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Evening public ledger. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, May 29, 1918, Final, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045211/1918-05-29/ed-1/seq-1/

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Thursday, parity cloudy
TEMrKHATt'HB AT EArW WOt
18 1 9 110 111 I 12 t 1 I 2 I 3 I I I 6
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VOL. IV. NO. 220
PHILADELPHIA, WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 1918
CnrrmoiiT. litis. r Tim Pt Mir l.rtxirn Compant
PRICE TWO
,1
1
i
i
fc
Vi
PENNSYLVANIA
LEADS STATES
m COAL QUOTA
Only Commonwealth to Re
ceive Greater Allotment
Than Asked
GETS 8,059,700 TONS;
NONE FOR 24 STATES
Distribution Is Announced at
Final Session of Na-
tional Body
COMMANDEERING HINT
Must Produce Enough or Give
Up Mines, Warns New
President
Anthracite Allotment
Among Atlantic States
Comparison of the actual distri
bution of anthracite to Pennsjlva
nla and nearby States. In the coal
year of 1916.17, and the Goernment
allotment for the curient coal year,
announced today, is shown below:
1916-17 'Allotment
N'ewYork.. ..14,169,809 16,855.300
New Jersey .. 1.961,622 5,460,784
Pennsylxnnla. 6,815,650 8.059,700
Delaware . .. 223.503 245.853
Maryland 933,889 1,027,317
Dlst. of Colum 517.760 665,800
Virginia 256,000 102,400
Pennsylvania is the only State to
which the Government has officially
allotted more anthracite for consump
tion this year than was asked by its
fuel administrator,
Twenty-foui States hive had their
supplies of hard coal shut off entirely,
while Pennsylvania will get between
now and April 1, 1919, 232.970 tons
more than requested by William Pot
ter, State administrator.
Mr. Potter asked 7.828,730 tons as
Pennsylvania's allotment for this year.
He was ei anted 8,039,700 tons. The
Increased allotment was glv'en this
State because of its importance as a
war-work center, with a network of
war-industry plants stretching from
one end of the State to the other.
Announcement of the- allotment was
made by the anthracite committee of
the Federal fuel administration, made
up of Joseph B. Dickson, S. D. War
riner and William .1. Richards. Chair
man Dickson made the announcement
at this afternoon's bession of the Na
tional Coal Association, now meeting
ct the Bellevue-Stiatford. At the same
time he told of allotments for other
sections of the country.
Hint of Commandeering
Another feature of this afternoon's
cession was a warning that unless the
operators produce sufficient coal the
Government will commandeer the
mines for the duration of the war.
This prediction was uttered by J. H.
Wheelwright, Baltimore, who was to
day elected president of the associa
tion. Anthracite miners of Pennsylvania
and other States will waive their holi
day tomorrow and mine cdal to help
ward off a shortage next winter. The
national association was so advised
today by William Potter, whose pro
posal of Memorial Day mining had
been approved by Frank J. Hayes,
president of the United Mine Workers
of America.
If the American people are to have
an adequate supply of anthracite next
winter. It is "highly important and
very necessary," In the belief of the
Federal fuel- administration, that the
available labor supply for the mines
hall be increased both in volume and
effectiveness.
This statement was made by Chair
man Dickson during his address at the
convention.
"There are new demands of an Im
perative kind for anthracite," said Mr.
Dickson. "At the same time the war,
through the draft and even In larger
ways, has drawn down the anthracite
mine workers from 175,000 to about
145,000. A further reduction In the
force, which Is' already down to a point
where It restricts the production of
coal, Is going on and is most threaten
ing." New Allotment Plan
Mr. Dickson outlined to the coal
operators a new plan of allotment and
distribution of anthracite coal for the
present year, under which Pennsyl
vania's supply will be Increased 18.25
per cent, making, jthe State's total
supply for the next twelve months
1,069,700 tons.
