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Memphis daily appeal. [volume] (Memphis, Tenn.) 1847-1886, May 01, 1879, Image 2

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THhi MEMPHIS DAILY APPE AL -THUESD 4lY. M A.Y 1- 1S79J
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UU VLt'HlS APPEAL
BI
..AMiVWAY 4Ki:.TIS.
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r Contributor and Correspondent.
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ct veneral Interest, but sucb must always be ac-
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41 letters, eommnnlcatlons, or anything else for the
i.t'1'KAL.. sbould be addressed S3M
U1LUW1Y KEATING,
.ti C. Ga.uwaT, i Hm2 Second street,
J M. Kkti-i. f Vempbls, Tenn
MMPHiSimFPEAL
TIIUKSUAI, : : JIIAY 1,1879.
THK BKLL-PIXCU.
"Onward the bell-punch works its con
quering way." It is tha resource where pub
lic burdens are large and money is wanted.
The bell-punch is set on the ceunter in the
liquor-saloon, and whenever a drink is taken,
a cent, or whatever sum the law requires, is
dropped into the receptacle by those who sell
the liquor. As the money is deposited a bell
rings and proclaims that the law has been
complied with. If do bell rings the saloon
keeper has "pains and penalties" to endure.
So well has this little instrument contributed
to swell the public revenue of the States
adopting it, that others are seeking to par
ticipate in its advantages. We see, by the St.
Louis Republican, that the legislators of Mis
souri have the bell-punch nnder considera
tion at the present time, and that there is
great probability of its adoption. Through
oat the State there is no opposition to it ex
cept in St. Louis. There the salooj-keepers
are about to send a delegation to the State
capital to oppose it. It is considered likely
that the appearance of such a delegation,
seeking to influence legislation to accord
with the saloon-keepers views, will have just
the contrary effect the delegates desire, and
insure the adoption of the bell-punch.
VHKE.TUIKINU AND FBEBaOVE;
ISM.
In another column we publish this room
ing a narrative of the fearful results recently
made known at Toledo, Ohio, and occurring
from the infatuation now happily decreaa-
ing arju'.eJ by the apostles of free-love,
spiritu ilisra aod other absurdities. It is a re'
murkall J fact that the unbeliever is as readily
led into superstition as the unreflecting re
ligious devotee. When Rome ceased to believe
in the gods, the superstitions of Egypt with
its sorceries and incantations, its good and
evil influence, and occult causes; its com
pound of a religion that was dark fetichism
with a philosophy that was principally
groundless inference from little understood
natural facts this Egyptionism became
the fashion, and the Roman ladies
embraced it with as much enthusiasm as
some of the modern ladies have done the
"isms" of to-day. In France, when the un
believers bad dethroned God and deified Rea
son, superstitious regard for lucky and un
lucky days, fortune-telling and omens in
creased in a remarkable degree. So, to-day,
the victims of the silly "ignis," that are pro
claimed by "long-haired sages and a shriek
ing sisteihood," are commonly what is called
free-thinkers. The light of revelation being
lost, a superstition that blasphemes science
by assuming its garb, professes to open to
men communication with the ipiritual world,
and a pretty era of deception and fraud has
followed. As might be expected from the
facts we here refer to, the principal person
age in the Toledo sensation had been brought
up among fr je-thinking people and under
sceptical influences.
BKSIFEOTABLtS BaHCaLITY.
The frequency of fraud, and the coolness
and effrontery with which it is perpetrated,
and tbe success that often attends it, are
most remarkable facts in modern social life.
To judge by the conduct of Tweed and his
brood of infamous imitators, it would appear
as if public office was sought, by a large por
tion of the aspirants lor it, only as a means
of dishonestly appropriating to themselves
property that belongs to others. Officials and
employes of corporative institutions have
boldly followed in their wake, and the per
nicious example Bet so freoly by "respect
able" scoundrels fails not to taint tbe less
icfluctl ljufa uub lcoo oortnpt tkkovos of till
lower grades. The vastness of the plan on
which some of the most barefaced stealir.g
is perpetrated is astounding, and wnat is
especially horrible and abominable is that
tha immensity of the crime commonly saves
tha criminal, on the principle stated by the
poet that "one murder makes a vil
lain, millions a hero." The United
States government has recently dis
covered that a plan was in course of per
it'ction by which, during the coming sum
mer, eonie thousands of individuals would
suddenly have taken possession cf a large
portiou of land long owned by others, but
not yet1 cultivated, held directly from the
United States by full legal guarantee. The
multitude was to have settled upon this
property and proceed to plow, reap, and
build their residences. Ia this way not
acres, but miles of land were to have been
stolen, and, when the thieving was accom
plished, the thieves would have built churches
with their dishonestly gained money, and
built them on ground stolen as fully as horse
thieves steal horses. Fortunately, the scheme
bus become known, and it is presumed the
United States government will protect the
owners of the land in question in their just
ngbts. Even in ordinary business there are
frauds carried on systematically and con
tinually. We nave before us an ex
tract from the Scientific Monitor, which
informs us how cotton goods can
be weighted with chloride of magnesium
so t'at shirtings can be made that are fifty
fivo parts cotton and forty-five parts "size,"
as it is called. The siz3 disappears on the
first washing, but the manufacturer has
pocketed the proceeds of his cheating by the
time of that occurrence, and is a respectable
man and a good church member. The Monitor
also informs us that silks can be made fifteen
to twenty per cant, heavier by the use of the
same chloride of magnesium, but "unfor
tunately" the goods do not handle well. But
there must bo cbeatings in silks as well aa in
cottons, or how could respectable scoundrel
iani pay any better than merely slow, old
fogy honety? Accordingly, sugar is used
for the purpose, and answers so well, and
pays rogues so handsomely, that the use of it
"increases more and more," says our author
ity. Weighting with sumac and galls is
also an increasing practice in the silk trade.
