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Evening public ledger. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, July 30, 1918, Night Extra, Image 15

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045211/1918-07-30/ed-1/seq-15/

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";.W " ?T ' rX'-"" JtUlJjU JDIfiJJSKr-PHILADELPHJA, TUESDAY, ' JULY , 30, 1918
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GOSSP OF Tffi? STREET
MARKET OUTLOOK OPTIMISTIC,
DESPITE INACTIVITY YESTERDAY
AND FAILURE OF ALL FORECASTS
Bankers Surprised at Number of New Security Issues
Given Quasi-Approval of Capital Issues Com
mittee Current Gossip of the Street
TONE of the predictions, which were largely founded on hope., made at
'true esterday morning, and for that reason, coupled with the depressing
dullness and the excessive heat, no one could be found In the financial
district brave enough In the face of the most Inactive market for a long
time to say what might happen today.
.And yet no one would admit that the market Is likely to fall off,
especially In view of the continued exceedingly favorable news from the
European war front.' Every one reluctantlv admitted that with such news
as we are continuing to receive there Is no reason why prices of stocks
and all other securities should not -advance
A well-known broker was asked vesterdav which he considered was
exerting the greatest Influence on the stock market the tightness of
money or the war news? His replv was, "As far ns tho market Is con
cerned today, neither Is affocttng prices, because we have, no market."
There Is, however, a growing opinion that tho Crown Prince's army
Will not be "bagged," as we would all like to see them bagged, and that
many will get out of the mouth of the bag before the mouth can be closed
tight enough. It Is acknowledged that those In the bag are being pounded
Unmercifully, but the fear yesterday was that many would escape.
There was little discussion oer tax matters esterday, the Inclination
Jelng to wait for further Information, as certain technical terms need
explanations before tho scope of the proposed daw can bo thoroughly
understood.
One would have thought that there would have been more discussion
over the possible action of the directors of tho United States Steel Cor
, poratlon "on the dividend at their meeting (after hours) today.
A well known broker said today that, notwithstanding the almost
Universal opinion prevailing that the usual dividend with the extra will
be declared, directors have a habit of doing things differently one'e In a
while, and that the meeting today might be "one of them.
Many New Security Issues Tentatively Approved
Some bankers are expressing surprlso at the number of new Issues
of securities which are meeting with the quasl-approval of the capital
Issues committee. Of course, these Issues are not approved by tho capital
Issues committee as such, but are merely passed upon "as not being Incom
patible with the interest of the United States," but at the same time there
!s no escaping the fact that to "the man on the street" such approval
counts for something. One banker called attention yesterday to the
difference between the extent of such Issues In Great Britain since they
adopted a sjstem of restriction almost similar to ours,
"In the first quarter of this year," he said, "the British Treasury
authorized the Issuance of $20,000,000 of corporation Issues and $13,215,000
tn the second quarter, making a total of $33,276,000,"
"In the same period," he said, "the British Government raised $3,447,
62S.00O through the sale of bonds and war-savings certificates."
Banks Drained of Cash for Harvesting Season ,
One of the reasons advanced by a banker yesterday as, to the money
stringency which has pre ailed for some time past and which it Is said
has been the principal cause for the unusual conduct of the stock market
Is different from those which have obtained currency recently.
He claims that there has been a drain on the banks for harvesting
and moving crops In tho West, which have matured at least three weeks
ahead of tho usual time. In New York, he said, the money stringency is
felt more acutely than here, and were It not for the relief given by tho
bankers' money committee there, which made extensive loans on call, the
situation would have been much more serious. This committee, he con
tinued, has the money market as far as it applies to New York locally
under Its supervision, and the Federal Reserve Bank, as well as all
local bankers, must make daily reports of their loan transactions to it.
This arrangement was necessitated by the shortage of funds, and Is said
will eventually result In the stabilization of funds.
Speculating Upon Future of Utilities Taken Over
There Is a good deal of quiet discussion going on In the financial dis
trict over the future of the railroads and of the telephone and telegraph
lines after the war, but It Is more or less of a desultory character. Some
bankers and brokers shake their heads ominously when the subject Is
broached and indicate In whatever opinions they may express that the
country Is drifting Into a condition from which it will bo difficult to extri
cate Itself when the time comes, while others say that before the war was
dreamed of there was an atmosphere in this country which portended
radical changes In many things, both social and economical, but in none
so much as In the rising demand for tho public ownership of public
utilities.
As time goes on public opinion is growing steadily In favor of a better
plan or, at least, what Is considered a better plan, namely, public control
with private operation. A recent article In the Electrical News of Toronto,
Canada, on this subject ends with the following significant paragraph:
"Excellent as the theory of municipalities owning their own utilities
may be, there Is no doubt whatever that It has been a fatal policy for
many of our cities and towns throughout Canada, who, In their endeavor
to avoid the evil of unconti oiled private ownership fell Into the trap of
uncontrollable municipal ownership.
"There Is evidence, however, that all over Canada, having now had
experience with both evils, we are sitting back and taking a survey of
the whole situation with a view to effecting a compromise that will'
Include as many as possible of the good points and aa few as possible '
of the bad points of the two tried systems."
Much Pivots on Meaning of "Invested Capital"
A downtown banker, .speaking yesterday of the proposed taxation,
remarked that a great deal depends on the meaning which will be given
to the term "Invested capital." The main question which will come up In
this connection will be whether the money which a corporation has put
baek Into its plant Is to be so regarded, or whether a corporation Is
assumed to have all its investment capitalized. If "Invested capital" Is
based on capitalization there are some corporations, notably the United
States Steel Corporation, from which some large dividends could be
expected, as under such a ruling It could save sevetal millions by having
" Its capitalization and Invested capital the same. If Its capitalization
were to be measured by Its outstanding stock the Steel Corporation could
easily give Its stockholders a dividend of 100 per cent.
