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Evening public ledger. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, September 24, 1914, Night Extra, Image 5

Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045211/1914-09-24/ed-3/seq-5/

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NOTHING TOO GOOD
FOR BABY, BULLDOG
WHO CAUGHT THIEF
'Animal Avenges Master,
Struck Down by Robber.
Baby's Value Bounds,
But He's Not for Sale.
EVEHi4?G LEXTO13B--PHILADELPHIA, THUftSflAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1914,
- - - i -i. ... . hi I. i i i i i i ii i i i i ii i '
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Baby, a loyal bulldog which prevented
robbery of his master, Charles Iorder, of
lit West Qlrard avenue, a Jeweler, la hav
ing the time of his life today, after. spend
ing the most miserable night of his canine
caieer In an alley near Second street and
Qlrard avenue. Tho dojr slunk Into the
dark alley late last night, after he had
prevented the lobbcry, and lay there
whining all night. v
The courageous animal was found by
CharleB Blehl, of 1S4 West Glrard ave
nue, this morning. Blchl was attracted
by the pitiful cries of the dog, and
Baby was taken home again. He Is
petting everything ho wants to cat to
day and the whole neighborhood Is
praising his valor, patting him on the
head and telling him what a good dog
he is.
NEVER WAS A FIGHTER.
Hcretoforo Baby haa not had much
ef a reputation as a fighter. His nature Is
peaceful. He stayed In the house too
much to get experience. He was dozing
In a corner of his master's Jewelry store
Imt night, when a man, who later gave
the name of Thomas Stercks, of 1137 East
Columbia avenue, entered.
The man askod to seo wedding rings
ana: displayed a ?5 bill. Then ho re
quested Mr. Harder to show him dla
"1 monds. When the Jeweler started to put
the wedding !lngs back Stercks drew a
piece of lead plpo from under his coat
and struck Harder over the head. Tho
jowclor dropped unconscious.
Stercks heard a low, savaRo giowl and
then something that seemed to be all
action and teeth struck him In the throat.
Scarcely able to see, ho fought desperate
ly to break tho grip of the bulldog.
But when Stercks toi'o the animal loose
by main force, Baby sunk his tenth
somewhere else, and for ten minutes the
1io battled around the store. At last
Stercks managed to get a grip on the dog
and threw him tho length of the room.
Then he fled. t
THE ROBBER VANQUISHED.
Baby Is fat, but he Is n bulldog, and
therefore persistent. He had but one aim
In life. It took him two blocks to catch
fateukx, who ran with thp speed of fcir.
but when Baby sunk his tocth again It
was In tho feat of Stercks' trousers. The
man fell and the dog stood over him.
11; that time persons In the vicinity
f the store Irnrned what had happened
1o Haider. The dog willingly stepped
oiide. Stercks' head was covered with
blood. His throat and ear aro badiy
marked. While Stercks and Haider were
beinc taken to St. Mary's Hospitals Baby
disappeared.
Harder did not recover consciousness
for nt-nrlv an hour after ho was admitted
1n the lu-spltnl. Todav ho Is hack In Ills
Jen eli store with his head swathed In
bandnscs. Hteu-ks is being hold In ?S00
liai! for court on the clmrge -of highway
robbei v,
A smashed iw fl.':t'--e lit the stove
allowed the sticngth Stercks put Into
tiir blow meant for Harder. Tho gas
Pxturc puitlall Mopped the force of th3
blnw.
The bulldog. In Hplle of the fine treat
ment hslng glcn It, Is still somewlint
undecided today nbout the whole affair.
"When an TC eni.vo l.noaEn photographer
Rrnt to tho Jewelry store Baby was
under the Fafe. and the do? looked wor
ried It will take a few hours of cares
liu to overcome the animal's evident
fear thnt It was too brutal with the In
truder last night.
Baby's value went up by leaps and
bounds today. Three men applied to
Harder to buy the dog before noon
. and one of them offered $300 for the
animal. But Harder says Baby Is not
for sale, and anyhow the dog Is tho prop
orty of his wife. Mrs. Harder refuses
even to discuss such a illly thing as a
rale She sas she knew all the time
that naby would prove his worth some
day.
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GERMAN EMPEROR REVIEWS
ORDER OF THE IRON CROSS
Founded by King Frederick William
III as Reward for Vaior.