Tbe oxymuriate of tin, "in concentrated
solution at twenty-Eve degrees Biume,"
is excellent for making silks heavi
er, and, consequently more profitable
to tho fraudulent maker and dealer, but
"unfortunately" again for cheating is some
times subject to the misfortune of not being
able to cheat enough unfortunately its use
is necessarily restricted by the fact that "it
affects certain colors." In all this there is
no blush for the dishonesty, so ehame tor the
puiit; cottons and silks are made heavy that
the same money may be got for the size that
coats a mere nothing as ia obtained for a
valuable fabric. Tbe men who commit these
frauds hold up their beads in society and
their hymn-books in church as high, at least,
as tbe pure and tbe upright. If society is to
b3 judged by its fruits, have we not, in the
things we have mentioned, clear proof that
our moral teachers are remiss and fiil to in
culcate some imporlaat requisite of christian
conduct? The frauds and corruptions that
are now so prevalent are outward manifesta
tions of vitiated morals, or distorted reli
gion, or both, and the good and the right
thinking should seek a corrective for the un
principled conduct that seeks no covert, puts
on no dieguiae, but flaunts the luxuries it has
gained by fraud and theft in the light of day
and amid the applause of society.
THK COUIKtt DUOH OF KIHHI4.
The position of public affairs in Russia is
alarming to the last degree. Until the last
quarter of a century the Russians reverenced
their czir with a sacredness that almost en
dowed his person with divinity. See the
contrast. To-day the cztr is unsafe in his
own capital. He cannot go out unless he is
surrounded with soldiers. His principal offi
cers and nobles arej frequently in the same
position; public duties are often discharged
at the risk of life. A large portion of the
people are banded together in a mighty con
spiracy to rule without mercy all who oppose
them. Every prominent man in Russia
trembles as he is informed by the conspira
tors that he is ' doomed, and that the bomb,
tbe pistol or the knife will execute the sen
tence that has been passed cpon him by the
dreaded tribunals of the nihilists. Why
comes the chanze from a devotion that went
almost to the extent of blasphemy to an
opposition that sticks not at assassination?
The Russian government is an absolute des
potism, 15 has long been carrjpd cn, not for
the benefit of the people, but for the ambi
tion of the governing powers. Not the ex
tension of trade, the spread of intelligence,
the increase of the comforts of the people are
the object of the measures of the rulers, but
their own aggrandisement, the extension of
their own power. To secure thesa objects
the .hard-won earnings of the laborer, and
the modest profit of the tradesmen are ap
propriated to the indulgence of the lust for
conquest. To subdue and aunex new terri
tory is the grand aim of the sovereign power.
All the energies being directed toward war,
civil anairs are in disorder, corruption pre
vails everywhere. Justice itself is prostituted
for bribes, and it is not the just cause, but
the heaviest purse that wins. The effects
of all this upon the mass of the peo
ple has been fearful. War does not
build op, it destroys, and a nation that
is always at war is a nation on tbe way
to extinction. Corruption saps the very
existence of a people. It degrades the pub
lie moral sense. It blunts the national con'
science, and robs crime of its disgrace. In
this way the government of France, in the
latter half of the last century, degraded pub
lic sentiment while it aroused public indig
nation, and revolution and the guillotine was
the result. In Russia a similar result has
been prepared. A grinding despotism has
treated the people with every indignity,
arousing a savage spirit of resistance. To
oppression it has added a corruption that has
polluted the public moral sentiment until
assassination is no longer shuddered at as a
crime, but acclaimed as an act or patriotic
heroism. The government is endeavoring to
quell the storm it baa raised, by exercising a
more severe harshness and a more cruel vin-
dictiveness. How does this violent opposi
tion to public sentiment act upon the current
of events? As a dam acts upon the flowing
river. It mitigates the force of the cur-
rent, and behind
it the waters have
a placid But face,
they are mounting,
in strength until,
But though quiet
As they rise they gain
at last, the barrier is
broken away. Then "the hell of waters
broken loose" bursts forth for devastation.
Thrones, and aristocracies, and the hoary
traditions of uncounted generations all go
down before it. Tyranny, oppression, in
justice and corruption are overwhelmed in
one wild, mad swirl of overwhelming and
destroying revenge, and history has one
more page added to its record of the results
of despotism, oppression and wrong. Russia
is now the dammed-np stream the rnsh and
roar of the resistless deluge has yet to come.
THE OTHKLLO JSTOKY,
Ah Related as a TaUe-olT of the Modern
91 as I a of Sentimental Vounic Ladles
Klopluz with their Family
Coachman.
Cincinnati Enquirer: "Another interest
in character in Shakespeare," remarked
Grandfather Lickshingle, "is 'Othello, the
Moor cf Venice,' an' perhaps I can spare the
time to tell you a littleeorue!hin' about him."
One of the family said that tney were dying
to hear about "Ocheha," but thought it
would be nothing more than fair to postpone
the recital until the next family reunion,
which would occur in about ten or fifteen
years. Grandfather said he would repeat it
then by rr qa-;st, and started in :
" 'Othello was a colored coachman who
eloped with 'Desdemorm,' his employer's
youngest daughter, beautiful, gifted an' ac
complished, an' the acknowledged belle of
the town. They fled to Jersey City, where
they were married with great Pomp and Cir
cumstance. I can't say pobitively, but I
think great Pomp was a bi; nigeer, also a
coachman an' a friend of 'Othello,' who had
perhaps run away with his employer's
daughter. Anyhow, they were all married
together. 'Othello' and 'Ik-sdemona' lived
happily together until they made the ac
quaintance of 'Iago,' a schemin villain cf an
undertaker who was always maneuverin'
around to get somebody killed an' get a job.
i ago' concocted an' pouted into 'Othello's'
ear the wicked lie that 'Dedcmona' had
grown tired of him an' was carryin' on a
desperate flirtation with 'Cassio,' a book
agent."
'"What kind of a flirtation?' demanded
'Othello,' growing white about the giils.
" 'Well, I suppose you would call it hand
kerchief flirtation,' replied 'fago,' 'as a
delicately wrought handkerchief, Which thou
didst purchaKO and give unto 'Desdemona,
is now in the prssension of 'Cassio,'
" 'My first gilt to the wench,' exclaimed
'Othello,' strugglin' to catch his breath, 'an'
doth he blow his plebeian nose upon it?'
" 'No, good my lord, he doth use it to
knock the dust oiten his boots.'
