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Evening public ledger. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, October 08, 1917, Final, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045211/1917-10-08/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. IV. NO. 21
PHILADELPHIA, MONDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1917
PRICE TWO CENTS
CortiuanT, Ion, bt tii rctio Lrtxjt- Comi-ii
e
BULLIVAN TAKEN ON ISLE;
BIG WITNESS FOR ROTAN
!man who hired thugs
"POPS UP" IN COURT; JOLTS
DEFENSE WITH TESTIMONY
y :
gfel O'Farrell Operative, Caught on Quiet by
District Attorney, Tells of Importing
Gunmen $50 'Set as Price for
Blackjacking Job
t
tThugs Will Tell Court of Doings in Fifth Ward on Election
Day McNichol Anxious to Testify Maloney
Habeas Corpus Hearing Postponed
to Monday
Eight high points stood out today on the fifth day of the hearing of
"murder conspiracy charges against Mayor Smith and his eight codefendants,
rising from, the killing of Detective George A. Eppley by New York gunmen
in the "Bloody Fifth" Ward during the primary election of September 19.
They were:
1 Michael J. Sullivan, private detective and long-sought go-between in
hiring of gunmen, suddenly was produced in court as a Commonwealth's
witness by District Attorney Rotan after mysterious silence of his w here
abouts, during which city police directed countrywide search for him.
2"Frojr Hollow" gunmen were brought to Philadelphia at personal
solicitation of Isaac Deutsch, Sullivan declared, corroborating testimony
Of Samuel G. Maloney, his chief.
3 Alleged conspirators agreed upon price of $50 for each "strong-arm"
man to do twodays' work, according to Sullivan.
4 Sullivan was arrested by District Attorney's men late last Saturday
night on island near Delaware Water Gap, where he was hiding,
brought to city by automobile and secreted until today.
11 . C Lee Ellmaker, secretary to Congressman William S. Vare, went to
'fie e npntsrh rluh twice before election and delivered mefssairen nq neronnnl
representative of State Senator Vare.
r State Senator McNichol, anxious to testify as soon as his healtht
permits, said he would "stick" until persons responsible for preventable
murder and thuggery arc brought to justice.
rj Third effort of police to get possession of Samuel G. Maloney, star
ftP' wftness"f or ComnaUhTrA"itedvlIen', argument on writ of-'habeSsrH
corpus w&b postpohedlintU rieXt Monday, and his bail was renewed at $10,000.
Q Police Captain Kenny threatened to "get a shot at" James A. Carey
before election, according to fire lieutenant, who said Deutsch and
William E. Fihley offered him captaincy if he would help Deutsch.
;SVTS"
Rowland and Comiskey
Hope to Win Series in
Four Straight Victories
ROTAN COUP CREATES SENSATION
The appearance of Sullivan, private detective for the Val O'Farrell Detective
Agency, created a sensation shortly after court was reconvened at 10:30 o'clock
Jthis morning by President Judge Charles L. Brown in the criminal branch
' of the Municipal Court.
For the first time the man who personally negotiated with the "strong-arm"
Smen was brought face to face with tho nine defendants Mayor Thomas B.
Smith, Executive Director William E. Finley, of the Republican City Com
ratttee; Common Councilman Isaa'c Deutsch, Varo-Smith "boss" in the Fifth
.Wardj Police Lieutenant David "Bennett" (Steinberg), Special. Policeman John
I Wirtschafter and Michael Murphy and Policemen Emanuel Uram, Lewis Feld-
Ban and Clarence Hayden, the negro.
SULLIVAN CAUGHT IN TENT
The testimony of Sullivan, who is a former New York Assemblyman, ren-
itsentlnj: the Bronx, was not ns sensational as the news of his arrest. His
FUstimony, which corroborated, that of Samuel G. Maloney, head of the Val
lOTarrell agency here, that Deutsch negotiated for the thugs, was overshadowed
Iby the sensation that followed when the fugitive from justice was called upon
ito take the witness stand.
Sullivan was arrested late Saturday night on a warrant accusing him of
murder conspiracy after a country-wide search for him. Tho arrest took place
Slate Saturday night ns the fugitive slept in a tent on a little island near the
Delaware Water Gap, midway in the Delaware River between New Jersey
wa Pennsylvania, where he worked in a lumber camp. Through a letter
written by Sullivan, District Attorney Rotan learned of his whereabouts and
jaletly sent Assistant District Attorney James Gay Gordon, Jr., and' District
Attorney's Detective Joseph McClain to tho place. Sullivan was brought 'to
tbic city by automobile and kept in concealment until half an hour before
mg called upon to testify.