'The allotment, he said, had become
n imperative need. States with an
available supply of bituminous coal
will suffer the biggest reductions In
their supply of anthracite-. Needs of
the war industries have been given
first consideration In the plan of dls
trlbutlon. In the New England. States
the anthracite supply will be Increased
from 8.83J.J79 tons 10 9,833,879 tons.
The AtlantlcStates also will have a
greater supply-31,417,154 tons this
year as against 27,8,18,238 tons' last
year. Army and( navy camps and
v cantonments will be restricted to 600,.
L aaa .- MtHtafltA Thft linnlv fn
K-Ai..- ifM.4 ia1a 1111. TBI tun
. WfijffrT . ,t ""--. ' , "
Another Record Set
by Hog Island Boys
Another record wai shattered
today at Hog Tsland.
Within three and a half hours
'after the twenty second keel was
laid, 14S tons of steel had been
bolted Into place, and the work
was held up several minutes by an
accident to a derrick.
One hundred and nine men set
this record. They were under the J
direction of J. J. Blandfoid. super
intendent of the first five nays.
The keel was laid on May 5.
The best previous record was
made yesterday, when 190 tons of
steel was laid. But th.it work re
quired nearly eight houis.
NAVAL OFFICER
ruAor.rn with
m-"'" V w I
HOARDING FOOD
11 1 tt-t t? . tj
He and Wife Experts in Pro
pnrcdtless Home Resembled
Warehouse
Wa.lilntttnn, Ma 29
The first indictment for food hoarding
In the United States was returned today
agalnbt a United States naval officer.
Medical Director F T. Nash, U. S N
and his wife, Caroline.
An inventory taken at his residence
showed $2000 vvorthrf supplies on hand,
Including two tons of sugar, one-halt
ton of rice, one-half ton of flour, 700amore definite support will be Riven
pounds of ham and bacon, hundreds of l1 seeking to throw off the Austrian
cans of meats, fish, vegetables and, Th-e EtatPnient a tno
fruits, many quarts of cordials, chain- "The Secretary of State desires to
munrs. wlnps. whlsUv and hrandv. and 'announce that the proceedlncs of the
even tea. oysters, sal,, talcum ,-'
ana snaring tuup were iuuiiu m h :.
quantities.
BODIES OF AVIATORS ARRIVE
Local Men Were Victims of Air
plane Collision
--The bodlts of Lieutenant William
-. lie iiuuivn vi wnmiiinni tnin.ni
Besse Kuen. Cynvvyd. and Private Wll- ,
nam w. snyner, '" ,onn smw
llch w.h-?w..re-k'"'4,;ine.n...t.'.eirJ!;l.r:l
nlanes collided at Blch Kleld, treat
Waco, Tele., wero brought home today
on the same train.
S. Eugene Kuen, father of Lieutenant
Kuen, and a brother of Private Snyder
met tne train.
The two caekets. draped with Amer
ican flags and floral tributes, arrived at
North Philadelphia station at 11:53,
and ns thev were lemoved from the
car passengers and bystanders stood
witn Dow en neau as tnry were lanen to
the undertaker's carriages.
Lieutenant M A Sharp, roommate of
Lieutenant Kuen, accompanied thc
bodies.
AIR MAIL PLANE THRILLS
Crowds in City's Center See
Pretty Glide Toward Bustlcton
Lieutenant Kllgore, piloting the mall
plane from Washington to Philadelphia,
thrilled thoubands of persons in the cen
tral business district this afternoon.
Thousands of feet in the all, the plane
passed over the city's center peon after
one o'clock. . At It passed It started a
downward Tilde which landed it at the
Bustleton Field at "1:32.
Lieutenant Bonsall, from New York,
arrived at 12:12, and Lieutenant Culver
continued the trip to Washington, de
parting at 1:17. Lieutenant Miller took
thc Washington mall to New York.
Airplane mall service was stamped a
success today by the Postofflce Depart
ment with the completion erf vthe first
two weeks of aerial mall flights between
Washington, Philadelphia and New
York.