"'It is here that "Otheilo" speaks the
famous lines:
'Then, by my soul, she dleg?
trlse, black vengeance, from thy
Hollow ceil, an' bumpb thyself e'en now!
oh! blood, iago, a bucketful of blood!'
"To this the deceitful 'lago' tuggested that
it would be well to go slow, and perhaps
'Othello' would change his mind. The jeal
ous Moor made reply :
" 'Never, Iigo. Like to tbe Pontic sea,
Wnose Is? curceut and luipublve course
Ne'er feels returning ebb, but keeps due on
To the rropomto au7 tbe Uelleapour,
Or a politician hot on the scent of an office.
E'en so my bloody tliuoghts. with violent pace,
Hhall ne'er look back until I sweep
To uiy revenge-e-e!'
"And going right up to 'DesJemonaV
room he hammered her over tbe head with
the boot jack until she was quite dead. lie
then threw the body into the well, reuiarkiu'
that he would teach her to give away a hand
kerchief that cost him good money earned
by hard licks as coachmau tor her father, who
paid the smallest salary and set the poorest
table of any man in town."
After wiping the tears from bis eyes, grand
father concluded:
"The moral is that there is nothin' gained
by bein' an orney cus, as we seen in the case
of 'lago,' the scheniin' undertaker. Al
though he succeeded in creatin' a death in
the family, the body was thrown into the
well, an' h, therefore, got no order for a
funeral. While virtue was not exactly re
warded, vice received a terrible rebuke.'
A. Colored .Family Iolsoned.
Savannah, April 29. Three negro women
and a child were roisoned Saturday. Two
are dead, aud the otht-rj are not expected to
recover. A woman has been arrested on sus
picion.
CllillST AX1 Til 12 SABBATH
Wan the Subject or a most Interest
lug; IMsconrse by Bev. Sr. Bocxe,
i'astor of the Second Pres
byterian Church, Last
Monday.
Rev: Dr. Boggs, in continuation of a series
of sermons on the above subject, last Sunday
chose for his text:
Christ and the Sabbath.
Matt v, 17-10. Think not that I am come to de
stioytbelaw, or the prophets. I am not conn to
destroy, but to fulfill. 'or verily 1 say unto you, till
heaven aud eailh pass, oue lot or one tlHie shall la
no wise pass from the law, till all be fulfilled. Who
soever, therefore, sball break one of tbe least of
these commandments, and sball teach men so, be
thai I be called the least in the kingdom of heaven;
but whosoever shall -tond teach them, the same
shall tie called great In the kingdom of heaven.
Also Matt, xll, 1-13.
Those of you, my brethren, who were present
last Sabbath afternoon may perhaps remem
ber that the obligation laid upon men to con
secrate one day in seven to religious resting
from all secular affairs, save works of- neces
sity and mercy, so that the entire time may
be given to purposes of worship, was pre
sented from the standing-point of the old
testament. The ground taken was that the
moral law, consisting of the ten command
ments, was intended to be a rule of" life for
all men. The observance of a Sabbath is a
prominent part of this moral law, and, there
fore, it was designed tor all men who have
knowledge of the law. This is made more
apparent from the special mention of "the
stranger," or Gentile, as bound to keep the
Sabbath, though rigidly excluded from the
ceremonial observances of tbe passover and
sacrifices. It is further established by tbe
eyident reference of the word "remember"
to a previous enactment. .Ihat enactment is
found recorded in Gen. ii, 1, 2. The Sab
bath is as old as the human race, and was
given to Adam for all men. I propose now
to consider what Christ has to say on the
Sabbath. It is my purpose to tceat this
question as one of biblical interpretation sim
ply. It does not disturb us as much as
some seem to imagine to have the
opinions of Luther and Calvin quoted
against our interpretations of scrip
ture. As Protectants we have no infallible
theologians. We call no man on earth mas
ter, remembering that one is our master even
Christ. We reverence such men as Luther
and Calvin. We valne highly the help Which
they give us in the interpretation of scripture.
We would not hastily nor arrogantly reject
their counsels. But the word of God is tbe
only rule of faith and duty which we ac
knowledge. 'To the law and the testimony;
if they speak not according to these it is be
cause there is no light in them.'' If time
and duty allowed us to argue this question
by an appeal to history, as some have done,
we might point to the churches in Germany
and in Switzerland, founded by these emi
nent men, as illustrat-.ons of the danger of
setting aside the commandment which calls
tor the sanctiiication of one day iu seven.
Wise men in these countries see it clearly,
and the evangelical revival which is now re
building the desolations of German and Swiss
Protestantism, incorporate the holy Sabbath
as one plank in its platiorm. Amicus
Liutnerua, umxeut vautnus, sea magxs
arnica Veritas liuther is our friend, Calvin
cur friend, but truth is yet more our friend."
We appeal unto the word of God, which is
open unto all. I discussing the words of
Jesus touching tne Sabbath, I propose to con
sider, first, what He says of the decalogue
in general, and, secondly, what lie says of
the babbatn law in particular. Ihuslhope
to bring the whole subject clearly before your
minds, that you may decide lor yourselves, as
in the signt Ood, what is true.
1. Let us consider what our Lord has to
say concerning the decalogue in general. I
take up this point because it has been imag
ined that our Lord s handling of the moral
law, or rather ot certain portions cf it. lm
plies less regard on His part f or the Sabbath
law. We shall waste no tim-, therefore, by
looking into this matter fully. What teas
our Lord's attitude, then, toward the moral
law of tha ten commandments? Our text
answers the question most full? and clear! v.
That He bad his eye especially upon the law
as expressed in the ten commandments
seems to be put beyond all question, lor in
v. 21 he cites the exact words of the sixth
commandment, ana proceeds to correct pop
ular impressions as to the extent or the coin
mandment, "Thou shalt not kill." Mariv
supposed that it only forbade the act of man
slaughter. Ibey imagined that it took no
cognizance of the thoughts and feelings of
the heart, it only a man kevt bis nanu
stained with blood he was sinless, so they
teit. war uom exposes and corrects th9 cr
ror. God's law goes into tbe heart, he savs,
Hatred and malice are murder in God's sight.