CAPTAIN TATE SURPRISED
Captain of Detectives 'Tate almost fell out of his chair when told that
iSallivanwas in court.
Sullivoh" was called as a witness for the Commonwealth by Judge Gordon.
Sullivan testified that the eunmen from New York were brought to Phila-
llphia at the solicitation of Isaac Deutsch, defeated Vare candidate for Repub
lican nomination for Councils in the Fifth Ward.
It was Deutsch. according to Sullivan, who nersonallv went to the office
tSamuel G. Maloney, Philadelphia manager of the Val O'Farrel Agency, in the
?1 Estate Trust Building, and asked' for the men. And it was also Deutsch,
WHvan insisted, who requested that the gunmen imported from New York
would be "strong and husky."
uransel for the defense strenuously objected that Sullivan should testify
ntil he has had a chance to consult with his counsel.
! bulllvan told the court he expected no immunity from the prosecution. He
Hid ht Was reftrlv tn toll nil anA olll Hio nnotliinn Vo mirrnf cor- nmv iv.i.rlit
jjK wed against him later.
Legal tilts between Judge Gordon and William Connor, of counsel for the
ISe, Were freauent. .TuHitp Gnrrlnn finnllv fiirneH Viia bnek to Mr. flnnnnr
r "id, "K,ecp silent. Let the witness tell his story."
As SlltllVnn kun. J.. It., il.. ..:.li. xi. i r...i t. j .. .1. - -m
4, ". Mvnan w uc&crpue uie visit uiuv icuvocii nmuo 10 111c unites
J the Val O'Farrel detective agency, the seven gunmen under arrest were
(tit into the COUrt room henvllv hnnHriiflTed nnd trnnrded hv twpntv.fivp.
stives,
QUUlVail admitted th.Af. I10 una tn mnn ftariiarttlir name1 in ino nnnfaceinna
lntd frOm the minmin Ihnf dluJ 4V, ". -.,, m.n r,r,A AoUlyvrnA !,
Jiimnie' Clark, the "mnn with .. ..hn v.nA .nn if v.om n.
wion day. He bought the famous white ribbons used to identify ihe thugs,
aid. H
Sullivan detailed hnur h wax . vt.., v.i, i... xrainn... i.;. i,if
i. , " " oltv k illinr i) .jm.u.iu;, ilia iiuvi,
I 1? 1 eh men wanted by DeuUch. DeuUch, he said, was introduced to
r. ","MJ" ice two days before the murder at the time wheif Maloney
ft.tra.Us
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George A. Persch wob present.
ng his (nstrUpHnna .QnllNrnn .t.l 1. ,.,., f tn V0.1. V1- nn 7
train that (Mohday) night arriving there at 9 oclock. About 10 o'clock,
SULLIVAN AND ELLMAKER ON STAND
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CIC0HE TO PITCH
IN GAME TOMORROW
SOX ARE
FINE
ROBERT W. MAXWELL
NKW YOUK. Oct 8
Those Joy-ridlne. lctorlous Whlto Sot
have arrhed. Despite the gloom without
there una sunshine and gladness on the
White Sox special. The tattler carry Ine
Chicago's- pennant hopes as passing
thiuugh a heavy rainstorm near Syracuse.
JI iiiager Ilowland tool; time from his pleas
ure chats to answer an important Interview
"Who will pitch jour third game?" was
asked
"Cicotte." teplled the Sox leader without
hesitation.
The man who has turned the trkk of
making a piobable pennant winner out of
Comlskey's amalgam ited and tempera
mental team was then queried about his
lionco.
"Hope we win four straight," r.eplled the
Sox leader.
"Them's mj sentiments," chorused f,eeral,
ball players who were standing near In
fact, this sentiment seems to be imanlmous
on the special, and It's the feeling of Chirles
A comiskey, president of the club. Commy
wlll lose a barrel of coin If his men win
In four straight, but he declared yesterday
he was out after four In a row.
