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Evening public ledger. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, October 04, 1918, Night Extra, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045211/1918-10-04/ed-1/seq-1/

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S3 M 67 IS7 68 I T i I j 1
EXTRA
THE EVENING TELEGRAPH
PHILADELPHIA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1918
VOL. V. NO. 18
Publlahed Dally Eicept Sunday. Butcrlptlon Price! fl n Tear by Mill.
Copyright, 1U1B, IV the Public Ludgrr Company,
Kntirid as
rViund-lina Matter at the pnatnRV at Philadelphia,
Under tlm Act t JlHUh 3, 1S71I.
Ta.
PRICE TWO CEN1
War- :
JWC
&
w
fo
SALOONS SHUT
AT 7 TONIGHT
BYGRIP ORDER
Ban on Liquor Includes
Breweries, Clubs
and Cafes
COURTS TO SUSPEND
FOR NEXT TWO WEEKS
788 New Victims of Disease
in City in Last Twenty
four Hours
THOUSANDS OF CASES
'Third Rcgitnpnt Armory May
Be Hospital Situation
Grows More Serious
Health Commissioner
Has Sweeping Power
The ilraatlc order of I lip State
Health Department In made pnsalhle,
br the legislative net of. April 27,
1908, which created the department.
This ort doen not specify what the
action or the State Health Commla
Inner uliall he In the time of rtlaeaae
epidemic, bnt Riven him broad dla
eretlonary pnwrriv to deal with the
situation. Section R, Art ill, which
ire the 8tate Health Commlaaloner
the power tn place a han on public
aMemblleft, read an follow!
"It uliall he the duty of the Com
mlsaloner of Health to protect the
health of the people of the State and
to determine and employ the moit
.efficient nnd practical mean for the
prevention and suppreaalon of dis
ease." In 100.1 the l.exMntiirc created nn
emergency fnnd of $30,000 for the
ue of the State Health Department
for the auppreanlon of dlsraiie epi
demics. Every branch of the liquor traffic
will come to a complete halt In 'this
city at 7 o'clock tonight, as a
result of new orders Issued by Health
Director Krusen In tho battle against
the Influenza epidemic.
Tho new orders affect breweries,
distilleries, wholesale and retail liquor
establishments, hotel and restaurant
bars and clubs of any character.
Superintendent Mills has Issued in
structions to all police lieutenants to
see that tho regulations are put Into
effect promptly at 7 o'clock,
The"DIrector's action followed A con
ference, of the Board of Health, at
which It was announced that 788 new
cases- bf the disease had been re
ported In the, last twenty-four, hpurs,
the largest number of any day 'since
the scourge first clutched the city.
All of the Common Pleas Courts will
suspend business for two weeks as
runner precaution against the
spread of the disease,
A suggestion has been made to
transform tho Third Itegiment Arm
ory, Broad and Wharton streets. Into
a temporary hospital and Install at
least 500 beds for the care of the
victims of the plague In South Phila
delphia, which the epidemic Is raging
more fiercely than In any other
aection.
Kinds Public Co-operation
There are 52,000 cases of influenza
In Pennsylvania today, according to
estimates made by State Health Com
missioner B. Y. Royer. The rapid
spread of the disease and tho willing
ness of the people to co-operato with
tho State Health Department resulted
today In the strict enforcement of the
order of Doctor Royer closing all pub
lic meeting place9 and saloons, and he
had heard of not a single violation of
his order anywhere.
Doctor Royer called Adjutant Gen
eral Bpary In conference today, and as
a result the State Armory at Chester
was turned Into a hospital, and a hos
pital tent, with twenty-five cots,
blankets and a mess kitchen, wero
bent to Mclntyre, Clearfield County, In
which locality thero are 700 cases.
The decision to close the courts was
made at a special meeting of the
board of Judges, which had been called
, fopthe purpose of selecting a county
commissioner to All tho exlstinir v.
I) cancy. Thq regular fall term of court,
'which was to have opened Mondav.
twill be nut off for two weeks. Sheriff
R.i T7.,..i.. i u i. .-j . J...-
i MjJniiiaioj nun uevn iiinuuiieu, 1(1 noiliy
an jurors, witnesses ana counsel, in
'olved In pending cases.
The suggestion to use the Third
Regiment Armory as a temporary has
pital was made by Select Councilman
Prank J. Willard, of the Second
Ward, The armory now shelters men
of the quartermaster corps. V. S. A.
1 air. vvinarti urges mat these.be al
lowed to occupy tents to mnke room
for grlp-strlcken South Phllndelnhlnnx
i' who, he asserts, are "falling like
leaves.
A meetlne nf thn itTMiniiix, ,....-
tVutteo of tho Philadelphia Retail
Liquor Dealers' Association la to he
j held this afternoon at the associa
tion ncaaquarters, um south Penn
Square. B. F. Ludwlg, secretary of
' the retailers organization, summoned
committee members to the conference,
;A possible loophole, tetallers believe,
may bo In the1 sale of half-pints of
whisky. Secretary Ludwlg said today
he understood Director, Krusen had
recommended tho sale of whisky for
'Influenza, patients and he further un
derstood, ho said, that physicians are
prescribing whisky for sufferers.
'. 'J Says Whisky Is Essential
Nell Bonpcr, president of the Retail
Liquor Dealers' Association, said to-
i day that whisky, as a medical commod
ity. Is an essential. If tho Baloons aru
cloned, ho Bald, the demand for whisky
wlll icrcato an unprecedented demand
. for it upon druggists, a demand that
the druggists will Imj unable to meet.