In v. 27 he cites the seventh commandment,
and insists that unchaste thoughts are viola'
tiona ot it. in v. oo ne cues what is no
doubt a pharaphrase of tbe third command
ment. It implies that some persons imag
ined that periury or false s wean us was toe
only sin committed in the third command
ment, uur Jjora corrects this error and in
sists that all conversational oaths are viola
tions ot t-iod 8 law. rroianity as well as
nerjury are forbidden in the commandment
In v. 43 our Lord vindicates the Mosaic
summary of the second table of the law from
tbe gloss that men had put upon it. Tne
principle, he says, of love to our neighbor
rises above ail disputes and animosities. It
meats lore all men enemies as well as
friends. Thus our Lord indorses the law as
a whole, atd then proceeds to expound three
out ot the ten commandments. Why he
chose these three rather than the others
seems to have been the fact that he had dis
covered a special tendency in the people to
set aside these and to explain away
their meaning. Ua another occasion our
Lord cited ceitain of the commandments to
the rich young ruler, who so earaestly ia
auired what he must do to be saved (M tt.
xix, 18, 19). Ftr the purposs of prcbing his
conscience, our Lord repeats to him five of
the six commandments of the second table of
too law. Tha caaf, as it stands, sterns de
signed to show how much a man may have
and yet lose bis soul. In the next instant our
Lord applies the test of forsaking all to
serve God. Then the veil is removed, and
avarice is seen to be his ruling passion
Uompanng the two series togetuer we see
that in all, Christ mentions six of the ten
commandments, omitting the Jirst, second,
fourth and tenth. Why he named just these
and no others we can only surmise. It seems he
deemed them best suited to the occasion. lie
was engaged ia ccrrecting errors and awk'
emng sleepy consciences. He knew the
hearts of those to wnom ne wa3 speaking,
and doubtless 6aid ju?t the things which they
needed most to near, i rom tnis exatuma
tion we learn that our Lord both assumed
and asserted the divine authority of the
moral law as expressed in the ten command
ments. In his reply he repeats the brief
summary of the ten commandments: "Thou
shalt love the Lord thy God with all trty
heart, and with all tny soul, end with all thy
uind. ibis is the hrst aud great command
ment; and the Becond is like unto it: Thou
shalt love thy neighbor aa thyself. On these
two commandments hang all the law and the
prorhbts. In saying this he asserts by im
plication the authority of all the ten. And
also, our tiord singled out several of the ten
commandments that were being misunder
stood, that he may correct error. Had the
people of that day set aside tbe Sabbath, as
many do now, we cannot doubt that be
would have named the fourth commandment
and expounded it. 1 rom the mere fact ol
not being specifically mentioned it loses
nothing of its authority. But there is no
evidence of our Lord's intention to re-euact
any one cf the ten commandments. His lan
guage is that of a prcacner, not ot a legisld'
tor. He explains, but does not enact. Tne
commandments bind ua by the original en
actment at Mount Sinai.
2. Havinsr thus seen our Lord's attitude
toward the moral law as a whole, let us now
see what he has to say about the Sabbath ia
particular. Much importance ha3 beeu at
tached to the fact that Christ had frequent
disputes with the Jewish authorities touch
ing the Sabbath, and that tney bitterly ob
jectea to some tnings wnien lie did on
the holy day. Irom this undeniable
fact the inference baa been drawn
that ho did not regard the day
as the Mosaic law required. ino argument
stated in its logical form would be about
this: The notions ot the Jews in Christ's lite
time were in exact accord with the fourth
commandment. ( A.J But our Lord's views
and practice did not harmonize with them.
(E.) Therefore, our Lord's conduct did not
accord with the fourth commandment. (E.J
Now, the question is, do the facts warrant
the conclusion? Are these premises right?
And as a spur to caution and care in such an
inquiry, it might be well to pause a moment
that we may consider the bearing of this
question upon the character of Christ. I can
very well imagine how a christian man could
maintain that ice are no longer bound to keep
the Sabbath, because it was a Jewish institu
tion. He would be in error as to the lact,
for it was not a Jewish institution; see how
he might reason in that way. But I cannot
see how Buch a person should imagine that
Jesus would be exempt on that ground. If
we are not Jews, and therefore not bound to
keep the Sabbath, we must not forget that
our blessed Lord was, as to his humanity, a
Jew, being the Bon of David. He assumed
all the obligations of an Israelite. Aa a
token of this he was circumcised when
eight days old. Forty days after bis
birth he was presented in the temple witi
the usual ottering for the first-born on, at
Moses directed. If the fact of being of Jew
ish blood makes any difference with regard
to tho fourth commandment, then Christ, in
becoming man as a Jew, was bound. And I
see not how any christian would set about
proving his sinlessness if it should be provei
that he had violated the law of the Sabbath,
There were disputes between our Lord and
the Jewish rulers about the Sabbath. Thet
did call him a Sabbath-breaker. He justified
himself, but they were not satisfied with hii
explanations. Now let us examine the facta
for ours elves and see who was right? All
the charges of Sabbath-breaking brought
against Christ were founded upon the fact
of his working miracles on that day, save
oue instance only, which wa will examine
separately. Now about his miracles of heaN
ing, were they violations of tho fourth com
mandment? What did he say in justification
of them? Did he say frankly, "I in
tend to abrogate the Sabbath and
therefore do not conform to the law?" Such
would be the candid course, if he
had leally acted upon that principle. Doe
he hint that he intends to modify the strict
ness of the law, by authorizing bit discip.tj
to keep it less completely than the pious
Israelites have done ? No such words does
he speak. But on the contrary he affirms
that his miracles were in exact accord with
God's law as it then stood. His miracles are,
he contends, just such works of necessity and
mercy as tho law allowed to be done on the
Sabbath. They were in no sense the
"works" forbidden in the law as God gave it
to l3rael at Mount binai. He appealed to
familiar instances of just such deeds of
mercy which bis over-zealous opponents
themselves practiced. " VVhat man khili
there be among you," he said, "that shall
have one sheep, and if it fall into a pit on
the Sabbath day, will be not lay hold on it
sd lift it out? How much is a uan better.