Shortly after the opening of 'hostilities
the German Kaiser, following the piece
dent established by William I, retnstltut
ed tho famous Order of the Iron Cross.
The New York Staats-Zcltung fur
nishes an Interesting history of this cov
eted mark of distinction, which Is
awarded solely for tho performance of
deeds of the highest valor on the field
of battle.
King Frederick William III of Prus
sia founded tho order on March 10, 1313,
as a reward for services rendered to the
Kutherland In the Napoleonic wars. Tho
plainness of the Iron Insignia v.as Intend
ed to remind Its wearers of the hard
times that had brought It Into bolng, It
was n small Iron Maltese cioss Inlaid wlt't
a narrow, sliver band Just Inside tho bev
eled edge. The only other murks upon
11 wore three oak leaves In tho centre,
the royal Initials V, V. surmounted by
a small crown and tho dale 1813.
As Is customary In the case of loyal or
ders, there were two classes and a grand
cross, tho. latter twice the regular size.
In IStt a permanent endowment was add
ed, paying fixed annual sums to the
wearers of the decoration.
On July 10, 1S70, the day that Trance
again declared war on I'russhi, tlio older
was revled by King William I on the
sumo conditions as originally Instituted.
At that time tho three oak leaves ttcro
diopped. and tho letter W, the rrown and
the dale JST0 were substituted for the
orlirlnal inaiks. hut the Lhion Iruvnn upin
I restored by an order of the' Imperial
council In UVi. TI12 decoration as ro
lsed In 1'70 has been bestowed on -18,571
German warriors of all claese", Includlnn
those coming from German Stales outside
of Prussia.
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"BABY," THE BULLDOG THIEF CATCHER AND ITS MASTER
EDISON'S LATEST RECORDS
TELEPHONE CONVERSATIONS
Simple Machine Keprcscnts Years of
Patient Experiment.
NEW YORK, Sept. :t.-Edison's laltst
Invention, the lelescrlbe, which records
both sides of a telephone conversation, Is
now on exhibition.
The machine Is simple. Tho desk tele
phone Is equipped with two transmitters
and two receivers. The talker used one
sot and tho other sot is hitched to a
phonograph record which takes down
every sound on the wlie. The phono
graph is started rocoidlng and stopped at
will by pressing buttons.
But though tho machine Is simple and
easily understandable, like other Edl'on
Inventions, It represents yeais of experi
ment. It was pointed out 03tcrday that
though Sir. Edison said of the phono
graph In 1S7S "the phonograph will per
fect the telephone" neither he nor nny
one else perfected a mechanism lorecord
telephone conversations In the K years
following his prophecy until the appear
ance of the telcscribe.
An Important difficulty was the weak
ness of the voice at the further-end of
the telephone wire. This was overcome
by putting one receiver against an ncous
tlcon, which sufficiently magnified the
sound to permit tho phonograph to take
It down clearly.
It was said yesterday that GO per cent.
of all communications in this country to
day Is over the telephone. The chief
value of the tolescrlbo Is crcpected to be
In living exactly what wns agreed to by
phone In business transactions. One tele
set Ibe will serve for all the business of a
firm. It can be nfllxed to the switch
board and used in recording any conver
sation wished. Tho price of tho Instru
ment has not yet been settled.
GERMAN CRUISERS'
ACTIVITIES CAUSE
WAR RISK RAISE
OKAY'S inn alive now
Gray's Inn Squnre nnd tho beautiful
gardens close by are In these, days nllve
with recruits being licked Into aliupe.
and the old walls are echoing back
words of command tluough all the daj-
light hours, says the London Chronicle.
Not since Sir Samuel Homily stood at
the Holborn Gate to repel the Cordon
( rioters, should they chance to turn fu-
I floUS eyOS Unoll the heliohors nrnnnrM-
has the Inn presented such a. warlike ap
pearance. Once, long bofoic, did Gray's
Inn send out nn armed force on Its own
account. That was when a bundled
"gentlemen of tho Inn." nrnwii win,
bludgeons, sallied forth to do battle with
me worKmen engaged In building Red
Moti Square, this form of "developing"
the pleasant fields to the west of their
Inn not meeting with the appioval of the
said gentlemen.
Sinking of Six Ships by
Commerce Destroyers In
Influences Increase to 5 Per
' Cent, to Far East.