Concluded en Pate Two, Column Three
ALL KINDS OF WEATHER
iTalr both tonight and tomorrow
(rte., Saturday):
YBut in the north portion '(will be a
rain-patter day;
Cool on fhe former, but icarm on
the latter day,
UJl Save of iof in the crdnberry
, r ruv,
teK.
NURSING FORCE
OF DISPENSARIES
JOIN fcRIP FIGHT
Dr. Royer Closes 120 Centers for
Treating Tuberculosis to Aug
ment Relief Work
Following his drastic order of yes
terday closing all saloons, theatres and
places of public assembly. Doctor Iloyer,,
Slate Commissioner of Health, today or
dered the 120 tuberculosis diKpensarlcs
of the Department of Health closed and
the nurses to be used In general epi
demic work.
This Is tho first time It has ever
been necessary to take such an action.
Commenting upon tho spirit with
which people of the State are co-operating
to wipe out tho epidemic. Doctor
Royer said:
"The order was the most drastic ever
put out by thin department, but It was
required. In the case of fairs, where
they are In progress this week, they will
have to finish, but none are to be held
next week. Lodges and similar organ
izations come under the general prohibi
tion of meetings.
"As for cluhfl I will nnneAl In them to
obey tho order. Including stopping of
serving of liquor to members."
20 ALLEGED SLACKERS HELD
Men Rounded Up in Raid at
Trenton 'Fair Grounds
Ttt'Mitv mnn nlTof.,..! ulanbnrv t r
the net results of the big raid ycsteiday
anernoon on tne Trenton Fair grounds
conducted by agents of the Department
of Justice, assisted by members of the
American Protective League from Phila
delphia and Trenton.
After a speedy sifting of the sus
pects, uho were detained In tho Armory
at Trenton last night for examination,
United States Commissioner Harry S.
Wilson conducted hearings for those
detained. The twenty men remaining
were held under heavy ball awaiting
Induction Into the army.
About 500 men without proper draft
credentials were taken to the armory,
where their wives, parents or friends
came in throngs to obtain their release.
The Influenza epidemic played a part
In the latest raid. Several of the men
detained were found to have the malady
and were released for medical treat
ment. It. D, Dark, head of the con
scription squad of the Department of
Justice, was stricken Just before the
raid, which he was to have directed.
MIX-UP IN SALUS'S STATUS
Resigns From Council to Enter
Army "Unfit," Says Long
The military status of Attorney Her
bert Salus Is still somewhat compli
cated. Although Salus resigned yesterday as
a member of Common Council from the
Fourth Ward, for the purpose of en
tering the country's services. George
W. I.ong. chairman of local draft boaid
No. 6, which has Jurisdiction In the
case says that Salus Is not physically
qualified to Join the army.
Salus's cases so far has been similar
to that of tho famous Flnnlgan of "In
ngln out agin" fame.
lie was originally placed In the first
class. Upon examination he was found
"unfit for service." I.ater he was placed
In the limited service classification. Salus
resigned to enter the reclamation service
as a private.
Although Chairman Long says Salus
Is unfit, the latter declares h will get
Unto the service.
5 FROM STATE DEAD AT M
Lieutenant and Four Enlisted
Men Succumb to Diseases
One lieutenant and four enlisted men
from Pennsylvania are numbered among
the thirty-four deaths reported at Camp
Dix today. With the lessening of the
number of new cases tbe influenza
cases having dropped, to seventy-eight
for the day's total nnd pneumonia to
twenty-one the tension that has been
gripping Dlx has been loosened, and the
men are again taking up their work.
Hopes are entertained that the quaran
tine will shortly be lifted.
The lieutenant uho died was Carl K.
Crltchlow, of Butler. I'a who reported
at Olx on August 39 as an assistant to
the camp quartermaster, having charge
of the subsistence work. The 1'hlladel
phian who died was Private Samuel
Moore, 1620 South Twenty-sixth street.
FIREMEN OFFER TO F1GHTGR1P
Local Union No; 22 Will Aid in
Combating Epidemic
Waiving all legal restrictions and per
sonal rights at a meeting of Local Union
No. 22, International Fire Fighters' As
sociation held last night, the organiza
tion pledged its aid In any capailtv to
ward comBatlng the epidemic of In
fluenza. To this effect the secretary of the
union was Instructed to write Mayor
Smith and Director of Public Safety
Wilson.
"If necessary," commented J. M.
Shnlster, president of the local branch,
"tho men have offered their services to
the utmost, and will work twenty-four
hours a day if it will In any way as
sist the campaign."
ARREST,FOR SNEEZERS
Use of Handkercbief to Be En
forced by Police in Chicago
Srrrlal nhvalch to the Bi'fiWiio l'ubho J.edotr
Chicago, Oct. 4. In an effort to eradi
cate Influenza In this c'ty, the Health
Commissioner and the Chief of Police
todav Isued orders to every member of
the police department directing h'm to
arrest not only violators of the spitting
ordinance, but every person caught
couEhlns or sneezing without using a
r handkerchief.
All offenders caugnt win ne taken di
rectly Into court.
BRITISH RAID IN ITALY
Warwickshire Troops Take 142
Prisoners Near Asiago
London, Oct. i. Concerning Hrltlsh
activities oo the Italian mountain front
the War Olllce today issued this state-
"Last night Warwickshire troonjr'car
rled out a most successful raid into
the enemy trenches facing Aslogo, cap
turing H2 prisoners. Including four oltl
cers. Our casualties were twehe."