There Is, said this banker, a great .danger In the misinterpretation of
,the term "Invested capital," and a clear, lucid definition of the term
should be made public by the Administration, The dangerously bullish
possibilities In leaving the market open to any and every Interpretation
re too patent to be disregarded. .
The week opened with the market for Liberty Loan and foreign gov
ernment bonds firm. The demand for corporation Issues was only mod
erate. With a few exceptions the total transactions in individual Issues
of the latter group last week did not exceed $100,000. Among the indus
trial bonds International Mercantile Marine 6s are being steadily bought,
as they have been for a long time. While it has been Impossible to get
any definite idea of tho financial plan that the directors have under con
sideration, It has been Intimated for many weeks that the bonds were
being steadily absorbed for the account of the company. Just at the
present time this steady "buying is not making much net changes In
prices.
Among the railroad bonds Burlington Joint 4s are being dealt in on
a, rather larger scale than any other issue. These bonds fall due wl'hln
a few years, but as yet there has been no intimation as to what the Joint
Northern Pacific and Great Northern management intends to do about
them. The Burlington stock which these two companies own together is
pledged as collateral for the bondB. In the case of this issue also the
buying had not made more than fractional price changes.
i
CLAYMONT, DEL, GROWING
War Work . Brings Boom and
60,000 Population Is Expected
Wilmington, Del.. July 30. Unless all
indications fall Claymont, In this State,
will In a few months become a city of
from 50,000 to 60,000 persons and out
strip all other places In Delaware, with
the exception of Wilmington. A num
ber of housing propositions are under
way, the latest being one for 100 addi
tional houses for the General Chemical
Company.
Worth Brothers' big steel mills., near
Claymont are nearlng completion and
In a'ahort time will begin making steel
Under Government orders. The plant
la fonstructine homed for Its men and
other are In contemplation In addition
I A.' a- x. ..- . W..M. I... n.ka In.AAB.a
ffci io inuse uviiufc wwm vj uwt ivii.a
and Individuals. Worth Brothers will
employ about 15,000 men.
From Wilmington to Claymont and
from Marcus Hook, Pa , to Claymont
building operations are under way.
Companies in the vicinity have made ar
rangements 'for temporary school build
ings to accommodate 1200 children of
the workers
BRITISH BUDGET 700,000,000
War Credit Will Be Presented to
Commons Thursday
By the Associated Press
London, July 30. The 'largest appro
priation demanded since the beginning
o the war will be submitted to the House
of Commons Thursday, says the Dally
Telegraph.
The vote of credit to be asked will be
fnr 70(1 (100.000. Thh nrevloUR hlirhftnt
was 660.000.000. voted a year aao The
new appropriation Is required to finance
tllA U.U.. Il.ltll tVlA .knit Itf Ot-tfllL.
" - - - w,,.,
BUSINESS CAREER
OF PETER FLINT
A Story of Salesmanship by
Harold Whitehead
...'I.; V "'.'" lll aiMu.tr vour bvsine
Zn,.,i. !!. e.n Vino, selling, advertising and
it .. W.V .A,k "r autUlons fltnrlv one!
?ilif -J' "" """ rur correct name and
55S?. - .""k ""'"lmon must be ignored.
In IM,' ,l2JT V!"""" "" anttiered
iftl Si MeV'tintJ" Wmcn "" ""
CHAPTER CLIII
THIS Is my lucky day. 1 have actually
got to policies signed one for a
thousand from a fellow who rooms In
the same place I do and the other for
ten thousand from Brother Oubbup.
Say, vou could have knocked me down
with a marllnsplke when Oubbup came
across for ten thousand
yhen Perkins found the doctor's ex
amination of Oubbup to be O. K he
made out two $5000 policies.
He showed Oubbup one, saying:
There, sir. Is the policy that you are
1 .r7'fted ,n That's quite satlsfac-
i. "J"0"'" snltl Oubbup after he had read
it through very carefully. "I give you
a check for that now jes?"
'Thank vou I'll write the receipt at
once," said Perkins
Oubbup opened a drawer, pulled out a
big checkbook and said to Perkins, "How
much Is that?"
Instead of answering direct, Perkins
said, "t wonder If ou realize that for
a man of your age ou are In excep
tionally good trim?"
"Yes, Indeed I do I have always
taken care of myself no cigarettes, no
cocktails, no lobsters Just good, quiet
living, full of happiness es?'
"I wonder If It hss occurred to -nu.
sir. that ou may not over get such a I
good chance to take Insurance as now. '
You unqucstlonablj will want to take
some more, for jour bcneflclarj', jour
only daughter. Is nine jears old now.
When this and jour other pollcj ma
ture, she will he twenty-nine We hope
you will be alive and active at that time,
but jou may not live to see these ma
ture, or you may not be able to look af
ter business at that time. Under or
dinary conditions that $10,000 Invest
ed at five per cent would bring In $500
a year or $10 a week That wouldn't
be much for jour little daughter to live
on, especially If anything were to happen
to jou in tho next jear or so
"While jou are in such excellent phy
sical condition, why not take another
$5000 worth? I asked the home office li
it would be possible for jou to get an
extra $6000 worth and they said j-es, so
I had this extra policy made out, which
jou can take or not, Just as jou like"
The old chap put his elbow on his
desk, rested his head In his hand and ev-ldentlj-
was wrapped In thought. I
guess he forgot we were there, for wc
heard him muttering to blmself, and
were able to catch the following dis
jointed words: "Ten dollirs my little
Elois those pretty little curls If those
dear little hands should ever get spolleo
hard work." Then there was a si
lence for a minute or two
Without sajlng anything, Perkins
passed the other policy over to Oub
bup. .who looked at it, then at Perkln
and signed It: and then he wrote out
his check for the first premium on both
policies
Perkins put the check In his pocket,
passed me the signed application blanks
and said to Oubbup, "I think jou have
made a very wise decision and one that
will gLve you much content and happ
ness If, however, we can be of any as
slstance to you, don't hesitate to let us
know. The Magnitude looks upon all
of Its policyholders as friends as well as
patrons."