ALFALFA PLANT BROUGHT TO
ECUADOR BY THE SPANIARDS
MIND'S POWER WILL
KEEP THE BODY YOUNG
Men Have Ability, if They Wish, to
Defer Old Age.
In the October AVomau's Home Com
panion, Ralph Waldo' Trino wiltes an
KUicle entitled. "When Is Youth What
After Youth?" Tho principal point which
ht bilngs out Is the power of the mind
to keep the bod young and vigorous. In
the following-extiact fiom his article he
touches on this point, and also Indicates
the divisions between youth, middle age
nd old age:
"That we have It In our nower to de-
eiinlno our physical and bodily condi
tions to a far greater extent than we do
Is an undeniable fact. That wo have It
in our power to determine and to dictate
iho conditions of 'old ago' to a marvel
mi degree is also an undeniable fact If
e are sufficiently keen and sufficiently
ake to begin eaily enough.
' It any aibitrary divisions of the va
rious periods of life were allowable, I
should mako the enumeration as follows:
Youth, barring the period of babyhood,
to 43: middle age, to to CO; approaching
ee. M to 73; old age, 75 to 03 and 100.
' That great army of people who 'age'
long before their time, that likewise
Kieat army of both men and women who
slong about middle age, say fiom 15 to
M, break, and, aa we say, all of a aud
den go to pieces, and many die, Just at
the period when they should be in the
Prime of life, In the full vigor of man
hood and womanhood and of greatest
alue to themselves, to their families
and to the world, is something that ij
contrary to nature, and Is one of the
I" tlable conditions of our time. A gieat
e. knowledge, a little foresight, a little
arc in time could present this in the
Kieat majority of cases, In 90 cases out
of every 100, without question."
Now Cultivated Between 5)250 and
10,500 Feet Above Sea.
Tho alfalfa plant, known for many
centuries In Europe," was introduced Into
Ecuador by the Spaniards in the 16th
century. They found growing wild there
an annual species of the plant having
ellow flowers, which differed somewhat
from the European species, although In
no way superior to It, and had never
been cultivated by the Indians.
Tho elevations at which it is cultivated
here are between 5250 and 10,500 feet above
sea level, aa the climate Is too hot or
too cold outside of those limits for the
PENROSE SHOWS IRRITATION
Calls Palmer's Indictment "Garbled,
Insincere and Misleading:,"
The bill of Indictment against Penrose
m upon which Congressman A. Mitchell
Palmer has been basing his arguments
to demonstrate that Senator Penrose
should not represent the people of Penn-
hanla at Washington haa biought
(o:th an answer fiom the senior Senator.
In an interview last night the Senator
characterized Congressman Palmer's
tharges as "garbled, insincere and Inten
tionally misleading, and scarcely worthy
of being dignified bj any notice from
we. '
Then, referring to Mr. Palmer's own
lealsUtlvs lecoid, Mr. Penrose designated
mm as "the Benedict Arnold of Pennsyl
vanla," on account of hu tariff position
cpl particularly his work for the pjaaage
M thtmetal sebsdute.
CANADA'S BIG PROBLEM
IN MOVING HER CROPS
Uses Vast Continental Hallways to
Hurry Men to Quebec.
Canada Is making great contributions
to the war. It is still uncertain how
many troops she will contribute, but 100,
000 is the number most frequently men
tioned, and the statements recently made
by Lord Kitchener and Lord Roberts re
garding the necessity for raising the
largest possible number of British troops
makes It apparent that every man
Canada can send will be needed, says
Kathleen Hills in Leslie's,
Canada, being a vast teiritory, sparsely
settled, has Important pioblems of com
munication, and the Government has
taken every precaution to t,ee that none
of the transcontinental railway facilities
are impaired by the destruction of bridges
or other strategic points, That accounts
for the sentries at bridges, along difficult
stretches of track, nnd In the mountain
passes.
All along the route we saw troop trains
rushing the volunteers from the Far West
to the mobilization headquarters near
Quebec The Canadian Pacific Is hand
ling most of this traffic, being best
equipped to do so because, in Its own
shops, It was able to build nine special
kitchen cars in less than a week. These
are painted white Inside, and provided
with storage facilities for four days' food,
Including refrigeration, and with kitchen
appaiatus sufficient to prepare three
meals a day for 1000 men.