Daseball plajers today were- discussing
the Interesting ecnts at Comiskey Park ter
mlnatlng In their one-sided victory bunaay
The crowd of early birds seemed to Interest
them most. , ,
One fan, who had come eaily and re
mained wrapped In a blanket for sixteen
hours In order to see the first game, had
watched the battle and immediately went
straight back Into the line for the second
game. Last night he was seen, blanket In
hand, near Comiskey Park.
"Why don't you go back Into line for the
third game at Comiskey Park?" was asked
"There won't be any third game here,
replied this ardent booster of the Sox who
had come all the way from Los Angeles
to see Chicago trim the Giants. . That argu
ment was conciusie.
"You win," said Buck eaer,
you nae me riK"- ui.
lXerylhlng went along smoothly on the
"Sox special.
jolly mood
"Hope
Th nlners seemed In a
'.iiip nnnetltes seemed unim
paired and' Trainer Buckner reported no
casualties,
SEEK EIGHT STOLEN dUTOS .
Police Looking for Thieves Operating
in Different Parts of City
Klght automoblleTere stolen In differ
ent parts of the city yesterday and are
hMnir sought by the police
The Stolen cars belonged to the follow
l,J Vred C Peters. Ardmore. stolen from
fei, of Schuylkill: 11 Iss Elsie S. Howe,
mi mtnutBtree Harry Mccormick 4X34
York ad; Henry Maxman, 3439 Frankford
avenue; H. T. Uphouse, of Drexel road;
David Pottasht Clayton, N. J.. B, Jr.
Murnrty 10 North Twenty-first street, and
" jl Dougherty. 721 North Thlrty-fifth
ktxfe- hmV the window of the jewelry
store of CharJe. C. Braur, and stole a tray
nf rings valued at J8U0. 'Another negro
Monned Charles Knox, of Thlrty-lxth street
and Lancas
his pockets.
arid Lancaster avenue, and took J161 from
ItMfiAl 1.. . .V
lh- f mt a !. mamuu! "TVubU'
wh5se last name, he thought was
WILSON STAYS IN CAPITAL
WASHINGTON, Oot . Although
deluged with Invitation! to make ftddraMca
In all parts of the country, President Wilson
plans to remiln In Washington all the time
Congress tnt. It w learned at the
White House this afternoon.
" n hi nflr time after his labors In co.
JSSHSBSB
QUICK NEWS
BASEBALL SCORES POST-SEASON GAMES
CINCINNATI, N. L.... OOOOOOOOO 0 73
CLEVELAND, A. L. . . . O 2 2 2 0 1 0 1 x 8 10 0
Toney, Wingo mid Sinlui; Klepler nnd O'Nell.
BT. 10UIS, N. h O 0000123 0 0 10 0
ST. LOUIS, A. L 00000010 0 1 4 !
Packard nnd Snyder; Dnvenpoit nnd ITnitley.
ADDITIONAL RACING RESULTS
Second Louisville ince, mile and 70 yards Fell Swoop, 112, Wil
liams, $0.00, S2.80, $2.70, wou; Prospector, 112, Gentry, $2.50, $2.-10,
second; Avis, 100, Connelly, $3.10, third. Time, 1.-17 2-5.
Thlul Louisville race, 5 1-2 furlough rrank Wilson. 103, Mar
tin, $7.80, $3.00, $3.70, won; Lady Luxury, 108, Steams, $1.80,
$4.00, second; Quaitctte, 103, Hanover. $5.30, third. Time. 1.09 1-5
Fourth Louisville race, 1 1-10 miles Warsaw, 102, Douohue,
$0.30, $2.40, out, won; Glpsey George, 112, Connolly, $1.00, out, sec
ond; Bac, 100, Disunion, out, third. Time, 1.48.
rifth Louisville race, 0 furlongs Tom Anderson, 110, Shilling,
$11.80, $5.10, $3.00, won; Ophelia, 111, Maitln, $5.00, $1.00, second;
Jocular, 105, Hownid, $5.00, third. Time, 1.14 4-5.
Sixth Laurel race, 1 1-10 inilet Hairy Lauder, 112, F. Robin
son, $8.10, $4.10, $3.10, won; Tranby, 100, Kownn, $3.80, $2.10.
second; Impression, 117, Stirling, $3.00, third. Time. 1.40.
Seventh Laurel race, mile and 70 ynrdb Tfc Pin. 103, Ciuise.
