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Evening public ledger. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, September 23, 1914, Sports Final, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045211/1914-09-23/ed-5/seq-2/

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EVENING LEDGEBPHIL'ADEL'PHIA WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, TPI&
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RUSSIANS SEIZING JAROSLAW PRESS ON TOWARD CRACOW. AUSTRIA'S GIBRALTAR
ALLIES THREATEN GERMAN
REAR BY GAINS ALONG OISE
Continued from Pace 1
Vised ngatnst Maubouge, have been
moved forward and planted along the
German lines and these lmvo proved a
strong factor In tho fighting.
A number of German prisoners htivo
been taken around Amiens. One re
port sajs that the enllro general staff
of one German division was captured
In the fighting along tho upper reaches
of tho Olse on Sunday and were taken
Into Amiens.
One correspondent sends word of
tho destruction of two German troop
trains which were rushing with rein
forcements to the extreme northwest
ern end of General von Kluk's front.
According to the correspondent, this
disaster took place between St. Quen
tin and Peronne. A French gunner
managed to tap a priato Geiman army
telephone, connecting two stations.
He gained Information as to the loca
tion of the two trains and communi
cated thl3 to his commander. Artil
lery was placed In an ambuscade and
the trains were shelled and wrecked.
On the German centre, It Is stated,
the lines still hold. The southward
movement of the enemy has been
checked, although he still continues to
attempt to break through tho French
line, now strongly reinforced. The Ger
man left Is very active. Strong rein
forcements have been sent Into action
and they are operating well within tho
Ivorralne frontier.
The death list Is enormous on both
sides. In tho last thrco days tho Allies
have suffered more than the German's
on their centre and right, inasmuch as
they lmo been attacking in force In
an effort to break through tho German
lines.
An olllclal dispatch from field head
quarters of General Joffre, tho French
commander-in-chief, admits that the
losses of the Allies have been "severe,"
but, It Is added, the losses of the Ger
mans were undoubtedly heavier.
Tho Germans aro still bombarding
tho French lines around Hhclms with
tho French artillery answering tho Are.
The Invaders are making desperate ef
forts In that region to pleice tho Al
lies' front. In tho fighting around tho
plateau of Craonno tho struggle has
been titanic. One superior officer esti
mates that tho Germans lost 7000 men
there.
British troops are now supporting tho
French ccntro and a largo force of
British Is reported on tho Allies' lino
at Rholms.
Tho Germans are making violent ef
forts along tho French lines around
Verdun In order to offset tho progress
In tlu region of Argonne. Still farther
east, to the right ot the Meuse, In the
Woovre district, the Germans are
struggling against the French forces
which are trying to push northward In
the direction of Metz.
It Is estimated that the French have
at least 700,000 men In the battle lino
from Rhelms to the Vosges, and prob
ably 200,000 more In reserve.
NINE MILES OF TRENCHES,
FILLED WITH DEAD, TAKEN
LONDON, Sept. 23.
Nino miles of trenches filled with un
buried dead were the fruits of yester
day's fighting by the British troops
. now making up tho allied left wing
They were taken, according to reports
received from several sources, unoffi
cial but well authenticated. In a suc
cessful turning movement between tho
district just south of St. Quentin and
Peronne.
For hours before the British charged
the line, the British artillery shelled
"""the" German position. The range was
deadly. From aeroplanes that flew
low, defying the hail of German bul
lets, the range was given and the shlte
burst like deadly hail directly over the
tops of the great line of parallel
trenches, jammed with German troop3
waiting for orders to charge the Brit
ish line. Twice they essayed to do so,
but tho British fire was so accurate,
so deadly, that all finally had to crawl
back to the frail shelter of the earth
works. When the British finally charged
there was hardly a single unwounded
German left In the lines. Thousands
were dead. The wounded and the dead
wero so mixed that It was hard to
rescue those who yet had a chance to
recover. But the movement had been
a complete success from the British
viewpoint, and the position marks thf
flrt real ground gained against the
enemy.