SCHWAB HERE TONIGHT
Director General of Emergency
Fleet to Attend Dinner
Charles M. Schwab, director .general of
the Kmergency Fleet Corporation, and
Kdvvard Hurley, of the shipping board,
will arrive here thu evening.
Mr. Schwab left Washington at 2-40
o'clock on the Pennslvanla, and arrives
here at 6:03 o'clock. He will attend to
personal business, and tonight will at
tend a dinner given by W, H. Donner, of
the Donner Steel Company, at the Belle-vue-Stratford
Mr. Schwab will make an effort to
night to get away for New York, where
he will spend the rest of the week. He
exnects to return to Philadelphia early
next Monday and start into business at
his new offices at 140 North Broad
street. ,
Mr. Hurley also will attend the Donner
dinner. Mr. Hurley will spend tomor
row (Memorial Day) In Philadelphia
taking a partial vacation. He expects to
return to Washington on Friday.
NO PRIVATE CARLOAD COAL
Sales at Mines for Individual
Family Use Forbidden
Wealthy families of Philadelphia who
In the past have been purchasing coal
in car lots, direct from the mines, must
hereafter buy from retailers, un1r an
order issued today by State Fuel Ad
ministration Potter.
Francis A. Lewis, city, fuel adminis
trator, announced the new order and
said he would enforce it,
. Mr. Lewis sald'Bll preferential ship
ments would be cut off, the rule being
that every consumer get tne same treat
ment in procuring fuel for the winter.
Wealthy people who have Urge houses
and plenty of room for storage have
generally ordered a carload direct from
the mines, and in this way obtained large
rge
the
supplies more cneapiy man tnrougn
retailers.
BRITISH WREATH FOR GRANT
English Officers to dorn' Statue
In Park Tomorrow "
Officers of the British army will, piece
a wreath uponNthe statue of Qeiu-ral
Grant In Falrmount Park tomorrow. .- '
Lieutenant Angus 8. Fletcher,', Royal
Horse Artillery, asked and reoelved.'per
mission to honor the Civil War bero In
this manner from Thomas 8. Martin,
secretary, of, the Falrmount Park Com-,
mlssionera. , '
The British army officers, a number, of
whom are visiting this city, expressed
a desire to participate' In the day's
services. ?
BIGGER GUN BOMBING PARIS'
' " -
Higher-Powered. Explosive Alto
' Used by Germans
Perls. Hay J9.Lonran' shelling
of Paris continued today. 'The Oer
mans appeared to be using- a shell ot
adbhtlr different model.
jniMimiot irinnisufx snejis
U.S. ENCOURAGES
JUGO-SLAV FIGHT
TO GAIN FREEDOM
State Department Espouses
Cause of Downtrodden
Austrian Provinces
AMERICAN SYMPATHY
Marks Beginning of Definite
Support of Moves to
Discard Yoke
wa.him-tnn. mv 29
TJir iaiin iU. .... ..! ,l,l..t
1 1,,onIes of Autrla-HunRar was openly
iepc.sed by the Ignited States Oocrn-
' mont for ,hp nr"t '"" today. In a
formill ,,,,., thc -(ate ne.
p.irtmnnt declared that "the nritlonnlli-
aspirations of the rzecho-SloaU
nnn jugo-fias for freedom hae the
crimen syitipathy of this lioxernmnnt "
Copies ,f the communication were
(lashfrt to all part", of the world by
rable.and wireless
The action of the State Department,
in line with the avowed friendship of
this nation for all oppressed peoples. Is
expected to have a mot heartening ef
fect upon the rtriij-Rllni? southern Slavs
and Czechs in some quarters. It was
accepted as Indliatlmr that, from now nn.
SXhT.d SiSSnU't
npru, nave neen followed with ereat
IntesjRt by the Government nf the Pntted !
States and that thc nationalistic asplra- i
tlnn$ Of Ihf ISonhrt-MIn, nl.o .. A '..-
Slavs for freedom have the'ca'rncst sm-
pathy of this Government.