$0.70, $5.30, $3.00, won; Marianne, 103, Kownn, $5.70, $1.20. htc
oiid; Lady Moll. 102, A. Collius. $4.40, third. Time, 1.45.
FATHER OF GRANT RICE DIES
NASHVILLE, Tenn., Oct. 8. Boiling II. Rice, St, blxty-two,
retired cotton bioker and father of Grantlund Rice, spoiting writer,
ut New York, died here today.
GERMANS MASS MEN AND GUNS FOR BLOW AT DVINSK
PETIIOGHAD, Oct. S The Germans are again showing great activity in the
region of DUnsk. ncconllng to news from the front today. Bodies of troops and
nrtllleij nre lielnjr concentrated there by the Germans. The Government Is warned
that the GeimanH muj be planning a blow ngalnst the fortress of Dvlnsk on the
Dvlna niver Hint Mould endanger Petrograd.
MAY RENEW RUSSO-AMERICAN COMMERCIAL PACT
PKTllOGltAJD.tCcXfi-NegiUlalkuiB-are today In progress between the Uusso
.rnerlcan committee and Important Russian commercial organisations with a view
to renewing the commercial treaty between the United States and this country that
was abrogated some time before the war broke out over the question of Jewish passports,
( DATE SET IN DRAFT LAW CONSTITUTIONALITY CASES
WASHINGTON. Oct. 8, In accordance with a motion by Solicitor General Davis
last week, the United States Supreme Court today set the eight cases Involving the
constitutionality of tho selective draft law for hearing on December 10 next'. It Is
likely that a decision on the alldlty of the law will be handed down as soon after
that date as possible, probably before the Christmas recess.
The upper photograph is that of
Michael Sullivan, private detective,
who negotiated with the New York
gunmen who were brought into the
Fifth Ward. He was produced as a
witness by the prosecution this
morning after having been kept
under cover since the shooting of
Detective Eppley. Lee Ellmaker is
the private scretary of William S.
Vare. He admitted having made
several speeches at the Deutsch,
club.
BASEBALL CHIEFS "
INP.R.R. COLLISION
Herrmann and Tener Jolted
When Limited and
Freight Crash
TWO TRAINMEN INJURED
BEAVER FALLS. Pa., Oct. 8.
Cairjlng Garry Herrmann, president of
the National Baseball Commission, and
John K. Tener, president of the National
League, en route to New York for the third
game of the world series, the Pennsyhanla
Limited Train No. ;, eastbound from Chi
cago, crashed Into a freight train near here
early today.
Neither Herrmann nor Tener, who were
traveling with their secretaries, were In
jured, Both were severely jolted, however
Two trainmen probably were fatally In
jured. One passenger, Thomas JIcNamara,
of Jersey City, was slightly hurt. The in
jured trainmen are James Jacobs, of North
Unlonvllle, O., whose skull was fractured,
and Ernest Genney, of Marlon, O, C. V.
Jlylon, engineer of the freight, suffered a
broken arm.
Early reports that both the Giant and
White Sox teams were on the train were
erroneous.. Tho teams were traveling over
another road.
The wreck Is said to have been caused
through a misunderstanding of orders.
At "Ky" tower, two miles from the scene
of the wreck, the limited was switched
to a track on which railroad officials de
clare tratnc waff carried In both directions.
The limited Is said to have- been traveling
at foTty miles an hour when the crash
came. That none of the passengers was
killed Is attributed to the fact that the
coaches were of steel construction. Two
coaches on the limited, the combination
Continued on Pure TMrtern, Column On
'JIM
The Continuation of the Story
"Germany, the Next
Republic?"
by
Curl W. Athermm
GERMAN SHIPS MASS FOR ATTACK ON HELSINGFORS
LONDON. Oct. 8. Reports of an attack on Helslngfors and thence against
Petrograd bv combined land and sea forces nie apparently confirmed by the pres
ence of strong German naval foices off the Island of Bornholm in the Baltic and off
the Swedish coast. A traveler who haj arrived at Stockholm says he learned from a
trustworthy source that considerable German forces are soon to be assembled In
the Baltic, including numerous mine-swecpeis, seaplanes and transports.