When we get out of Jhe building I
said to Perkins. "Didn't jou alwajs tell
me I should call people by their names,
and notice tho name on the doorplate
and use It whenever I had a chance?'
"II m. h m !"
"Well, never once did j-ou call the corn
artist by his name Now what shall I
do as jou say, or as jou do "
"Both, stupid," said he with a tw Inkle
In hlH ejes, so I didn't mind his call
down "The old chap hates h(s own name
and uses the name of Pelletler, the
chiropodist, from whom he bought the
business 1 couldn t can mm jeiieuer;
that Isn't his name, and I wouldn't call
him Oubbup because he dislikes It so
much
"Hvery rule of selling must be tem
pered with common sense Well, what
are jou going to do now?" he asked
Oh." I replied, "It's half-past three,
and I've written up about eleven thous
and dollars worth of business "
"You have?"
"Well, jou have written some or It for
me and I thought I'd drop Into a mov le
to celebrate."
"Don't do It. Oo ahead and see some
more prospects while jou have a win
ning streak on."
TODAY'S ni'BINKSK KPIORAM
Slop to think, but don't slop fhlafc
ing. (Sent by "Benz," tphlcago)
What iloea tills mean to YOU?
I am nolnu to take mir advlre IJut first
let me tell my story. I m b Ijd at ven
teen anrt tin-! It vers hnrtl ;. net along vith
the small wires I earn lor four enrs I
have be.nwo"lnB with a tailor whose
business I had a ureal desire to learn I
regret It now. I nm earnlnj 1J fr
Would Jou consider It wise for me to quit
worklni for that hoss' .!'a"tlfc"7kI,1LI'iy
wKrVVent fnlaJ? n1O0Urrnt.hnC0'haJU.ya.S'tI
coSld' l Wont.nonhef da, . """ '
Was fair? I am a poor boy and somen
w"kln for hln. when nly thirteen. All I
learned of the trade was with him I am
nnlv a helner but I can do a Rood bit or
that fine of work Po sou think It a cood
lln. of business? Hut I must say I cannot
make as much in a ". thei thTnk I
a-JY1 vvorklnVTn 'S
niants or lror worUn Would iou letne inai
'ulTsVtrTfoVYlV
seltlwori.r,yhesUh'!PBbuTd?nghapt.asU
should not be ".'Vliourw?.lU8tudy
to get more money If you will B'uay
vour work thoroughly and attend night
achool and get a good education There
U every reason why jou should make a
ifi J .fift urn for jourself. You know
i!rfrl Sam is going to be the leading
sWpbulfde? In the world and that means
thSe are, Plenty of opportunities for
bright j oung men.
Business Questions Answered
Lt - tit., V
I hae a tonsmeraDie . " ;"v
1
ik-.. vt white aan, wnuo u,
white
"."""" . !- (.ubHi-u anA rhfstnut
What
? n'ther'pV.7nt markt "prtr 1000 fee,;
sawed Snd delivered f. o. b cars yny
"Thaven't the 'least Idea . but under
seiiarate cover I am sending you the
Sam of two sources through which you
can find out.
I have derived much pleasurp In reading
oir "Peter Flint" storlan and the advice
on business matters ou have so kindly
disseminated, from tlms to time. I am
therefore golni to avail maelf or jour
kind oftices In this latter connection.
I am a oun married man. with no pre
vious business know ledse other than that
derived from engineering- (civil) experience.
I am out to he"" myself, and hava
about I100O to Invest In a Bood business
on a partnership basis I "'?' D"r,htlu
as to what line It Is In, as.I think that I
could take a prettv keen Interest In any
thing that promised well for the future.
i Intend running an advertisement soon,
and think It possible that I may have a
fair choke of offers. .......
Before doing this, however. I wish to ob
tain as much knowledge as possible on
business affairs from books, as I have no
time to spend on business colleges
Have heard that Edwin Cod's book,
"How to Deal With Human Nature In
i,...inrtB. ana "Vet Worth of the Balance
Sheet." ' by Btockwell C. A., era goodj
books along tne lines i nav in mini. -n
you give ms your opinion of them and sua-
est urnr others that occur to ou as being
upcrler to or additional tn the above?
Any Information In tuners! that ou enn
offer me will be much appreciated.
, Dovyou thlrlc that with the sum mentioned
I cruld set Into nnvthlnir really worth while
and everMhlmr ele lielnrr equal, between
what UmltlDK tlRiirea can I expect for n re
turn In talar), etc on this amount?
onus "
The two books jou nak about nrc
both commented upon favorably. The
one on accounting 1 do not perMnallv
Know. The one on dealing with human
nature In business Is well worth the
price.
I have mailed jou a list of other
userul bocks under separate cover I
Frankly, I cannot commend .vour plan
of taking any old thing which looks
promising. One man may take hold of
a proposition and succeed remarkably.
wnere ou nilgnt fall because he wculd
have the nectsnary (luallflcntlons. nnd
In consequence would be happy In his
work, while ou would not feel contented
on account of the work being uncon
genial to you.
