OCR Interpretation


Evening public ledger. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, December 22, 1914, Night Extra, Image 1

Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045211/1914-12-22/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

HaSl
oamwmniaHimwnMinnMWMmMMi
hmMfe&$t&$.
FINANCIAL EDITION
NIGHT
EXTRA
NIGHT
EXTRA
3
VOL. tNO. SG
PHILADELPHIA, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1914.
PBIOE CtfTE CENT
CoriionT.1014,Br ma Pcnua Ltwra Coiimht.
$
FRENCH TAKE
TRENCHES OF
I: FOE BY DRIVE
I OF INFANTRY
Bllies' Furious Bayo-
.net Charge Wins Ad-
vanced Positions in
Argonne-- Counter
; Attacks Between Lys
', and Aisne Thrown
! Back After Terrific
; Battie.
Fleets Bombard German
Coast Defenses, as Land
Forces Push Forward To
ward Ostend P a r i.s
Claims Gains Along En-
tire Battle Front From Sea
to Alsace.
f Progress along virtually the entire
battle frdnt, from the sea to Alsace,
is claimed in the French official
communique issued this afternoon.
German trendies in the Argonne have
been taken at the point of the bayonet,
While between the Lys and the Aisne,
where the invaders have made furious
counter attacks, this offensive move
ment has been repulsed.
AlthoURh the official statement says
that the battle near the coast is con
fined largely to cannonading, unofficial
reports indicate that the Allies are
making progress in their advance to
ward Ostend, Rumors of the evacua
!l f(on of that port by the Germans
lack confirmation, but it is known that
the German shore positions are silf-
'"fdrinff heavily from the fire of the Al
lied fleet, which is co-operating with
the land forces.
French attacks near Albert, Com
piegne, Soulin and Perthes and Brit
, ish attacks at FestubcrfGwenchy have
been repulsed, it is officially an
nounced in Berlin. The Germans also
claim the capture of French trenches
in the Argonne.
German forces, held at bay on the
left bank of the Bsura River at their
THE WEATHER
Noe Noel!
Christmas Is near, v
Noell Koell
- The weather Is clear.
' - "Twss the night before Christmas."
, But wait! We must write
These lines on the weather.
'Twill be colder tonight,
Noel.
, And you probably thought yesterday
Was the shortest of the year. Well. It
Wasn't,
Feday is.
; J FORECAST
f For Philadelphia and vicinity
. Generally fair today. Clear and
folder tonight.
For details, see page S,
Observations ot Philadelphia
a a. u,
Bsrcmcter , anna
....... " --" '
nww -..... U1
Northwest, u rallia
fKqr
sjtatton' 1 et'i" Vm?h " ,Car
Buy ,.....7.'.r..VsQD.v-nr
... - r T td
:"'ji
Alfiftsae ofths Day '
ulx
Jim (tomorrow)
3!p. m.
-.t.f .. T4oa. n.
i . ...
............. 48Tp,nj,
: run
J V ' VH ,
m.
InbS J$,3 lighted
and tbMtc&lli. ,.,.,. 4iS4p.iv.
The Tldea
rom Hioaotff.
1UATSU .-o
ctMMm,);;:::::-..:: ?ss
"w imwnwf jStsb;
m
stncov I8LANO.
(buuir! ;..2a.ilt
$
tbAK uttt
fr 91 e- m.
pr iwstfti 9im a
wawiKi' .i
SKATIMO TOD
-. s firrnant Pfur.
OFFICIAL WAR REPORTS
FRENCH
Between the sea and the Lys nothing
happened during the day of December
Zt except artillery conflicts.
Between the Lys And the Aisne wo
rolled back a German attack which
tried to debouch from Cnrency and
we took some house at BlanKy. An
attack by tho enemy upon Mamets
and neighboring trenches were not per
mitted by our troops to make any- ap
preciable progress from that side. In
the region of Llhona three attacks by
the enemy havo been repulsed. We
have made a slight gain to tho cast
and to the west of Tracy-le-Val. Our
artillery successfully shelled the pla
teau of Nouvron.
In the sectors of tho Aisne and ot
nhelms there were artillery conflicts.