CONTRACTS SIGNED FOR DESTROYERS COSTING 5350,000,000
WASHINGTONVOct. 8. Contiacts for tho huge number of destroyers for which
an emergency nppioprlutlon of $350,000,000 was provided very tecently have all
been signed, It was announced today at the Navy Department. The number of de
stroyers contracted for and the companies to which the contrncts were awarded
were withheld, but they may be published later. It Is known that the estimate was
based on a plan to build at least ISO In addition to the present force.
NEW LOAN TO ENGLAND MAKES TOTAL $2,333,100,000
WASHINGTON, Oct. 8. The United States today made a loan of $15,000,000
to Great Britain, it was announced at the Treasury Department. This brings tho
total of United States loans to the Allies to $2,533,400,000.
OPEN VIRGINIA MEDICAL COLLEGE TO WOMEN
RICHMOND, Va Oct. 8. The Medical College of Virginia is to open its doors
to women nt the next session. This has been decided by the faculty, and women will
bo given chances to study medicine, pharmacy and dentistry' in separate classes from
men. Women can practice their profession In this State at this time.
STRIKING SWITCHMEN RETURN TO WORK
CHICAGO, Oct. 8. After being on strike two weeks, switchmen employed in
the Gary nnd South Chicago yards of the Elgin, Jollet and Eastern Railroad re
turned to work today. The men agreed to return to work at the wage scale in
effect before the strike and to submit their demands for Increased pay to arbitration.
POPE WOULD END AIR ATTACKS ON CITIES
GENEVA, Oct. 8. rauslng In ills peace efforts. Pope Benedict XV is now work
ing to end air attacks against unfortified cities in which only noncombatdnts suffer,
said a dispatch 'rom Rome today. It Is understood that representations have already
been made to Berlin nnd Vienna with a view to stopping German raids over English
and French soil and Austro-Hungarlan attacks against open Italian cities. The
Pontlf believes if the Central Powers discontinue their raids the Allies will not engage
in reprisals,
CUSTOMS COLLECTORS ORDERED TO SAVE FOOD
WASHINGTON. Oct. 8. The Government has found another way to save food.
The Treasury today Instructed all collectors of customs to discontinue the practice of
destroying food products abandoned to the Government because of nonpayment of
duty or other reasons. Collectors are Instructed to save food which can be used in
whole or in part for human or animal consumption.
PACT BINDS SWEDEN TO SELL ORE TO GERMANY
WASHINGTON, Oct. 8. From a trustworthy source it is reported Sweden is
bound by treaty to export to Germany 5,000,006 tons yearly of her high phosphorous
iron ore. The treaty, made in 1911, has not yet been presented In the negotiations
between Sweden's representatives here and Vance C. JlcCormlck. chairman of the
Exports Administration Board. Sweden seeks American food, but it is said no food
will be permitted to' enter Swedish territory as long as that country sends to Ger
many the Iron ore used to make shells to shatter American lines.
CLIFTON PUTS WHOLE INCOME IN LIBERTY BONDS
BUFFALO, N. T., Oct 8. President Charlis Clifton, of tho Plerce-Arrow Motor
Car Company, plaps to invest his entire income, rnlnus-uctual expenses. In the. sec
ond issue of Ubttty Lean bonds. He notified Walter P. Cook, chairman of the, local
Liberty Lo bemtnlttM, today, ot his plans. He 'will mmUm pynU on tha ka.
TEUTONS POUND
IN VAIN AGAINST
FLANDERS LINE
Renewed Infantry Charge
East of Polygon Wood
Driven Off
HAIG TAKES PRISONERS
8000 RUSSIAN MUTINEERS
SUBDUED BY COSSACKS
PETROGRADS, Oct. 8. Cossacks were
sent against 8000 soldiers at Gomel, in the
province ot Mohlley. who refused to go tt
the front. The soldiers had become dis
orderly, and to prevent excesses they were
surrounded by Cossacks. The troops
promptly surrendered.
The railway men's congress hat given Its
approval to the strike on all the railway
lines, ns decided updn by the railway men's
committee, the congress declaring that the
strike does not run contrary tn the Interests
of the Stato, as a refusal of the Govern
ment to grant the demands of the men for
an Increase In wages threatens to preclpl?
tate conditions of anarchy on the lines. The
congress, however, has agreed that the
strike shall not affect the railways serving;
the fighting front.
Premier Kerensky telegraphed the rail
way men Friday that their demands wouls!