From these trenches It will be pos
sible to check any further attempt to
push southwest, and It gives the Brit
ish a strategic position on the hills that
command the roads from Peronne to
Gonzeacourt and on to Cambral, where
the British suffered so severely three
weeks ago, and from Peronne to St.
Quentin north toward Belllcourt, and
north by east toward Guise.
Ik JK! mm 'P
AMPHIBIOUS
GERMAN RIGHT TURNED
AND IN PERIL, FRENCH SAY
BORDEAUX, Sept C3.
The positive declaration that the
flank of the German right wing has
been turned and that Von Kluk's army
Is In danger of being cut off, was made
by the "War Office today. It was stated
that while reinforcements are being
, rushed to his rescue from Belgium, they
' -will not be able to alter the situation
They will not be able to prevent the
German right being encircled and
forced either to retreat In haste to-
ward Belgium or meet an attack from
all sides by an army of vastly superior
force.
The British and French columns now
outnumber the Germans two to one In
the western section of the line. There
re more than 1,000,000 French and
British engaged in tho battle along the
entire front, and nearly half that num
ber held In reserve should they be
needed.
The Germans are making a desperats
effort against Verdun and the lower
lines of the forts In an effort to reduce
them, but the official reports reaching
here say that all are still intact.
Summing up the entire situation, it
was stated at the War Office today that
it has never looked so promising since
the commencement of tho war.
For the first time since tho begin
ning of the war official and authentic
information as to the Identity of tho
commanding officers of the Allies has
been given out. The right wing in Lor
raine Is commanded by General Pau,
the centre la directed by Generals
Mnunary and Duvall. the left by Sir
John French, and the extreme left by
Generals Decuriers and Decastelnau.
FRENCH CENTRE RETREATS,
SAYS BERLIN WIRELESS
WASHINGTON, Sept. J3.
Fearful losses have been Inflicted on
the French by the German guns, and
, the French centre on the long battle
line In northern France appears to he
weakening. This was the gist of a dis-
' patch received at the German KrobaBsy
today from Berlin. The dispatch toU
lows:
The French offensive is weaken
Ing In spirit. The French losses
are enormous. Their centre Is re
treating. Verdun has been successfully
bombarded, the effect of the Ger
man mortars again was tremendous.
The Paris papers show a down
cast spirit. Colonel Rousset com
ments In La Liberie on the strength
and actual position of the German
army as heing quite unique In his
tory and warfare.
The English cruiser Pegasus de
stroyed the German survey vessel
Maeze. but wa3 attacked and sunk
bsequently by the German cruiser
Koenlgsberg.
The Colonel Rousset referred to In
the dispatch Js said to be the military
expert of La Llberte's staff. The naval
battle was said to have taken place off
the African coast.
GERMAN ADVANCE STEADY,
BERLIN WAR OFFICE SAYS
BERLIN. Sept. 2? (by wireless
through SayUUe, I L. to the United
Press).
The War Offlee today officially de
clared that conditions at tho front coa
Jtfauo to show hs steely but neces
sarily slow advance of the German
armies.
The War Office again places all of the
responsibility for the destruction at
Rhelms, and especially of the Bheuns
Cathedral, squarely a,t tag dooxg pf the
French. It is stated that the Germans
withdrew from the town to save it, but
that the French not only reoccupled It
but posted much of their artillery,
especially their three-Inch guns, there.
The tower of the cathedral was occu
pied, the official report says, by
French general officers who from that
point of vantage signaled the range of
the German positions to the gunners
In the streets and on the outskirts of
the city.
When the deadly character of the
French artillery fire became manifest. It
was discovered that these officers were
In the tower and the signal men could
plainly be seen. It was therefore neces
sary for the Germans to open fire on
the town and to drlvo the ob&crcrs
from their point of vantage. That the
cathedral was damaged Is a matter nf
deep regrpt to all Germans, but It Is
in&isted that firing on Rhelms became
a matter of tho most urgent military
necessity when the French themselves
turned the city Into a part of their
battle line.
The sinking of three English
cruisers Is the big news feature here.