In the Champagne, region and In tho
Argonne around Soualn there were
violent bayonet combats. We have
made appreciable progress In that re
gion. We captured In the environs " of
I'erthes-le, Hurlus three German wdrk
representing a front of 1500 yards ot
trenches. To the northeast of Beau
scjour, we fortified the position taken
on December 20. and occupied all tho
trenches which border upon tho sum
mit of Calvalrc.
In the forest of Oniric our prtgress
continues. At St. Hubert wo repulsed
an attack. In the Bolanta forest,
where some ground had been lost, wo
retook the two tiers of trenches.
Botween the Argonne and the Mcuso
wo advance's slightly to tho environs
of Vn.uo.uols. Td the north of the
forest of Malaucourt our troops suc
ceeded In crossing a wire entangle
ment' and In capturing some trenches,
where the enemy has hold Its position
on the right bank of the Meuse.
GEBMAN r
At NIeuport and around Tpres It
was generally quiet yesterday. In
the region around Mchebourg tho Al
lies succeeded In obtaining a Arm foot
hold In their old position. Yester
day's attacks by the French In the
neighborhood ot Albert, northeast , of
Cpmplegne, noa? Soulin and Perthes,
were repulsed with heavy lass.
Ordered to recapture positions lost
Mondav at Festubert and Owenchy,
the Englluh. reinforced by French
territorial forces, made desperate at
tacks yesterday and during the night,
but all were repulsed.
In the western part of the Argonne
forest, we captured a few French
trenches. In the eastern part, north
west of Verdun. French attacks
against our lines were repulsed with
heavy losses to th French.
In tho eastern theatre of war the
situation Is unchanged In Cast Prus
sia. In Poland our troops are en
gaged In ti fierce battle for branches
of the Bsura ond Bawka Rivers. In
many places crossings over these
brandies have already been won. On
the right bank of the GllUa (Plllca)
the battle continues.
RUSSIAN
In the region of Mlawa, north ot the
Vistula, -the Gennaus have fallen back
toward the ilne of Jjiutenburg-Nleden-
burg. acrpas the frontier, Into East
rrussia.
-TriGaIieifr'tha ATUrtrifl.T.voffensrrttHa.
Deins greauy ninuorcu uy uu ,wi,
.and the operations In this tslort havo
taken on a character Immediately fa
vorabte to us: One of the Austrian
divisions which was operating in the
vicinity ofDukla Pass was easily de
feated by a bayonet change made by
our troops. The enemy left on 'the
battlefield GOO killed and we captured
10 ofllcera and more than 1000 soldiers.
most forward point in the Warsaw
advance, are furiously but vainly
striving to force an opening in the,
Russian line of defense. The Czar's
hosts again have straightened their
lines and are moving forward slowly
but definitely, repeating the 'history of
the first German invasion by rolling
the foe's legions back to his own
borders. Furious battle rages for the
possession of Sbchacrew, 30 miles
west of Warsaw. In the far north
of Poland the Germans have been
forced across the East Prussian
frontier, while in the. extreme south
pressure has been increased at
Przemys! and in the Cracow advance
Russian and Austro-German armies,
numbering more than 800,000 men, are
arrayed, 'against each, other in Galicia
along an east and west front of more
than 100 miles. Austrian initiative for
the relief of Przemyal has precipitated
a sanguinary battle, in which infantry
forces are mainly engaged as the ter
ritory is too difficult for cavalry
movements or artillery duels.
Reports from London say a
gigantic force of territorials is
massed at the Pyramids, in Egypt, to
meet the Turkish invasion. Turkish
troops, it is reported, continue to be
transported across the BJack Sea to
ward. Batum, unmolested by the Rus-
sian fleet.
Russian successes in minor
Armenian- engagements are reported
front Petrograd.
GERMAN TRENCHES CARRIED
BY ALLIES' BAYONET CHARGE
New Positions Gained as Adyanca la
Pushed on Entire Pront.
PARIS, Deo. ?t
Driving the. Germans from, trenches In
the Argonne at rfee point of the bayonet
and taking up pew position In northern
France and Belgium on tho western nd
of the battle line, the, official commurAaue,
Issued from the War Offloe today, reports
new progress along virtually the entire
battle line on which the Allies Otrelvi
U being conducted.