New Liberty ('ontrr
"A -ongress. organized by a committee
forme.1 at Homo 'for tho liberation of
tne onnieFRed natlonn It eq of Austria -
-,
Hungary. waa ne)(l , jlomc on tll0 8tn
u, ivin o, apni, inn,
"All the people dircrtlv concerned
were represented Italians. Czechn-
imiovbk", uumanians, roles Jugo-slavs
" """a ine in, lowing resolutions
were unanimously adopted
The representatives of the nation
alities wholly or partly subject to the
domination of Austria-Hungary
Italians. Poles. Rumanians Czechs,
Jugo-slavs hav united In affirming as
follows, the principles by which their
common action shall be guided
First. Kach of thee peoples pro
claims Its right to establish its own
nationality and State unity, to com
plete this unity, and to attain full
political and economic Independence.
nominated by fltrmnn
Second. Each of these peoples recog
nizes In the Aurtro-Hungarlan mon
archy the instrument of Germanic
domination and the fundamental ob
stacle to the realization of its asplra-t'.Kii-
and its rights.
Third. The assembly consequently
recognizes the necessity for a common
struggle against the common oppres
sor, in order that each people may
attain Its complete liberation and
complete national unity as a single
free state.
The representatives of the Italian
people and the Jugoslav people are
rgrecd In particular an follows:
Freedom Vital to Italy
First As regards the relations be
tween the Italian nation , and the na
tion of the Seibs, Croats and Slovenes
known also under the name of the
Jugoslav nation Uic representatives
of the two peoples recognize that the
unity and independence of the Jugo-
Continued on 1'nte Five. Column One
P0ILU RESERVES
BACK FRONT LINE
Several Divisions Arrive at
Sectors Attacked by
Germans
BELIEVE WORST OVER
" Dy G. H. FERRIS
Special Cable to Evening Public Ledger
Copyright, IHIB. by Kew York Times Co.
With the French Armies In Cham
pagne, May 29.
FRENCH reserves have arrived at
the front and It Is believed the
worst is over.
It is now clear that the German
plans were for a big offensive and
not for a mere diversion.
With the French Armies. May 2D.
Hindenbure has scored -mother spec
tacular success. At dawn Monday,
after three hours' bombardment, com
posed largely of gas shells, a new
German mass attack was thrown upon
a twenty-five mile front, extending
from the Ailette near Vauxalllon to
the Alsne-Marne Canal near Brimont.
It was four or Ave times as nu
merous as the defenders, and in other
regards correspondingly stronger. In
these clcumstances, an attempt to re
tain the line,. of the Chemln des
Dames would have meant that the
French troops would have been mas
sacred before reserves could reach
them, and there' was nothing for It to
do but to fall back steadily and In
good order, using- successive lines ot
trenches and deep folds of! ground to
punish the enemy for every forward
step he made.
As I anticipated In my -last mes
sage, the method of the first phase
of the German' offensive was again
emptoyed with some Improvements.
This method rests, as I have shown,
upon two main elements the prodi
gal expenditure of the large reserves
obtained by- the collapse of Russia
and. Rumania and the skillful use of
the great advantage of what are called
interior lines of communication to
throw a 'mass 'attack suddenly upon
the chosen sector, and so to gain the
further advantage of surprise.
Th''front now chosen was held till
si day or two ago by parts, ot two
armies,, belonging to the. group of
wmen w r ruMir-.11 viuwn crtuv w
titular cmsr, t. ueaerat von
1 ZMm '
1 ' .IHa
bbbbbbbbbbl"'- '?4&Jfc-1
bbbbbbbbbbV?. vk.ffilP mL ' A
.1 ;mv mA
Thoto l Gutfkiiniu.
CYRUS u. ross. JR.
Formerlv 'ciretarv to the late
Major Rlankftilturc, now prav ch
ill at the I.atikciiiiu Hospital.
