DIIY AJPPBAX. SATURDAY . 4, 1S7S.
MEMPHIS APPEAL
IV
UALLiWAV & keating;
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(ALUWiY A KK1T1NU,
OaUmwaT. (. :d2 Second street. .
-. t. fcunw. ( Memphis. Ten.
MEMWUS APPEAL
SATURDAY,
MAY 4, 187S.
THE SKtV F.SKJ1V TO l)E3IOCKA Y.
Whatever evidences of disintegration may
be shown among the political elements of the
country, it is Kratifjinj and encouraging to
eeo that the Democratic party will re
main lintact. During 5 the fifty years that
it controlled the destinies of the coun
try it secured its power and its popular
ity by clinging to its name, its principles, and
its organization. In the Greeley canvass the
Democratic party engaged in the unfamiliar
business of bartering and trading. The re
sult demonstrated that it is strong only by
an inflexible adhesion to its traditions. The
strength of the Democracy is attributable to
the fact that it i a plain, straight-forward
party, with no "entangling alliances," no
compromises looking to the ulterior interests
and aims of ambitious partisans and pel fish
factions, and that it sedulously pursue? its
own peculiar policy for the advancement of
the material interests of the whole country.
The ephemeral organizations that have sud
denly sprouted up, and equally a3 suddenly
disappeared, have always been hostile to the
Democratic party, been encouraged by its an
cient enemies, ever ready to join any combi
nation hoping to defeat the party which has so
often defeated them. This will be illustrated in
the National party. In the sooth the Radi
cals have no organization, and they will flock
to the banner of the Nationals with the hope
of defeating their old enemy, the Democratic
party. In other States the Nationals and
the Republicans are bartering and trading,
and will no doubt join forces against the
Democrats. A SpringGeld, Illinois, special
dispatch to the Chicago Tines, says: "The
Republican State central committee is making
great exertions to bring together at the meet
ing of that committee, in Chicago, on May
2d, a large assemblage of representative Re
publicans from all parts of the State. Circu
lars inviting such persons have been sent out
to the number of net less than one thousand.
This action is interpreted as meaning that an
early convention will be called, and the con
vention will not indorse the nomination of
the Nationals. It is also said that the game
at present stands thus : The Republicans will,
at an early convention, to be called, say,
about May 15th, put up their own candidates
for State officers, and these are to be sup
ported by the Nationals throughout the State
la return for this service the Nationals are to
have the privilege of naming the candidates
for the legislature and for congress in all the
strong Democratic districts, and all the dis
tncts which the conclave to bo held on May
2d shall agree are doubtful. The leaders of
the Nationals are to be in attendance on
tho meeting, and will then assist
in tho proper division of the dis
tricts. In return for this service, it is
arranged by the Republican leaders that
Dates shall bo the National candidate for the
United States senate in 1879; that a fair divi
sion of the offices in the gift of the next legis
lature, which tho Republicans and Nationals
will control, shall be made, and that the Re
publicans ehall help elect Dates to the sen
ate." The same negotiations are now going
on in this city and county between the Na
tionals and the Republicans, but there is not
much margin for trading, as the National
party is composed mostly of a few disap
pointed Democratic office-seekers, and are
not able to transfer tho votes which the Rad
icals demand as a part of the contract.
VVlule these negotiations are pending let the
Democrats move forward in the good work
they have undertaken. A strong, bitter and
watchful enemy hangs upon the flanks of our
party, and will profit by any omission or
blunder. But everything indicates that the
Democracy of Shelby county will present a
united front and win a brilliant victory.
KISti t'OTTOS.
Under this heading the New York Star
h.m an interesting article, bristling with facts
and figures most encouraging to American
manufacturers. It shows that while the out
flow of American breadstulfs and other pro
ducts has increased enormously during the
last couple of years, the outflow of American
raw cotton shows an astonishing falling off
for the same period. To some people, at
first sight, this diminished export would seem
a loss to our commerce; but it is nothing of
the sort. On the contrary, it is a most en
couraging omen for the manufacturers of the
United States. Fewer cargoes of the raw
tt p!e are njw sent abroad, because the ac
tivity of our own mills is marvelously increas
ing, and our looms have already made us in
dependent of Lancashire. A great deal
of information relating to this im
portant industry was furnished at a
meeting of New England cotton manu
facturers in Boston last week. How
few, even among our well-informed mer
chants, accurately realize what a sweeping
monopoly England has heretofore enjoyed in
this lucrative branch of production. A few
figures, however, tell the whole story. In
1874 the total amount "of cotton goods export
ed by the United States was only one per
cent, of British exports in the same line. At
present the gap has been closed to four per
cent., which, though leaving a wide dispari
ty, is still is an immense gain for America,
in view of the brief term within which it has
Uen achieved. Where England four year?
ago was selling one hundred, Bbe now sells
bnt twenty-five yards to our one yard among
foreign consumers. The mere fact that her
long-established monopoly has not succeeded
in crushing out all competition, proves con-c!u-ively
that monopoly is shattered, and that
the scepter ot King Cotton is passing away
fi-o-n British hands. If more specific truth is
demanded, it cau easily Uc found in the con
fessions of British economical writers and
trade journals, as well as in the alarm which
has seized tho factory owners, and from
which have arisen the existing strikes
in Lancashire. England has cf late been
making shoddy cloth, impregnating her cot
ton f thrics with starch, claor other delete
rious substances, which impart to tde woven
material, when new, a rich and solid appear
and, but which a little wear or washing .xu
c.:ns. s to rot the fiber. American manufac
ture r-. on tho nllior kinil no 11-
" utc 'UIC WJUUI1,
with the least possible amount of starch, and '
the result is that wherever the two qualities
of cloth have been put upon a foreign mar
ket, the English stuff won't be touched while
an ell of the American can be obtained. In
days gone by we used to sell the bulk of our
raw cotton to England, send it across the
ocean to keep her mills in operation, and ac
tually buy back a large share of it again in
the shape of manufactured fabrics for our
own use. England had the ships and the
machinery, and was thus enabled to gain
control of the markets of the world,
while we were in the agony of civil war.