In Belgium the aetlon yesterday waj
marked by heavy cannonading. The, G--miBs
lUtempted au offensive myeeaest
feetweaa the Iff and tfee. Atne, bfc wa
refMibtd. About 0reay. JAusetge and
I.Swpa, ;vher violent fljfitin ha, b
la MOffM for ib last few daya, etm
ware made by the French at svra
paint jt
It is reported that 04n44 beisg bora
bjdd by the Aagta-Freaca atUIUry. but
tbar o t ho cosArwattoM ot tba rumor tht
Ot AlBaa hav ntr4 Ml ett? 0tod
wu straay mrttaed by ibe OerAma,
u4 tttey mtnid at sraat nuiLodty uf artll
lrj to dataad tb !t
4- KoUetdiaw 4KHtti . Britltt wer
fci hav IHwb kewntf us u, huaOjrtf
'MILLION
HKHHESlBIKSHHflMfjsflAsSBBHffiBHf jts SEJSkSmCqmjz h BniKnMlSC7gU!l't .. ktfwBBBBBBB
i
Mrs. Keith (Donaldson, who was divorced three years ago, appeared before .Magistrate Beatontoday
to press charges of assault against her mother-in-law, Mrs. William F, Donaldson, and her maid,
Fannie Blanc. The younger Mrs. Donaldson asserts she was attached when she called to see her 7-year-old
daughter. She is accompanied by her attorney, John R. K. Scott.
PROHIBITION VOTE
IN HOUSE TONIGHT
IS KEENLY AWAITED
Question of State Rights Ex
pected to Defeat Hobson
Measure After Spirited
Debate,
WASHINGTON. Dec. 22.-Nat!onal-pro-hlbltlon
waa put squarely before the
House this, afternoon. By a viva voce,
voe and without a. demand foraroll
call, tho House 'passed the rule permit
ting" e)ght hqura' debate on the Hobaon
resolution proposing submission to .the
States ot a constitutional amendment for
national prohibition.
By. 9:50 'tonight , a, roll-call record voto
will show whether the Home, by two
tlilrds vote, wants the prohibition question
Phased op to. the States- Defeat of the.
resolution appeared foregone this after
noon. For two hours tho. House had debated
the passage of the-rule, but considering:
Us success a foregone conclusion mem
bers swept Into dlaoasslon of the merits
of the resolution. Itself.
Ssver&l speaker opened-an unexpected
line of attack by polnttne out that the
resolution doea not prevent manufacture
for personal use, but merely for aale.
Under such circumstances, they argued,
the measure merely opens the liquor bus
iness to a wider scope without taxation,
In presenting the, rule, Representative
Henry, of Texas, declared, he Intended to
vote fpr the adoption of the rule, but that
he was opposed o the Hobson resolution.
He was followed by Representative Camp
bell, of Kansas, who urged the passage
of bqth the rule and the resolution. Rep
resentatlye CantrUl, of Kentucky, op
posed the resolution on the ground that
prohibition was & State Instead of a.
national question.
KELLY'S SPpqH APPLAUDED.
Representative Kelly, of Pwinsylvanla,
urged the adoption of the Hobson amend
ment. Ilia spJMtcli was so loudly ap
plauded by tbe antb-calopn workers who
orowded the gallwlM that Speaker dark
warned too ssJa against making;
denMastretteM tt ajrYl ot tba
apaaphaa.
"The ruten t tha ll&um forbid daman
stratlons sitba t agMgvai w dtt,"
4eelard, SpaatEW Clark, "aad tby mast
. The 1Ihm la hr for the trans
ftctiuM uf I u4uM HI d iut tor a. sluxy '
Ei,iaeiiLiln e Uuasun autliur of the
r jUi.ii UJ8-JU a tM( iietv In up
fm or the rut in wbich he 4t.lrHl
tbat owu tbi. I.UW.U0O pfaoa and U.M i
orgwulwitltnui bU iui!oua ti ifouM 1
Majvrtt Leader " - -v,Hjd
DOLLAR BRIDE" ON WAY
MRS. DONALDSON'S HEARING
POSTPONED TO NEXT WEEK
Attorneys Agree to Have Case Oo
Over Until Neat Tuesday.