CALLFOR 29,999 STUDENTS
Grammar Graduates Entrain for
Technical Schools October 15
Washington, Oct. 4. Provost Marshal
General Crowder today called for 29,999
grammar school graduates fiom forty
two States and the District of Columbia
to entrain October IB for technical
schools. Of the total 980 will be ne
groes. Voluntary Induction will be allowed
until October 12.
Thn call Includes 1500 students from
Pennsylvania, to be sent to the Univer
sity of Plttsuurgn, anu i"u to uarnegle
Institute, Pittsburgh: 200 from Mary.
Inml. In irn to Illlss Klcctrical Sl'lllml
Washington, !. C, -and 300 from .Vew,
Jersey, to go to i-uiHyeue loiiege,
Kaston, J'a.
.
& '9i.mtJialLiiiJrUv.
KAISER PREPARES
TO SUBMIT EARLY
OFFER OF PEACES
First Tries to Clean Up His
Pplitical House to Placate
His Enemies
ALLIES MAY JOIN HIM
Overtures From Berlin Likely
to Be Participated in Ity
Austria and Turkey
Scheitlcmann Linked
Willi Russian Revolution
Scheidemann, who has been
elevated to the (Icrm.in cabinet by'
the Kaiser, aided and nbelted (c
coidlng tn an expose made by the
Committee on Public Infoimntlon)
tho Ilnlahevlk utilising in Russia
and subsequently his Influence n
used In bringing about the shame
less sunender of the Lenlne
Trotzky group to .Oerm.my in the
conclusion of the Hrcst-Lltovsk
treaty.
Ry CLINTON W. CIMIERT
Special Correspondent Kvenlno fubtlc Ledger
CoiwrloM, 1918. Iiu f'ntillc l.edocr Co.
Washing!"". Oct. I.
Tlie Herman cabinet changes an
nounced yesterday and today me.ir. an
early peace offer that will come close
to the line of acceptance. Tho new
parliamentary combination is u liberal
combination bringing together the
best elements lii German political
life. '
The selection of IWr.ce Max of
Baden emphasizes the Importance of
the Socialists In the new government.
Prince Max Is a Socialist, has been
a paying member of the party since
before the war.
Phlllpp Scheldeman, who was ele
vated to the cabinet as it secretary
of State without portfolia, is the leader
of the majority Soi.lali.sts gioup.
Groebner, also named ns a secretary
of State, is leader of the Centilsts.
who have also been a strong peace
policy of the majority Social
ists Is well known, ai.d It Is possible
to (Jeduce the nature of thp pence
piopusal that will come from Prince
Max and Scheidemann. They will
piobably offer to free Belgium, to liar,
ttcipate In an International Indemnity
'to Belgium, northern France nnd per
haps some other war-devastated terri
tories; to,, withdraw fiom conquested
lands; to create ar. autonomous state
of Alsace-Lorraine within the Ger
man Kmplre or under German Influ
ence; to levlse the Brest-Lltovsk and
Bucharest treaties; to create a league
of nations, and accept the principal
of disarmament. In short, the propo
sition will bring the Central Powers
very close to tho Allied terips, or, at
any rate, to the propositions of Presl
det.t Wilson.
Internal Reforms limited I-'or
...11.
Tliey may precvuu ims nun- "
certain Internal reforms which will
give Germany at least a more demo
cratic appearance than It has now,
and perhaps a mole truly democratic
government. In this connection It Is
necessary to recall the Kaisers' words
when he accepted Hertllng'a resigna
tion tho other day. The Kaiser prom
ised a larger participation of the
people of Get many In the German Gov
ernment. oNw the calling of the lead
eis of popular parties Into the cabinet
J ... .. I.. nl. .H.n.. .lA IriCIVAM ...1,-.
ticipatlon of the people In the German
Government. The constitution remains
the same. As one of the men best In
formed about Gei many In Washington
described It today, "putting Prince
Max and Scheidemann In the cabinet
Is like putting n new team of horses
Into a carriage, while the carriers,
the harness, .the reins, the driver le
mains the same. It Is a fine pair of
horses. A more splendid looking team
could not be Imagined."
An Illustration of Just what the
system Is was afforded, as this man
said, by the news the other day that
the Herman Government Is committed
to Prussian electoral icform. Yet the
military masters of Germany have for
midden public meetrngs to discuss the
one-man, one-vote plan. It Is as If
General March would forbid meetings
on woman suffrage while President
WlUon la trying to have the Senate
pass .the equal suffrage amendment
This prohibition of Hindenburg and
Ludendorff went forth and all Hert
ling, the German Chancellor, could do,
was exclaim: "I can do nothing about
It." Prince Max Inherits the placcc of
Hertllng In the scheme of things.
If tho Kaiser means real populariza
tion, Prlnco Max will have to be some
thing nore than Hertllng. The Gel man
military authorities will have to be
subordinated to the civil authorities
Continued on Pane Two, Column Five
LACK OF COFFINS HALTS
GRIP VICTIMS9 BURIALS
Undertakers, Swamped With Funeral Orders, My Have, to Make
Cashets.of Rouph Boards Camden Also Affected
ly thc Shortage.
Undertakers. In Philadelphia and vi
cinity are unable to get enough cof
fins to bury nil the hundreds who have
died of Spanish Influenza.