You should decide whether vou are
going Into manufacturing, retailing or
Jobbing, and whether ou vourself are
more fitted for selling or accounting or
whatever phase of buolnecs vou like.
Then when you advertlie vou can nv
that a man who Is qualified to handle
the selling end of a manufacturing busi
ness (or whatever jou decide vou arc
most Interested in) Is locking for n part
ner lo put In an equal amount (or
whatever you decide upon).
The better plan would be to try to
secure an Interest In an existing busi
ness which Is healthy nnd growing, but
crippled for want of capital There aro
many such about.
It would be Impossible to state In
limited figures how much salirv ou
ought to be able to command with' an
Investment of $5000 You m,i be onlv
worth $500 on account of Inexperience,
ot jou may he worth $20,001) without
any money of vour own at all It all
depends upon how much our practical
experience and ability Is worth to n busi
ness That Is why It Is better to get
Into a line which nppenls to jou and
with which jou are acquainted
Your monej would earn vou G per cent
Invested In a good organization
If jou jourself belong to thnt organ
ization, vou Hhould have salarv mm.
mensurnte with jour cfTcrts and the pos.
slbllltlcs for their excicl'-e
in addition
to that jou should have a return on vour
money decidedly in exce.s ot lit u b per
cent.
Don't take the first thing that looks
good and dent take anvlliln until It
has been most thoroughly Investigated
for jou by an accountant unless j-ou
are one yourself. AUo have jour agree
ment drawn up bj a lawjer. Safety
first.
MORE PAY FOR GLASSWORKERS
Makers of Pressed and Blown
Ware Grant Increases to Blowers
Atlantic City, Julj 30 The American
Flint Olass Workers' I'n'on was granted
further wage Increases by the National
Association of Manufacturers of
Pressed and Blown Olassware In the
thermosabottle department blowers were
advanced 16 per cent, and the gatherers
25 per cent.
For beakers and flasks, the blowers
were Increased 15 per cent, and an ad
vance of 32 per cent was granted the
gathering boys The conference of the
respective committees Is the most har
monious In years
Delegates representing tho Glass Bot
tle Blowers' Association and National
Association of Vial Manufacturers open
their annual conference hero today.
John A. Voll, of Philadelphia, Is chair
man of the committee here of the former
organization.
NO OLD MAIDS HERE," IS BOAST
OF PROUD PENNSYLVANIA TOWN
Girls in Vandergrift," Westmoreland County, Marry at 20.
Place Is Patriotic, Too, With 550 Young Men
in Army and More Going
AN Interesting letter has just been
xirecelved here by tho committee of
nursing of the Pennsvlvanla-Delawaro
Division of the Ited Cross from the lit
tle town of Vandergrift, Westmoreland
Countj", Pa
In sending out a hurrj call for sixty
nurses' aides to go to France, the nurses'
campaign committee asked each of the
chapters to get In touch with the women
In their locnlltj more than twentj-flve
vears old who had completed the Ited
Cross course In clementarj hjglene and
home care of the sick.
Vandergrift, however, stated that It
"GO GET 'EM." CRY AMERICANS
Soldier Wounded Three Times
Crosses the Ourcq
On the Onrcq, Julj 30 (by I. N S )
One American thus told his expeilence
In the fighting on the Ourcn. Ttlver:
"Though wounded three times, I went
on acioss the river. A New York State
captain was leading his men up the
wood d slope on the north bank. Out
from the wood and up through the
wheat went our skirmish line, tho men
frequently stumbling across German
dead and the ruins of German machine
gun emplacements When the first Ger
man machine gunners were encountered
the captain leading the attacking group
shouted:
" 'Go get 'em !'
"That became the battle cry through
out this company Whenever the men
came upon enemv resistance a wild jell
went up: 'Go get 'em!'
"And our men went up and got 'em.
too Bombing and using the rifles, the
men would advance within a few feet of
the emplacements, when the bocheH gen
erallj threw up their hands, crjlng:
'Kamerad ' "
BARS GRAIN FOR MALTING
Food Administration Issues Order Pro
hibiling Purchase Before October
By the Associated Press
Masblngton, July 30 Under a ruling
today by the food administration, malt
sters maj not -purchase any grain for
malting purposes before next October 1.
This action was ttfken pending deter
mination of the amount of malt required
enr nevt Inter's oneratlon. the admin
istration explaining that maltsters now
have on hand a sufficient supply to meet
their requirements until January 1.
Publisher of Toledo Times Dies
Toledo, O., July 30 Clarence Brown,
attornej", capitalist, politician of State
wide prominence and publisher of the
Toledo Times, died this morning
New and Only Route
Direct to Hog Island Ship Yard
VIA
"SOUTHWESTERN"
FROM
3rd and Jackson Sts., Moyamensing
Avenue, and Penrose Ferry Road
Connecting with all P. R. T. cars
between 3rd and 15th Sts.
i PHILADELPHIA 'RAILWAYS CO.
WILL REDUCE STEEL
FOR NONESSENTIALS
War Demands Necessitate
Further Cut in Supply for
Other Industries
New York, Julj 30
Demands of Government and pi I
vate war Industries for steel have
reached such huge ptoportlons, with
repoTtcd expansion of the nation's
military piogiam, thut the allotments
to "less essential" mnnufactuies must
be continually i educed, It Is an
nounced by J. L Itcplogle, federal
steel ndmlnlstiator.