The hearing' ot Mrs. 'William P. Don
aldson, 2003 Chestnut street, and her
French maid, Miss Fanny Blanc, on a
charge ot assault and battery brought
,by Mrs. Evelyn Donaldson, was post
poned today by Magistrate Beaton.
Neither Mrs. W. F. Donaldson nor her
mafd was preaent'at the hearing-. Mrs,
Evelyn Donaldson arrived profnpTly at
noon, attired In a becoming- blue broad
cloth suit and fox, furs.
David N. Smyth, attorney for Mrs. V.
F. Donaldson, In asking for a postpone
ment said he had only recently been
enguged in the case with M. Hampton
Todd, who accepted services of the war
rant yesterday on behalf of Mrs. Don
aldson and her maid. He said he had
no time to confer with his client. In
agreeing to a postponement John It. K.
Scott, attorney for Mrs. Evelyn Donald
son, said he would waive none of the
rights of his client.
Mr. Smyth said that when the case
came -up next week It was not unlikely
the defense would waive a hearing before,
Magistrate Beaton and let the case go
Immediately to Court. He said it would
not be possible to settle It out of court.
Mr. Scott said that Mr. Todfl, In ac
cepting service of the writ oi habeas
.corpus to show cause why 7-year-old
Dorothy, Mrs, Evelyn Donaldson's daugh
ter, should not be turned over to her
mother, promised to produce the child
within SO days, and said he would be
responsible for the appearance of Mrs.
W. F. Donaldson and her maid.
Mr. Scott showed, today the decree of
divorce from Keith Donaldson that wss
granted Mrs. Donaldson several years
ago at Reno. In it waa a claus provid
ing that Dorothy Donaldson, the daugh
ter, -should remain with her father six;
months put of the iyesx, and with her
mother six months. Theyi were to agree
on some mode pf education. The child
has been living at her grandmother's,
and It waa there, pn Saturday, that her
mother was arrested when she called for
her daughter.
"Billy" Sunday Page
Page 6 in today's. Evening Led.
ger is devoted to the whirlwind
evangelist and his coming cam
paign in Philadelphia. The life and
work ot Mr. Sunday and the elab
orate plans for the local revival are
told in interesting articles. Pictures
of Mr. and Mrs. Sunday and some
of the leaders in the movement.
Boy Scouts Activities
Today's Evening Ledger inaugu
rates) a new department to be de
voted to the Interests of the Boy
Scouts in PfcHadcJiiWa. AU ac
tivities of the raaa-bufldlne organi
sations in tnis section will be re
patVad in tWa dfMtiaat, which
will be printed on Tuesdays and
Fridays of aach waaJc.
Qet acquainted witn both these
btj; itur in the
Evening ijedger Today
TO COURT
.-tvr.-'Ufci
REMOVAL OF STATE
COMMISSION PDT
UP TO GOVERNOR
Commuters and Business
Men Ask Executive to De-
mand Answer From Body
- to Eleven Specific Charges
Governor Tener, up to 2 o'clock this
afternoon, had not received any com
munication from Edward M. Abbott, of
Philadelphia, counsel for the commuters,
atklno the Governor to Investigate the
charges that the Public Service Commis
sion conferred with railroad officials and
agreed upon passenger rates prior to the
Philadelphia hearings.
Mr, Abbott nave the commission until
midnight last night to answer a series
of questions he asked, but as the com
mission as a body has not been notified
officially of the receipt of the questions
and will not meet here until January B,
no action was taken.
Kleven distinct specifications, charging
the members of the Pennsylvania Public
Service Commission with "Inefficiency,
neglect of duty; an,d mlcondust-ln odce"
in the matter of the resent passenger rate
In wr ease hearing, were sent to. Governor
Tener this afternoon by counsel repre
senting the combined committee of the
United Business Men's Association and
the Commuters' Association.