This new dlfflculty In the epidemic de
veloped today, when many funerals had
to be postponed because of the shortage
of coffins. ,
Klfty deaths have occurred In Cam
den In the last twenty-four hours, and
undertakers there are unable to get
enough colllns to bury all of the victims.
The undertakers believe It may be neees.
kui-v fnr them lo resort to the old prac
tice of making their own colllns of rough ,
boards.
I The aovrnmnt han commandeered
.;MMb( tlM twfirt-atk&BMtwifae.
scs0 48
- believed lost
it .. i i
urgo carrier iicrmtiti mindi,
Goes Down Off IS'out
Scotinu Coast
Ity the United IVfii
Vvaahlnxtnn, Oct. 1. The American
steamer Herman Krasch, a small cargo
carrier, owned by the I'tilon .Sulphur i
Company, manned by a navy crew unci '
In the overseas supply service, bus been
sunk In collision at sea with a loss of
piohably forty-eigni or ner crew.
The vessel collided at night lth the
Amprlrnii iiink stcamshlli tieoige 1.
Henry, about 160 miles southeast of the
Nova Scot Ian coast, and went down In
seven minutes. She carried a crew of
about thirteen olllcers and st-eiit-slx
men, and survivors leported number
only forty-one.
The Henry, with a hole stove in her
how above the water line, picked up the i
survivors and stood by all night hunt
Inn for others. When da light tame I
she abandoned the search and resumed
her voyage. ,
ROVA MEN GUILTY
BY JURY VERDICT
Lithuanian Socialist Paper
Publishers Convicted
of Sedition Plot
MAY GET TWENTY YEARS
Two Defendants Released on
Bail Pending New Trial
Arguments
Two ofllclals of the Kova. a Llthu -
anlan newspaper, accused of publishing
articles against the I'nlted States In war,
were found guilty today by a Jury In
conspiracy to violate the espionage and
helectlve service acts.
The convicted men are Jos-eph B Sili
con, alleged to have been secretary of
tho Kova and national secreiary nndi
translator of the Lithuanian Socialist !
Federation, and Joseph K. Rukys, busi-
nets manager of the Kova. The news
paper was published at 229 North Slxth
street.
Theso are the second convictions with
in a week of publishers of foreign lan
guage newspapers charged with the pub
lication cf seditious matter. Five offl
cals nnd former editors of the Tage
blatl were convicted last Friday. The
prosecution In both cases was conducted
by Owen J, Boberts, special counsel for
the Government, and Assistant United
States Attorney notenbaum.
In addition to the charges of publish-
cl wOTimM tilTf m
States, the defendants were charged with
Issuing pamphlets telling Lithuanians
how- to evade the draft laws.
Two editors of the Kova, who were
also Indicted, are still at large. They
are K. Vldlkis and J. W. Stalloraltlf.
Both escaped through a rear door when
the place was raided last November.
The maximum punishment for viola
tion of the espionage net Is twenty
years' Imprisonment and $10,000 fine.
Violation of the selective service act
nurrlaii r flna nf lift fiftfi ilrwl ttvn voa rt'
",,,v' ""V . .v.-v. .. . w j .... . u
I Imprisonment.
I luring the trial the defendants at
tempted continually to shift tbe blame
on the editors who escaped arrest.
Motion for a new trial for the de
fendants wns made by their counsel,
Henry .1, Nelson, and both were released
In ball pending disposition of the
motion.
COP'S FIST HIS POLITICAL BIT
it,ainpillgn
Collector Knocked
From Patrolman's Doorstep
Retribution Instead of contribution
came to a Vare committeeman who at
tempted to collect fifteen dollars from
Policeman Leonard of the Twenty-eighth
and miner streets station.
Something shot out straight from the
doorway of the policeman's home. It
was his flat. It Interrupted the maclng
argument of the political campaign col
lector, who later collected himself In
the street and sunk away in a cloud
of dust the only kind he got from
the cop's home.
Leonard then went to the station
house and resigned. But Lieutenant
Graham told him to keep his badge
and forget about It.
U. S. FLIERSJOMB 14 TOWNS
Drop Thirty-eight Tons of Explo
sives on Enemy Centers
By the Associated Press
vVlth the Amerlran Forres Nurthweftt
of Verdun, Oct, 4. American aviators
were busy all yesterdav carrying out
bombing attacks on Con flans, Longuyop,
Audun. flommary, fluxleres, Vlgneulles.
t'hambley, IHaliK Arnvllle, Grandpre. i
Abilevllle, Gorze, llaydenvllle and.
Marcq. They dropped thirty-seven and
one-half tons of bombs.
In twelve days' flying on this front
thirty-four successful missions have
llt-eu iniuei inncii u' uitj .Miiericuil
aviators.
turers here and In other large cities to
take care or dead soldiers In many camps
and supplies on hand have been ex-1
hausted, Manufacturing plants have,
been working night and day to make
up tne snonage, but they tre swamped
with orders and are handicapped by
the shortage of labor and Illness among
their employes.
The shortage Is felt by undertakers In
Philadelphia more than In nearby towns.
because undertakers here, being near the J
manufacturers, do not carry large stocks, .
but go to the fastorles when they want
cofPns. j
Notices are being Inserted In Camden
newspapers announcing the postpone
ment of funerals becaupo of the jack of
coffins. One underUkehai had twenty.
one otMfityiiL- Rgit , y
AESI
and Ships
U. S. Submarines Partici
pate in Wiping Out Aus
trian Naval Center
PIERCE
MINE
J
FIELD I
,
Americans Destroy 1 WO I'.ll-
i
nnv Undersea Craft-
-Foe
Flees Albania
Ity the Associated Pre
Home, Oct. 4.
