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Evening public ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, December 05, 1914, Night Extra, Image 12

Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045211/1914-12-05/ed-1/seq-12/

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EVENING LEDGER-PHIlTADEEPHIft, SATURDAY, DECEMBER S, i
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Theatrical Baedeker
OPE.V1N0.
SIUtEST Kaw Vnrle lllnnn,1fnm nt-fbttiMirtn
nf "Plnaore." I
KEITH'S Houdini and varied bill.
LrrrLB theatiib "Th silver not," ty
John Galsworthy.
WALNUT "The Wlnnln of Barbara -Worth,"
dramatisation of Harold Bell Wrlghfa
popular novel.
contiwino,
ASEbPHt Today," by Umric Droarlhumt
nd Abraham Schemer. A wife, excellently
played by Ethel Valentine, eeeks luxury by
."the easiest way" and Is killed by her hue
band.
BJtOAtV "The Secret," by Henri Tlerneteln,
adapted by David Delaeco. A etudy of fern
Inlna Jealousy In which Oabrlelle Jannelot,
the heroine, aeeka to' destroy people's happl
neee. Frances Starr proves nereelf an
actress of exceptional talenta In an unpleas
ant role.
GAnniCK "Potash and rerlmutter," drama
tisation of the famous stories by Montague
Glass. One of the most capitally amuafnt
plays or years, human, appealing- to- an.
juxjiiu- "jugn jinKs," musice
musical comedv.
with
book br Otto llauerbach and muslo by Ru
dolph JTrlml, starrliur
RtellA Msvhew.
roiucHinar evenings
fun and sons.
entertainment, full
DEVELOPMENT OF
THE SPECTACULAR
j ra MODERN DRAMA
Witnessed In N. Y, Hip
podrome Production of
; "Pinafore" Reinhardt to
Produce Shakespeare in
America.
The Now York Hlppoilromo has Added
on adjective describing a phase of tho
modern drama. Hlppodromatlc this de
scribes many productions of recent years
marked by mammoth scenic settings and
ornate spectacular effects. Those who
witnessed the various revivals of "Pina
fore" during tho past decade could well
estimate the development of tho stupen
dous by tho production of the Gilbert and
Sullivan operetta at the Hippodrome last
spring. In this production, Instead of the
conventional fake ship built from the
stage, thero was a real ship, floating In a
lake of real water. '
While the Forrest Theatre In this city
Is not nearly so big as the New York
playhouse, the real ship will nevertheless
float on real water on the stage when
"Pinafore1' opens hero next Monday.
Tho enormous tank which Is to bo In
stalled on the stage of the Forrest will
necessitate the practical rebuilding of tho
entire stage.
Year by year theatrical productions.
have become mora and more stupendous
and elaborately realistic. Nevertheless,
much remains to be dono artistically. No.
producer has, perhaps, ever consistently
equaled Belasco, nor have we a Rein
hardt. One remembers, with marveling
admiration, Lleblor'a production of Pierre
Lotl's "Daughter of Heaven," which was
at once both massive In Its setting, gorg
geous and consummately artistic. Singu
larly, It failed. On the other hand, "The
Garden of Allah," massively staged, was
correspondingly great a success.
The presentation of "Pinafore" brings
to mind the numerous stories which have
been printed concerning the origin of
that light opera classic. According to the
late Francis Celller, for many years musi
cal director at the Savoy Theatre, Lon
don, where' most of the operas were
first produced, the Idea evolved from the
rhyme In "The Bab Ballads."
the worthy Captain Iteece,
Commanding of the Mantelpiece,
who was so devoted to his crew that there
was no conceivable luxury he did not
provide for their comfort. For example:
A feather bed had every man,
warm slippers and hot-water can,
Brown Windsor from the captain's store,
A valet, too, to every four.
"Gilbert began, then, by renaming the
Mantelpiece II. M. S. Pinafore. William
Lee. coxswain, was promoted to the rank
of boatswain's mate and given the name
of Bill Bobstay; the widowed laundress
was transformed Into that 'plump and
pleasing person' to be known henceforth
and famed as Little Buttercup, tho
Portsmouth bumboat woman. But the
roost important action that Gilbert made
to his dramatis personae was the night
Hon. 81r Jobeph Porter, K. C. B., First
Lord of the Admiralty. To this distin
guished personage were bequeathed 'the
sisters and cousins and aunts,' who. In the
'Bab Ballads,' belonged to Captain Recce."