GRAND JURY LAYS
fRIMR TO M0II0R
H
Prohibition Would Cause'
Tremendous Decrease,
Savs Presentment
' RAPS INDIGENTS' HOME
"The drawl Jury feels impelled to
B'1v that a ,arR'' nart of ,he b,IFlnPS that I
.came before this bodv '.is due to Hip
liquor traffic, and we believe tint if it
were annus,, ,ne amount or rmne ann
criminal
would be tiemenrlously
rln.
1,,.. .-
v.(riiicii
T)(i Hst plrnBraph ot thp flm, prP.
sentment of the May Grand Jury, which
I was made this afternoon to .ludge Mr-
Cormlck. Quarter Sessions rourt. con-
' tainea tne foregoing lecommcnuation
i tor proninmon it is ine nrs, time win-
In the memory of the attaches of the
courts that such a suggestion was made
by a Grand Jurv
The report Is signed by Gllmour Mc
Qullken, timekeeper, 23" West Ontario
street, as foreman of the body, and Ed
ward Stulb, clerk, 43 Alleas lane, Ger
mantovvn Home for Indigent Crltlrlted
The Jurors visited the city's penal ana
hospital Institutions, and with thc ex
ception of the Home for the Indigent,
find the places in good order The re
pot t says:
"On May 23, 1J18, we visited the
Home or the Indigent and it was the.
unanimous opinion of the Jurv thit al
most everything that rould be desired
was lacking.
"The buildings are good, but the
cinder walks are a menace, the Inmates
tracking In the dirt, the walls wero
filthy and need cleaning badly, no door
pulls on screen doors and a general
lack of discipline and men l Ing around
the cinder walks like pigs.
"In the bakery and kitchen a very
unclean condition was apparent, dirty
aprons on workers, a leak flooding the
floors of one building On the end of a
table in the dining hall were clothes that
needed soap and water very badly.
"In general the contrast between the
criminal institutions and the inbtitu-
Contlnu-d on l'nte Two. Column Rtirn
PERSHING KEEPS
WOOD FROM WAR
Omitted His Name From
List of Division Com
manders He Desired
NO EXPLANATION GIVEN
By CLINTON W. GILBERT
Staff Corrc)orfrMf Excnino Public Ledger
Vt'aKlilnstnn, n, C May 29.
It was Oeneral Pershing who pre
vented General Wood from going to the
front in Frsnce.
The American commander abroad
sent some time ago to the War Depart
ment a list of generals who were ac
ceptable to him as commanders of
divisions. Wood's name was not on
this list Other names emitted were
those of Major Generals Scott, Franklin.
Bell and Morrison. So much is clear.
There Is some doubt why the Adminis
tration, In the face of this, allowed the
situation to drift until, In a most
dramatic way. Wood was relieved of his
1 command Just as he was about to em-
bark,
One report Is that the Administration
did not take the mere omission of
Wood's name by Pershing as final, but
was proceeding to send him anyway,
when a positive veto came in the shape
of a dispatch from General Pershing- re
questing that Wood should not be sent.
A better view is that the "War Depart
ment merely met the situation created
by Pershing's attitude timidly, allow,
ing 'the matter to drift until the last
moment, when the unexpectedly swift
and vigorous movements of Wood got
him away from Camp Funston before
orders relieving him could be sent. At
any rate, General Pershing prevented
Wood's going to France. It is evident
that the War Department wishes the
country to know that It was Pershing
who did It. though officially It is making
no explanation ot what happened.
Wood saw the President yesterday and
he Is likely' to 'continue the training of
American troops. Instead of being sent
to San Francisco, which is a very
Inactive and unimportant post As to
the Italian front, there Is not the slight
est 'reason for believing that the Ad
ministration has, any idea ot sending
Wood to command Americans there.