Aineileaii, Hrltlsh nnd Itallnn warships
Ameiinui, Hrltlsh nnd Italian warsnips
.... ........
nave cietm cd the Austrian naval -
at nurazzo nnd the warships anchorfil
tht'ie, nci'oiillng tn an announcement
made by Piemler Orlando,
American submarine chapels detrnjed
Iwn enemy submarines dining the bom
bardment, the olllrlal Hiinnuncement Kniil.
The attack on Dur.izzo nvuJJM at
noon mi Wednesday, when Italian and
British criilceis, protected by Italian
and Allied torpedo boats nnd American
HUlunarlms mici eedetl In making Hielr
way through mine fields and, avoiding
attacks by submarines, got into Duiazzo
harbor
An lnlene bombardment followed un
til tbe base and the Austrian ships
ancboied there wete completely de
strojed. Italian sailors. In the ttcth of a hot
enemy lire torpedoed an Atisttlan rte
fctiover and a steamer. Another vessel,
which was lecognUed as a hospital ship,
was allowed tn withdraw,
llrlll-h nnd Italian airplanes co
operated in the work. Other Italian nnd
I Alllrrl untslilnd uui-n illnv.n lit. III
,orilpr nf ,,,,, outsWe or thc hBrlor lo
deal with any enemy warships coming
I up to the assistance of the port
I , N" '""J1 "" '''""W was suffered by
UIH Ulliru MJUtlUIUII, t'All'lll II MiKlll Ill
JUly to a British cruiser by a torpedo
from an enemy submarine.
Imilnn, Oct t. In the leveling of the
foitlllcatlons nnd depots at Duiazzo
WAilnnarlu .li l-nlanl. si.it.i nt, ....
wording to n Central News dispatch
from Home, destroved much material for
the Austrian aimy In Albania.
Durazzo Is a Kcapoit In Albania flfty-thu-e
miles south nf Scutari. It Is sit
uated on a peninsula In (lie Adriatic
Sea. For some time past It has ben
a base for Austtlan operations Jn Al
bania. DURAZZO RAID PART
OF GENERAL SCHEME
WnnhlnElon. Oct. 4. American-Allied
destruction of the Austrian naval base
ftmWMWi
IfJMHHMKnemuMhem
euTnn nner.itlnir hasp
whenever onnortunltles offer. Sallies
have been made against this port before,
but the success of the new raid Just re
ported from Home far exceeds anything
undertaken to date.
Americans have been operating In Ita
lian waters for many months, but sped,
fie reference tn them has been withheld.
The Navy Department expected full
details of the raid. The action removes,
a constant source of naval annoyance.
Taken In conjunction with the Aus
trian retirement from Albania, It meant
further relaxation of pressure by the
Allies.
CAMP MEDICAL CHIEF DIES
Colonel Charles E. Dorr Victim
of Grip at Humphreys
Colonel Charles K. Door, medical corps
commandant of the base hospital at
Camp Humphreys. Is dead of pneumonia, ,
ii,.i,r u.l .j..n,i, i..n.... ..'
I ,... ,.. ..,, uv.un v.. Miuut-utti. iuill- '
net Dorr, whose home Is In Covington. '
jvj., ,.H.. ucwi a,, mi uiuic man w ueeK,
The Days Honor Roll for
the City and' Its Vicinity
KII.I.KII IN ACTIOS
SLHCrUNT tiKAIMM MK OSSr.l.I,. T1S
.North 'nlon utreet. (Umtflclally re-
iiortil 1
HI.IHllIXNT II. F. KOOKKS, S3U Cllen-
mnrn aienuc, .
I'KMATK IIKMIV KCKKKT KKKVKS,
-'4l-1 -siirucB nireet. tt'iioffleUlly r--
PKIV.VrK Kl'miXK HKCKWOUTII. .129
L'uiiumilii utrppt.
lIK FKOll VTOITMIV
I'l'IVATK MK 1IAKI, NKI.F.SKV.
south Water mreei. d'revlouily re-porli-il
wounitrd.)
I'KIVATK CIIAltl.KS It. WASSKK. 3-")
Lnraon nireet, Jlanayunk.
IVOl'MIKII
MKKC.KINT KICHAItl) . IIAOUK. 3J1
(lren trert.
"yiS'PT 'iuiK it. HonniTsoN,
CI lltl'OICAI. C. 4. I1TZ(1KUI.I, Ea.t
Tabor iohiI. lllne. tUnofllclailj- rt-
Jinrlpil 1
I'KIVAlr; (IIAHI.KS CAItn. UtS Ea.t
Palmar street.
I'KIIATi: IIAItHV 4, HAM-IN. 18.17
Vlorrln ntr--t
,'I,.,.,:JJ -,,"".MA' J- -McdAltltldl.K.
H"o I levlanil avenue.
litlVAIr: THOMAS F. DKKHKS. 3Jl
North Mnlh alrert.
I'ltlVAri; 4.WIKS 4. HAtlAS. -7M Went
APeffhi-ny nvenup.
1'lilV.Vri: CHAIII.KS KKIZAKI'.WICZ.
3J7K Atmonrl alrei-t,
I'KIVA'.V; AMIIKOSri MIAKKSPKAKK.