The morning newspapers all place em
phasis on this victory. They e.splain
it will fenc to reconcllo tho sailors
with tho policy of repression which tho
high nasal authorities have Imposed
upon them. Officers and men alike
have been chafing because they wore
not permitted to go out and fight, but
now it Is believed that the men will
be satisfied If successes of this charac
ter continue.
A hostile aeroplane dropped two
bombs near the Dusseldorf airship hall
yesterday, but did no damage.
A number of special correspondents
make charges that the Russians are
violating the Red Cros3, They assert
that they personally saw a Russian
train of between 40 and 50 cars loaded
with rifles and ammunition, but with
the insignia of the Red Cross displayed
on every car.
The noted Bavarian socialist, Mi
chael Schwab, has been awarded tho
Iron Cross for bravery In the field. He
was serving in the landwehr,
The German press emphasizes the
loyal American attitude of neutrality
in refusing to make a loan for France.
At the same time the papers say that
so far as Germany Is concerned there
is no need of any war loan from abroad
at this time.
SARAJEVO INTACT,
SERBS LOSE GROUND,
YIEMA DECLARES
Servian War Office Contra
dicts Austrian Claims to
Victory and Reports Win
ning Nine Days' Battle at
Losnitza.
HENRY PHIPPS RESCUES
KIN FROM ELLIS ISLAND
llSSPSF'
Reed-Bird Mackerel
$1.00 A KIT
Nicaragua Blend Coffee
Th' famous blend U th ufnoat la
cant quality at rtaona.bl pries.
MERRILL & HOPPER
HEADING TEUJUNAI. MAItKOf
VIENNA, by way of Rome. Sept. 23
Tho Wnr Ofllca today denied positively
tho Servian-Montenegrin claims of the
tdkliiR of Sarajevo and of a disaster to
tho Austrian army near Loznltm. The
otllclal statement sajs:
"Wo are invadlne Servia successfully.
Sarajevo not only has not been taken
by the enemy, but the enemy's forces
who have attempted tho Invasion of
Boania hae been repulsed with heavy
loss and aro now retiring before our vic
torious troops.
"There lmvo been a number of cases of
cholera and dsenter at the front,
necessitating the isolation of tho suf
ferers, but conditions are not alarming."
RHEIMS AFIRE AND HOPE
OF TEMPLE'S SAFETY WANES
Famous Glass Windows Ruined and
Walls Threatened.
LONDON, Sept 3
Nearly all of the thirteenth century
stained glass, ana more especially the
amber glass of the roe window In the
main facade of the Cathedral at Rhelms
is irreparably ruined, according to the
Parh coriet-pondent of the Mall. The
treasures of the Cathedral weie saved,
however. Wiring under yesterdaj's date,
he eays:
"Thu hhelllng of Rhelms andthe smok
ing of the ruins continue. Parts of the
walls and tor of the Cathedral are
falling continually, and the little hope
entertained jesterday that the main
fabric itself might remain Is rapidlj van
ishing. The town hall, museum and other
histoilc buildings are sharing the fate of
the Cathedral."
Held as Possible Public Charges by
Immigration Officials.
NEW YORK, Sept. I3.-Henry Phlppa,
Pittsburgh steel magnate, prevented
thrco of his grandchildren fiom being
sent to Ellis Island today for further
examination by a board of Immigrant In
spectors uhon ho assured the government
officials that each child was worth $100,000
In his own name.
They arrived here today aboard tho
steamship Olympic. Mr and Mrs. Phlpps
bad been visiting their daughter, and
brought tho children with them. All
minors coming to this country wthout
their parents must appear before a board
of Inquiry at Ellis Island to determine
if they are likely to become public
charges.
PROPOSES $80,000,000,000
U. S. RAILWAY SYSTEM
Senate Bill, Introduced "By Re
quest," to Create Transportation
Monoply.
WASHINGTON, Sept. 23.-A bill In
troduced by Senator Jones, of Wash
ington, today, by request, provides all
tho steam railroads and electric rail
roads in the country shall be combined
Into one company called tho United
States Hallway Company, with a capi
tal of JSO.CCO.OOO.OOO and 50,000,000 shares of
stock having a par value of $100.