The Administration does not tike the
Wood issue'' and it has done Just the
very things that will raise it In Its
most acuta fortav It might have dls-
ALLIES'
ATTACK; RESERVES IN B A TTL
U. S. CHECKS FOE A T CANTIG,
Yankees Beat Back
Two Counter
Assaults
ENEMY DRIVES
PROVE FUTILE
Americans S p ti r r e A to
Greater Effort by Cap
ture of Village
GAIN THEIR BIGGEST
VICTORY OF WAR
Dashing Charge Completes
- Jo
nb in Forty-five
Minutes
TAKE
18
PRISONERS
! Hand Grenades Used
Ef-
' fectively Against Teuton Ma
chine Gun Positions
Paris," May 29.
American troops have broken two
, ,uccesslve German attacks on the
. ..,,, ,ow f Canticnv.
" " "
the French War Office announced to
day.
, , , ,. )llo t.,,,. .
American losses In the battle Of
Canticnv were lieht. it was orncialir
announced today.
Artillery activity has increased in
all sectors held by American troops.
With the Americans in Pieardy,
May 29.
American troops charged to the
capture of Cantigny yelling: "Now
were in Germany. Let's wallop h
out of 'em and go on to Berlin '."
t Back at headquarters, when the
boys went over, officers waited anx
iously for news of the attack. After
forty-five minutes of fierce fighting,
a voice came over thc field telephone:
"Hello! this is Cantigny!"
And headquarters knew the Amer
icans had taken one of the most im
portant towns on the Amiens front
and had won their biggest victory
of the war to date.
The leport caue from a signal
corps captain. Wire carriers, ignor
ing the German counter-barrage, fol
lowed America.i infantry and French
tanks in the attack. When Can
tigny fell the field telephone station
was ready for business.
The attack took place over a front
of more than a mile. Within forty
five minutes after the infantry had
gone over, Cantigny, the Chateau
and several hundred yards of Ger
man second-line trenches were Amer
ican territory. The regiment sent
back 182 prisoners, including five
officers.
After crossing the enemy trenches
it was a game of hunting the German
machine guns. The corporal attacked
an enemy machine-gun crew of four
men. The corporal was wounded five
times, but he killed three Germans
and captured the fourth. He carried
off the machine gun on his shoulder
Continued, en Time Five, Column Foot
CY WILLIAMS'S DEBUT
RUN-GETTING SINGLE
Giants Get Lead, However,
Scoring in First and Sec
ond Rounds
First Games of Double-Headers
New York, Ii Athlttim, 2.
ItaMftn. 4t Wsiihlnsten, 3,
Brooklyn, 5 Doftton. S,
By ROBERT W. MAXWELL
, rhllllei Park. May 29.
Cy Williams made hlc debut with the
Phillies here today by slapping out a
Btngle In the third Inning, which scored
Bancroft. The Giants, who opened the
series with the Phils, scored one in the
first and another in the second inning.
Prendergast started in the box against
Tesreau
FIRST INNING
Toung grounded to McGafllgan. Kauff
doubled against the right field wall.
Burns filed to Williams. Zimmerman
doubled to right center, scoring Kauff.
Fletcher filed to Will.lams. One run, two
hits, no errors.
Bancroft filed to G. Burns. Cy
Williams was given a hand when he
stepped to the plate. Tesreau threw
out Williams. Niehoff fumbled Stock's
grounder, Stock was sate at second
when Fletcher dropped Mccarty's throw,
Luderus filed to Kauff. No runs, no
hits, two errors.
SECOND INNINO
Hoiks doubled to right center. Me-
Ceatiaset rate Ttlrteesu ectasia Iwe
FLANKS
THE WAR SITUATION TODAY
Aided by fr'li divisions, the Germans continue their advance on the
ninus of thc forty-mile Snlssons-nhelms front, but are held In the renter.
On the left the French apparently have withdrawn to the outskirts of
Solssons, nine miles from the orlpIn.il line.
On the risht the Ilrltlsh have retired about three miles, midway be
tween Itheims and the Aisne.