An amusing mistake was made at the
Little Theatre when the troupe M French
actors came there last week. They ar
rived, with their trunks, JuBt as the Little
Theatre Company was preparing to leave
for an engagement In Wilmington. They
unpacked their trunks as the local com
pany were packing theirs. There was much
hurry and excitement. In tho confusion'
the stage manager happened to get hold
of all the wigs belonging to the French
actors. These were hurriedly put Into
their trunks. When they arrived at Wil
mington they found a plethora of pow
dered wigs. Meanwhile, among the French
actors at the Little Theatre, there was
the moat voluble perturbation. They were
to go on the stage. The wigs had van
ished. French expletives cut the atr.
They were not so explosive as "Jack
Johnsons," of course, but they seemed
ao when, the next day, the stag man
ager of the Little Theatre returned and
admitted his mistake. That was why the
French artists appeared In the(r own hair,
whitened with talcum powder.
Fearing ihat, being written by an Eng
lishman, there might be demonstrations
.gainst their production. Max Reinhardt
early in the autumn dropped Shakes
re's pUys from the repertory of the
Deutsche Theater, in Berlin. Thereupon
a clamor arose, and the plays were re
Dlxced In the schedule of performances,
Jlax Jlelnhardt's productions of Shakes
peare are noted for their consummate
artistry. It Is also true that Germany
baa mrpaMed both England and America
In adequate presentations of these great
dratsos,
"With Shakespearo still playing la Bar
's1' Li1.-,1 - . , ,i
xa' GRAND
fc.d St. and llMIiomsry Ave.
raaq m. hixom-nirdunoer. oa- Mr.
TUB U1S VJni.iMKI.rmA EDITION
jSISwv PBTTICOAT MINSTRELS
A PftOUO OV VUN AMD MBLOPT
MtiR Sister , Daly & Healy
H SL WfeUlt? I AJlda. Pigg & Ptttfy
- BiJBKEaMBUBKE .
WP bitb oy yopngttwjfrfta
saU3l INVH MT9XVm
aewcoAJajtaijft.
Ttis tiMU Was . at 8:15
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EMPIRE waK P?
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Frances Starr "The Secret" Broad, j, J&jgmk'' '"f$mm$- "-'' ; '" 'Mr j!Kmm&& fW
lln, Herr Reinhardt will como to this
country to superintend the production of
"Tho Midsummer Night's Dream," by
the Stage Society of New York. Dr. Karl
Vollmoeller, tho author of "The Miracle,"
which will not be produced hero this sea
son, will havo charge of tho company
engaged to give the play, and, according
to announcements, rehearsals will begin
In February.
Whether we shall see nn Influx of Ger
man nctors. which Is Improbable wo
shall, at least, have Shakespeare effi
ciently given by two of the greatest and
most artistic producers In tho world.
Houdini at Keith's
Harry Houdini, known as "The Bluslve
American," will head tho bill at Keith's
next week, and will present for tho first
flrriA h.ra lita Intnat Tnnf "Thn fhlntxiA I
Water Torture Cell-." For many years
Houdini appeared as "Tho King of Hand
cuffs," but he has discarded this for a
more sensational series of escape tricks.
"Tho Chinese Water Torture Cell" con
sists of escaping from a compartment fill
ed with water, Into which Houdini has
been suspended head downward, fastened
by his ankles. Houdini has added several
more new tricks to his act. Including the
East Indian needle trick, which he per
fected during his three years' tour of the
world. During his engagement at Keith's
Houdini is open to accept any rational
challenge Issued to him. Others on the
bill arc Bessie Wynn, with a repertoire of
new song selections; Emmet Devoy, In his
new playlet. "His Wife's Mother"; the
Primrose Four, heavyweight singers;
the Pedersen Brothers, acrobats; a rural
comedy sketch, "Hiram," which Fred J.
Ardath & Co. will play here for the ttrst
time; Lew and Mollis Hunting, singers
and dancers; and Luplta Ferea, a Pari
sian oerlallst.