Mr. Rcplogle, after confeirlng with
Ch.tiles M. Schwab, dlrcctot general
of thp Emereencv Fleet Coiporatlon,
Edward N. Hurlej', chairman of the
United States shipping boaid; J. A.
llonner, representing the American
lion nnd Steel Institute, and heads of
the country's leading steel firms, de
clated there was no cause foi ulaim
over the steel situation as It uffects
shipbuilding, munitions making nnd
other activities vital to the war.
Mi. Rcplogle said the greatest dltll
cultv the Government faces Is not a
shortage of steel. In general, but In
ability of mills, owing to limited equip. i
ment, to tuin out the vailetlch of the
product In gicatest demand In suifll
clent nuantltv. This condition Is being
met as rapidly us possible, he nsseited
by turning out the required machlnciy
Pinch Copies on Plate Steel
Development of the shipbuilding In
dustry far bejond the most sanguine
estimates from a jenr ago, Mr. He
plogle continued, has created a de
mand for plate steel which has ex
ceeded the rapacitv of all the plants
equipped for tills tvpe of vvoi k. Steel
for munitions and foi other war sup
plies also has been requited by tho
Covernment In greatei quantities than
the manufacturers have been able to
meet.
Obviouhly, the ndmlnlstiator said,
steel has been nvallable for Industrie,
not essential In the prosecution of the
war, but the allowance to these con
cerns, he declared, will grow less and
less as equipment Is installed in the
"more essential" Industries.
Mr. Rcplogle announced that In con
feience lit Washington today with
representatives of the war Industries
boaid and the Cmergencj' Fleet Cot
poratlon dlstilbutlon will bo made of
the available supply of steel to various
shipjards and other war woik pi ints,
togethei with allotmenth to private In-
dllbtlj.
Schwab Satisfied With Outlook
Mr. Schwab was enthusiastic over
the future of American shipbuilding
when be came out of tho conference
with the steel men. Ho said theie
was "no leason for unusual alaim" In
regard to the supply of manufactured
materials for steel ships.
"Steel In lurRe quantities Is avail
able," said Mr. Schwab "The onlj
question Is Its distribution, and that
will be taken care of by Mr Heploglo
and his conferees."
could not comply with this request for
the following reasons:
'"This Is a singular town Wo have
no old maids, as the term Is used Our
girls arc all In the late 'teens or Just
past tho twentj mark They mostly
get mArrled about this age This is a
young town, with all verj- joung people
In It searcelj what one can call an old
person among us Hnrdlj one of these
girls but has a brother or husband In
France About 550 v oung men from this
town alone In the United States army,
and more to go "
SUED BY KING GEORGE
Monarch Asks $1,022,000 for Black Tom
Explosion Loss
New York, July 30 The name of
King George of England has been added
to the long list of those who would
have the Lehigh Valley Railroad com
pensate them for tho losses thej suffered
when the store of munitions went up In
a blast two jears ago on BJack Tom
Island
King George's name appeared as
plaintiff In action for tho recovery of
Jl, 022,000 for munitions aboard the
schooner Pauline
The French Government also filed suit
for $520,00(1 for loss of munitions aboard
the schooner Charles Rockwell The
Aetna Explosives Companj' Is seeking
to recover JH0.000 The totil of suits
filed today was for $1,859,000.
Noted Steel Expert Dead
rittaton. Pa.. July 30 Jacob K Grif
fith, a noted metallurgist. Inventor and
steel expert, Is dead at the age
of sixty-one After graduating from
Lafajette In 1878 he was for ten jears
In the emploj of the Midi ale Steel Com
panj. of Philadelphia In 1888 he became
general superintendent of the Latrobe
Steel Works In Uatrobe, Pa , and was
a large factor In the growth of that con
cern After twenty-two ears of active
service tn Latrotfo he returned to Wist
Plttston to occupy the Griffith hom
stead and in died in the room In which
he was born.
Launching at Sun Yard Sunday
The cargo-carrier Deerfleld. one cf the
larrest built on the Delaware River,
Is to be launched next Sundav at the
Sun Shlpjard. at Chester. The Deer
field Is a 11,600-ton vessel of the stand
ard type and will be readv for commis
sion within a month after Its Initial dip.
COLLEGE SOLDIERS IN CUSS 5
War Department Defines Status
When M.n Become of Age
Washington, July 29 The military
."(at u.i of the college man In the ranks
of the students' army training corps and
his relation to the draft have been de
fined In a War Department order. The
student-soldier Is enlisted In the military
tervlce of the nation, but upon reaching
draft age he becomes subject to regis
tration whenever the President directs.
He Is then placed In Clsss 6-D and will
not be Inducted an long iir he remains
In the students' army training corps
On the day the order number of the
student-soldier Is reached the fact Is
reported to the college president, to the
commanding ofllcer nnd to the adjutant
general A report upon the man's rec
ord as a student-soldier and as a scholar
Is put before the War Department's com
mittee on education and ppeclnl training
with the recommendation that he be
called at once to an ofllcers' training
camp, to an army camp or be permitted
to complete college training by transfer
to the enlisted reserve corps
FERTILIZER PLANTS
ENJOY PROSPERITY
nmanfl fnP r: rrnna Tl.