than a Bheep?" (Matt, xii, 11, 12.) Ihe re
ply was a center-shot. It closed their mouths,
but unfortunately for tnem, it am not open
their hearts. On another occasion there came
to him a suffering woman, who was
bowed together, and could in no
wisd lift nerseit up. Ana ne iaia
bis hands on her; and immediately ;she was
made straight, and elorihed God. liut
there were blinded critics present. "And the
ruler of the synagogue answered with indig
nation because that Jesus had healed on the
Sabbath day, and said unto the people,
There are bix days in which men ought to
work; in them, therefore, come and be
healed, and not on the Sabbath day.' " This
allusion to the words of the fourth command
ment makes it clear, if such a thing were
needed, that the issue was joined on the
decalogue itseif, aud not on any of the politi
cal or ceremonial observances. And what ia
our Lord's reply to this indictment? His
tone was in this instance uuusually severe, as
if He had delected an element of insincerity,
of quibbling, in one so intelligent: 'Thou
byptcrite, doth not each one of you cn the
Sabbath loose his ox or his ass from the stall
and lead him away to watering? And ought
not this woman, being u daughter of Abra
ham, whom Satan hath bound, lo, these
eighteen years, tw loosed from this bond on
the Sabbach day V He thus claims to be
keeping the Sabbath holy as God meant that
it should be done. Is bis exposition of the
law correct or not? Was he in error, or
were they in error as to the real intent of the
commandment? Among christians, of
course, there can be but ona reply.
Oar Lord's miracles did not abate one ' jot
or tittle"' fioru the complete consecration of
one entire day in seven. So much lor the
miracles. Now let us cxamiue the only
other case oa recer J in which he was chargea
ble witu Sabbath-breaking. The facts as
ptated iu Matt. x;i, 1-3, are briefly these:
His disciples were going with him on the
Sabbath through a field of grain. Poverty,
or elso the exic-.ccies of the public service,
had deprived them of necessary food. In
their hunger thty availed themselves of the
privilege accorded I j every Israelite to satisfy
tbe pangs of hunt?e". God had expressly said
(Deut. xxiii, 24, 2-3): "Wnen thou comsst into
tby neighbor's vii'yard, then thou mayest
eat grapes tby fid bi. thine own pleasure; but
thou shalt not pat away in thy vessel. When
thou co meat into the standing corn of thy
neighbor, then thou mayest pluck the eais
with thins hand; but thou shalt not move a
sickle unto tby neighbor's standing corn."
Such was a peculiar property-law of the
Jewish commonwealth. God, as the invisible
king and lord ot the soil, had ordained it.
He assumed authority over every acre ot
ground from Dan to Beersheba. And it was
His will that no Israelite should be taa
gry while there .were grapes stand
ing giaia at hand. He miht help himself,
by God'o jermi8sion, and witheut further
asking. This law all Jews scKnbwledk-e.
There was, therefore, no question ot tJuft
raised against them. They bad followed the
well-known law of the land. They bad only
done what God permitted. The charge was
that they were doing secular work on the
holy day. The record does not cite in this
case the words cf the fourth commandment.
It is possible, therefore, that they had some
other regulation in mind when making this
charge. The Jews were forbidden to cook
toed on the Sabbath. They may have con
strued the rubbing of the heads of wheat aa
iu some sort equivalent to that preparation of
food which thy laws ot Moses forbade. It so.
how does our Lord reply? Does he intimate
that thencelorth he meant to aboiish the
sanctified! ton of a eiay to God? Not at all.
He gives no hint of it. On the contrary, ho
appeals to the old testament to justify his
dibciplcs. He cites the extraordinary con
duct of David when, under stress from hun
ger, he ate, by consent of God's priest, those
consecrated loaves which, by tbe
letter of tho law, were allowed
only to the priests. Had he done this with
out the plea of necessiLy and mercy, it would
have been siu in him. But God pitied his
necessity, and no blamo was attached to him
at all. Our Lord also reminds them that the
tom pie worship itself required some manual
work frcm the priests on the Sabbath, and
yet no sin was imputed to them. He thus
argues from the old testament that they had
done nothing inconsistent with their position
aa Israelites. They had acted, He said, on
the same principles upon which David had
acted. Tbcir case in gathering a few ears
on the baooath to appease tueir hunger was
on a par with that of the priests who Offered
the daily sacrifices on that holy day. Ia a
word, the disciples were "innocent" of any
violation of God's law as the law then stocd.
Ia further support of this. He cites from Ho-
tsea vi, 6, wherein God enters complaint
against Dacks;iaing Israel tiiat they had sub
slituted forms of worship in the place of ro
ligious morality, and especially in place of
humanity between man end man. The
whole verse reads: "For I desired mercy,"
that is, humaniiy between man and man,
and not sacrifice, not mere forms
ot worship; "and the knowledge of
(jod moie tnan barct-oitenngs." The case
is clearly put. Our Lord denies for himself
and his disciples any violation of God's law.
And he esUblislt;d hi3 position by means of
th'3 old testament itselt. Their objections
were untcriptural, he argued. They were
not sualaiced by the word of God. The dis
ciples were "innocent" of Sabbath-breaking,
according to the old testament itself. Act
this conclusion cannot be set aside by the
declarations of Canst that he "is greater than
the temple" (v. 6), aud that he is "Lord even
cf the Sabbath day." Whatever be the im
port ot such expressions, they cannot, of
course, be set over against his own clear ar
gument that his disciples had done nothing
inconsistent with their religious professions as
Je-.Ts. bunie interpret them to be an intima.
tion of his purpose to dirtct the change of or e
ncn-esseniuu aeiau in tne old lebtamcnt Sal--
bath namely, to appoint, through his apos
tles, the first t!ay f the week instead of the
seventa, that tiius the two great wcrks o
God, creation an i redemption, might be com
memorated together. Ihis may be so. But
this unfulfilled purpose in Christ could not be
pleaded t? justify the apostles in what they
did before he r..f,j from the dead. They had
at this stage ol tbe history no rule other than
that ot the old tcstamenl. iy that, there
fore, our L)rd dies them and pronounces
them innocent. L'pcn next Sabbath I Dro-
pose, God willing, to examine the remaining
portions of the :;ev. testament to see what
change.!,!! any, tat apostles may have made in
the Sabbath. Up to the time of our Saviour's
death, we have found, I think, thatno change
whatever was ii.ade in the law of
the ba'Jba'.h as i-. stood in the deca
logua. In this conclusion I feel sure that
you will agree with me. I propose that we
Khail abide by the word of God in this, as in
all things pertaining to our faith and duty.