Of course the troops are not given elab
orate tourist meals, but they are well
fed. the kitchen cars containing tea and
coffee urns, hot water boilers and all
necessary conveniences. The meals are
served from enameled plates in the cars
in which me troops are quartered. A
detail of soldiers does the serving, it Is
a big task to transport seeral thousand
men from Western Canada to Quebec on
short notice, and Canada haa a right to
congratulate herself on the promptness
and efficiency with which It has been
done.
Activity of Gorman commerce destroy
ers, which recently sank six steamships
In the Bay of Bengal, has caused an ad
vance to five per cent. In some classes
of war risk insurance rates, and has In
fluenced the American Institute of
Marine Underwriters not to quoto any
rates on vessels bound to countries
bordering on or near tho bay.
Tho advanced rates will apply particu
larly to countries on. the east and west
coast of Africa; In the Antipodes and in
tho neighborhood of China and Japan,
where German cruisers are said to be
particularly active In their raids on com
meice. The table below, prepared by the Amer
ican Institute of Marine Underwriters,
shows the rates ruling this week for
war risk Insurance on exports of general
merchandise shipped through Philadel
phia, New York and Boston. These rates
were received today by local underwriters.
Tho Institute makes it plain that they, are
not to be nccopted as current figures
and that it is not imperative that they
be followed in the writing of risks. The
matter of proper rates to be charged is
left entirely to tho discretion of the In
dividual undenvrlters.
The :ates are percentages of the cargo
values. The first column cocrs vessels
flying flags of belligerent nations, except
Germany and Austria, for which no rates
are quoted : the second rnlumn .hin. r
foreign neutral nations, and the last col
umn for American vessels.
To
Eneland anil Scotland, nest
roan, and .Ireland lii
London. JiigllBh and Frencn
Cnunncl ports , 24
England and Scotland, east
coast, north ot Strain of
oer 5
Atlantic Buropean ports, Havre
to Gibraltar 3
uSP'.t.,'rrancan, not cast ot
Sicily 3
South Africa ,,' 3
West Africa ....!!!! 6
East Africa
Ja Cape of Good Hope n
.Via Suez 5
Australia .Vew Zealand,
Straits Setttoments
via Suez fi
Vja Cape ot Good Hope.... ft
la. PaMn. pnntt
Via Panama Canal... '..i.'li 3
1
1V
5
1!
3
1
1V4
fi
Hi
1
1
1
China and Japan
Via Sum...
..;' L'i" 01 uooa nope 3
la Paclflc cojst s
Via Panama Canal s
Bermuda
Cuba. Porto R!co
Other West Indies
North coast South America....
Hrazll
Argentine and Uruguay
'.fl c.oabt South America- .
Via Panama Canal
Vfa Magellan
fast coast Central America ...
Wt coast Central America
J la Panama Canal
Via Magellan ... .
M;i Hcotla. New BrunewlcV
Newfoundland
i5
it
V
X's
o
3
t
1
1
1
1
is
1
1
STUDIED DANISH AT EIGHTY
It would be too much to expect that
Prince Edward should have learnrri n.-
lah Is preparation for his brief visit to
Copenhagen, but Gladstone thought it
necessary to acquire the language when
at the age of 80, he made a visit there in
U05. on board the Tantallon Castle. He
took with him a book on Danish and a
dictionary and spent most of. the time
during the voyage in his cabin studilng
the language, Whle the vessel lay in
dock and visitors weie allowed on board
the G. O. M. sat .quietly in his deck
cabin, absorbed in his study and oblivi
ous of the crowd of eacer far.. .,.,
lj t the door and wlndo.w -London J
taWt(tVV
ARMY RIFLES DIFFERENT
Most of Contending European Na
tions Have Distinctive Weapons.
The German Infantry uses the Mauser
magazine rllie, model of 1893, calibre .311,
firing a "spit ball," pointed like a lead
pencil; velocity, 2TC0 foot-seconds; sight
range up to MOO yards. Cavalry uses
Mauser magazine carbine and carries
lances.
French Infantry uses the Lebel maga
zlne rllie, .313 calibie, and the cavalry has
a carbine of the same make.
The Russian Bmall arm for infantry Is
a "3-line" rifle. 1901 pattern, holding five
cartridges; calibre, .290; velocity. 2033 font.
seconds; sight range up to S0O0 yards.
Similar arm for the cavalry, bat with
shorter barrel and with a bayonet used by
no other mounted troops.
