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Evening public ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, September 26, 1914, Image 1

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tH
EVENING
LEDGER
VOL. I NO. 12
PHILADELPHIA, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1914.
PRICE ONE CENT
HUGE LAND GRAB
HID IN COURT BILL
BY ITS PROMOTERS
Acquisition of City Block Contemplated
in Measure Jammed Through Councils
Over Mayor's Veto Map of Property
Defaced to Conceal Boundries.
KEY TO MUNICIPAL COURT LAND GRAB SECRET
A great land grab to bo put through
jby the Vnre-McNIchol-Pcnrose-controllcd
'Councils la back of the bill to condemn
land for the Municipal Court at 21st
nd Race streets. Tho bill -waB passed
Tuesday over tho Mayor's veto. On tho
surface tho Municipal Court plan meant
tho purchase of a small corner lot at
21st and Ilacc streets.
Hut tho real BCheme Is tho acquisition
of an entire city block and tho construc
tion of buildings which would cost 5SCO.00O.
Ileal estate agents say tho speculative
possibilities are enormous. This explains
the frantic mustering of a vote big
enough to override tho Mayor's veto of
the preliminary bill.
Thp scheme will cost Philadelphia
nearly $2,000,000 unless It Is blocked. The
price of the land needed will exceed
U.OOO.OOO, and tho buildings will run tho
price up another JSOO.OOO.
, Tho opening wedge was the bill to con
demn land at Second and Race street,
now tho property of the Magdalen Home.
It seemed Innocent enough, as the cost
of tho property would not exceed $160,
000. For buildings on this site $400,000 of
the loan bill money had been appropri
ated. Mayor Blankcnburg and many
others opposed even this expenditure as
extravagant.
HUGH SCOPE OF THE GRAB.
To all appearances tho Municipal Court
plans were to be confined to the pur
chase of the Magdalen Home property
and the construction of buildings cost
ing no moro than $100,000.
But the Municipal Court offlces at city
hall gave out an architect's' sketch show
ing the proposed buildings.
This was the key to the grab secret.
It showed that the Magdalen Homo
property was loss than a fourth of the
land tho court proposed to uso. And tho
buildings to be put up could not be built
for less than $800,000.
The land to be condemned for tho
Municipal Court Is not big enough to
accommodato even ono of the proposed
buildings. Yet thus far there has not
been oven a. whisper that more lanfl
would be needed.
Only three boundaries of the Municipal
Court site wcro given In tho architect's
sk.tch nlftp. The name of the street on
tho fourth side waa mysteriously miss
ing. This was Important, because It left
the size ot tho grab open to conjecture.
Eomo who saw the map Bald that the
tract shown must be Intended to run
only to Winter street. Others believed
it went all the way to Vino street, thus
extending the grab more than 100 feet.
In anv case the property on the map
extends 110 feet and possibly 280 feet
further north than the promoters ever
laid It would.
ORIGINAL. MAP DBFACRD.
But a close look at tho map explained
why the name of the northern boundary
line failed to appear.
It had been blocked out by sticking
piece of paper over Mie namo on th
original sketch and photographing It De
foro sending the picture to newspaper
offices,
Instead of the missing name there was
n strip of dead white three Inches long,
which entirely concealed the name of tho
street.
The Magdalen Home site Is relatively
so small that only a part of the "Ad
ministration Bulldlns" would fit In It.
The "Courts Building" Is at least SO
feet from tho northeast corner of tho
Magdalen property, the "Hospital
Croup" Is far off to the east, and moro
than 100 feet west Is shown tho "De
tention Gioup."
Officers of the Municipal Court grew
Tetlcent whep asked to talk about tho
map.
Fred C. Simon, executive clerk to tha
court, was said to know the name of
the, northern boundary. He refused
point-blank to tell what It was. He
refused to say who drew the map.
"The public is not Interested." Simon
declared. "It Is not news. No one cares
about that. The public knows very well
what the fine work this court Is doing,
and when we have any Information to
give out the newspapers will get It."
Pressed for ths name of the architect,
Simon ilnally declared that he was the
Judge of news of tho Munlclp.il Court
nd he deemed the architect's name of no
value to tho public.
"Th plans uvo not definite and I can
not ell you the nomo of the street," ho
aid
Jl'UGK BROWN UNINFORMED.
Later Judge Brown was asked about tho
northern boundary.