JIOJ Itotton ntr-et.
liiiv.vn; m:it. vitn ocinn. his
South Twentv.lhlrd treei.
I'lllVATK CIIARLKS ,V. MrCORVIICK,
1'CM Naudjln lri-ct. tl'notrtclally re.
porteil I
I'KIVATK 4VIK MctiOWAS. 1013
Lunmlonne avenue. (Unoftklally re-
tmrteil
ritlVATi: 40IIX V. VVAIlll. Chentnut
l(t)l (No houne ml. Iron Klvrn.)
I'lllVATK HAI.TKK VVII.SOS. 1001
llrown street.
I'KIVATK 1'ltASK IH'XX. 5515 Oifonl
OVSSKH
SKIKHIVST 40IIS (1. nKNXKTT, 2310
Mouth Twentieth afreet. (Unofficially
reported.)
MISSIXO
timrOKVI, RflilKKT II. KNCIMSH. 120H
Soutn Kortv-wUth afreet
I'KIVATK KimiN 4. DUYKII. 1SIB Cal.
Ion-hill alreet. (Previously reported un.
nfflrlallvi nn official 1lt today.)
I'KIVATK ISAAC tlOI.Il. not South
Kronl afreet
I'KIVATK FKANK 4, KEI.LY. 1A18
bouth Twenty-aeventh atrcet. '
XKAHI1V P0IXT8
.SKIH1KANT JAV II. T. KOFKK. Weft
Cheater, Pa- (Wounded. I
COItrOK.il. I'AIIK K. I.K.VMAX. J.an-
raater 1'a (Wounded.)
I'KHATK S.WUIKI. MOOItK. Clifton
HeUhlt. Delawivre County, Pa, (MHj.
I'KMATK fjKOIIJlK II. I.I.KAVKI.I.YX.
1'hoeiimlll'. l.MIlnB )
OclobirJ, J 018
T'te above Hst 1j complied from
the official cuaunUu records and
from unofficial reports lecelved by
relaflrci and filcnda of the aoldieri.
r '
'X
IN-
AMERICANS PLUNGE 3
IN NEW CHAMPAGNE
BRITISH DELIVER
See Sunreme
British A rmip.R "nn Eup.
!
ties," Says Philip
i Smash Through
nN pjlll.ir
Uprcinl Cnhlr In r.irniiif! I'lihlir I.rdKer
. .
(-oriftii. 11. bu Aim I'otfc riuua to.
Willi the British Armies in
ranee,
Oct. 4.
By the attack nf the British yester
day net oss the St. Quentln-Si'lieldi
I'annl. south of C.imbial, wheie they
have taknn mai.y pils i.eis (S000, no
rm ding tn reports i caching London),
and broken Into the country about Ie
Calelet, they have suercded In dilv.
Ing the enemy xtlll further away fiom
his main defensive lines, nnd. if they
have luck, they may foice him Into
ictieat (o Lecntcmi and, by cutting
ills line of cnmmimlontlni.s across the
road which goes that way, to compel
him lo abandon C.imbral,
Owing to the constant pressure
ninth and south of. the battlefront
RECRUIT ESCAPES DEATH SENTENCE
WASHINGTON. Oct. 4. Btnth sentence lmpased by a nvlli
tniy coiut-inaiUnl upon Sander Maki, a leciult villi the 103d
Depot Diicailc. t'ov retnsal to obey orders of his superior officer,
has been commuted to confinement al haul labor for twenty
ycais,. the War Department today announced. Fapeib in the ense
indicated that Maki refused to tvear a uniform.
ITALIAN CAVALRY PURSUES AUSTRIANS
j;OME, Oct. 4. After the capture of Bemt by thc Italians,
ca vnli y joined in the pursuit of the retreating Austvlans and lias
made a considerable advance, according to nn offlclnl note issued
today.
LISTED MISSING,
STILL FIGHTING
j,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Sc)altc,,
i 1?,., Tf ;, i "W1. i
M. IWIli -H-Viil II1L111 XlUUIil
Up" With Another
i
t. ..a i.i.. .. .. . ,..
f-ridi .in-i iiv,,i tn-. u ii I rKiiiirui tun- i
nK (he heavy fighting of August in
and ILvvhcn tbe I-'rrnch nnd Amu loins
I Inlli. I.il (1 Mi.tnlH ftr.-tlt ..II til,, (lul-nt in.
! ('orpoi.il llobert H. I'nu'll-h "Ii.ioKp.1 up"
I with another unit and Kept right mi
1 -handing it to Heinle," as he put it in
letters home '
The command to which he attached
hlmelf was shy of noncommissioned of
ficers, many of theirs having been killed
or wounded, and Its colonel eagerly
availed himself of the services of Cor
poral Imgllsh. He failed, however, to no
I tlfy headtinsiiers of his new recruit, nnd
I so Corporal TCngllth hasoftlclally been
lepoiled lis missing In action.
!ll widowed mother, Mrs. Sarah ling.
Usdi. i:0S South Forty-sixth street, has
had sevet.il'lettem from him, however,
the last dafed September 8, In which he i,0(.ne. On the other hand, only a
said that h was well, and "going f(vy pnch soldiers have passed through
stiotig ' (he mti,, cty to the suburbs and vll-
Inhuman treatment of American prls- ja,es hordering It on the east, where, as
oneis bv the Hermans In described by wr entered, hard fighting was going on.