The stock Is to pay 4 per cent, a year
dividends and no more. Bonds are not
to be IsBued. A board of trustees con
sisting of the general managers of 13
of the big railroad companies Is to con
trol tho company.
ZEPPELIN SHEDS ATTACKED
BY BRITISH AEROPLANES
Damage by Bombs Unknown, Says
London Statement.
LONDON. Sept 23.
The Government Press Bureau Issued
the following statement this afternoon
"Naval aeroplanes attacked Zeppelin
sheds at Dueeseldorf. The conditions
under which the attack waa made were
difficult. Tho weather waa mlst, but
Flight Commander Collett launched three
bombs, approaching within 400 feet of the
sheds. The extent of thu damage was un
known "Collett'i machine, was struck by a nro.
Jectile, but all ot the machlm-s i turned
safel)
"The Incident Is Important, showing that
In the event that further bombs are drop
ped In Belgian townB measures of re
prisals can be taken."
GERMANS RE0CCUPY TOWNS,
FRENCH EMBASSY HEARS
Three Token, Instead o One, as An
nounced in Paris.
WASHINC1TON, Sept. 23.
That tho Germans have reoccupled
thrco towns opposite tho French right
wing In Lorralno was made clear when
tho full text of the ofdclal statement
from tho French War Oftlco wan read at
tho French Embassy hero today. The
official statement as given out In Paris
set forth that Domovre, south of Bra
mont, had been reoccupled by tho enemy.
Tho Embassy received a statement,
however, which contains this phrasal
"On our right wing In Lorralno the
enemy has again passed tho frontier with
several s.mall columns. Ho has reoccu
pled Domevrc, south ot Bramont, and
Nomcny nnd Dilme, north of Nancy."
BRITISH CAPTURE GERMAN
SUPPLIES IN NORTH ATLANTIC
Reconverted Liner Spreewnld and
Two Colliers Make Seizures 02.
LONDON, Sept 23.
Tho Hamburg-American liner Spreo
wald has been captured by the BrltlBh
cruder Berwick, Captain Lewis C. Baker,
In the North Atlantic, the Admiralty an
nounced tonight. Two colliers also wero
captured.
The Spreewnld was fltted out a? on
armed cruiser. The two colllors carried
2000 tons of coal and ISO tons of piovl
sluus for the German cruisers In Atlantic
waters.
Tho total number of German vessels
which, according to latest reports, liavo
been captured by British vessels at sea
or by British port authorities Is 82.
Nlncty-fHo German vessels were de
tained In British ports at tho outbreak
of tho war.
ENGLISH TRAWLER SUNK
Mine Sends Kilmarnock to Bottom.
All But Two of Crew Drown.
LONDON, Sept. 23.
It Is announced that the big steam
trawler Kilmarnock, from Grimsby, has
been destroyed by a mine In tho North
Sea, and that all of tho crow but two
have been lost.
WOMAN, FAST IN FROG, GIVES
FOOT IN PREFERENCE TO LIFE
With Member Gone, She Calls to
Workmen and Faints.
Dragging heisclt 100 feet after a
freight car hnd cut off her right foot
at tho ankle, Mrs. Anna O'Donnell, 45
years old, of 1213 South Napa street, called
to sovcral men working on the train and
then fainted. No one of tho several dozen
men working within 100 yards of the acci
dent saw it. '
Whllo It cost her tho loss of her right
foot below tho ankle, a less plucky woman
would have been ground to death beneath
the whtels of tho heavy train. Mrs.
O'Donnell was ciosslng Grays' Ferry ave
nue at 31st stieet about 3 o'clock this
afternoon and In tiylng to get across
ahead of tho train she missed her step
and her foot was wedged In a switch.
Seeing that she could not get her foot
out quick enough, she lay down and
stretched her body as far as she could
on the ground. She then waited for the
approaching car and saw her foot cut off.
After attracting tho attention of tho
train men she fainted She w,is taken to
the Polcllnlc Hospital, where tho physi
cians say that should tho woman recover
It will be due entirely to her nerve.