U Ior OIS -TOp$ De-
cause of War Increases
Business
Atlantic ( Itr, Julv 30
War and the world's demand for bin
ner crops In the United States and
Canada to feed thp warring nations of
Europe are bringing an unpirallolcd
run of prosperltv to chemical compa
nies specialising In fertilizers to speed
up agricultural production, according to
Samuel T. Morgan, head of the Virginia-Carolina
Chemical Companj. one
of the largest single producers of fer
tilizer In America
Figures just compiled. President Mor
gan said, show that tr" gross Income of
the Virginia-Carolina Company for the
first j ear of American participation In
the war, despite the complete suspension
of Imports of potash from Germany,
reached the enormous total of el22.
reached the enormous totatl of $122,
000,000. This will permit of tho pavment of a
dividend of 24 per cent upon the cor
poration's $28,000,000 of common stock
and of an 8 per cent dividend upon the
compinv's preferred stock, of which
there li $20,000,000 outstanding. Enor
mous activities due to nxtraordlnarj
demands In new lines for war sup
plies are one of the factors In the
company's heavj profits
Another source of big profit for south
ern capitalists Is tho virtual substitu
tion of the soa bean, which was vir
tually unknown to American farmers
prior to Its Introduction from China a
few jears ago, for the famous Boston
"baked ' bean The Chinese bean Is so
much hardier and more prolific than
Its American predecessor that , It Is
crowding the former out of the market.
It Is now grown In virtually all of the
southern States from Virginia to the
Mississippi
SEEK LOSCHER'S FATE
5100 Reward Offered for Definite
Knowledge of Philadelphia!!
Atlantic Cltj, Julj 30 James Bender,
un official of the du Pont powder plant
at Carnejs Point, called ft police head
quarters and off-red $100 reward for In
controvertible evidence that Abraham
Lnscher, of 3537 Kensington avenue,
Philadelphia, Is either dead or alive
Mr Eoscher disappeared on June 21
ifter he left his wife here to go bath
ing His clothes were found In a bath
house. Mrs Eoscher believes her hus
band was stricken with heart disease
and died In the surf Mfeguirda refuse
to believe Mr Eoscher could have
drowned without their knowledge or that
of many in the water.
FERDINAND LEAVES HOME
Bulgarian King Reported Traveling "for
His Health"
W ushlnaton. July 30 An official dls.
patch from France sajs German news
papers report King Ferdinand of Bul
garia has gone to ' foreign lands" for
some time on account of his health
According to the Xeue Freie Presse,
of Vienna, a Bulgarian personage cu
his way through Vienna admitted ''.
Bulgarian people were verj tired oi the
war and had prospects oi a poor narvest
rHOTOPI,V18
The Stanley Booking Corporation
THE following theatres obtain their pictures through the STANLET Booking
Corporation, which is a (ruarnntee of early sholnp- of the finest produc
tion All pictures reviewed before exhibition sk for the theatre in ycur
locality obtaining pictures through the STANLEY Dool.lng Corporation.
Alhambra
12th. Morris ft Passyunk Avs.
Mat Dallv at 2, Evks. tt.43.
NAZIMOVA In
'TOYS OF FATU"
A tOI I "i 5-'U AND TIIOVIPSON STS
rtarliarn CastlMon IrvInK Cummlnns
In 'THE HEART OF A OlHI
ADPAnlA CHESTNUT I1EL. 10TII
ARCAUIA ID A. M loll IS P. M.
SBSSl'B HAYAKAVVA In
"THE CITY OF DIM FACES"
rI I IDDlDn UROAD STREET AND
BLULtIKLi, HIISQIJEHANNA AVK.
JACK PICKFOMD In
"THE VARMINT"
r-inDCCC 1-A1N ST" MANAYUNK
EMI Kfc-33 MATINEE DAILY
ALL STAR CAST In
WOMAN ANI THE LAW"
FAIRMOUNT M,ht,PSAja,tv-
VIVIAN MARTIN In
"VIVETTE '
f- A IVIII V THEATRE 1811 Market St
rAMlL.1 0 A M tn Midnight.
ALMA REUBENS In
"FALSE AMBITION"
Ciril CT THEATRE Below Sprue
36 1 M 3 1 . MATINEE DAILY
CONSTANCE TALMADOE In
'OOODNIOHT. PAUL"
GREAT NORTHERN "rAnUV
CONSTANCE TALMADOE In
. 'OOODNIOHT. PAUL"
INIDCPIAI BOTH A WALNUT STS.
IlVir C-rVlrtU. Mats ? V) Kvs. 7 ft I
ELIZABETH BISDON In
"MOTHER"
I C ArMTD ST ft LANCASTER AVK.
L.CJUtLt Mslln Dally
DOUOLAS FAIRBANKS In
"SAY, YOUNQ FELLOW"
H
OWNED AND MANAGED BY MEMBERS OF
THE UNITED EXHIBITORS' ASSOCIATION
BELMONT WD AU0VE MABKET
ELSIE FERGUSON ,n
A DOLL'S
HOUSE"
fFDAR 60TI1 CEDAR AVENUE
Mary Piokford 'HOW,oTil?AN7'
-vl "MI A I GUI. A Mapleoo1 Aves,
UULAJINlVLi sjis and 8:1B P.M.
ALMA REUBENS . J"?)..
COLISEUM Mirket ut
SOth & UOth
Douglas Fairbanks ln
Say.
louns Fellow"
ENOUGH MEADE MEN
TO ORGANIZE DIVISION
Orders From Washington to
Form Eleventh Being
Awaited
Camp Meade, Admiral, Mil., Jutv 30
For refusing to obey an order from a
superior officer, Private Wasll Krlworlck,
twenty-third company, 154th Depot
Brigade, will havo ten jears to reflect
upon his Indiscretion. By the terms of
an order Issued today, the Boldler has
been sentenced to hard labor for that pe
riod at the United filntes Disciplinary
Barracks at Fort Jay, K. Y
Krlworlck flatly refused to do work
assigned him by First Lieutenant Wil
liam F. Dalton, or the same company, a
few davs ago He will also forfeit all
paj nnd allowances due or to become
due, nnd when he has served his term he
will be dishonorably discharged from the
army. The findings of the court were
approved by the reviewing authority
without comment
Many Virginia negroes are pouring
Into the big wooden cltv these davs
More than 1500 came vesterdnv, nnd this
morning more than 14 00 arrived from all
sections of the same State With the
other negroes here from several States,
they will be organized Into several regi
ments of Infantry The organization of
the 808th Infantrj, a negro unit, Is well
under waj.