Now, however, we spin and weave the
greater part of our home consumption, and
have a surplus left, which we are beginning
to push into foreign marts. Bow wide a
field is here open to us, may be inferred from
a single illustration. The Argentine Confed
erationlast year imported fourteen million dol
lars worth of cotton goods, and of this aggre
gate only one hundred and seventy-five thou
sand dollars worth was from the United
States. Now, we who grow the cotton on
our own soil, and who boast a mechanical
genius second to no people in the world,
ought certainly" not to be thus distanced on
the South American continent. Much of our
backwardness is due to the decline of our
shipping interests during the war; but in the
brighter era now opening, it is to be hoped
that our mercantile marine and our exports
will keep pace together, until they reach the
advanced position to which our wondrous
natural resources entitle them. While the
eastern States are congratulating themselves
on the prospect of becoming the sole manu
facturers of cotton, and are holding meetings
at Boston to facilitate this object, they will
at no distant day have a more formidable ri
val than England has ever been, by
the south, which proposes, in a
few years, not only to grow
the cotton, but to manufacture it into fabrics
at their own door. With the return of pros
perity, the south will not export her cotton
to either Boston or to England, but export
the manufactured goods to both places. Com
mon practical sense shows what the south is
losing by exporting her cotton, and then pur
chasing the manufactured fabrics, with the
additional cost of freight paid on the raw
material and on the returned goods. When
ever the south retains her cotton, and exports
only the manufactured fabrics, she will have
the most prosperous people on the face of the
earth.
THE Bl"81ESS CONDITION.
The last month has been a very discourag
ing one in this market. Money has been
plenty, but it has persistently clung to the
bank vaults, so much so that one bank effect
ed a loan of two hundred thousand dollars
in New York, not being able to find an out
let for it here. On one of the last days of
April one of our principal banks found that
they had fifty thousand dollars less out on
loan than during any previous April for eight
years; on the samo day another bank had
one hundred and eleven thousand dollars less
out on loan than on the corresponding day
the year previous. During the month of March
our sales of cotton amounted to forty-nine
thousand five hundred bales; during April only
thirty-one thousand six hundred bales. Inter
est on money at our banks has for long years
been established at eight to ten per cent, per
annum, but during the last six months eight
per cent, has been the prevalent rate, and
now loans are made at as low as six per cent.
Outside of the cotton business the complaint
of dull trade is universal, and the
rush to get upon the list of bank
rupts has suspended all confidence,
even old standing and high reputation
has ceased for the time to command the usual
renpect. Prices of commodities are unpre
cedentedly low, but low as they are business
men do not like investing more than "from
hand to mouth." Accounts from the coun
try are encouraging as to the breadth planted
and the general condition of crop matters,
yet they fail to impart cheerfulness. If there
is one subject that throws a ray of light into
the gloom, it is the understanding that farm
ers are planting grain and raising meat for
their own consumption. In proportion as
that is done, there is less dependence on the
merchant, and the more assurance that the
agriculturist will meet his obligations. There
is also hope in the not distant future from the
expectation that the national currency will
soon be free from fluctuations, and that its
steadiness will aid to revive confidence and
improve trade. The New York Bulletin ob
serves that we have now passed the second
spring month, and with less improvement in
trade than had been looked for, but it draws
encouragemen tfrom the clearing away of mer
cantile wrecks at the bankrupt courts, and the
excellent crop prospect. The certainty of specie
resumption it regards as another element of
coming prosperity. In conclusion, the Bulle
tin says: "For the present, it need only be
said that at about all the trade centers in the
interior, as. well as the seaboard markets, the
feeling is one of hopeful confidence; for
while it is admitted that spring trade has
not, as a rule, been np to the calculations of
the more sanguine, it ia also admitted that
there is le3 real occasion for complaint than
has been the case any time since the autumn
of 1873." The New York rost observes:
"Probably the f pring trade this year is the
worst all things considered-on record;
While this is true of what In past; yet since
the treasury bond negotiation which assures
specie payments according to the treasury
plan, it is equally true that among business
men there is a feelicg of hopeful confidence
in the future. The outlook for the Crops in
all parts of the country is extraordinarily
good; and, to eay the "least, there is little
doubt that there will be a remunerative
foreign market for the exportable surplus of
them."
bums -v. Illtes.
Little Rock Gaeetit: It is not often that
we would select the opinion of a court for in
tereEtini? reading, but t.h nMPiainn ran.
dered by Chancellor Eakin. in the aWe
cafe, is so eloquent with feeling, so full of
sound morality and good sense, and em
bodies in ft few vnrHa anh a rriAt f mAl
- - . u w v. ujui m
ethics, that we feel constrained to publish it
for the benefit of saints and sinners alike. If
the sentinientfl prnrmwH )? iia looa1
1 -" ' " "J wiv im ucu
chancellor were more widely preached, there
is ii j utfuut out, mat mankind would be large
ly the' gainer: "It is not the part cf courts to
usurp the province of the pulpit or the chair
of the moralist. I can only declare the law,
and, so doing, say that the complainant has
not made out a case of such indignities as the
statute contemplates as a cause for divorce.
X A l L .'i t m t
i immiiwronff mine court to encourage
r r ....vuut tvuK MAM VU TT 1 ID tU OCT: Ik.
this divorce, and wrong in the husband to be
willing to consent to it on condition of hav
ing the children. They need the mother also,
as well as the father, and with a higher need
than either has for them. Perhaps the prin
ciples of that church of which the father is
so zealous a member, with the promptings
of the mother's heart, may yet suggest
to those unfortunate litigants a surer es
cape from their domestic troubles. For
tunately, there has nothing occurred to
impugn the virtue, honesty or integrity of
cimcr. iuere is no rpasnn tsriv r.riA rhiiiirpn
may not grow up to love and respect both
.-. 1 . n I .l 'T't 1 ! , . ..