Continued on late Pmn, Column Htitq
THE WEATHER
FORECAST
. For Philadelphia and vicinity: Vntet
tied tonight, with probably some light '
rain, follmecd fcj colder; Tuesday fair "
and colder gentle wetterlv urtndt.
For eastern j?enmvlvania and Keto
Jersey Light rain this afternoon or fo
night, colder, Tuesday fair and muck
colder, gentle west to northwest cinds.
IKXOTIl OF IIAY
Sun riM IM a. tn. I Sun sot ,.538 p
DEIAWAKK RIVKK THW CHANWW
CHJCSTNUT BT)ET
Tjavr irtr..J:e . !-
. w. i
English Troops Make Successful
Night Raid East of Monchy.
Allied Drive Awaited
t i
LONDON, Oct. 8.
Get man Infantry was once again in ac
tlon ngalnr new Hrltlsh positions In Vlan
der and once again unsuccessfully Field
Mnishal Halg reported today.
"Between Hollebeke and Broodselnde,
after a heavy enemy barrage yesterday at
dusk east of Polygon wood. Infantry action
developed," ho said. "The enemy was
driven off and a few taken prUoner."
The British commander-in-chief likewise
reported a successful raid by his troops
east of Monchy during the night.
For two days now press dispatches from
the western front have Indicated a heavy
artillery Are from both British and French
guns. On the British front, the Germans
replird with a bombardment of only slight
Intensity. Up to last night, however, sleet,
rain and spits of snow on parts of the
French front made Infantry attacks un
faornblr. The unabated violence of the Allies' fir
led to belief here today that the British
and French are starting the artillery prep
aration for a combined assault.
A press dispatch from .Paris today said:
"The line of heights dominating the Vpree
basin from Warneton to Broodselnde have
all been In possession of the British since
Field Marshal Halg's big smash last Thurs
day, and only feeble efforts could be put
forward by the Germans to regain them.
That section of the Germany army beaten
back In the fighting Thursday and Thurs
day night was plainly demoralized.
"The key position of Broodselnde, on the
Passchendaele Ridge, was among the first
of the German points of support taken when
the British swept forward on Thursday
morning. Broodselnde lies sixty yards above
the sea level and Is the highest pinnacle
on the ridge. Now It Is the British who
hold the ground dominating the Router
plain instead of the Germans."
Advices from Amsterdam, telling of Ger
man troop moempnts. Indicated that Von
Hlndenburg has already begun a rectifica
tion of the German front In Belgium, with
drawing his troops from the positions en
dangered by the latest British victory.
BAKER PREDICTS VICTORY
IF GOOD WEATHER HOLDS
WASHINGTON'. Oct 8.
Germany's U-boat bases along the Bel
gian coast will be throttled If good weather
holds out on the Flanders front
That epitomizes today Secretary of War
Baker's official war prediction based on
confidential reports to the War College.
Germany, massing her troops most
heavily to resist the British drive, begin
to see the handwriting on t.e wall, de
clares the report. But the Allies, even,
stronger In men and having the prepon
derance In aircraft and shells, are pushing
steadily, surely and Irresistibly through to
the railroad feeders of the U-boat bases.
All now needed to smother these sub
marine nests. In the opinion of the Secre
tiry nnd his military expert aid. Is con
tinuance of open weather. In fact, winter
setB in early on the grim west line. Rain
are due soon, and when they come the bril
liant, dogged smashing must cease. But
before that time the British expect to con
tinue their successes and perhaps develop
something truly decisive.
The slacking of U-boat operations may
be In part accounted for by the British
successes and their menace to the bases,
though experts warn that Germany may
be temporarily low on torpedoes and she li
merely replenishing for a new sea drve
along the American supply lanes.
A few lines from Baker's weekly war
summary, painting a hopeful color tn the
war situation, are:
"The defeats Inflicted upon the German
during the past fortnight are conclusive in
dications ot Allied superiority. The full suc
cess ot these operations means that thu
Belgian coast, with Its numerous submarln
bases, will become untenable to the enemy.
Zcebrugge, Ostend and the system of canal
leading out of Bruges are threatened. If
time permits and the combat season re
mains open, with the weather continuing
favorable for reconnaissance and careful
aircraft obsenatlon, the allied victories ot
the last two weeks will In all probability'
be repeated and extended,"
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