Weadr for New Division
There Is now a sufficient number of
white soldiers here to more than fill a
division, and an announcement as to the
organization of the eleventh division Is
patiently awaited from Washington
Promotion will come to many of the offi
cers In the depot brigade, and many of
the best-trained of the selected men will
win the chevrons of noncommissioned
officers when the organization of the
division begins
Nearly all of the thousands who re- '
ported are In the training battalions of
the 154th Depot Brigade The personnel
officers are particularly husy In getting
all of the neccssarj Information about
the new soldiers, and the medical exam
iners have their hands full
There will not be many rejections be
cause of phjslcal disqualifications Those
who are found unfit for service overseas
will bo assigned to the United States
guards for dutv In this country.
Brigadier General Joseph A. Gaston
announced the assignment this morning
of First Lieutenant John E Messmore,
of the medical reserve corps, to tho 333d
Labor Battalion, which was recently or
ganized HUGE WAR STAMP SAVINGS
Last Week's Exceed $58,000; July
Record Above $200,000,000
By the United Press
VV nlilnatnn, Julj 30. Five records
have fallen In five successive weeks In
the sales of war tavlngs and thrift
stamps The nation's savings last week
totaled $58,055,015 20. the Treisury De
partment reported todaj, bringing In the
largest sum jet received from that
source.
Tho natlonV stamp savings for Julj
are expected to exceed $200,000,000
Only one week In Julj, the first, baa
fallen bel6w $50,000,000 And last week's
cash receipts from tho small savings
source nlmost equal the entire war sav
ings nnd thrift stamp sales for June
Largelj as a result of the nation
wide campaign which ended June 28,
everj section of the ccuntrj- Is sticking
awaj more money. The first two weeks
In June showed average weeklj receipts
of less than $10 000,000. But the cam
paign's repults began to show Immedi
ately thereafter and the 'oundlng
figure reached last week has spread
optimism among Government officials
who have been urging national saving.
Schooner May Be Total Loss
An Atlnntle Port, Julv 30 The Amer
ican schooner Luna, which went aground
off this port Sunday night. Is reported
to be In a bad position and may be
a total loss The vessel, lumber-laden,
Is ljlng head-on and Is full of water
There Is a strong wind and heavj sea
The captain una crew were taken oft
bj life guards
Fight Epidemic
msterdnm, Juh 3(1 Tetanus has
broken out to a serious extent In the
Germanj armj. according to the Tele
graa f
The Netherlands Export Company has
agreed to send a larfe consignment of
antl-tetanua serum to Germanj.
riioToi-i.iis
STRAND Ctn A' ' v'nngo' E f Broad
ELSIE FERGUSON
In ' Till: DA.NGRU MAUK '
EUREKA 40TH MAItKUT STa
STAR CAST
In "ni.l."DNl:HS OK uivoncE'
333 MARKET.TC'S SiSffiZ
DORIS KCNYON In
' THE STREET OF .SEVEN STARS
MODFF 25 fcOUTH ST. Orcr
IV1WLJ 1, Cnntlnuoin 1 to 11.
Jt'NE ELV1DOE In
Orchestra.
"A WOMAN OF REDEMPTION
PAI APF 12U MARKET STREET
CKUHADER.S
PRINCESS M,"n rrai8,
EMILY RTEVEVH In ' "'
"A MAN 8 WORLD"
REGENT MARK-1? 5 V WiCT,
BERT LYTELL In
".NO MAN S LAND '
RIAI TO QERMANTOWN AVENUB
r!-l- IU AT TULPKHOChlENI ST
EMMY WEHLEN In K 8T'
"THE KOL'SE OF GOLD"
RIVOLI MD AND SANSOM STS
DOUOLAS FAIRBANKS',';!" DaU'
THE AMERICANO-
RURY MAHKfrr st below 7th
inn-'-' I io A M t0 nils p
WALLACE REID in "
"THE FIREFLY OF FRANCE"
M.
SAVOY mi MAJtKE-T STREET
SAVUTewel carVevV M"ln-"-'
"THE FALLEN ANQEL"
STANLEY
CLARA K
MARKET ABOVE 1TH
11 IK A. M tn 11:1(1 p. ' jt
IMBALL TOIINO In
THE CLAW"
VICTORIA "JfSF. ffiiflhra
OLOA PETROVA In
'TEMPERED STEEL"
T
R
FRANKFORD 4m r-AYe.
Douglas Fairbanks ' ys0 Pellow..
II 1MRO ''WONT ST- OinARD AVE.
jumuv jumbo Junction on Frankford "L"
STAR CAST ln "THB B08s
I On NT KD AND LOCUST 8TREETS
LUVJiJ i Mats .1 .SO, 3 80 fvsi.O 80 ta 11
Sessue Hayakawa 'Vg,. WAV..
NJIVOM KD HELOW MARKET BT.
IMAUll 2:15. 7 and 0.
ENID BENNETT 'TVoomrKT
m T"t fr
nojr urowBM .Mi
Atlantic Cltr. Julv M.-
itn years old, was drowrieii
without being observed yee
had entered the water with I
nantens. The body was w
last night. He was the son of 1
Fish, U North Mississippi V
w idow w Ith three children.