Austrian Infantry small arm, the Mann
llcher magazine rifle, 303 model, calibre
.313. Cavalry, caiblne of same make.
Italy has for its regular Infantry the
Mannllcher-Carcano magazine rifle, but
the tenltoriaU still use the old Vettcrll,
British Infantry and cavalry use the
Lee-Enfield rifle, calibre .30:1.
The Belgians have the Mauser rifle. .-,.
have the Servians, the latter using the
model of IS59.
Bulgaria has the Mannllchsr Hfle and
carbine, and so has Rumania.
The Greeks use the Mannlicher-Schoe-nauer
ilfie, model of 1S03.
P. B. B. Accounting Team Wins
In a railroad Inter-league game yester
day the accounting department of the
Pennsylvania RaMroad defeated the Ken
lingtou Freight Slatlim nine, I to I
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nmommmdkrtl
HPWBBF
r.
f Imperial and Royal Austrp-Hungarian ConsulatefS;
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OFFICIAL AUSTRIAN LETTER OPENED BY ENGLISH CENSOR
A breach of neutrality by the British is alleged at the Austrian Consulate
as the result of the opening of this letter. It is said that it was taken from
a neutral ship.
6RITISH CENSOR OPENED
AUSTRIAN CONSULATE MAIL'
Letters Seized Trom Steamship for
Official In This City.
A breach of neutrality by the British Is
alleged at the Austrian Consulate In
Philadelphia Ofllclal registered tetter
addressed to tho Consulate In Philadel
phia have been opened by the censor In
London, These letters were received
here late last night. It Is said at the
Consulate that there was a breach of
neutrality In thn those letters must have
been taken fiom a neutral ship, either
of the Italian or of the Holland lines, as
these nro the only ways by which Aus
trian mall could reach this country. The
letters will he sent to Dr. Constantino
Dumba, the Au3tro-Hungarlan Ambas
sador nt Washington.
The net of the censor at London Is con
sidered nt the Consulate as being a per
fidious outrage and surprise was ex
pressed that a nation such ns England
would he guilty of such action.
A private registered letter from Austria
wns also opened by the English censor.
This wns received In the same mall a
the official communication.
CITY TO FURNISH HOUSES
Shortage in Newport, Monmouth
shire, England, Engenders Scheme.
A shortage ot house? at Newport, Mon
mouthshire, England, Is encouraging pri
vate enterprise nnd stimulating the ptib'
llc nuthorltes to supply the necessary
homes. The official architect of Newport
CUBAN COINAGE TALKED OF
Project Presented the Island Con
gress Would Create National Bank.
A project of law has been presented to
the Congress ot Cuba for the cieatlon of
a national bank for the emission nnd
coinage of Cuban money In gold, silver
and copper. This money will have the
same value as American money. Thl
project of law establishes guaranties for
the emission of bank notes. These meas
ures are caused by the scarcity of money
whit.'. Is felt In the Cuban market.
Tho creation of a currency bank, with
the privileges enjoyed by the Spanish
Bank of the Island of Cuba up to the
close of the colonial regime, was urged
bv President Menocal In his mossase.
The President urged thnt the bnnk
should enjoy nn exclusive concession for
SO xcars, with a capital of $20,000,000, and
power to issue double the amount or lis
has presented a scheme to the town coun- , "that of" the United ' State.:
ell for constructing 2)8 houses IB feet t;uoan .aplt.il to be given preference to
wide, containing two bediooms. In blocks subscribe the stock. The coinage of frac
ot six, four, and two, nt a cost of $024.63 tional cunencj was also lecommendcd.
each, and to rent at $1.52 per week. It Is Thr money now In use officially on the
also propobed to erect eighty-seven houses Island Is American, although business
wltii a frontage of 23 feet, with three bed-J S transarted also with Spanish and
rooms, at a cost of $1070.03 each, to rent Trench gold coin and Spanish silver
for M.04 per week. money.
STORK OPU.N.N P.:iO A. M. AM) CI.OMZS AT .",-10 P. SI.
Mtll.Oll I'llOXi: OKDKFt? TILLED :
57
c
75c Seamless
Sheets
Size 81x90 inches.
No mail or 'phone orders.
f .a standard and well-known make
ot bleached sheeting. Medium weight;
no dressing. Three-inch hem.
FIRST FLOOR, NORTH
HATS TRIMMED FREE OF CHARGE
Market Eighth Filbert Seventh
.