Private James J. HSgan, 73J West Alio-' j suppose the Impressment of the In
gheny avenue, wounded In action, and habitants would be defended on the
now In a base hnultal A Phlladelphlan, ' Rround that they might give Information
whose name he falls to give, was cap. (n their countrymen on their arrival,
tured by the boclifs and shut twice Xcvf rtheless. It Is surely an outrage
thtough the body because he refused to u,,0n the laws of war which should not
'thtough me nimj nrcuiise ne rerused to
give Information of nilitsrv value about
I the American foiees Later Ihls man'
,'lvas re-cuod. nnd is row In the samel
hosnlial with Private Ilagan
The utile nl casualty lists, made public
I by the War Department -today, contain
I 962 names, but Include only 117 Penn
sylvanlans, of which number but thirty
one are from Philadelphia and district.
. .Most of the man named are from Xew
York. Illinois and southern regiments.
Indicating that troops from this State
had been sent back to a rest camp.
, Pour Philadelphia soldiers who were
killed In action, appear on today's lists,
j two are icportcd tn have died of wounds,
sixteen havo been wounded, one has been
gassed and four are missing. Two from
nearby Klnt& have been wounded and
I two are missing,
1 The otticlnl list released for the morn.
Ing papers today contalnj 473 names, In
cluding fifty-seven men from Pennsyl
vania, while the afternoon papers' Hat
vanla. while tne afternoon papers' Hat "",,", jook put for traps- We met
contains 183 names, of which number,"'' all groups of French officers
sixty uro fmm this State,
SKETCHES OF TUE HEROES
I'M VAT
ii i; x it y i: c k i: it t
UIXVi:, killed In action In France onbe),n closed to us for four years, to
Kenteinlier 5, was the son of Mrs. Al- ,..- the town, the largest In the
Sepl
fred Scull lleeves, formerly of Ihls city,
but now rcsnilug la Atlantic city. 1'rl- wl0s roofs and towers we nave so
vale iteeves had been In the service fori0ften distantly gaxed. It waa more ex
more than a year. Besides his mother. inordinary then, not to be able to find
Private tleevca Is survived by hit wife, t noW its people have endured their
... -Oallstted ra Vt Thre. Cabins Sm
Chance
for Decisive Victoryl
of A maziiia Possibili-'
- ,,
Gibbs, After Latest
Hindenburg Line
(JIllllS
the enemy is alieady In wide tetrcai
from hi 1m Bashee salient. I
God fnibld that we should give our-
i selves up at this time of day, after
I (rightful disappointments through
many yeais of effort, to losy and op-
. tlinlstic "dreams nnt based on reality.
I but this, at least, we may say, we
litre on the eve of amiuiug posit-
lilllt lei, and pnssilil.v I here may he
i open lo ns thc supreme chance nf
i bringing Ihls war tn a decisive Issue.
It will not he our fault If vie nilss
Ihls dunce. '
I Does the world even now understand
what these men of the British nrmy
have done and arc still doing'.'
think i.nl, for even we, who are among
them out here, vvhp follow their bat
ties' and go thinugh tile battlcflclds,
can hardly icallze the heights of cm
durance which these men have achiev
ed. Continued on VnKt Tnfhp, Column I1t
ABDUCT PEOPLE
OF ST. QUENTIN
Inhabitants and Every
Article of Value Taken
Away by Bodies
, . ,,,,- ,r . . m
mrvwrivr cvn KWflVl V TNJF.AT
I Y ll u 1 11VL1UJJLIA llUik.
Bv G. H. I'F.RRIS
Special Cahie lo .'tening Public Ledger
Coimrfo'if. 111. l -Vetr York Time Co,
Willi the French Army, Oct. 4
St. Quent'ln was completely cleared
nf the enemy Wednesday afternoon.
Immediately afterward, by special per
mission of the French general command
ing the t-eclor, I crossed this portion of
the Hindenburg line and traversed the
town, being, with my colleague, (lerard
Campbell, the first civilian to do so.
There did not remain a single one of
Its inhabitants to liberate. Of the
original population of 66,000 not an old
mani woman or child has been left. Hale
or" 8Jcki 0ung and old, they have been
.rriP,i Bway Into what our Allies call
upon the laws oi r
, overlooked simply.
, , .,, .. ....i, tal
""B U8",., Hh'ml
necause we are
barbarities. Thou-
i Klliiih -
' . . l.-rAiiellrt fumlllpa mnt nnur
sanus in . r- -
suffer prolonged anxiety on their ac-
count.
May Have. Ileen Mined
There is perhaps another reason for
this forced evacuation wnich, however,
would but aggrevate the offence.
A general told us that, like Noyon, the
town was probably mined In many places
with time fuses to delay explosions for
as long as a week or more. Like Noyon,
St. Quentln will probably be left empty
for this reason. At any rate it Is empty
now dead, and but for the echoes of the
outer battlefield a silent solitude.
We had been warned to hurry
through our task, not to enter public
hulldlngS, nOl IU liiui-ll unci ou, Bvn-
passing on tours of Inspection, but they
knew no more than we.
It had been a notable experience
.v in nass Into a zone that had
orlatlnally Invaded area yet liberated, at
Catbu4 rM ntteea. Cthwua fMT
MILES
ATTACK;
BIG
u s Tioops Stonil
8uo,SSlM
Defenses
v.
-At . .
tt - ,-, . --.,.-,.-.