Trentini in New Comedy
Emma Trentini, the little prima donna,
will appear In a new production, "The
Peasant Girl," at the Lyric Theatre dur
ing the holidays. Refusing all offers from
American managers for this season, Tren
tini sailed to Italy last summer, deter
mined to present "Tho Firefly" In London
this winter and then return to grand
opera. Her plans, however, failed because
of the war, and as a result the Shuberts
signed her up with a flve-year contract.
To supply Mile. Trentini with a suitable
score the Shuberts engaged Rudolf Frlml,
who wrote the muslo of "The Firefly."
Clifton Crawford will sharo the star
honors with Trentini, Other notable mem
bers of the cast are John C, Thomas,
Francis J, J3oyle, Mary Robson, Ethel de
Fre Houston, Ernest Hare, Henry (Mack,
Charles Tingle, Stanley Henry, Lucille
Delberg, Edith Hallor and Karen Krlflch
ner, Trentini begins her New York season
shortly after the- Christmas holidays, so
her Philadelphia engagement Is limited.
BROADWAY
Advanced Broad and
Vaudeville Snyder Ave.
7B8T TIME AT POPOLAB PRIPE8
Gallagher & Carlin
In a Nautical Traveaty
"BBFOBB THB MABT.'r
riHSTPHILADELPHIA APPBAUANCB
Boat and Dance Review of 1914
COMPANY OP TBN
9-IRST PHILADELPHIA APPEARANCE)
Oakland Sisters
DAINTT BITS OF VAUPBVIU.B
Charles and Adelaide 'Wilson
The Umemif, the Maid and the Violin.
Billy Rodeera
ECCENTRIC MIMIQ
Maboaey & Tretuont
THB TRADING STAMP Q1BL
THREE SHOWS OAiEi5:lfcrI "
Mats. Alt Seat 10c. Bvrs. 10, 30, BOe.
WJSieAX. BXTRAYA0AMZA
CO WTESS OF TUBS
AT WI
BW-i
Jr:
TSiuiiT an Mft
Ttaasts aw
ACADSMT T MMS0
WiD. AyTSB90W, .WW W.
AT 1:4
KREISLER
DiRKCTtON C. A. KIXtB
TH.tT. t CW TO II
Om tW at Utivtf. Hi jCaattau Htwe
' Jf7.-K? Us, .: . ... i - ', . , ,-.? XUbtmts&am&k -.'-A
S& , , . -.. , - ,ro, ,s iKKmmhf-M ' ;t
'Jx sit 18 - 'MSt '4-m$ ;' J :"'
Ethel Valentine and Margaret
Actors Must Be Realistic
"An actor today cannot merely make
believe he must be consummately real
istic. So must tho stage settings. If a
robber tinkers with a Bafe, we must have
a real snfe. We must transplant life to
the stage ns never before."
Thus declares Edmund Breese, who
plays the leading male rolo In "Today,"
at the Adelphi Theatre.
"Somehow," continues Mr. Breese, "I
seemed to sense this demand when I first
went on the stage." continued Mr. Breese.
"I was tho villain In a play called 'The
End of tho World.' In one sceno I was
to rush upon the stage hunted by a
frenzied mob for a murder I had com
i.iltted. I was supposed to run In Dreath
InB hard and panting as It from a long
chase. I thought the situation over, and
concluded that my pants would bo more
natural f augmented by physical exer
cise. The stage door opened on a long
alley. I decided to run up and down this
alley until I had secured the natural
out-of-breath pants. Unfortunately, we
wore playing In an Indiana town where
the town marshal reigned supreme. I
had made four sprinting trips up and
down the nllc;y, when I was nabbed by
tho sovereign arm of the law,
"'Xaw I've got yet' he chuckled. So
you're the crittur as has been cutting
up your didoes In these parts for the past
week, air yeT
"I tried-to explain, but he dragged me
off to the station, where the man on
guard averred that I might be telling the
tr.ith, and suggested that the local Sher
lock take me to the theatre and find out
I knew It was my time to go on. and I
was desperate; but tho police force, the
two of them, took tbelr time and marched
me between them. Tho curtain had been
FORREST Lat Mat and Night
niiPPN or
MAUIFQ UVSM2AT.