"It is Winter street," he said, "and tho
architect who drew the sketch is John
T. Wlndrlm. That Is what you wanted
to know, Isn't it?"
"Do you know why the name of the
Hrect was omitted?" he was asked.
"I don't know anything about It," was
the answer.
"Didn't you notice the white mark In
stead of the name of tho street when you
saw tho sketch 7'
Judge Brown said ho hadn't noticed It.
"But don't you know why tho street
was Mocked out?"
Judge Brown turned on his heel and
walked toward his onice.
"I'm not answering conundrums," he
said at thodoor. ,
The vote by which the opining wedge
was forced through over the Mayor's veto
was that of Dr. William D. Bacon, a
Penrose supported and noted gang man.
Judge Audcnricd declared hn had no right
to a seat In Select Council, after a re
count or tlio votes In tho Forty-fourth
Ward. Dr. Philip H. Moore Was tho man
legally elected, according to Judge Auden-
riea. But Justice D. Newell Fell, of
me Supremo Court, granted Bacon tho
privilege of holding his seat until tho
supremo court reviews the proofs against
mm.
GERMANS HOLD 50,000
Exchange Plans Beduce Early Esti
mate of 250,000 Prisoners.
LONDON, Sept. 215.
Tho Central News Agency has received
the following dlspatrh from Rome:
"A message from Berlin says the Gen
eral Stnrf, having agreed to the complete
official lists of prisoners, hns found It
necessary to admit that tho totals nl
ready nnnounced were erroneous. Tho
aggregate number of prisoners In Gorman
hands Is now rpduced from 230,000 to
50,000. of whom 30,000 arc Russian."
Telegraphing from Amsterdam, the cor
respondent of the Reutor Telegram Com
pany says tho 31st German casualty list,
carrying a total of about 1000 men killed,
wounded and missing, has been given
out.
It Includes the names of 23 officers of
ono regiment who were killed In five
days' fighting.
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tj? -. ;, -4my&:mm : mi--$r ." ;? -.
f "' ' - Ai ,'Wvx i:,J' ; Jffii'-yys vr; v, y, -v- wO;??
VIOLENT ASSAULT
MARKS NEW MOVE
ON GERMAN RIGHT
French and British Saved From Disaster
by Heavy Reinforcements Again
Charge Important Positions Near St.
Quentin, Defended by Von Kluk.
Berlin States Enemy Retreated 12 Miles
Along Oise Bombardment of Verdun
Toui Forts Continues With Invaders
Unable to Cross Meuse.
,o
The War Today
GERMANS AGAIN REPULSED
IN POLISH MOVEMENT
Henncnknmpf, on Offensive, Checks
Swaslon, Inflicting Heavy Damage.
PKTROanAD. Sept. 26.
It Is announced that tho Russian army
of Gcnernl Rennenkampf has assumed
the offensive and has repulsed the Ger
mans who tried to Invade Russian Po
land In tho direction of Suwalkl. AVhllo
details are lacking, the early reports
to the General Staff Indicate that the
rcpuise na-i neon serious to the Germans,
who wcro driven hack toward Gumbln
npn with the !o&s of many men and a
number of cannon.
The general Russian ndvance on Ger
man positions Is described ns well In
progress. For str&tgrlc reasons the de-
i.viia are oraercu withhold by the cen.-or.
but the announcement Is authorized that
tho advance, with Berlin ns tho ob
jective. Is "now In progress."
Whether this means that the known
movements nro being carried on with
this Intention ot whether a great move
ment Is masked Is not revealed; but the
significant fact is admitted that the en
tire Russian army. Including even the
troops brought through Siberia from Man
churia, nre now at position available for
service.
BERLIN, Sept. 2fi.
Minister of Agriculture Von Schorlemet
nnd an imperial commission have re
turned from East Prussia, where they
went to Investigate conditions and esti
mate the loss caused to tho population
Dy tno uussian Invasion. The commis
sion decided to replace the destroyed
buildings with temporary structures .o
mat me pcopie coma contain their cus
tomary pursuits.
Food has been distributed to the poor
Tho Russians on their retreat before
General Von Hlndcnburg nio snld to have
left grent quantities of supplies of vari
ous kinds which fully compensate for the
damage done.
Architect's sketch made public by Municipal Court which shows that a whole city block is wanted instead of
small plot 'asked for in Councils. The sketch was sent to newspapers with the name of the fourth side boundary
blocked out as shown, supposedly to conceal the huge extent of the contemplated grab.