Ujman opinions we may lawfully use as helps
to tho understanding of scripture. But
wherein they depart from scripture we will
depart from them, no matter by what great
names these opinions be supported.
Mad Acrident.
Cakbox Hill, Pa., April 29. The house
of John L. Keogh was destroyed by fire this
morning, and a son aged eleven and a
daushter age-d thirteen years were burned to
death. Mr. Keogh had his face and hands
terribly burned in his endeavers to save his
children. Ills youngest child, aged five
years, had its head and arms badly ecorched,
and its recovery is doubtful.
TtJTTP
INDORSED BY
PHYSICIANS, CLERGYMEN AND
THE AFFLICTED EVERYWHERE.
THE GREATEST MEDICAL
TRIUMPH CF THE AGE.
TUTTS' P3LLS
CURE SICK HEADACHE.
TUTT'S PILLS
CURE DYSPEPSIA.
TUTT'S PILLS
CURE CONSTIPATION.
TUTT'S PILLS
CURE PILES.
TUTrSP!LLS
CURE FEVER AND AGUE.
TUTT'S PILLS
CURE BILIOUS COLIC.
TUTFSPILLS
Cure KIDNEY Complaint.
TUTrSPILLS
CURE TORPID LIYER.
TUTT'S PILLS
IMPART APPETITE.
Dn. Tutt has suc
ceeded in combining in
those piils the hereto
fore antagonistic quali
ties of a Stbenotuino,
PiraoTivE, aDd a Pu
bifyinq Tonic.
Their first annarent
effect is to increase tlio
Hppetito by canning tho
food to properly as
similate. Thus tho sys
tem is nonrtahed, and
by tbeir tonic action on
the digestive organa,
regular and healthy e
racnations are pro
duced. The rapidity with
which PERSONS TAKE
ON FLESH while nnder
Hie influence of these
pillR, indicates their a
daptability to nourish
the body, hence their
eltlcacy in curing ner
vous debility, melan
choly, dyspepsia, wait
ing of the iuusciea,shig
giflmc8 of the liver,
chronic constipation,
and imparting health &
strength to I lie system.
Sold everywhere.
Price 25 cents.
Office
53 Murray Street,
NEW YOR-
ELECT1UC BELTS.
PULVERMACHER'S
AND BANDS
Are sclf-nppllcablo to any part of the body,
for the speedy and effectual care of
Rheumatism,
Neuralgia,
Dyspepsia,
Nervou3 Debility.
Liver Complaint,
Kidney Disease,
Female Complaints,
Nervousness,
Urinary Diseases,
General Ill-Health,
Wasting Decay,
Spermatorrhea,
Epilepsy,
Paralysis,
Sexual Exhaustion,
Spinal Diseases.
Indigestion,
Ana other cbronlc ailments,
VOLUNTARY
TESTIMHNY.
Extract from the Ballimore UA irican,"
December 21, 1873.
The Pulvermacher Electric Belt Is recom
mended to general use for tho following ron
boiis: First, fer ts wonderful propr-rties for
the euro of diseases of the kidneys, stomach,
liver nnd blood; secondly, for its extreme
sii.iplicity, and the fcet of Its being nrtilied
outside, precludes all possibility of any in
jury being done to the patient, as nn external
remedy is universally acknowledged to bo
b ifo. Another advantage la the fifclllty wil h
which the progress of the disease and curu
cj.u bo watched, and If the Belt be not quite
in tho right place, ltcmi be very easily read
(usted so as to cover the parts nflected. Tho
rulvcrmacber Electric Belt, and its perfec
tion, has been balled with deiight, not only
by the sulTerers who have regained health,
enjoyment, and a new lease of lifo thiwyh
Us bouoOooot Q.rf"-e, but by tlio roc-Uic:-.l
profession, who very frequently prescribe its
use to their patients."
PULVERMACHER'S
ELECTRIC BELTS AND BANDS
are indorsed and approved by tho most em
inent medical and scientific authorities, in
the world, by tho Faculties of France, En
gland, Austria, Prussia, Belgium, and Amer
ica, and by well-known writers, who refer to
the extraordinary cures effected by Tulver
raacher's Electric Belts and Bands, in up
wards of one hundred medical and philo
sophical works.
Pesckii-tive PAjxrnurr nnd The Elec
tiucQitaterly, a large Illustrated Journal,
containing full particulars mailed free.
Address
PULVERMACHER GALVANIC C3.,
Cor. Eigiti sz& Tiro Sts., CSTSHuTATI, 0.
ti?Avo!d oogus appliances claiming elec
tric qualities. Our Famphltt explains how to
distinguish the genuine from the cparioiis.
ELECTRIC BELTS.
A. wire cure for Nervous Debility. Premature Decay
Weakness, Consumption, Liver and Kidney diseases
uenerai Debility, etc.
The Only Reliable Care.
Circulars mailed free. Address J. H. RESTK3
hat bam ptmt. New orlc.
3IIKCKL.L. AX E4 US.
CIA
navingmaeleFlJiE WHISKIES, as well
asPUKK HAY LSI CIGARS, specialties
ia our business, we hive accepted tho
agency of Messrs. Iluweu & Motire.t lie old,
reliable distillers of Slmvrhan, liourbon
county, Kentucky, and wo are now offer
ing, free and in bond, tbeir celebrated
brands of SOUK and SWEET MASH
WHISKIES, embracing ages, 1873, 1874.
1875, 1876 and 1877. The Trade supplied
at distillers' prices, freight added.
Our J.iue of Liquors and Cigars is com
plete, covering all grades; while in the
.Line or groceries, Provisions and Planta
tion Supplies, we lefy Competition in this
or any other market. Cash and Short
Time Uuyrs will consult their interests
by Ins.ecting our Stock.