T - COAtatDV
NalXT W.
fKu.a jivrv
A REAL SHIP OK A
MIMIC LAKK OP
JORL WATER
of.iBiwoNpaa op tub
t. mreomunm
PRODUCTION Off
PINAFO
gyjyPjSxT WEEK I
iPThe Walnut I
Skv tii and walnut I
flu NIGHTS. !5c. 60a,. TSe, $1.00, 1
""trail TuM- Thurs. Ms.ts..2Js 80a 5
I OS ne5l Saturday Matinee, S9a, BOe, T6o f
KlAjSttl Tbe nret local presentation
EB2MH of Harold Rati Wricht's most f
HP A SPLENDID CAST I
ffJL STRIKING EPPKCTa I
lS6bW. ROSIANCB ADVBNr
( ' JJaT TONIGHT ' " i
T.TTTI.B lost Biarga ij
Robinson "Today" Adelphi.
held for 10 minutes while tho stage man
ager looked for me everywhere. After
more or less explanation I Anally got on
tho stage. I was careful thereafter to
secure my realism whero tho securing
was eafer."
Broadway
Gallagher and Carlin will appear next
week at the Broadway Theatre In a mu
sical travesty, "Before the Mast." "The
Song and Dance Review of 1911" will bo
presented by tc company of ten persons.
The rest of the bill will Include tho Oak
land Bisters, "The Trading Stamp Girl,"
Mahoney & Tremont, in a skit; and
Charles and Adelaide Wilson In an act,
"The Messenger,"
Nixon's Grand Opera
The bill for next week at Nixon's Grand
Opera House will Include Joule Flynn's
r"I n55ou ' Lyrle Adelphi Theatres,
Alt HI MH JUatinee
Caught With
the Goods !
During the past
week the Phila
delphia play-loving
nublio. ever
alert for the best jtA
in the drama, fU
Adelphi and
caught ua with
the dramatic
triumph of the
age.
By GEORGE
BROADHUIIST and
ABRAHAM
SOTOMER
LYRIC
MATINEE
BEGINNING
The
Musical
Jollity
That
Hag
Won
the
Whole
Town!
T. laTsBBBBBpssravMil
1 1 rjtm
mm
jjfc2Sfy5fvL KfsaW
JPPK 2&?'F ' jr JlijBBBBBBBBBBBBB
noith st i31BPKw
CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR'S ATTRACTION
EMMA TRENTINI ".
- IN A MBW OPKHETTA
"THE PEASANT GIRL"
Witt CLIFTON nmtvpnnn
I ithlb Q8PHM KOTT
mxotr
GRAND "V"'
rr
Knxgs
; Fare,
Kathryn Stevens "The Winning
of Barbara Worth" Walnut.
Fcttlcoat Minstrels; Burke and Burke In
a skit, "Bits of Foolishness"; the Morln
Sisters, acrobatic dancers; Daly and
Ilealy, comedians: Aiken, Figg and
Dully, with a slnglnp specialty, and W.
E. Whittle, n ventriloquist.
Burton Holmes
The two flnal Burton Holmes Trav
elogues In the regular, season at the
Academy of Music will be devoted to the
nations now Involved In war. In the
first of these two, to bo presented next
Friday night and Saturday afternoon, Mr.
Holmes will discuss "Germany and Aus
tria," from Berlin to Tyrol. Mr, Holmes
.was fortunate In tho possession of rich
picture-records of all Germany and Aus
tria, and is consequently admirably
equipped to present a. striking and com
prehensive Burvey of these two countries
and of their peoples as they were before
the outbreak ofthe hostilities. A week
later he will close his Philadelphia sea
son with a companion Travelogue on "The
Allied Powers."
Applr Uox twice or Phone Walnut 6786.a7.flS
Today at 2:15; Tonight at 8:15
Beginning Monday, 2d Big Week
This is the terrific
climax in "To-day"
which shows the
most powerful dra
matic situation ever
seen on the Ameri
can stage.
"MTrn
EDMUND
BREGSg
TODAY. 2:15: TONIOIIT at n.it"
MONDAY, LAST WEEK BUT ONE
"IRRESISTIBLE"
"DELIGHTFUL''
"A ttaile-logUag. 'Z&2?'
Inquirer.