Ka.ruWnucr, i ne aerenuant avows his
readiness to receive his wife again, and per
form all his duties as a husband, if she will
only do the same. They have lived together
for nearly a quarter of a century. The best
years ot their lives are gone. Perhaps by
mutual patience, forbearance and absorpt:on
in mutual cares for the happiness of their
children, there may yet grow up for them a
haj pines they have not foreseen. If there
be any disposition to make the experiment, I
will, even here, allow the proceedings in this
caj to be withdrawn with the papers, at the
disposal of the parties, so that none of the
evidence may be left of record. But, as the
caw now stands, the decree must be entered,
dismissing the bill for want of equity at the
cost of the defendant. All injunctions will
bo dissolved, and the complainant, in any
eai. will be ordered to redeliver the children
to the father whenever he may think fit to
remove them to his home, in the exercise of
which power it may not be amiss to caution
lit .i.liinrA Bn.l a 1 r l: - i
, - - u " " Human, i Lmu iue ieei- .
lugs of the children."
COHMUMSM.
Its Supporters Organizing an Armed
Force In Cincinnati, Hacked by Cap
ital from Secret Enemies of the
Country Companies Organ
izing and Drillin tin
Secret,
Arming Themselves with Breech-Loading
Rifles An Unsuccessful Attempt
to Capture the Gatling Gun
The Military Preparing to
Resist an Outbreak.
Cincinnati Enquirer, 1st: On Sunday last,
Secretary Van Patten, of the so-called Na
tional Socialistic Labor party, caused to be
published broadcast throughout the United
States a statement, in effect, that no branch
or body of the Socialistic Labor party was or
ganizing military companies, or arming for
any purpose whatever. On the very same
day, organized, armed aad uniformed mili
tary companies of Socialists were secretly
drilling in Cincinnati under superior drill
masters, and armed with breech-loading
guns of the most approved pattern and dan
gerous form. Urged to an investigation by
the statement referred to above, and by the
recent developments in Chicago, an Enq uirer
reporter of an inquiring mind has been since
that time investigating the subject, and has
found an alarming state of affairs among the
adherents ot the communistic party, and the
class who were prominent in the strikes of
last summer. The reporter's first visit was
to one of the acknowledged leaders of the
party of Socialists in this city. This pentle
man said he didn't think there was anything
in the Chicago stories about the armed men
there, or at least he was sure that the Na
tional Socialistic Labor party didn't counte
nance anything of the sort. There was, how
ever, he admitted, a little organization here
of men who were armed and drilling, but
didn't know what for, and he thought it con
sisted of about ten men.
THIS WAS'A 8TABTEB,
however, and the "ten men in buckram,"
and with no definite intentions, have already
grown to hundreds, some of them with
breech-loading arms and uniforms, and others
drilling secretly and preparing for active
work when the occasion should offer. Di
rected by the member aforesaid, the reporter
soon found a member of the society. He ad
mitted its existence, but was chary of detail.
BULLETS BETTER THAN BALLOTS.
The society was, it was learned however,
formed under these peculiar .circumstances:
Some months ago, after the strike and the
ensuing elections, at a meeting of the So
cialistic party here, a member arose and
moved that, as the party was unable to ac
complish its desired end by ballot, it resort to
more forcible means and arm in defense and
enforcement of its peculiar doctrines. This
was voted down by some of the wiser and
more conservative heads, but the result was
that the mover of this resolution, followed by
a considerable number of his adherents, pro
ceeded to organize in the proposed manner.
and now had in his single company about
seventy-five men, instead of ten, as was at
hret reported. Xhese men; it is learned.
meet every Sunday at a hall on Ninth street
for practice and drill, and are becoming very
efficient in the use of arms. They have, it is
learned, lull
UNIFORMS OF 6 RAT
and military hats with green cockades. They
have, by some means, obtained Springfield
rifle, though the sale of these guns at first
hands is not allowed by the government. A
member of the company, however, admitted
to the reporter that the company had Spring
field rifles, and that a part of them were
BREECH-LOADERS
of the latest and most approved pattern.
This, the member said, was the only company
of the sort in the city, and was "simply
formsd for pleasure," though why it should
have been organized under such peculiar cir
cumstances, armed with such expensive guns
and uniforms in these "depressed times,"
when labor is, according to the socialistic
theory, being so oppressed, and capital is in
the ascendency, and all for "pleasure," can
hardly be guessed. The company is, it is
learned,
INCREASING ITS MEMBERSHIP
very rapidly, adding from five to ten per
cent, at every meeting. This company, the
members interviewed insisted, was the only
one of the sort in the city, but a persistent
search of a few hours showed tip
TWO MORE COMPANIES,
both with evidently the same motive, and
both earnestly but very quietly drilling and
preparing for business. Both of these com
panies have, it is said, for their officers men
who were fjrmerby members or officers of
some of the militia companies of this city.
They are rapidly gaining in proficiency, and
have made one or two efforts to obtain the
arms belonging to one of the military com
panies here. The leading spirits of these com
panies are
MEN OF WELL-KNOWN COMMUNISTIC PRIN
CIPLES, and the Intention understood as forming
for concerted action in case of an outbreak
such as that of last summer. One of these
meets at a hall over the Rhine where two
hundred stands ot arms are stored, and, in
case of desiring an outbreak before their
arms are obtained, could easily seize them.
THERE IS NO LACK OF ARMS
in Cincinnati for communistic organizations
of hundreds or even thousands. Scattered
all over the city are largo lots cf guns used
during the War by the various military organ
izations, very many of which could be vsry
easily changed from the present muzzle-load
ing capacity to that of breech-loaders, and it
is shrewdly suspected by some that this is
now being quietly done, and that this is the
origin of the breech-loading Springfield rifles
now used by the one company' mentioned, as
it is difficult to procure thesef in any other
way. At Turner hall there are a laree lot of
Enfield rifles, which could be readilv thu3
changed, and there are many others in vari
ous portions ot the city.
THE KNIGnTS OF TOIL.
Another large organization, which is said
to have been in existence since the close of
the strike of last year, is called the "Knights
of Toil." This society was formed directly
after the failure of last year, and with tho
intention of keeping up the spirit of the
organization then in existence, and prepara
tion for a more systematic movement durin?
the coming summer. In regard to the member
ship of this association no definite figures can
oe obtained, but it is believed to outnumber
the companies mentioned above. Of these
four organizations the members may be
counted by hundreds, perhaps by thousands,
and the membership is said to be rapidly in
creasing.