$1.50
$2.00 to $6.00
Cnrspfs
No mail or 'phone orders.
Popular make-, in desirable models.
High, medium or low bust. In
coutil, batiste and fancy materials.
All boiled with best corset boning.
MAIN ARCADE
Despite the great advance in prices of all gloves we are able to hold;
,1L
xuut
And
Ana even more remarkable is the fact that many of our prices arc lower than were ashed last year, ,
aue to oumng in much greater quantities and buying earlier long before any one gave thought to 1
foreign difficulties. j.. wj 1 ,
The Vast Majority of These Gloves Are Imnorted
Many of thn unf. iu. -.... .. , ,- ..
Tim n,iV., , if ,,T , """-"i" iiiuiieH are nifo represented:
searrftv wiii ,!,,!liJvm ?uy for now nnd the future, for It's Impossible to foretell what "Jumps"
m-arcuj win make prlcei take later on.
Women's Genuine French Kid Gloves, $1
Reg-ular $1.50 Values, at vi
i"pnHsHleA .Whiie: tn"' "ray- also w-hlte-with-black and black-wlth-whito backs;
in 1 aris point, flat and two-tone embroidered effect.
Women's Fine $1.75 and
$2 French $ 1 ij Q
Kid Gloves, 1.1 57-
Two-clasp pique, In black, white,
tan and gray; also whlto-w-lth-black
and black-with-whlte flat
embroidered backs.
Women's Long
White Gloves
Flno Imported kid; full-cut
arms; three clasps at wrist;
16-button length, (! i jr
$2.50 value .... iDli9
20-button length, J0 1 Q
$3 value 0t,LiJ
FIRST FLOOR. KIGHTH
blKtiKT rtlUU
jOMli
A New York Importer's
Entire Sample Line
of Gloves
Regular 50c to $1 oc
Kinds at OC
For women, misses, men and bo.s
Be sure and always get
YELLOW TRADING
STAMPS
when you shop here. We fic two for each
10c worth you purchase before noon.
Friday Bargains
85c to $1,00 qC
Silks OOC
Striped Tub Silks:
It's Worth Your
whYietoBuy Men's Fall Suits Here
We are practically putting a Five Dollar Note in your pocket in the case of
any of these three lines
Oular dj. Regular ( 4 gr Regular R
5 Suits y 1 J $20 Suits y A O $25 Suits'? AJ
S2 to 3) Indies wide.
Kxtra heavy; all
silk quality in styl
ish lion striped effects on white and colored
Krounds.
TnfT4-. 3(i inches w Idc. smooth, fine weave
lailCtaS: and soft dress finish A few de-
- slrable shades only.
TIRST FLOOR. SOUTH
$2 and $2.25 Bed Spreads, $1.65
One Ih a white Marseilles with a satin finish.
Pretty deslpns. Plain hem.
Another is fine, closely woven, white crochet
in Marseilles effects with out-out corners and
scalloped edce
FIRST FLOOR, NORTH
Uft 'if
hmMMM
Regular d Regular
$fo Suits T J. J $20 Suits
lonald'eslSns 'SnooKfr ""'"' a"-W01' ,n a W,de rane of thB most 'ash
loneB servIcS.,endld,r ta"ored and wlU retaln thelr dressy appearance in spite of
Tl-to-f R-i-r U;Mr. wno 1La,s confidence In himself, and nothing
I nai JDOV W HIS g,v?s nlm 8U,ch a rcad-v assurance as to know
J ho is properly and stylishly clothed.
EnAJr rl I
1 Tmr i
$1 Crepe
Night
Gowns,
LIKE CL'T
D a I n t v floured crinkled
crepe Slip-over models with
cotton Clunv lace Insertion
and edue, ribbon run.
SECOND n.OOR
BOYS' $8.50 SUITS at $4.98
Of worsted cheMots and cassimercs. also navy blue seree in newest Noifolk and
in two- and three-button. double-breasted styles, with patch pockets and stitched
U6lt.
Also cordurovsuUs In new li&ht and dark brown, with peB-top tiouaers and
watch pocket; lined throuRhout. Some with extra pair trousers
Besides. Russian and sailor models of pretty blue and brown serBe, in i emulation
stMes, with chevron on sleeNe. And resulation style in fanc mixtuies of graj
and brown. Sizes 2' to IS jeais.