"Sot to pleaaa
ttrjrbody." -
Record.
BgAT SALX Of&NS BXCBUBBK TK
GARRICK 'nita . :ia
Ptjiulw fcia Wa. eiaa. Seal M 14
ltJSflff .-,
Kf((iJ I 1 m
Carolyn Lilja "Potash and Perl
mutter" Garrick.
Ten-Minute Talks
Seriousness In Comedy
Miss Ruby Cutter Savage, grand opera
singer, who plnya the rolo of Josephine In
the New York Hlppodronie production of
"Pinafore," nt tho Forrest Theatre, de
clares that tho possession of a well-developed
sense of humor Is sometimes a
drawback instead of an asset In tho ren
dition of Gilbert and Sullivan comedy
roles.
"I know that It Is popularly believed,''
said Miss Savage, "that only those pos
sessing a highly cultivated sense of hu
mor can extract the full value out of Gil
bert's Inimitable lyrics, and yet to me the
possession of such a sense Is a serious
handicap. Of course In the singing of tho
lyrics nn absolute seriousness of demeanor
Is essential. That Is tho difficulty for me.
There are moments In the performance
of TlnafoVo" when tho task of kcoplng
a straight face and maintaining a serious
mien is almost Impossible. The words I
am singing appeal to- me so strongly to
my seneo of the ridiculous that there are
times when I positively suffer in the at
tempt to stifle my mirth,"
CHESTNUT ST.
Afternoons, 1 to 5 10c & ISc.
2nd
SENSATIONAL
MONTH
of.be
Most
Gigantic
Eym
Produced,
with
William
Factum and
Kathljn Williams
COMING "M?
THE
UllKni.xi r 4 vtt
III I Mil
i Mil iiif
llJ ivl : I 1 lJ
tmrmr-TTr --- n -, ri i ---T TT" I , th
t HHOWH I1AII.Y. MAIM.. X 1 il S5o and SOe. MC.UTtf. 8 I. M.JJe to fj.
BACK yHOH THKKKVK.tUa'oj' KpilOPEAN THIL'MVIIS
HOUDINI wsasr
TUJMKiiTlna TIIH CHINBSB WATER TOIITUUE CEtl."
TH Crounlila .Effort ol ILe slaster Mind of aljaterr .
t iMS?8'srPUR " miurj. AUuSnTaTco:
lOOO-feoUBda of Harmwr Rural Comedy Sketch. "Hiram"
"DOIF IVVMIT.
Jldmlnlstalnr' lJUyh Tonics
EMMET DEVOY &qO,
: . In, t,h "PfoaJtaua lAuahlnr Playlal, "H13 ; WIFga MOTHER"
. ' lEW tf MOtSlTOSTINa ' P LWITA FElieX
' Bonra. nances and Caaady. Dainty "arillan JurUllrts
p HEAItST-SBLia N'KUK All lt.au' liAi-ir kl'brm it . ' '
VABDBVII-T.fc'a'DAINTIKST'luUJY "
UJiSSIlS
Ntvr
Bejta
Gotaaeus Qovul
8EAT8 AlWAIBAWKKKIN ADNCE-a,MraiblrtS9sirKfystoM Kic llio.
VISITOBS TttTKHW OHH BHOVLtitVAiir'ririiWFi
" i gq . " . ' ny BEAimypr, uoiwk in tub woblp
PROTECT Uffl-wfiBS4K
aHrg StpH tt Tee Ortaw emFti
VICTORIA THEATRE
silteTM
mit-ssasmk
MKTleOtfOWTAN OPJtRA KOU85
jarZoLiTN oiwA co.. New to
TuaMay Vac , 1 fll
Maaiin. 3svaU. J&Mwutwr, Mat
I' .-I j. Wi
"Little Miss Valentin"
This Is tho story of a ellp of a girl.
It Is always best to Identify your story
so that your reader will know what tft
expect Tou see, It might have been a
story about something entirely different!
but, trulj', It l about this slip of a girl,
Just a year ago do you recall how It
snowed and the wind howled that nlght
bIio was a member of tho Chestnut Street
Op'ry IIouso Stock Company. She played
"there's n carriage without" roles, and
once In n while she was permitted to
dust the furniture just as the curtain
wns going up.