AMONG THE GUN-DEALERS
is a feeling of uneasiness, though in but one
instance has there been any call for arms in
any quantities. The plentiful supply of tho
cheaper government arms, which can be
made over into the most effective breech
loaders at small cost, and without attracting
attention or causing suspicion, makes this
plan of obtaining arms more satisfactory.
One prominent gun-dealer was, however,
visited several times last winter by men evi
dently of the communistic order, who wished
to purchase breech-loading guns, inquiring
especially for the Springfield government
(pattern) rifle. They were told by the dealer
that to get these new would be difficult, as
the government did not manufacture them
tor any others than the militia, the dealer
then suggested that they could obtain arms
at little or no cost from the government if
they would enroll themselves in the National
Guards. To this, however, the inquiring
committee at once objected, and in the most
positive manner, saying they wanted the gov
ernment to have nothing to do with their or
ganization. This fact considered, suspicious
of itself, when viewed in the light of the fact
that arms were afterward secretly purchased
from other sources, is much more so. Another
source, from which a band of this sort
might readilly obtain arms, would be the
plunder of the private arsenals in which the
arms of the various companies are stored.
There is no central point where these are all
stored and guarded as should be the case, but
they are scattered promiscuously about the
city, "and they could," said a well-known
military man of the city yesterday, "be all
captured by ten determined men on any
night, despite anything that might be done."
AFTER THE GATLING GUN.
Several quiet attempts have, it is alleged,
been made by supposed members of theae
parties to capture the Gatling gun belonging
to the police. Captain Lew Wilson, who has
charge of the gun, has been approached by
certain parties in a manner which gave him
suspicion, and which, addd to other facts
learned, have led to the belief that there has
been an effort to get possession of the gun, or
at least to learn its workings, so that it
might be captured when the proper time ar
rives. 13 THE MOVEMENT BACKED BY FOREIGN
CAPITAL?
The reporter yesterday called upon Mr. E.
M. Davis, formerly a member ot the Labor
party. "I have quit the party," he said, "or
rather it has quit me. 1 found that it was
drifting away from the true principle upon
which it was founded into communism and
the encouragement of the feeling which was
seen here last summer, and I felt impelled to
leave it."
"Do you think anything will come of this
movement?"
"Yes; I think something similar to last
summer's outbreak may possibly be tLe re
sult." "But it is said the Cincinnati communists
have no money."
"Don't you believe it. They -have not
much of their own, I admit; but they get it,
or at least that is my belief."
"How?"
"From abroad. The foreign powers are
anxious to see this, our republican institu
tion, overthrown, and will do anything to
bring it about. England and France had
paid emissaries in this country fomenting
trouble over the slavery question, and thus
helped to bring on that war; and I have no
doubt they have plenty of men here now
working up and supporting this communistic
feeling. The terrible work of the commun
ists was seen in France, and those who hate
this country would be glad to see it repeated
here. The men at the head of these move
ments are generally idle, worthless fellows,
yet they always have plenty of money, and I
am satisfied that that is the way they get it."
THE MILITARY EXPECTING AN OUTBREAK.
The reporter also called yesterday upon
Colonel Hunt, of the O. N. G., to get his
opinion upon the subject.
"Do you think there are any organizations
here similar to those in Chicago ?'J-said the
reporter.
"No doubt'of it," said Colonel Hunt; "there
are three thousand men enrolled here."
"Three thousand men?"
"Yes; the socialists have three thousand
men here, and they are virtually, in my opin
ion, backing these movements. They began
organizing immediately after the strike last
summer. They were not defeated then, but
simply retired in good order to prepare for
future action "
"Then you look for another outbreak?"
"Certainly."
"How soon?"
"That I can't say precisely, but perhaps
during the coming summer."
"And what will be the result?"
"Oh, they will be overpowered in the
end, for there are more people who favor
peace than plunder; but it will not be done
without some loss of life."
"How many men do you think they could
muster here?"
"There are three tndusand socialists en
rolled, and they could add about two thou
sand of the riff-raff the class who never
work to this, and would make, with what
arms they could pick up, a very strong fight."
"What is the condition of the military?"
"It is in good condition, except that we
need a central armory, where we can store all
our guns and ammunition, and have them
properly guarded, so that the communists
cannot get them."
Colonel Hunt remarked in the course of
the conversation that himself and all his offi
cers had been placed upon the "black list" of
the secret organizations tor the part they
took in last summer's campaign. Several
representatives of the communistic organic a
tion have, it is said, applied to some of the
present omcers ot the regiment lor instruc
tions in drilling and other military exercise,
THE POLICE
are quietly preparing for the Worst; Chief
Ziegler has appointed some men, whose duty
it is to specially watch the movements of
these parties, and it is impossible that the
citv and State troODS could be causbt naD-
ping. Colonel Wilson guards his Gatling
gun with constant care, and never leaves it
in such shape that it could be used if captured
ANOTHER SUSPICIOUS FACT
is that which pertains to name. The name
ot one ot those companies is exactly the same
as that adopted by the Chicago companies,
It is said that the companies here are in com
munication with those by the lake, and that
if any early movement is decided upon, it
win be by concerted action.
DEFERRED TELEGRAMS.
Lowell, Mass., May 2: Base-ball Lowells,
10; Crickets, 7; ten innings.
Manchester, N. H., May 2: Base-ball
Manchesters, G; Live Oaks, 1.
Springfield. Mass., May 2: Base-ball
Springfields, t j Allcghenies, S.
London, May 2: The Princess of Wales
and Crown Princess of Denmark have left for
Paris.
Syracuse, N. Y., May 3: International
championship base-ball game Stars, 5; Buf
falo?, 1.
St. Petersburg, May 2: No more bulletins
will be published concerning Prince Gorts
chakoff's condition.
Portland, Me., May 2: Rumor is afloat that
the Ci rubra will come here to send Russian
passengers by rail to San Francisco.
Chicago, May 2: The railroad rates for
grain to New York, although nominally
twenty-five cents per hundred, are now stated
in reality to be weak at twenty cents.
Chicago; May 2: Several Nee Perces In
dians passed through here to-day, eti route to
Canada, where they will have a talk with the
Indians who have left their reservations and
agencies, and will urge them to return.