Kolloulnp: the capture of Cantlpny by United States troops, two suc
cessive German (.uunter-attacks wcte lepulsed by the Americans.
PHILS CEl.EBRA.TF UOTvTFCOVT-vTn tv p"tw .---
PHILLIKS a1 r h
Bancroft, fs. . . 4 2 1
1 a p
1 2 0
Williams, cf. . . 3 1 1 5
Stock, 3b 4 0 10
Luderus, lb..., 3 I 3 13
Cravalh, rf.... 4 10 1
Meusel. If AZIZ
0
4
0
0
0
McGaffi'n.2b.. 2 n 0
Burns, c 0 0
I'rcnd'gast, p.. 4 0 -,
4 4
Totals 3: z s 27 1C 0
YANKS TAKE PAIR FROM MACKMEI"
ATHLETICS ah r Ii o a
.Tamieson, rf. . . 4 0 ? 1 n 1
Dugan, 2b 4 0 0 4 4 0
Walker, cf.... 4 114 0 2
Burns, lb 4 1 " ." 3 1
Gardner, 3b. . . 4 0 0 0 3 1
Shannon, as... 4 0 10 2 0
Fahey, If 1 0 n 0 0 0
McAvoy, c. ... 3 0 2 3 2 D
'Myira, p 1 0 1 1 1 0
Adams, p 2 0 0 1 1 0
Davidson, If . . . 1 0 0 1 1 0
Tot.) Is.
32 2 i 21 17 4
BASEBALL SCORES
NEW YORK 11000000 0283
PHILLIES.. 0 0100040 x 680
Tesreau-McCarty; rrenderga3t-Burn;.j umpires, O'Day-Byron.
ATHTICS.. 0 00S0000 0 294
N Y (2d g) . . 1 0 5 0 0 1 5 0 X 12 16 0
Myers-Adanii-McAvoy; Finue rau-Mogridge-Han n n h .
AMERICAN LEAGUE
ATHLETICS 00100000 1-282
NEW YORK 1st g.... 03102001 X- 793
Geary-Perkins; Love-Waltcis; umpires, O'Loughlin-Moriarlty.
'WASHINGTON 000000000-051
BOSTON (2d G.).... 10000002 X- 370
Johnson-Alnsmith; Jones-Agnew.
DETROIT 0 10 0 0
CLEVELAND 12 0 3 0
James-Stanage; Couinbe-O'Nelll.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BOSTON (2d G.).... 000011010-380
BROOKLYN 000000000-043
Fillingim-Henry; Chtney-Miller.
OTHEE MAJOR LEAGUE GAMES POSTPONED
OTHER GAMES
SOUTHERN 10 0 0
CENTRAL H 4 0 0 0,
STATE TO PAY $120-000 TO FREE TRENTON BRIDGE
HABBXSBURO, May 290. The State Board 'of Public
Grounds and Buildings today directed that the State pay $123,030
toward freeing the Trenton bridge, New Jerseyto bear the re
mainder of the cost.
YANKEES TAKE U-BOAT CREW
Capture Follows Torpedoing of
British Ship Inniscarra
trsriilacten. May St. Seventeen Qer-v
man submarine sailors America's sec
ond group of this kind have been taken
prisoner by an American destroyer, ac
cording to official Information to the
Navy Department today.
The Germans were capturtd after their,
vessel hsd torpedoed the British steam
ship Inniscarra. The first grovp, was
captured some months ago by the de
stroyer Fanning. . .
UNDER
NKW YORK
Yriinir. rf. . . .
K:ni IT. ef
trt
4 ".
1 1
Hums If 4
Xim'man. 3h. . 4
0
4 0
0
2 1
7 0
1 3
2 3
Pli'tcher, ss. ,
Holke. lb...
McCarly.c.
XiehoIT, 2b..
Ti-srcau, p . .