WHITE STAR LINER
CRETIC IMPERILED
BY FIRE IN HOLD
Cotton Ignites and Threatens
Destruction of Vessel
About to Leave for Medi
terranean Ports.
NEW YORK, Sept. ;6.-Flro started
early today in the forward hold of tho
White Star liner Crctlc as sho lay at
her pier at tio foot of West Eigtccnth
street, ami for a time threatened to
destroy tho vessel.
The Crctlc was scheduled to sail at
noon for Genoa and Mediterranean ports
with a cargo of cotton.
A sailor discovered the blaze In for
ward hatch No. :i and sounded the fire
alarm. Captain HouaTth, master of tho
liner, led tho first fighting force of soll
ors while city firemen under eputy Chief
Martin fought to savo the big ship from
destruction.
Tho city firemen had not been sum
moned Immediately, as Captain Howarth
believed his firemen could put out Ae
blaze. As the cotton became Ignited,
howcDver, tnc blaao spread to such an
extent that outside aid was hurriedly
summoned. Tho flroboats Duane and Wil
lett rushed to tho scene and hurled tons
of water over tho forward deck of tho
liner.
In tho meantime, tho smoke pouring
skyward caused Intense excitement along
West street and In tho vicinity iff
Eighteenth t street, ' as persons believed
that tho Whlto Star pier was abl.izo.
hying noxt to the Cretic was the great
liner Olympic, which was scheduled to
sail for Liverpool. Tho pier was crowdfi
with this liner's passengers and their
fi lends. In their excitement men and
women ran aimlessly about on th.i nf,w
In tho way ot tho firemen and hampering
the flre-tlghtcrs.
Two sailors who had been sleeping In
tho hold had a narrow escapi from death.
They wore unconscious when found by
the firemen, and It was with tho gieat
ett difficulty that they were taken on
deck.
Tho Crctlc, which Is one of tho best
known ships In the American-Mediterranean
trade, has had nn exciting career
since sho was built at New Castle, Eng..
In 19K. In 1M7 theto was an explosion
on board, and two yeais after she went
aground on George's Island, off Boston.
in iju mo i-reue urrivcit Hero after n.
thrilling race foi safety against a giant
water spout.
GARRANZA FORCES
DEFEATED BY YAQUI
ALLIES OF VILLA
Indians Drive Troops Com
manded by Governor of
'Sonora Into Santa Barbara
After Severe Fight.
N"OGALES, Sonora, Sept. 25. Carranza
forces under General Benjamin Hill
vcro defeated with severe losses In a
battle with Vaqul Indiana at Santa
Barbara, a small town between Nogales
and Cannncn. Ho is still in Santa Bar
bara. ha!ng been drlen Into the town
by the Yaquis, who are said to be com
manded by Governor Maytorona. Roln
foi cements for Hill were sent fiom
Cnnnnea last night, and Matorena'
forces have heen lelnforccd with M0
troops fiom Nognles. Both sides in
jcsicruaya uattlo had about -lOOo men.
Four of Intcnention alone will hold
Concluded mi I'aee 3
m
' fv
S VJ
o a
FAIR
GERMAN PLAN IF VICTORIOUS
Would Have Made France Ally
Against England nnd Russia.
, .. . LONDON. Sept. 2G.
It Is said here on what Is ieganle.1 as
the best authority, that tho plan of aer!
many, In the event of her crushing
I- ranco at tho outbreak of tho war. was
to force the republic to become her allv
against England and Russia in consldera
tlon of not asking a war indemnity
Without In any way Implying a lack of
trust In ! ranee's Integrity of purpose It
Is felt In Influential circles hero thut th"
declaration signed by Russia. France and
Britain Is opportune. None of the Alllej
will demand terms of pence without the
pievlous agreement of each of tho othei
Allies, and It may be taken for granted
that there III bo no talk, of tonus so
far as the Allies aio concerned, until
German despotism Is effectually ciushed
It will be "a war to a llnlsh." v,,usm-u'
POET ARRESTED AS SPY
D'Annunizo Released After
THE LINE-UP IN TODAY'S FOOTBALL GA ME AT FRANKLIN FIELD
PENNSYLVANIA
KOONS
18
Right End
Left End
1
TURNBULL
HUGHES
21
Right Halfback
HARRIS
3
Right Tackle
JOURNEAY
1
Right Guard
MOFFETT
7
Fullback
IRWIN
10
Quarterback
BORIE
29
Centre
RUSSELL
3
Left Guard
Left Tackle
2
SCHEFFER
Left Guard
3
WEBNER
WEATHER FORECAST
For Philadelphia and vicinity Fair
and continued cool tonight and Sun
Pay, with possibly frost on lowlands
fvmyni; moderate northwest winds.