SECOND FLOOR, SEVENTH AND MARKET STREETS
50c Camisoles, 29c
Shadow lace, ribbon straps oer shoulder: rib
bon run.
SECOND FLOOR
$1.00 to $1.50 Silk &Q
Stockings "3' C
Limited lot of women's insrnin hilk stockings
in black with topR nnishe,! in dalnt colorings
red, trold, lavender and purple All full fash
ioned with hiph splkta heels. doubU- soles nnd
doubly garter top- Slauufncturer s throw
outs, but nothing to affect wear.
No Hull Drderw.
FIRST TLOOR, SUI'TH
tnr-
$1.50 Tea Sets at
Of Particular Importance in the Salons of Apparel
Six Styles in Smart
;$20 Fall Suits . . .
ri a i i .
. o.etc snows one. tncy arc of cheviot, medium weight serge and gabardine,
;in sreeii. brown, blue and black. Smartli tailored in the ultra iaslunnf,hi,.
I Redingote effect, with -10- to 45-inch coats, shovvine wide bands at liitx;. velvet
; or braid trimmmg and lined with guaranteed satin.
! ll'i'fA these nrp. rntuhtttail a,.. nt ..a.. ..w.u ;.. ..1...-1-.J i .. ,
; ..,,,... ., wj kciu ammt ami. uHtu una yone 10a
fashions.
' I' .
Women's and Misses' $27.50 Autumn Suits, $Ofl
Of serge, gabatdinc and cheviot.
include English cut-away and Russian sknted fashions, some of the jackets
bound with silk braid others trimmed with velvet, cord ornaments or ft?
cloth, and all lined with jarn djed satin nls or Ulr
Shifts are exceedingly stylish, too. Colors include Hunter's qrecn
dark brown, black, Holland and niuy blue. urccn,
E Women's and Misses' $25 Top Coats t-iQ qrj
t Pebble cheviot and Scotch initureu in run Autumn ihades n,i .h . , .
B or Hedlmrni nrt ni. ...... ..... 1 .,aues aml showing rippla
Cor lleulncrote tanrinv Man, tm.L. .!...... .. . ..
E iin iii ..; .,,;..,: l J .. ' ur ,ur--l0n trimmings
h -- u iitu in niKii military fashion.
h SECOND FLOOR
""MIIIIIFII'ti ........
II --.....
'V--r
K ripple
guaianteed
fi k '
1 "
1
y it n :
w
v j
Three
plece Ger
man China
sets with
lilv . of
i he - val
If.v deco-
ration
11 e x a con
sbapr Tea
pot. supai
bntvl it it h
I cover and cream pitclie
lHk
JK.
l . rTJl.i?U v1 ,trJ
'vi;ijy'"i''1' "TiiL?Lji0
THIRD FLOuR
$1 Inverted Lights, -19c
With tinted Klass shade: pink, blue or amber
Complete with pood burner and two mantles'
THIRD FLOOR
$1.75 Couch Covers, 97c
Heavy tapestry In Oriontal designs, fringed all
atound Full lenKth and width.
THIRD FLOOR
60c and 75c Heavy Cork OQ
Linoleum, sq. yd &ZC
i5iBmrallt.i,en8:tn" '1V"0 and 'oul' ails wide
i lease orinn sizes.
t'Ul'P.TH FLOOR
11
SI REX MOP and a 25c BOTTLE SANLGENIC
l-LUUK UlL, Com. CQ
plete . . . UJ7C
Mops Ii a v e adjuotable
loim handle fold flat t,
reaching under furmiur,
and allow full beivi .. ,.f
mop to polish a--i ce
Heavily padded to pre,".
m,1rr.lns of WOOlJ woil,
Klimtiiates dustinc aim
scrubblns on hands ano
kn5s. THIRD FLuUfl
fyii
10c to $3 Embroidery
liTnls: 5C ,o $rrso
ninnii.......,....p,l .
r.ii nnA'iuiuuu - . . ---'
" BS1" """ "U uWAlUAft'IU-BBM. OK BVKttVlHIAU AT LOWBbT PH.OMB..
Clearance of all odds ai.d enns and mussed
engths for dresses included
A Kirar many noi.iirirics m si.iinhi.
.(.... 11 ! M.W
o3T it'ijuaeq
tOlTH AROADF,
rijaoni LIT DHOTUKHS
J

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