J J. BUSBY & CO.
Just Received!
FULTON MABKET EXTBA MESS BEEP IN
half barrels.
Kitra Mess Pork. Extra Prime Pork.
New Patent Process Premier Flour.
Herman Millet Missouri Millet.
Tennessee Millet. Hungarian Uiass.
Country Hams. Shoulders and Bacon.
A large stoek of Sugar-cured Hams and Shoulders.
Bacon. Bulk Meat , F our, Meal, etc
Also, a well selected stock of Fancy nnd Staple
Groceries, Wines, Liquors, Tobacco and Plantation
bupplles. Call and txamine.
TAYLOR AItBfLX
272 FKOST STREET.
REWARD BUndwdi,
Itchier, or Ulcerated PILES
that lc-ItinN file Remedy
fails Lo cute. livet izzuueduita
relief, eore-i CTLs- of m.flr Btand
in in 1 irnr.ii nrri inATY C1e in 3
days. Slboti!n. Buld br ail
dnyrlta. J. P. Mrtiin, W
UJIUUU
Pronripfir. Adv:,- fre in all dineaH-s. Cull or write.
C'AIJTJON Wrarvrr on bottle vrtrt. priatrd tn
biaci,iat UatUlfJiia, 187 u, tlur.ua. JV'om utters gmuiua,
G. W. JONE31& CO.. Agxnt. Vo7'Maln street,
COTTO .V-S KKI.
THE
HOPE OIL MILL
Advances the price for good clean
OOTTON-3I33Z:i3
to Eight Dollars Per Ton, delivered at Memphis.
BY. HALLKB, Secretary.
M. f a via
Jmhn B. BalllvM.
M. Gavin & Co.
Wholesale Grocers. Cotton Factors,
And Commission Merchants,
QQQ UTrront Street,
RotvMn A damn
Our MAJOR T. J. COWG1LL devotes his wcole time
our cnarire. wa ha.v our own evrfton wnrebou.se. comer v&sninirton anu aecona. i
V. T. PORTER.
W. F. TAYLOR
TER, TAYL
COTTON
MD
Wl&olesalo Grpooors
"No. 300 Front Street.
Between Madison ncd Monroe Vemphla. Tennessee.
-pBE FIRM OF FADER, JACOBS A CO. 13
i jutuer men?rer is autnonzea to sign uie name
Memphis, Tenn., April 1, 187P.
JOH. FADKK,
HENKV
FADER, FRANK & OO.
SUCCESSORS TO FADER, JACOBS ft CO.
WhnlfisnlP. Rrnnprs
a UWiUHUtU Wl. 1UUU1M
294 -Front Street,
AXItllKAV HTKU'tHT AKIIUKIV
Kew Orleans.
OTWART.
J
WHULtSALh HHIIIIhKS 1(1 IN l Alt I Unci
tmm aa aaaa a, a. av naai aav
No8. 35G mi 358 Front St., Memphis, Tenn.
AND
Stewai't Brothers & Co.,
Cotton Factors and Conimission Merc bants,
New Orleans,
HUKKA & RlDtiELY,
Merchant Tailors, So. 38 Madison Street,
Take pleasure in notifying their Friends, and the Public generally,
tbat they are Receiving a New and Full Assortment of SPRING
and SUMMER GOODS, comprising the very latest styles and finest
Makes of French, English and German Manufactures. We solicit
those who contemplate ordering their Spring Clothing to give us a
calL PRICES MODERATE.
EAEDWARBIpt
HOPKINS 8: CO.
WE HAVE IN STORE THE MOST
Hardware, Cutlery, Guns, Fishing-Tackle!
rianterb' Hoes. Trace?, Haines. Ulind-bridlea and Collars, Sinsrletrces, Back
bands, Plowline, Clevises, kept in tki market
Agents for M'Cormick's Flowers & Reapers
ana HKLF-iiiuiAU uaikibsij'.us.
Avery Plow. Wm. CI ore' Plows, and Blount's CSennlne fjrle Plow.
aiun -tl ..hi...,- rutlami. Ks-ttina? aaifl Packlnc.
ttca.atisB
ORGILL BROTHERS & CO.
O lO ta.za.ca. 8 X S3 B'ront Street Momolils
IEW
J. J ACOBS, late of Faor, Jacobs 4 Co,
Jacobs &Book:er
COTTON FACTORS
AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
No. 294 Front Street,
IL
tT"ft E-u fl-S V?.
Ail iiise ifCrtlf Setti
STOCK.
OP
LADIES' BLACK SILK SUITS,
LADIES' COLORED SILK SUITS,
LADIES' Cashmere & Silk SUITS,
LADIES' GRENADINE SUITS,
LADIES' BUNTING SUITS,
Also the Largest and
.Hisses and
LINEN,
SWISS,
PIQUE,
uws,
Tho Very Newest Novelties in
PARASOLS AND SUN UMBRELLAS!
tSOnr Pricesi.are always the
invariable rule not to allow
OWENS
100 CASES BOLLINGER DRY EXTRA,
(Plata ana quarts.) th Jiaeat Champasnes jimportexl.
lOO CASES KEEITS GILT-EDGE TONIC.
100 CASKS OF GUINESS'S STOUT-Pints.
100 Casks Allsopp's Ale Pin.ts and Q,ts.
All Direct rrom Abroad Our own Importing.
WE HAVE BESIDES CONSTANTLY ON HAND AN IMMENSE STOCK OF 8TRAIGHT
PENNSYLVANIA, KENTUCKY
At LOWER PRICES then erer
M. J, Clark.
3V3Lom.T3la.io, Tonn,
and Jelfnaoi.
to the WeUjhlP? and Sale of all Cotton Intrusted to I
tt. W. MACR4.E
FA
THIS DAf DISSOLVED BY MUTUAL CONSENT
or tne orm in uqutuauon. ius. r auak.
J. JACOBS.
JOS. SUeiARTf AN.
HENBX KHANK.
'KAXK.
JOS. rAKMAS
nnii nnttnn Pgnt.nra
UUU. WVfWWWU mwwwm
Memphis, Tenn,
i WVIE. P. IL HACLKY.