Havana, May 2: Credible rumors have pre
vailed since yesterday of the surrender of
Maceo, the Cuban leader. It is supposed
that the government has such intelligence,
but defers its publication until all the facts
are known.
Chicago, May 2: The irter-OceanVspecial
saj-s that a fire last night nearly destroyed
the business portion ot Adair, Illinois, on the
Chicago, Burlington and Quincy railroad.
Loss, fifteen thousand dollars; insurance,
nine thousand.
Calcutta, May 2i Cooper, a British politi
cal agent at Bhamio, in the kingdom of Bur
mah, and two Sepoys have been murdered
by a Sepoy guard. There is no reason to
suppose that the assassination was the result
of a political plot.
Lavaleta, Malta, May 2: Brigadier-General
Keys and Quartermaster-General Adams
have arrived here to arrange for the recep
tion of the Sepoys from India. The iron-clads
Minatour and Resistance have sailed, it is
supposed for Port Said".
Albany, May 2: The senate will attend
the late Senator Morrissey's funeral at Troy.
Lieutenant-Governor Dorsheimer and Sena
tors Harris, Jacobs, Robertson, St. John,
Pomeroy, Hughes, Wagner, Ecclesine and
Wagstaff will act as pall-bearers.
San Antonio, Texas, May 2: Official tele
grams to General Ord say that a revolution
has broken out in the States of Durango and
Neivaor. General Treviro is ordered to quell
it. The garrisons at Matamoras and Mier
are said to be on the point of pronouncing
against Diaz. There is ereat excitement on
the lower Rio Grande. Escobedo is here.
Havana, May 2: Cuban refugees continue
to flock back to the island. Over one hun
dred have just returned from Key West.
The rumors of the surrender of Maceo are
received with much gratification. An easier
feeling prevails among the merchants and
planters over the prospect of complete pacifi
cation. Paris May 2: General Noyes, American
minister, gave a dinner to-night in honor of
Bayard Taylor, the newly-appointed minister
to Germany, aad Mr. Welsh, minister to
Great Britain. Among the guests were the
members of Mr. Taylor's family, attaches of
the respective legations and a few American
residents.
Winnepeg, Mon., May 2: The 6teamer
Swallow, from Selkirk, was struck by a squall
this afternoon and capsized in Red river,
near Winnepeg. One passenger, a Norwe
gian, was drowned. The remaining twenty
four passengers were saved. The steamer
carried no boats or life-preservers, and bnt
for a flatboat which she had in tow the loss
of life would have been great.
New Y'ork, May 2: William J. Geasner,
builder, has filed a voluntary, petition in
bankruptcy, with liabilities at "one hundred
and twenty-eight thousand dollars, of which
one hundred and six thousand dollars "are se
cured. They are mainly on account of real
estate transactions and for mortgaged de
ficiencies. The assets consist of real estate
under foreclosure an I debts due of merely
nominal value.
Rochester, N. Y., May 2: The forty-fiah
general convention of the Psi-Upsilon col
lege fraternity met here this mornmg
Every chapter was represented by from one
tosix delegates. Isaac Smith, signor, of New
York, was chosen chairman. Yale was se
lected as th place for the next convention,
in May, 1879. A large number of gradu
ates are in town, and telegrams of congratu
lation are being received from the prominent
members from Maine to California.
A TERKIBLE TALE.
Nhoektnc Harder and. Halclde at Hu
as City A Cienwan Chemist Kills
bis Wife and Fires the House
Be then Blows Bis
Own Brains Oat.
Epef'al to the St. Louis Republican.
Kansas Citt, April 30. The city was
shocked this morning by the news of a most
horrible double tragedy, which was enacted
at two o'clock, and is shrouded in deep mys
tery. At 1417 Grand avenue, in the upper
story of a brick row, th?re resided until this
morning a German chemist named Theodore
Hal ten bach, his wife and fl beautiful little
blonde daughter eight years old. He was a
highly cultured man, had been in the drug
business, but was unfortunate, and for some
months has had a hard time making
both ends meet. His wife was well connect
ed and has rich relatives in Baltimore, and
it was their wish that she could come to
them. This she refused for some time, until
dire necessity compelled her to accept. It is
supposed that her husband learned of her
decision, and preferring that the grave
should find them united, he took her life and
his own. They were both found dead in
their rooms this morning, and under such
horrible circumstances as to make one shud
der. It was about two o'clock when the
neighbors were aroused by a Crash of glass
ana the wild piercing shrieks of a little girl.
The house was discovered to be on fire. The
alarm brought out the fire department, the
little girl in the tneantimo being cared for.
The flamea were speedily extinguished, and
on entering the room first was found the mu
tilated and charred remains of the wife. In
an adjoining room lay the husband, his skull
mashed in, and a revolver in his hand with
empty barrels. The bed upon which the
woman had been murdered was saturated
with coal-oil, showing that after her death
the bed had been set on fire. Her little
daughter had been accustomed to sleep
with her mother, and on examina
tion her clothing was found saturated
with coal-oil and one foot badly burned. Her
little face was horribly cut, one hand terribly
mangled, and in other ways showed that her
escape from a terrible death had been gained
with a close call. Haltenbach's remains were
also burned, but not seriously. The inquest
this afternoon developed no new facts, and
the verdict is that both were murdered by an
axe which was found in the room covered
with clotted blood and hair. The little girl
is unconscious, and the only one who can tell
the horrible secrets of that midnight tragedy
is helpless. It is generally supposed that
Haltenbach murdered his wife, poured the
oil on the bed, set it on fire, and then ehot
himself m the head with a revolver filled with
water, which has a terrible effect when dis
charged ; that the daughter was asleep, and
knew nothing of the tragedy until the flames
burned her feeti that she sprang from the
bed and dashed through the window, thus
inflicting the wounds. Until she recovers, no
further information can be given.
39KD1CAI.
A PHYSIOLOGICAL
View of Marriage !
awuicbio vvcciocje ana
I -ontitifniinl TrratiM on th
duties ot tnarriiiffe and tha
causes thAt unfit tor lt. the se
crets of Reproduction and
!ma ufeattca or women
A book tor p-fvat. cow'
e-at4 rvftdisft. jtbO pafiea, prw
- A PRIVATE MEDICAL ADVISER!
v)T1ftll disorder nl m. PrivntA Kniurn nriinir tmm HrtlP
Abuse. EicCacea, or Secret Xhsciscs, viih the beat
lucana of rtirfu JnrrrrHtrci, price 0 ct.