Now, Just to provo how foolish torn
girls can bs without half trying, tlile
little girl went to New York and saw r,
play. Then she stayed In Now York and
aw tho tamo play seven times more,
Bv that time she decided that sho knew
what she wanted, and that was the lead
ins role. So sho sat herself down and
w'roto to thnt effect to the manager. And
n3 will happen In real llfo-but never In
novels tho return post brought a. re
iiuert that sho call.
And thnt Is exactly how Ethel Valen
tino advanced from the Chestnut Street
Op'ry Touso to tho rolo of Mly Wngner
In "Today," at tho Adelphi which 1b
constdciablo progress for one year.
"My ambition? To go on forward
toward tho goal of better things to
achieve to conquer," sho said. "I wont
to do big things better than anybody
else cvor did them. I want to bo some
nnp. I realize that It will be a hard fight,
but then I am used to battling for suc
cess. ' I know that I may fall utterly and
miserably, but I haven't the slightest In
tention of permitting any such fear to
Interfere 'with my best efforts. All day
I say to myself, 'I am going to win: I
must nnd shall win,' and I bclleva' that
somo day I will."
"And when you grow up, what do you
Intend to be?" I asked sho seemed so
tiny, curled up In tho big chair.
"Grow up?" sho naked, her eyes wide)
with astonishment. "Why, I'm married,"
nnd sho held up her hand to provo her
contention- (Isn't It strange how all the
really nlco girls are cither married or
aro going to be?) "I was married In
Paris, on July 3, nnd four weeks later,
my husband was called to the front. Ho
Is lying wounded "
Little Miss Valentine's eyes filled with
tears; sho gulped down a big lump In
her throat. Then sho went on:
"I can't bo with him I couldn't part
with him ngaln It Is Boldsh, I know but
he wants mo to work. Ho wants me to
do my duty by myself, as he calls It,
oven ns ho did his by his country. Oh,
Isn't llfo cruel brutal!"
Miss Valentine recovered her composure.
Sho spoke of her ambition to become
an emotional actress of the Duse type;
sho discussed Professor James nnd dress;
sho debated tho psychology of mind over
matter nnd music. But ever and anon,
her volco saddened, her eyes filled her
thoughts (lew acioss tho seas to the field'
hospital In France.
Miss Valentino held a letter In her
hand, ready for mailing. It bore at the
bottom tho word 'Franco." A dreamy
look camo Into lifer eyes forgotten was
tho stage gone was tho luro of the foot
lights, the acclaim of tho public; ths
pralso of tho critics. Sho saw only the
cot In tho hospital and HIM!
Dramatization of Novel
The dramatization of "The Winning of
Barbara Worth," Harold Bell Wright's
popular novel, will open at tho Walnut,
for one week, next Monday evening. The
dramatization of the novel is by Wil
liam Lynch Itoberta and Mark B. Swan
"The Winning of Barbara AVorth," as, a
book was a "best seller," and Its sales
are said to havo reached over the 2,000,000
mark.
The story of "Tho AVInnlng of Barbara
Worth" Is the story of tho winning of a
woman by a young Eastern engineer who
reclaims tho desert. All of tho scenes are
laid In the West.
OPERA
HOUSE
Uome ol World's
Greatest Photo Plays
Evenings, 7 to 11-
10c,15c,25c
Positively the
Best and
Longest
Picture
Show in
the World.
"The
Spoilers"
Is Shown
Twice Daily,
2.30 & 8.30
Preceded by
a Daily Change
otFifst'rtm Pictures
CHRISTIAN Mf
tuki kin u-i'ii vhtm
pkdeiiskn nuns.
World's Oymnaatlo Marvela.
WYWN
Bweet Smllca?
All Joy I
JOHN BARRVMORE
is rum man jcroji uxxiea"
I IITI 17 4T TOar, lea. We.
laiiUi Th. WALNUT
in
LOST SISTER
,t
s
' 1 ev
i nc
m
m
m
'2S3afcJHPl&
-tU fl
to $1 30
aket ttp' $t I
itLnjBm f'JTTiUt- lj:i,A
;-n, u
He3
EMa-S. I ivm 4BU-E
Wsiit,.,- iw5 , rk
1 Nt WW The Wruutwa; -i --- ..i96
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