.or details, see last paget ,
Beintr !
Held for Making Notes in Paris, '
r,.... -P.A"!S' srd. a I
v........ ,v ., nimuiuiii, iiaimti poet, wus
arrested tho other evening as u sp Ho
was standing on the I'ont des Arts malt.
Ing memoranda, of his Impiesslons when
a passerby, becoming suspicious, called
the police. '
The latter tried to read Slgnor d'An
nunzlo's notes, but could not. as thev
were written hi Italian. The poet was
taken to the station, where he aa ro
leased after proving hla Idontltj.
PRESIDENT SIGNS TRADE BILL
WASHINGTON, Sept. Jtf.-Ircsldeiit
Wilson today slgiitd the Kedeial Tiude
Commission bill. No cei oniony attended
hla uclimi Thp hill ivnl.l !.... ,..
lv, ,,. utcoine
law w uncut nis signature nad he failed
to blgu It today.
Left Halfback
8
SWOPE
Centre
4
TITZELL
Quarterback
7
STONEY
Fullback
10
STRATTON
Right Guard
5
MERCER
JONES
6
Left Halfback
NORWALD
4
Left Tackle
Right Tackle
16
SEELBACH
16
Left End
Right Eijd
MARKS BUEHLER.R.E.
Right Halfback
9
HQAR
GETTYSB URG
lit thy ac)ii)puiiylii3 ilhistiiin mo iiQwn Hi numuois i,y ,vllU.,, the j
Pennsylvania's vurslty a,al Is numbered ns follows:
eta of MWU lvou wlU U jinuttu.
ALMOST STRANGLED BY BONE
A fishbone In his throat nearly btrangled
James tlocknn, 15 year old, 0f 36U
iwiiu niiiin afreet, mini h was removed
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1
One of the most violent engagements
of tho battle of tho Alanc is In proB
rcss today, the fourteenth of the
Btrugele, along tho German right.
The AI11C3, heavily reinforced, have
taken the offensive near St. Quen
tin. a town of strategic importance.
Arrival of fresh troops saved the
Allies from disaster yesterday. They
were forced to retreat before supe
rior numbers. Fighting continues
on the eastern end of tho line, where
the Germans have not been able to
cross the Meuse River.
Aviators report the Germans are con
structing Une3 of entrenchment In
southern Belgium near the plains of
Waterloo. This is Interpreted as a
plan to provide a haven, in case of
necessity, for the right wing, which
has heen badly damaged by the Al
lies in the battle along the Alsnc.
Belgian authorities expect an attack
on Antwerp, as German jps are
moving In that direction. Firing
hoard a few miles from Ghent Indi
cate the presence of a nearby force
and the Inhabitants are fleeing from
tho city, which was believed safe a
day or so ago, when several train
loads of wounded were carried thero
'Russians have occupied Chyrow and
Dynow, important railway centres
near Przemysl. The bombardment
of Przemysl continues and two outer
forts have been taken. Its fall A
declared imminent. Near Dynow the
Russian advance guard was repulsed
by a superior force of Austrlans. Tho
Austrian army Is concentrated on
tho River Wlslokd. west of tho San.
where they will oppose the Russians
before falling back on Cracow.
Petrograd War Office reports capture
of small towns, giving control of en
tire railroad system In East Galtcla
and opening way for westward prog
ress to Cracow. It is &ald German
officers have taken command of the
defence of that city.
In 13ast Prussia tho Russians havo ns
sumed the offensive after Uenneu
kampl's strategic retirement south.
Germans who attempted an Invasion
of Poland near Suwulkl were re.
pulsed, uccordlng to Petrograd, nnd
forced back to Gumhinnen. Se
vens losses on the Gorman side, both
of inon and guns, nro roported,
lierliit otliciul statement j,as tho AN
lies have fallen back 12 miles along
had been reinforiod. Further nil
vnnecs along the Mouso nro reported,
ulnle the tjorumn artillery continues
to bombard tlio French forts,
London is intensely excited over op
erations of tho iienpolin tleet in the
North Sea, and extreme precautious
have been adopted agulnut a pollute
night attack. Lights nro out early
ami ertut toarvIilishts conib tho
skies.