A CLINICAL IaECTTJRE on the above diMnsra and
those of the Throat and Itinpa, C&vtarrh&upture, Liia
Opium Habit,&c price 10 eta.
A. it her book sent postpaid on receipt of price: or all three
. coTiainiit?.'iOOpfipr. beautiful iv ilmtmccHt. tor 75 cts.
AddresaXJB.. ETJTT3.fr a. 12 N. SUifat. St. Louis. Mo-
NO CURE-NO FEE!!!
IN.
vate
fall 187 Ea,t Wnhiu;;toD street, Chic-iura. for the cure of all
Private, Chronic nJ Sperial Iin(s, fkiTl In ill WeuLneMV
rvoua liability and IxMt Manhood, permanently cured.
Dr. O.ii a graduate of the Kffonn S,titxl, and uv no Alwrnrv; hw
tha Ivwt prartlcaln the United State. LAIHE9 reqnirinc treat
ment with noma and board, rall or writ. Kvrv ronvenifiw f
rnlfenta. Send FHtr Onto for M A KKI Alii GTI IMS I 73
ptSt Hostra ted. MAKRIKD LAIIIEM and pentWnien send
fifty Cents f or Sample of Ku liber (loo,! and Circular of important
information, bv exnrm. Consultation free and confidential IteliabW
Female Pills. (Sstioi-
VO HaJK GOOD HKA I.TII TUB livkb
B1UST HE KEPT IN OltDKlt.
"or Pamphlcn addmts On. Sanfobd, New YoS
MARRIAGE;
I A noon ofopnrlT 300 rmsrm.
I numerous enffraTliiff; re
-Teals neeret which tit mar
ried and those eootrraola-
SECRETS
IrlDg marriage ghonld know.
How to cure dlseaites. lluod
"rednof ReciDe.. Beutaceurclr
ealed rot at) cents t lAoneyor post? stamps).
Address C. A. Bmuua. 621 N. Firth Street. St. Louis. Wo.
THE BEST Til B CHEAPEST!
The American Soft Capsule Company's
PURK CAPSDLATKD MEDICTNM
In Metallic Boxes. Full directions.
Castor Oil, Codllver OH 25c
on Turpentine. Hals. uaoaua..i!r)0
Oil of Cubebs with Copaiba. ROc
Oil Male Fern with Kamala 75c
Finest Oil of Sandalwood SI
W ASK FOR THE AMKRICAS
"STAB" Tradk Mask, and see you get UV
For sale by all Druggists.
(DIR. RICE,
37 Court Place, LOUISVILLE, KV.,
A rarnlarlT educated and legally qualified physician and tha
most socessful. as hi practice will prore.
Cnres all forms of PRIVATE,
CHRONIC and SEXUAL
EASES. , ,
Spermatorrhea ana Impotency,
as the result or self-abase in youth, sexual excesses in ma
turer years, or other causes, and producing some o f the fol
lowing effects: Nerronsucss, Seminal Emissions, (nicht emis
sions by dreams). Dimness or bightf DefecllTe iltmory. Phy
sical Decay, Fimplos on Face, Aversion to Society of Females,
Confusion of Ideas, iMm of Sexual Power, -tc. rendering
marriage improper or unhajpyt are thoroughly and perma
nently curd. SYPHIIs IS PMlUvtlJ' mni El c
tirrlr eradiocito,, from the system; Gonorrhea,
GLEET, Stricture, Orchitis, Hernia, tor Kuyuirc
Piles and other private disease, qaieslj cured.
it fa) self-evident that a phy sician who pays special attention
to a certain class of diseases, and treatinr thousands annu
ally, acquires great skill. Physician hnowiuc. this loci often
recommend persons to my care, When it is inconvenient u
visit the city far treatment, medicines can be sent privately
and safely by mail or express anywhere.
Cores Guaranteed ia all Cases
under t&lxevj.. . . , ...
Consultations personally or by letter free and Invited.
Charge, reasonable and correspondence strictly oonndnnfial.
X PRIVATE COUNSELOR
Of mo pages, sent to any address, securely sealed, for thirty
OO) cents. Should be read bv all. Address as atove.
rtmo. hours from 9 A. if . to e P. if. Sundava- a to d
PKENCKIPTIOIT I'BEE.
T7V3B THB SPEEDY CUBE of Seminal Weakness,
Jj Lost Manhood and all disorders brought on by
Indiscretion or excess. Any druggist has the Ingre
dients. DR. JAQUE3 tSf,
1HO west gmn street. -
HTAKCII.
ERKENBRECHER'S
Bon Ton Starch
Is absolutely odorless, and Chemically Pure.
It Is snowflake white.
It is susceptible of the blithest and most lasting
Polish.
It possesses greater strength of body than other
trade brands.
It is packed In Pound Parcels. Full Weight guar
an teed.
It costs less money than any Starch In the world.
It is manufactu. in the heart of the ereatest
cereal region ol i-i Globe.
It Is Sold universally In America by Grocers and
Its annual consumption reaches Twenty MUllon
Pounds.
Andrew Erkenbreclier
CIHCIWXATI.
Srienhrfefter'ti World- Ftmrma rti fttnreh for Tn&
HUBSE8 &. MULES FOIl NAI.K
Boarding &SaleStable
TF you wish to bay a good Saddle or HaroMi
. nwarw vi ia, jjsm. vwo.il v oa uiw m - ma-vu m,
aa tbe city can afford, eltoer Horse and Buggy or
Cq1IIa TJnfMA Ton ran al7ata find thA hAKt Hi mv
stable. Call and tee me.
E. P. LEAKE,
Ho. 378 Main street. 31eiuphi
J. A. FORREST & CO.
DEALERS IN
Horses and Mules,
61 & 63 Monroe stT, near Penbody Hotel.
WE are receiving dally a large assortment o:
EOHSEd and HULKS. Persons wanting
lock will save money by calling before purchanlfty,
elsewhere. Everything sold by us fully guaranteed
Orders solicited.