The. petition calls upon Governor Tener
tounyion the Commu-sinars Imme
diately and x4Ulr them to show cause
why they should net be removed from
oitlee on tb basis of the charges pre
fprd. The Conwiisjlonsra named in
thq complaint ar Samuel W. Feeny
paaker, Saury K. JLoiwson. MUfen J.
BHwht, 8. lru Tone, Cfearlw Frederick
Wright and Frank M. WaUaec. The com
plaint was atgnad by Kdwln M. Abbott.
WUa T. Coojper and Muttfcw BandaH.
THst aPHCIFIOATIOXe.
L That tba numbers of the PuWJ Sr
vtc Cojcaptssion failed to eowpJy with
tb rsnuiremenu of Section i. Artiste 6,
of the act of Jul Sets, UU. watch re
Siulres that ' all hearings before the com
mission or befure auy commissioner sbaii
be public, ' In that they did grant oUutr
than imbllo htariug lo the Peniuytranla
kajirufcd i jiiiiju iu MuiadatpUa, and
KtiJmj Kall.u umtjij and too Jtol
UUl itud utllu lvii, oU 'iaysiffy. Of
ttvrtr rressqtsUves. lu re proBWSd la
creas in paasas;er fr and cbne lu
oaasensitr ixifl, uu)Wlui dovkat 415
i. That lOuuseJ lot i us mnlam., ,.u
Wta tMKVM tieUSed oi , UUh ti:J
SHORTEST DAY WITH US "
Sun Farther South Than Any Other
Tlmo in 1014.
Tlie dividends nre loominr Urge In Arms sup
plylns llsht.
And tho o py the bills today brush oft
Todsy the sun Is fr away, he will not come
,up north lo play,
Thla Is the shortest little day of all the lire
Ions year.
Today Is the shortest ot tho 3G5 of 1914,
and accordingly tho best for the electric,
gas and oil companies. Light today is
nt a premium. Tho sun will be farthest
south than any other day In tho year.
Householders who keep n dally account
ot gas, electric or oil consumption may
not bo nbto to note tho difference, but It
Is there. From now on, however, Phila
delphia may look for moro light on every
thing, aa the sun started Its Journey back
at 11127 o'clock this morning.
Just because It la generally Bupposod that
December 21 has first claim on tho short
est day honors does not mako It so. The
experts at tho Naval Observatory, at
Washington, aro responsible for tho
change in tho day. Those gentlemen are
net moro respectors of dates than they
aro of porsons. livery four years they
explain tho year's shortest day falls a
day late.
8o that means, In spite ot tho zero
weather of a few days ngo and the Icy
streets of yesterday morning. It did not
become winter until this morning. Tho old.
gontleman made his annual debut at 11:15
this morning to tho minute.
EX-DIRECTOR CLAY AGAIN
WILL FACE FRAUD CHARGE
Once Convicted With Two Others of
Conspiracy.
Henry Clay, ex-Director of Fublla Safe
ty, onco convicted of conspiracy to de
fraud the city, but granted a now trlel
by the Superior Court, will face a Jury
for tho second time next March, accord
ing to the plans of District Attorney
Hotr.n.
Tho second trial of Clay and his co
defendants, John It. Wiggins and Wlllard
II. Walls, of the contract firm of John
It. Wiggins & Co., will begin Monday,
March 1, 1915, In Room 653. It Is not yet
known what Judge will preside at the
trial, although a Judge from Common
Pleas Court No. 4 Is scheduled to Bit
In Itoom 053 of the Criminal Court dur
ing tho March term. The members of
No. 4 court are Judges Wlllson, Audcn
ried and Corn
On February 1, 1913, ex-Director Clay,
Wiggins and Walls were convicted of
conspiracy to defraud the city of thou
sands of dollars on contracts for the
erection of municipal buildings.) Carl
Zllenzlger, city architect, was acquitted.
Clay and the contractors each were
sentenced by Judge Staples to an In
definite term of not less than 18 months
nor more than two years In the Eastern
Penitentiary and a fine ot $500. An ap
peal to the higher court for another
trial succeeded.
Assistant District Attorney Taulane,
who conducted the first trial, also will
baitejchqrc'j uf-the comfautstiroaedutloiiM
Tio has been engaged several weeks In
preparing' the Commonwealths case.