1.. . '
MAIM ULfTlVJb&f
AND GUNS WO
i- i
BLOWi
tlail' nCUClieS KailTOM, "-
. . . ,. f ,
Line in rursuing JCineray m
Beyond Lens .W',
ENGLISH POUR THROUGH A
HINDENBURG SYSTEM?; ,
Frcsnoy Reported Capture r
Counter-Attacks Above St.! '
Uucntin brushed i v.-
M000 PRISONERS TAKEiJ
Frcnrli Armies Push Ahetwl
Above Klieims and in 1 -W,
Picardy
i':;
.
? the United Prest
With the American First
Oct. -I.
";
American troops attacking east of
Rhelms In conjunction with th
rrenrn, have advanced nearly thr
miles. The battle Is Continuing.
or y "
me v.umiiJUKiie, wnere tne Amer-v
leans have Joined thp fmni.ii v . '
The assault began at 6:T0 yesterda'-jJ '
(The attack was east of the Sulppf',;; m
morning without any artillery prep..-'3
uiai.uu. ine uermans were cna-. CX
pletely surprised. SJ
Following a rolling barrage for tin ..
ana u half miles uphill, the France
Americans gained the day's obJecU
oerore noon,- despite .determlned-i
anco from the" enemy, who 'occaf
n bei ica ui macmne-gun nests. ,
a great number of prisoners,
and HUnnllpri wnrA -a,,-.u1
-,-- ....... A.U.U,VI.. ",
-
With the Amerlran Afe- tr7
Champagne Sector. Oct. 4. m t
S.).-
American troops delivered 4T1
smashlnc attack In ilia ch-imn.
district yesterdav. storming i. eitV
mldable German defensive wnrL. s
Blanc Mont nnd capturing Mede?' 3
AMI l)J, -1.
The Americans advanced a consId-t."-'
V. u.o..ii- uiuiiK me mam n
Somme-Py-Attigny highway and at
last reports were maintaining steady
progress. ' i
(Somme-Py Is twenty-three miles '' "'
east of Itheims. Attigny Is Jilxteen '.
miles north of Somme-Py and Medeah h
...nn ii uiree innes nortn of Somme
I'y and Hlanc Mont Is nearby.)
j ne vmericans ro.nnpr.itiii .,iw
ijcnerai i.ouraud's army west of th L-1' 1
Argonne forest and their first hi at. 7-vM
tack in this zone wns entirely sue- Ifcl
cessiui.
By the Associated Press
Paris, Oct. 4. American nnd French''-) ?
uuuis m unampngne have made uf..'i,al
vnnces northwest of Blanc Mont an& "ft
"" i-in in, me war umce an-iv
nounces. North and nnriiiu-.at e.-f;'.' I
ivneims me t-rench have lncreBe4 j Jfi
their gains somewhat and Improved 5- "'4
..l , .. .. . . -" ---"v iy- E
...,. .iuiuiin iii un- region 01 ji
lletheny. French troops In the SU '1
..... .vc.u.. ,,u.c miiaiiim east Of'".;
a uispaicn ii om the Champagne -J- &
, . , . .. l-.-.
.-. V ii ... "" inuioa; , j
unuuii una uemoni unateau, north-
east of Somme-Pv.
Iilance .Mont, n position of consider V
able tncticil Importance, was captured f
uy me rtiiiericans, vvno nave Joined the
French In the operations east of the
Sulppe. t'V.
. . : . &
Ity the Associated Press " jj.j
Ixmilon. Oct. 4, Hrltlsh forces, nur. , U'.A
suing the retreating Germans In the HiAl
i.t-iio ictiiuii. nave reiicnea tne raih " -way
east of Lens, Field Marshal Halg VV'
announced in his oftlclal statement 'H'l.
today. To the southeast the British ' fJL
have made piogte&s between Oddy and .1 , JS
Merlcourt, . i.-Vft
uciiiiun nines i.i hi nigni aeitvere.
counter-attacks on Gouy nnd Le Cate- ..
let, midway between Cambrat and St. J
Quentln. The enemy asuults wsre,.'1
beaten off. ;',
More than 4000 prisoners were take y
yesterday by tho British in their oper- St
atlons north of St, Quentln when tb ,
uerman defenses were smashed.
The point of the British wedge hi
me region norm oi ri. wuentin
neen pusnea at tne end of yestei
ngnting ro tne nign ground a
northeast of Senuehart. The H
are holding this ground, having
puiseu a counter-attacK. ;
By the Associated Press J
MfiH
mSM
With the Iiritlsh Army In Um"' ?,.
Quentln Sector, Oct. 1. J, p- j
British forces broke through t ! if
lire iiinuenuuiB ueiense system M mm '
neighborhood of fresnoy yeaterHfc lfe2
As soon iis the break had been'MaalaV j. '&
cavalry forces swept throush. Brz V.
followed closely by whippet tanks iB
armored cars.
According tn reports which are
sldered reliable the village of rrrnnJjjr
Itself was taken soon afterward. ""
Aiuea airplanes which have been
ing low over me country in th
of the Hindenburg line sreport
there are only one or two thinlvr
and hurriedly built trench linea
front or tne advancing British. -This
Is a perfect cavalry to
and with this force free behind
enemys lines the entire German
tlons north and south of St,
are, gravely menaced.
After the cavalry and tanka
dashed into the open country
the Hindenburg line Intently
.,iDavo v. ..H-b.....v, ahw.nww
through the bewc Tfei
n?-riP
fjM
U1 -
5
ii
;,.
fa
rtl
S .
V. '..,- t
wgjfga

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