Clilneso Foreign OilUe has formally
protested to the Japanese legation
at I'oljlu agulnut tlio occupatiun of
WeN listen tn Shan Tung province.
ThP pron. which was seized wltlj.
nut resltuiuv, is SO miles from
Tsiiuj-Tuo. in tiie liirntun Uitt?tu4t
f Iviao.i'uau. uhcr-' the Japanese
aro uiwniti'd. and it.s occupation n.
resordwl us an infrinyrment uf
Chinese toverclgntv
BISHOP SPALDING KILLED
Head of Utah Episcopal Church Dead
in Auto Wreck.
fcAI-T I.AKK CITY. Itali. S,.pi. -BUh
ip P S Spjldliirf. beud of tin- i;pi.o.
pal Chunh In Utab. was intaiul kilUu
hre last night wtien the automobile In
which be was riding struck a curbatoui
and wa tverturned.
PARIS, Sept. 3.
Dispatches from tho front today de
clare one of the most violent engage
ments of the great battle of the Aisno
is In progress near St. Quentin, on th
German right.
General von Kluk, heavily rein
forced, compelled the Allies to retire
yesterday and additional forces for th
French and British arrived just in
time to prevent a severe reverse.
St. Quentin, a place of much stra
tegic Importance, is the centre of the
Allies' assault. This town had been
taken by the Germans after desperate,
fighting.
Tho Germans have made a supremo
effort to check the allied advanca
along the Oise and to push their lino
forward 0 as to split the allied forces
between Noyon and St. Quentin. but
they have been unsuccessful.
The new allied armies, which moved
cast from Amiens and Doullena, ara
reported to have so strongly entrenched
the Allies' left that the capture of St.
Quentin is considered certain within a
short tlmo. If tha Allies can take 'St.
Quentin and the railway lines between'
it nnd Noyon, the Germans must
abandon their strongly entrenched po
sitions in the Oise-Alsne region $na
retreat speedily to tho northeast or b
cut off and forced to surrender.
The fourteenth day of the battle)
found hard fighting also on the right
flank of tho Allies, while in the centra
both the Germans and the French re
mained behind their defensive work
as the opposing artillery fought a long
range duel.
General Gallieni, tho Military Gov
ernor of Paris, declared that th
French and British had shown con
spicuous gallantry In repulsing the at
tacks of the Germans.
The Allies, said General Gallieni, are
nuw holding better positions than the
have since the battle began along th
Aisne. Both flanks have been strength
ened as a result of the offensive move
ment of the Germans.
There was artillery firing nil through
tho night along the Oise.
The violence of the attacks is shown
by the great numbers of wounded sol
diers that are being brought to Paris
from the north. These soldiers say
that tho Germans have planted In
numerable maehino guns on every fa
vorable pleco of ground around St,
Quentin and Camurni.
Terrible street fighting is reported
from St. Quentin. whore the French
are fighting the troops defending Gcn-
j&f" &t 3-s
gaj?fc tew
the Oise. although the enemies' lines ora: von Kluk'b "ne ' communication.
It was regurded as possible that th
British reinforcements might co. oper
ate with General d'Am.ide's French
troops in the north iu u general move
ment against General von Kluk's rear
and the forces of tieuerol von Boohm
that aro defending tho German line of
('tinmunii'iiUon.
An unofficial dispatch from a corre
spondent who has beon at the front
mukes no mention of any British sol
diers at St. Quentin. This messags
says:
"The lighting at St. Quentin has been
80vcrt. Tho French were In control
of the city, but a superior force of
Uornmns onsuged thom uml secured a
firm foothold. Tlwre mm furious
haniNto.iuuul fighting in the street,
the Germans using Maxim guns against
the French, who wn forced to retire
before the steady fire. The French
had artillery and fUMMriuly thej could
have cNpellnd the Germans by bom
barding St. Quentin. but it was feared
that the city would h destroy cd."
The Utrmans are reported mrrtly
holdini,- their intrenched pokltioiu ,
the centre This i beliewd due to the
fact thut the l.a. t.tH ,-,Jrnp. id to
withdraw large lor-n vt mc-, and ar
tillery and "id, them to the wtat Aq
ll
IM
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