Key tit one Arctic Water Mi
Frost Cannot Injure
This Water Meter
All th workltiff patU of th KtritoM
Arctic Vatr Meter Hre protected from
Injury through freezing-. A catlro
plate at the tiottom serves urn a safety
MHf Should the meter frie. thw
Ktvea wrv, Anrl ran be replaced V
triflinc cost, it Is the most practical
nnd efficient meter for general use, w
Blmplf in construction snd so well mada
It bIs ears of patiafactory servlea.
Let ui show you how It will save
money for YOIT.
m
Keystone Supply & Mfg. Co.
Plumbing & Heating Suppliet 4-927-935
North 9th Street
St'MMFB B RSORT8
ATI-VM-IC CITY, y. J.
Coolest and Most Attractive Location .,
OSTENti
Whole Block. Ocean Front
Directly en the Hoardwulk. Bolton to SoT-'
erelgn Ave . In exclusive Chelaea section.
Freah and eea water tiatha. private aM,
public Modern hjdro-therapeutle depart-
ment. Orchestra. Dancing every evaalaCi''
Auto bus meets trains Booklet. "4
Ownership dlree JOHN T. DOLPHIN. MaT.
PITNEY iV'w Tork Ave . near Beath. ,'
"V Flrst-clasi table, noted for tni
wholesome, well-cooked fry!. Cap. 9&0. i
l.Hrsr. nlry rmi , open surround: batbla"
from house; free shower baths: tlo upwk.:,
12 up dally; M C. SWEBfT. f ,
0b 3aaal
SB? M
filSfc ffggt I jp
sa
HOTPI. RfKCnRFI Kentucky Av. aaar" -JS
w Bch AIwt pn.j- ij
Amir ft Kuro plans Pklt. A. R. MABIOtf.f 'i
Westminster Kr- "v ,lr Bch ia- 0,i
wcsiminsier,, Prlv. baths run. water,?
Si? -n un wkly : 12 no un dly Chaa. Buhr.
wii.mtoon. n. j. -i ?sS
mviumi mn 1 Mht Harris.Prop. n
OTKAV (.HOVE. N. J.
NKVV I'IHI.AIKI,I'I11A Directly on Bene.-!
Oiean Tftthwaj , unobstructed vtasr of
Orran nnd Atidltorloum MRS. C. A. COX,
KRNKRSVII.I.E. PA.
., i.
i v
C 1. TLI11 nnn all the VMr. Not', a. Z
3UTISCI. noil ...,rlm. Write Oca. U. Ji
nsnl. Pr Jtur or Iedaer Centra;. 1M
f
Km. CATION At.
Bath Rexes
- .- '
BOB
i :. mr-y rn
Day and Evening Schools ' M
Preparatory School
vAf?:
All HlRh School SubJerta vrff KrfM
Preparation for College and University "V? ilsm
Professional and Technical Schools irrV fiM
Elementary School
For men and bos who need to TMkVv'ftr"
ilcrkleiic In earl education. &-S-VH
in r cil.i ltkl
ttii-uay ocnooi
I!oi 11 to lfl -.ears Hrs 0 00 A. M. to S
I' M 7th and 8th grade Grammar Sobool.
First i ear Hlh bchool. .
Business School
Men nnd omen. Stenotpj. Typswrlt
Ing Bookkeeping, Business English aM
Arlthmetli
Hrhooli Open Early In September1
Write Now for Detailed Information.
DIRECTOR OK INSTRUCTION
1121 ARCH STREET
Shorthand
Students well grounded ih
the theory and practice of
stenography and carefully in-
structed in the art of takings
rapid dictation. Pitman andt
Gregg systems, two hundred
typewriting machines.
Short practical courses.
The term starts Tuesday,"
Sept. 3.
Ask for Catalog M-45.
Phone. Diamond 631
TEMPLE UNIVERSITY
Broad St. below Berks I
Philadelphia
Department of Commercials
Education .. - E
Secretarial.
New courses in shorthand (Pitman
and Grectr) and bookkeeDinsr will" '."si
start August 1. The opportunities- 3'J
are exceptional for those who can
start the course now. Write or.dtI
ta Is. it Viti
mcMDi c TrMivcDcrrv'r49.
I Broal St. belsw Bark K?j
Philadelphia ".M
T
Grpge shorthand, the easy, ipeady tjrstMBj Jwy Jjtifi
l.unlneaa toura? Day or ev. School. JBarwll tttZ
any time to meet tne navy ana incrftaw .a?'"
demand for lounir men and womw-wmt V&ir
office and buslneaa training our claMes wUlwJ
.. be tontlnued day and even In thfk-t-yr',? ,
Q
nut co mm aummer monina uai of
write for parttculara and ratau
1017 Cheatnut 8tewt
Strayer's Business Ci
Phlladelnhla'a (Jmteat Bullae
ExDert learhtra Modern enulomant.
vldual advancement. Charge mode rat
aitiona guaranteed, uay ana IN tent vl
tiki atuaenta nowauenainr. jsnrou
mi Cheat nnt Street.
Phone,
. - u lai1 iaff!Kr ,
oun Men n By
VI-,
THESTXt'T HlH.. TA.
CHESTNUT HIM. ACADKMV nJ .
A country bvaralnc and aar achaal far sm
Tnorouan preparation ror rousfs. aaiasj
school or business All athletics. Oolf m
fine Brmnaslum with swlmmtna; pool.?
nupns rrceivea tiiparaia ixiwer kcm
boys Iron) seven upwards Catalog.
Merianr law raies ror siMar m
JAMEKLAMriON -TTKRH(VTs1m
St. Martins, CbcataM tUUTH
im
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VA
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57 m
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