50,000 GERMANS WOUNDED
Homeward Pnssage Reported of That
Number Through Liege.
AMSTERDAM, Sept. 23.
A telegram from Macstrlcht says that
fifty thousand wounded Germans have
been conveyed from the battlefields In
France to the Interior of Germany by
way of Liege
wsgg&s3es&.&5s5 i&s;x:a2v
Presenting the
Season's Novelties
in Women's
Street and
Dress Boots.
Stefrferidali
"" 1 420 Chestnut St.
"Where only (he best Is good enough."
' Ml if I
in mnT tp
HoskinS
Office Outfitters and
Commercial Stationers
iftLiyzfr?" l'tJ'WT"'prBjit'mr r m I
Largest and most fair
ly priced stock to be
found anywhere.
Where economy must be
exercised in furnishing an
office, you may be sure that
every dollar expended with
us will result in a full dollar's
worth of satisfaction to you.
HOSKINS
I'rintera, EaKraTer, Stationer
904-906 Chestnut St.
!k
He do the rM.t" I1KST!
DEVELOPING
and FINISHING
(UochnUr Method)
HAWORTH'S
Kajtman Kodak Co.
k!020 Chestnut St.
KODAKS
Atlantic CUr Store 17 BonrduaU
BELGIANS HARASS
GERMANS ADVANCING
TO AID AISNE ARMIES,
General Staff, in Many
Skirmishes, Co-operates '
With Allies by Checking
Westward Moving Reinforcements.
ANTWERP, Sept. j.
Sharp llBhtlng Is going: on In North.
eastern Belgium between King Albert',
army and tho Germans.
The Belgians and Germans arc reported
to bo In contact near Mechlin, around
Tcrmonde, and In the vicinity of AuaN
mardc, some 15 miles west ot Ghent
The obvious Intention of the BelgM
Rrmy Is to co-oporate with the Allle, la
Franco by engaging the Germans over
as large an area as possible In Belgium
so as to provent reinforcements fronj
bolnjr sent west.
King Albert's forces are also working
southward toward Brussels to menace
tho German lines of communication. It
Is reported that tho advance guard ot
one Belgian force engaged tho German
outposts only 13 miles from Brusseli
Another leport describes a lively ak'r.
mlsh between Belgian civic guards arid
Germans near Audormaide, about is
miles southwest of Ghent, on Tuesday
Tho Belgians captured an automobile and
Iho prisoners, without any losses. The
Germans had throe men killed and ta
wounded. South of Mechlin tho Belglani
advanced and gavo battlo to a German
detachment.
Tho Belgian forces aro composed of In.
fantry, cavalry and light artillery, and
are fighting vigorously to prevent th.
Germans from establishing lines south,
wost of Antwerp,
AGENTS0RDER U. S. RIFLES,
PROBABLY FOR THE ALLIES
100,000 Guns Sought in New York
by Secretive Bidders.
NEW YOB.K. Sept. 23.
Somebody Is In tho New York gun mar
ket with an order for 1GO.000 rifles and
50,000,000 rounds of ammunition for ship
ment abroad. Local gun dealers have
been approached by commission agent!
during tho last week and aBkcd If ther
could fill a substantial part of the order.
Tho asents failed to state who their prin
cipal nas.
Tho agents were authorized to bur
100,000 guns and sufficient ammunition.
This Js taken to mean BOO rounds for
each rifle. Tho agents want as modern
rifles as they can get, but are willing to
take fairly old-fashioned arms.
They would have to pay from $3 to 910
for an old rifle, and up to $20 for an up-to-dato
arm. They are willing to pay the
higher price. If they get all tho gum
at the higher price the cost will be ,
000,000.
LOCAL FIRE RECORD
A. M. Loil.
1.342004 S. 7th t.j clirar store and
dwelling Unknowi
3 52 0R7 H. MojamenlnB ae. ; store
and iltteWns of hamuel Frill rnknown
G:31 Mtli at. and IVyaluslng at.. Unknown
0 100131 Ranton at. i dwelling of
Benjamin McCarty Unknown
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