BURGLAR KILLS RICH MAN
AND WOUNDS HIS SON
Daughter Comes to Rescue and Battle
in Dark Ensues.
LOS ANGELES, Dec. 22.-W. M. Alex
ander, a wealthy retired attorney of this
city, was shot and killed by a burglar
early today In his palatial home In Wll
shlre place, '
In the revolver duel in the dark be
tween the burglar and the capitalist's
son, William Alexander. Jr., Immediately
after the murder ofthe father, the son
received two bullet wounds,
Mr. Alexander's youngest daughter,
Penelope, went to her brother's assist
ance and the two fought with the thug
as he fled down the stairs and escaped,
leaving a trail of Ijlood.
NORSE STEAMSHIP STRIKES
MINE OFF SCARBOROUGH
Another Victim of German Bald.
Eight of Crew Saved.
FILET, Eng Dec 22. The Norwegian
steamer Boston, bound from Oran to
London, with a cargo of timber, struck
a mine off Scarborough today.
It was beached near Fley, where eight
tntn of her crew were landed.
EX-SENATOR WEST DIES
Georgian, Who Succeeded Bacon,
Victim of Heart Disease.
VALDOSTA, as., Dec. ft Former
United States Senator W. S. Wost died
suddenly today of heart disease.
Ex-Senator West was appointed by Gov
ernor Slaton to fill the unexpired term of
the late Senator A. O. Bacon, when the
latter died last year. Ills term expired
November 3. He was succeeded by
Thomas W. Hardwlck,
TRIAL OF COPE POSTPONED
Slayer of Niece Will Face Charge
in Court Next March.
John Cope, of Buckingham. Bucks
County, arrested In thla eity by dstec-
tives on me enarge or murdering his
niece, Florence Cope, will not be brought
to trial until tbe Man term at the
Buaks County Criminal Court, owing to
eongesUon of the criminal csddr of
the court, according to on announcement
made by District Attorney Boyer. of
Buoks County.
Cose, Into In September, shot naA
kMted his uiaca, a student in a business.
OoXsge in this oity. Tbe shooung m
aurd at tbe home of the girl. Cope, who
bad bB drinking previous to tbe widr.
is aUge4 to have leveled a ftsjUa at
tbs gist's Bwthar and miinoMTW be
was gout? to kill her. TdiSju to
old bsr mother, it is 4NbV 55 in
tbs scuffle., thai followed, was sfcot ao4
Pottanmin Bbnt by "Bad .Man
ims sol isms SfS s
ItMAWtt MM & WaA (! 'SSSHiiii, 1.
iria
snk
M4art " snot thfJb d prob
ably Fatally wound . ttroern as
b
ifki WWiAII vl 1&4 .!.-. zt
STARVE ALBM,
GERMANNAYAL
CHIEF'S THREAT
Admiral von Tirpitz De
clares 'Kaiser Has Right to
Wage Submarine War on
Allies Shipping.
American Navy Among Boat of
Nations atd Fulfills Mission
Ho Declares in Exclusive In
terview Blamo3 Britain for
War.
(Copyright in Great Britain.)
By XABL X. VON WIEOAND
anAND antfEItAL IIEADQUAJtTBItS
OP KAISER, in France, Dee. 2, by way
of Tho Haguo to New Tork, Dec. 22
(delayed for ofllclai vlao by General
Staff).
( "America has not raised: its voice in
protest and lias taken llttlo or no action
against England's closing of the Nortli
Sea' to neutral shipping. What will
America say if Germany declares sub
marlno war on nil enemy merchant
ships?"
Grand Admiral on Tirpitz, Mlnlsterof
Marine, regarded, tho strongest man in
the German Government, ?nd possible
next Imperial Chancellor, and whose
marvelous organizing genius Is largely
responsible for Germany's fleet, peered
sharply at mo as he leaned forward and
put tho question to roe In tho first inter
view ho has ever granted an' American
correspondent.
"Why not?" he continued. "England
wants to starve us I We can play tbe
same game. We can bottle it Up and
torpedo every English or Allies' ship
which ncars any harbor In Great Britain,
thereby cutting off largo food supplies."