IIGOITOiaWcwsti-osx 3
J UVER STOMACH JL?5
A
i IPOEllIOIf
NEW AXI
SUMME
JUST RECEIVED, AT
B. LowanstsiD
In announcing the receipt of those choice and charming novelties, direct from Paris, " In Bond,"
EX-OCEAN STEAMSHIP "CELTIC,"
We beg to call the attention of ladles desirous of purchasing the nsest and most attractive Summer Dress
Materials, to the line we are now showing, and which. In our position of " Dlrrvt Importers," vvv are etrt
bled to otler at such low prices as no other house In the trade can successfully compete with. Anions the
line shown TUld WEEK we will exhibit:
The Reantiful Plevna ISngnos.
Lorn Falanka Ilernanis.
Shnmla Ilonrettes,'
Erzeronm Brocade.
Man Stefano Zephyrs,
And an immense variety of other X ew
We beg to advise our patrons and the general public, that on same steamer we have received
5000 Pieces Printed Dress Linen Lawns!
In superb designs, exclusively our own, and which we offer at amazingly low prices.-
o
LOWEKJSTEIM
242, 244 and 246 Main St., Cor. Jefferson.
91. II. COOVER.
Coover
HAJiUFACTUREES OF
3 SASH 9
FRAMES OF ALL KINDS MADE TO ORDER.
THOBOCGHLY HEASOSEl)
Flooring, Ceiling, Siding and Dressed Lumber
of all kinds, kept constantly on hand. Gin-work and Tanks made to order.
Also Cottonwood Flooring, Ceiling and Siding for sale. We beg an
Inspection ot our large stock.
161 and 173 Washinerton St., Memphis.
It.. H. CABBEBY.
CeARBERY & CASEY,
importers and Wholesale Liquor IVIerchants,
Nos. 34V Front street, 51einplils. Teim.
M1
B. MARCUS A. COCHHAN has leen admitted
1878. The business will be continued as heretofore, under firm name of tt. L. COLHliAN CO.
K. JU COCHRA3.
M. A. COCHRAX.
CSuooessors to M. X. k J. W.
Doors, Sasli, Blind, and
Office and Yard at foot
Saw and Planing
Tlwayi have on hand s choice lot of Flooring, Celling, Siding, Latttce, Framing, Fence and Dressed
Lumber, Bough and Dressed Pickets, Cedar Posts, Laths, SMu&les Dour aad
wmuow frames,
A. VACCARO. II. TACCAKO. . A. U. YACCAEl?.
A. VACCARO 8s GO.
IMPORTERS AND
WINES, LIQUORS & CIGARS,
No. 324 Front street, Memphis.
SOLE AGENTS FOR COOK'S ClIAHHr'AGXK IMPKBIAI,
It. K. PLAIN.
W. A. WILLIAMS.
W.H.EAB
MANUFACTURERS OF
Doors, Sash, Blinds, Moldings
ALL KINDS OF
Rough & Dressed Lumber, Shingles, Lath, Etc
OFFICE AND FACTORY:
358 and 3GO Second street, Memphis, Tenn.
SEND FOR OUR NEW AND REDUCED TRICE-LIST.
JK. C PEARCE.
PEARCE, SU6
WIIOI.ESAXE ClROCRKri,
Cotton Factors and Commission Merchants
No. 25S Front street. Memphis, Term.
PART1CIILAB ATTENTIOK PAID TO THE HAL.K OFCOTT03
NAPOLOEN HILL.
N. FONTAINE,
HILL, FONTAINE & GO.
COTTOH FACTOR
AND WHOLESALE GROCERS
Nog. 3GO and 332 Front street, Memphis, Tenn.
AGENTS FOR 1 HE CELEBRATED. CARVER COTTON GINS.
STEWART & DOHERTY'S
OF
Millinery G-oods
ON THrRMWAY, APRIL 4th. AHOTUR rCCKKIIX BAYS. OI K :t
tomers,and the public, are Invited to our Mprinc KxhlbsUon of Jrench rattj-ru Iton
netn. Imported direet from Hari: KnsllNh llonnil list", American Trim in fit
Hannrf. and Jorkri, of the latest stjles An lmimne stork of r-rench ari1 hriglish l h!ii. lea
born, Milan, reditl. Cobun? and Canton Straw Hls. trimmed and untrtmme.1. A i-eaulllul ussortin.-nt f
AltTH ICl Ali Fi.O tV fr.lt!. Wre;Uhand Motitures, Silks and Klbbons, Ornaments and Fancj Uood.-.
STEWART & D0HERTY,269liATf7sfREET, OPP. COURT SQUARE.
EliEUAXT
ARR ia'
ftUSB
tsros.
Russian Lace (arenadines.
Torchon Crepe tireiiatlii.es,
Jtnlgarian Armnre,
Marmora tirenadincM,
Uallipoli Chenille tirenadines
and Elegant Textile Dress Fabrics .
WJI. Ill ILL.FR.
& Miller,
TMtmAS CASE1
as a member of our firm, to take effect from March 1
fiAJK'L, A. HATCIiEI..
COCHRAN), Moaufactarers
all fcinda of Packing L'oxea.
of Washington street.
SUII In Eayj Turd,
moiainirs. Ktc.
9
DEALKK3 LN
JEROME HILL
BLINBS.Etc
W. H. EADER.
U li. SUttKS.
1HSNOM TH.
Dissolution ot Copartnership.
"I BF.O to stinounoe that I hare this clay withdrawn
1 Irtml lhv- linn of L. A A. L. l.oenl-ii. In do
triiifo, l rs-unn thanks to lliv ub lo for their kind
an I Literal iitn;ige. and ol:ctt continuance or
sme ltir;rMi'x-or. L. Luwenste in. vli alone Is
aii:horlzil lo coliec' wvd rrwliil fi r n 1 outstanding
aoi-ouiiis t.t t!ie old Crsa of L. A. 1- Lowensteln.
rj reM-frtlullv, A. I.. LOWENSTE1N.
MEMiW-i, Jlar 1, 1S7S.
Change ot Firm.