'i'ctalb 33 2 8 i'4 U 3
'EW YORK nli
G'lirnli-y, rf, . 4
P'paiiRh.fiS.. 4
Ra!r.3b 4
Pratt, 2b 4
Pipp, lb 5
Hodic, If 4
Miller, cf 3
3 5
1 14
2 1
Hannah, c. .
Finnercn, p..
Mop-ridge, p.
Totals 34 12 16 27 17 0
"MOTHER'S DAF MAIL
Letters Written by Soldiers in
Trenches Distributed Today
"Mother's Day" mail from the
trenches In France is being distributed
In this city, t f
Several thousand tender missives from
the" "boys' of the American expedi
tionary forces, many of 'them written
under Are, and most of them written
within sound of big guns,- were among
the XQI.S00 letters which arrived at an
Atlantis nort Monday.
Mothers who have .not yet receive 'a
letter sfcovVI not b.;4lsaala)te tfr
UW-M-iapi " v? L
FIERCk
French Valiaj
Hold Heights fl
Aisne Center?!
.All
y
.m
BERLIN CLAIMS
,
11-MILE ADV AMI
,'i
Capture of 15,000 H
oners Also Is An-J
s Also Is
nounced
TM
el
-j-jj
hm
AL.HLS KfcSTUKE SS
DICKEBUSCH
Germans Outnumber Eb
Fnrnoa Tan Ia MS
w M
ENEMY PASSES VES1
.t$
Several Villages in RiverH
gion Reported Oo rA
f-iiniAi-l
M
. M5
rang, gv
The German rush, with thc
of fresh divisions, cpntinwsl
night on the two wings of tki;
sons-Rhelms front, the French
Office rnnrtJ oJ.v J,'(i'C
---- .-, .,. -r:
"The French left was draw
to the eastern border of
where the battle is going op
ously," the communique. saiie$
iims represent a maxim
tirement of about nine miles,
extreme French left) K
vi lire riKiu nann me r(
British, after an energetic'
of the Massif of St Thierry".
miles northwest of. Rhelms'
drawn back slowly to the
southeast of these heights;
holding between the Veale
the Aisne.
"In the center, the fl until
tinued fiercely on the sohUi
of the Vesle. where the FreM
valiantly defending the height'
mere is active cannons!
both banks of the Meuse and'
Lorraine sector. ,J
"A BArlae stf !?!, -.lik'i
north of Bexonvaux (no:
Verdun, where Americans aril
line) and in the Badonvilleni
(which includes the Americas!
ville sector)." k
a. m ffer
j) -i
xiuge iorces or uerman r
apparently remain inside tha
didier bulge within equal
distance of the Amiens front'
RniRnnns.nhAlma camw hw.
patch from the French army;
neid. There is reason to bel
are backed by tremendous
of materials of all sorts an-i
all calibers held in places whi
can easily be swung to the w
or southward.
"The German advance at
points on the Aisne front has'fi
a depth of fifteen and a halTi
the Echo de Paris declared M
SttS
'mi
Lionaon, AiajM
rieid Marshal Haig xeport'
today in infantry action. The J
communique received here&J
stresses continuation of enemi
sure, heavily re-enforced, dur
night on the two wings
rranco-imiisn aoissons-KneM
acainst the center nt whirh-.tl
mans have been progressing
Artillerying is heavy
fronts, and Haig specifically!
of hostile cannonading
the Albert sector. His1
giveg substantial confirmat
predictions made by milit
yesterday that the chief,
tensive is still in reserve 1
against Amiens, impor
control of the Paris-.
railroad, and its relation'-
yz:'c:r- :. &
ana tne cnannei porta, -f.-ii
Only artillery activity,!
were -reported by the
Office today. ' uVl
nowever, in ins aoiencwa
infantry assaults the big? i
thundering along the Ha
' The German, guns
larly active north ot All
Arras-Amiens front).
was heavy in the dlst
and in the sectors of!,'
Merville (on the .Flajuef
IMAKei
l-JBMB 't
payaicai
tit&tfeXy&arS&t. AUtf&-&

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