Admiral vopTlrpltz slowly repeated ths
first question.
, WHAT WOULD V. S. SAYT
"What wouli-Amerlca say7 Would not
such action be only meting out to Ens
land what It is doing to us? Yes!"
After several days at the Crown
Prlnce-'s headquarters,, and In ths Ar
B0un$sila4jnStpredto tho;Kalsw6l,r
'field capital in jrra.ncewher6au theTmln-Stt
lstries anddepartments V the German .
Government aro now located. (Note:
Since this lntrevlew most of the General
Staff returned to Berlin, owing to the.
Kaiser's Illness.)
For once departlngVfrom his rigid ruls
not to talk with newspaper men, Admiral
von Tirptts received me In a private
house, the home of a French banker
who fled beforo the German advance, and,
on the door of which was a cardboard,
sign, "Marina Department."
Mentally and physically, von Tlrplti is
a magnificent Teuton, He has a mind
of steel trap order, Is a marvelous or
ganizer and has more Bismarcktan fores
and Iron in his nature than any other
German ofllclai I have met He imme
diately plunged into an analysis of his
view ot the causes that led to the war,
and traced the growth of sea and world
power developed by England until, as he
put It, "the domineering arrogance of
the British culminated In the present war
which England engineered In order to
crush the natural growth and develop
ment of the power of the German Eta
plre."
GEItMANY FOB, PEACE.
"Britain's domination ot the sea," ha
declared, "was originally founded on
piracy, while its power on land was
established by robbery In all parts ot
the wprld. England and England alone
Is responsible for this war. Did Germany
want anything? Did Qermany make any
demands on any oneT Did Germany
have any quarrel with any one? Hoi
it only wanted to be let alone to con-.
Unue her peaceful growth of develop
ment."
"England's anti-Germany policy
bask as far as IJJ0. after our victory
over France," continued the illn
"Always dictatorial and domineer)??, U
uldjyt want Germany to expanay com
merclatly or to take the plaeain the
world to which Us pewer entltld it
"Bngland Is Impartial. It wllr cut any
one's thrdat wSB gets in Its yay Eng
land has no white man's scruples. Its
alliance with Japan shows that It will
form an alliance with anyone, regard
less of race or color ifit can croflt
thereby. Germany was developing too
fast, growing too Btrong and too power
ful, and waa getting In England's way,
so Its throat had to be cut that's it in
a nutshell. King Edward laid plans far
It years ago. He bad an Inexplicable
antipathy to Germany. Ho. looked about
and seised upon the giowlny pan&tatlsm
i
Concluded on Vase Tw
LOST AN tf QU2q
a4vertMc7B tbe nwestas Irsdiw or nswctsd
t tu emjui ana reuse rrowtw - a tyrssr
Cut! WlU t 1UU4 fer.Kt Saxs. Tb llta
In fistic. SUt u4
'vomit' aStt4-
(Aaawc l , ,! .!. S '
JIT-.- r.
r -t .m zt: te2
G4M sssjsi
n .. r Aft Mas- nAa or ran tus
icily to ! CMWU. am w
iia sew.
riH I ,1... W, OT.-? -Hm
. . .... lr,..i..-rt. ii
f via. taiipUra ana S". on CKSi
i" W JSXL.
SSVSirtl If KWVHraASja. W WiaiS w
",-mizi:
gyaifcgam
H N UsUg-i w. w
isbVJS
oo.
, mi laT &rti-e-
.-. . k. nit .a t Ar muiU Ka-n.t
ft a n - oaw mw " 75r JLa
M Si i- ox brMJ t is C
i ctliiLst
9 tsd- Ttisa
Vl K-sr lu tl mlM- fc P3SStJ
nri U i$Muad i T ' V .Ut
K k'KiJrfM&O &
as
klTT Jafi rT r Ktwrti C4jsH -: Hi T.
i.i .&
tJW " Mt-Aft
tomtsk ic I tferf 1 ks
JdPtt
IT
ILulUX wi Xw
u wyai, ua, ai ipu. CMl AsS

xml | txt