IN Ciiii; nttenfh.n to tbf above can!. I be to
Male that f fli.rll rsyiiihuie tlo "
iri twinM imrt rifKi stjle and "mi nmof
LoWENSfflX." and shall be 'U-.iaed to wait
or. mrfilen.ls fd th general ttorH 'c, aud lurntsh
thrn, as her...i. rr trie VEKV CLOTHlMi
in Memphis, al t.e VEBY IrOWEsTra; EfN
I.MFORJIS.
TO TIIK TRADE.
TO CITY TRADE!
At Lowest Market Price.
JNO.K. SPEED & CO.
303 Front Street.
mmmmr- mmmmmmmmmmmmmummmimmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm t
3IISCEL.LAXEOUS.
SI 31 31 EH nOABD-X. H West 31st
(Street. JVew Vert.
MR3. BCLKLEY will accommodate visitors to the
city during tbe summer montbs. with lirst-class
roo.ns.wlth or without board, at motlerate rites.
Her hoijio Is located between Broadway and "lfth
avt-.iue: Is most accessible from the various Ferries,
bei g within two minutes walk of Hie Elevated Hall
roa Is and six lines of Cars and Stages.
h ;feiences Dr. T. Gaillard Thomas, New Tetk;
Rev. T. D. Witherspoon, Petersburg, Va.; Rev. Kg.
E. Hoggs, Memphis. Tenn.
Flo wers Cheap!
DESIF.IN'l to make room and ealn time for en
larging their propagating facilities, J. H.
NALB CO.. 87 Main ttreet and outh eate of
Elmwood Cemetery, will, from April 2Mb, sell
Ho.?ers and Plants AT C03T "lower than the
lowost.'"
J. B. & W. A. Faires,
(Late of Forrest & Faires), Dealers In
MOTLES & HORSES
So, 55 Union street,
Near PostoHlce Meuiphis, Teniu
A large assortment of Stock always on band.
Everything guaranteed as represented.
ttrrtern solicited.
muxiken's
TORE
828 Arch Street,
Printetl Iinen Lawns !
WARRANTED PURE LINEN.
98 NEW 1ATTEKR? OVEN.
BE6T DISPLAY IN THE COUNTRY.
LIM:SI HA.MrKKRCHIKPM,
IsAUIK.' HAWKKKI'HIEr'H,
tiKXTf' H.tMlKKKt'lllKPM
Our line of Pure Linen Handkerchiefs Is very trxten
sive, and retailed at wholesale prices.
LIXEX tiUOI'N OK
EVERT IECKIPT10Ji t
vonderfullv Cheap.
tSAMPLE3 SENT BY MAIL-al3
George jtfilliken & Son
t29 ARCH STRKET,
3Fl3Lllet,3.oXi3l3.1ta,. Fa.
Ladies, Notice!
THB most beautiful ICE CRKASf PARLOR or
ril'KCU r A WA 1,T fr.lt. Xo. 37 3lad
Imoii Mtreet. has been most niagnlflcentiv refttted1
to please the ladis and gentlemen, where they will
be served with Pure Ice Cream, Sherbet and fine
Confectionery, ut low prices, wlilcli they also deliver,
in any quantity, to all pats of the c ty. and safely
shipped to the country. Wholesale and Retail.
riASOs.
PIANOS.
FOB SALS BY
Xj. Qoopel eft? Co.
Xo. 375 JIAIX HTKKKT.
FOR A HPLEXDIU 7lOCTAVE
ALSO, EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOB THE
STEINWAY PIANO!
AT REDUCED PRICES.
ORGANS AT $50 AND UPWARD
CSmitars. Vlalias, Banjo. AerordeoM,
etc, at wholesale prices to alL
E.A.BENSO.N'S
MUSIC JPAI.ACE,
307 Main, under Peabody Hotel.
LOAN ASSOCIATIONS.
New Series 1 New Series! New Series!
WORKINGMEN'S
ISnilding and JLoan Afutociatlon.
ISSUES a new series of stock every quarter; com
menced business In 1 878, and has beer and is
a SUCCESS. Stated meetings held on IRtJT TUES
DAY EVENING of each month, at their office, 2H1
Main street, up-stalrs. to make loans. Seventh Se
ries commences April 1. 1878. Subscribe now.
Money to Loan! Stock forSale! No Back Doest
L. LaGRILL, President,
Cvmi T. Patkrsom. Secretary.
STEAMSIIII'S.
INMAN LINE
ROYAL HAIL MTEAHERS,
NEW YOBK to qUEEXSTOWIH
and LIVERPOOL,
Kvery Thursday or Natnrday.
Tons. Ton?.
City op Bhrlis 54S1 1 CrrTor BsrsssLS.3775
Cnror RTCHMONn....4r(07 j Citt New Yokk. 8RO0
ClTTOr CHKSTKR 4-Virl I ("ITT OF PARIS. ..80X1
ClTTOF MOWTKKAL...44S) I ClTi BHfK-KLTW. .2V11
These magnificent steamers, built ia watertight
com part mMiu, are among the strongest, largest and
fastest on the Atlantic.
The saloons are luxuriously famished, e:dally
well lighted and ventilated, and take up tbe whole
width of the ship. Tbe principal staterooms are
amidships, forward of the engines, where least r-oise
and motion is felt, and are replete with every com
lo t. having all latest Improvements, double berths,
.;;. i r,c liells, etc
i .' c ilslne has always been a specialty of this
Li!;.
Ladles' cabins and bathrooms, centlemen srniok
InR and bathrooms, barbers' shops, pianos, libra
ries, etc, provided.
or p-Jet of passage and other Information, apply
to JOHN DALE, Agent,
31 and 3.J Roadway, New York.
Or to THOVA3 KlSHKR,
la met Baidc, Aiemph
Tlse Oldest Military Oothlns OVSf0r
.ti the Country. Complete 'j- '
f.ts. Uniforms, Hats, Caps, " 3am
Swonls, -nJ everything ylles. prices
nccafur rimcnts llp Md full infor
companies, bMcUQpaat.on m
colleges Mjy .ent m application.
C""'jsCr Correspoodeac with m
"uns"2y view to tusineis solicited
-Cv' Ijuldinq MiutAJct dorsums.
SALT

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