Bleaapnls. aeankil
6WYK3U
a. av aavasaamw m m aVAfJ aa A tftw .t am
Louisiana.
COMPLETE AND LARGEST STOCK OF
u uarpeatera' Tools. Iron and Hteel.
FIRM.
0
W. J. BOOKEB, late of Fader, Jacobs & Co.
Memphis, Tennessee.
LADIES' WORSTED SUITS,
LADIES' LINEN SUITS,
LADIES' LAWN SUITS,
LADIES' SWISS SUITS,
LADIES' PERCALE SUITS.
ITinest Assortment for
Children in
LAWN,
GINGHAM,
PERCALE.
JLOW3T, as we have made it an
ourselves to be undersold.
AND TENNESSEE WHISKIES,
before offered In this Market.
&
TkH. Clark.
CO
EiOO
FICHUS AND WBAPS TOBACCO TAX
TEN
& BROS.
U.F.Uavanagh&Co.
DEALERS IN CHOICE
'1 V. A A "ftTTI RPTnTlS T
m - " "
Java, Sfocka and Kie Coffes
Boasted Ially.
No. 330 Elain Street.
I WOOD AN1 WILLOW WABK
SHERWOOD & CO.
(Late Wheeler, Pickens or. Co.)
EALF.IM IX noon ASH WILUMV
Ware. Purchasers of goods In our line,
either at wholesale or rftitH, wilt Und it to their ad
vantage to caii on us.
1348 t maikt bt. i 348
VSiliK KTA 14 K I IN.
J. FLAHERTY & CO
UUfDERTAKERS,
I And Manufacturers of Flaherty's Patent
X Icfltl i llify ,i&m.: VA,V kCV v vrvv j
S17 and 318 SECOSJ) ST., ME3IPIH
TTTK keep on hand full lines of Metallic Solid
V V ujainut ttnuiinvul Vtninhml ClMket nnd
Cases, trimmed inthe highest style of art. Orders
br Mall or Teleerat'ii trni iwrrmnimv n".i... t
BF.IIOVAL.
2E 33CH cQrsrss. 2.
TRUNK FACTORY,
TO 318 SAIN ST.. BI Ell I'll IS
INCREASED facilities, and will sell home-made
goods, wholesale and retail, lowerthan ppt hnuHe.
FANCY DYEiHS.
Drew dooti, Shawls, Suits an4 Liotbiug dye
r-Kios.l.r: Crane Veils lvei.
DRY GLEAHSriO.
Dresses in nil fabrics c!eaii-d without ripping pr
remoTin? the ttimnnni;. Th mot elaborate lurty
and the.lrical dresses are llius elegantly cleaaed.
WM K.TI.!,iAI.K.265Wnlnut8t..nelnnatl,0.
B--'ci'"-!- rei.n .-! ! .-lr.- ir. rally p.M i.-d.
(Successors to Stewart 4 Doteity,)
IHPOItTERS AM) DEALERS IX
AND FANCY GOODS,
269 3IAIH STREET,
MEMPHIS, TEJiJiESSEE.
OKDEKH PROJ1PTLYATTESDF.DTO
PSf-GOOTH SENT C. O. D."f
BROWNE!
THE
PLUMBER!
Gas and Steam Fitter!
SEWEK-PXPE,
GAS, STEAM AND WATER-PIPE,
Tumps, Hose, Hydrants,
CHANDELIERS,
Bath-Tabs, Waslisinnds !
ood natrrlal.
Competent Workmen,
AT THE LOWEST PRICES!
J. W. X. BROWNE,
258 SccDPd Street,
OITCTMTt; rjocnv- KiUiuu. urMPni. .
TOBACCOS.
DEALER IN
Cigars,Tobacco, Pipes
17 I1AIX, Under Worsham lloaae.
S70 tsECOXO, opposite Court Hqaare.
Sole agent for Straiten ft Storm's
Capadura nnd Onr Daddies' ( I gars.
BAY!
Awarrlod AijkrH prt at Cefftmnlal Exposition for
aver male. As our blua atrl ar!c-mjlt fc- ciniy
ttuita-ie-l on inferior fmodv tl.at Jurlm te
ox vry plus- iwM by alt dealer. t?ri for raTl
free. o C. A- Jumoa A rev MfH.. jvmrahirjg. V-
OK THE-
Goes Into effect on the FIRST OK MAY. and
anllclr.v.lng a heavy dcnixnd tor Tibaoco
alter tuat date, ne have In advance nmdn
Large itircbases from 1 'acting manufaetu
lers in Virginia and In the Went for May De
livery at Bottom Prices, hlih will enable
us to off nr Superior InduveruenU to Dealers
la the Weed. We bavj
In Stock and to Arrive
THE FOLLOWING BRANDS AND STYLES:
150 butts and caddies Golden Rule Nxvy Tobacco.
50 butts and caddies 13. K. Uraveb'a and Henry
County Plugs.
250 butts other brands Virginia 1 1 and 12-lnrh
PlQRP.
15(1 caddies Fit's and 6 Inch' Virginia Plugs, all
grades.
boo caddies or McKei una Dime pieces isavy.
2n0 butts and cadales Twists, different styies ahd
qualities.
liiooucKfts nnn ou ts uouniry twins ana imu.
RO buckets Flnet'ut, very choice.
BOOO pound-i BlucUwell Durlmm Smoking Tobacco.
5000 pounds Gold Leaf, mixture, aud otuer brands
Tobacco.
50,000 Marguerite and Ten Broeck Cigars (Con-
cbas). . . . .....
30.OOO celebrated ixna uranu iiuars isiraitjnt
Havana).
50 OOO celebrated Peail brand Cigars (Havana
Filler)
20,000 celebrated Marls Twain Cigars (Eegalla
ao.OOO celebrated Miguel Jane Cigars (Regalia
BrlttHntca).
60.000 various brands, ranging Iu rrlce from Jf 13
to S20 per 1000.
oo.ooo Kicnmona oems ana r.cmv . ignmirs.
And a Complete block of Smokers' Artlc.es In
general.
fWBUYKRS WILL FIND IT TOTHtlB ISrtK
EST TO GIVE Uo A CALL.
G.AMerlpBros
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