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Evening public ledger. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, October 29, 1918, Night Extra, Image 1

Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045211/1918-10-29/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. V.--NO.. 39
Publlihtd Dally Except Sunaay. Subscription Price i JB a Tear by Mali.
Copyrlsht, 191S. by tha Public lder Company.
PHILADELPHIA, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1918
Entered Second-Claim Matter at tha PoitnfttM at Philadelphia, Pa.
Under tha Act of March S. 18T0.
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LT. A. B. LISTER,
CHESTNUT HILL,
DIES OF WOUNDS
Death in France Reported-
by Officer in Red
Cross
WELL KNOWN SOCIALLY
He Was Nephew of Assistant
PoBtrnaster Here and Former
U. of P. Athlete
Lieutenant Alfred Brooks Lister, son
of Mr. and Sire. William H. Lister, of
Chestnut Hill, and a nephew of John
Lister, Assistant Postmaster of Phila
delphia, has died of Mounds In France.
His family 'has received no official no
tification yet, but heard of the young of
ficer's death through a letter from Lieu
tenant Charles Jennings, of the Red
Cross, who was with Lltutenant Lister
-at the end and acted as a pallbearer at
the funeral.
Lieutenant Lister was better known
as Brooks Lister than by his first r.aaie,
Alfred. He Vras prominent socially In
Oermantown and Chestnut Hill, and was
a fine all-round athlete. He had attend
ed Trinity College, where he ran on the
track team and was shortstop on the
baseball team and a member of the
Alpha 3eta Psl Fraternity. LattT he
took the architectural course at the Uni
versity of Pennsylvania and graduated
with .honors.
Worked On Library Man
When this country declared war on
Germany, Lieutenant Lister was an as
sistant In the office of Horace Trum
bauer, the architect, and was engaged
in working out the details of the plans
for the new 53,000,000 free library to
be erected on the. Parkway.
He promptly applied for permission to
enter the first officers' training camp at
Fbrt Niagara, won a commission as
second lieutenant, and was assigned to
Camp Meade, fticre he was placed In
the UOth Machine Gun Battalion of the
Seventy-ninth Division, and went over
' seas In July, this year.
In the last letter receded from him,
dated July 15, he said his battalion o?
about to go to the front, and that "at
last wc will all get a chance to see the
big show."
In his letter describing the death cf
Lieutenant Lifter, Lltutenant JennlpgsJ
wrote: X naa several tants wun young
Brooks Lister before he d'ed, and he
sure was game. He met his end like
a,- man. I was h psllbearer at his fu
neral, and saw f It that there was an
ample supply of flowers. It was a beau
tiful and Impresses service."
Lieutenant Lifter was twenty-five
years old. He was a member of the
Phtladelph'a. Cricket Club, the T-Square
Club and the Phlladelph'a Sketch Club.
tjtMrtfMMeMDrpw Honored
Lieutenant Charles Wallace Drew,
wounded In an air battle against four
fjefman machine and forced to .descend
within the 'enemy lines on August 22. has
been awarded the distinguished service
cross by General Pershing for an act
of "extraordinary heroism," as the of
ficial citation puts It.
Lieutenant Drew was previously list
ed on the official reports sent out by
mall as "missing" and later a "killed
In action," but this error has been cor
rected by telegraph.' He is actually a
prisoner at Mets, the boch stronghold
In Lorraine, according to a cablegram
from the International Red Cross. Gen
eva. Switzerland. He was wounded dur-
lnc hla final desperate battle with tlje
four German machines, but Is pot In a
serious condition and his ultimate re
covery Is anticipated. The young aia
tor's mother, Mrs. S. D. Drew, lies at
24 West Seymour street. Germantown.
Captain Charles J. Blddle, of Anda.
lusla, tried to go to the rescue of Lieu
tenant Drew when the latter was fight
lnr against overwhelming odds, hut was
prevented by engine trouble.
The feat for which Lieutenant Drew
won the coveted Croix de Guerre is thus
tersely described In the official citation:
The official Citation
"First Lieutenant Charles W, Drew,
Thirteenth Aero Squadron. For extraor
dinary heroism In action near Fllrey,
France, August 15, 1918. Lieutenant
Drew operated one of a patrol of four
machines which attacked four enemy
ba'ttleplanes In the fight which fol
lowed, he attacked In succession three
of the enemy airships, driving one of
them out of the battle. He then engaged
another machine at dose range and re
ceived ten bullets In his own plane, one
of which penetrated his radiator, while
another pierced his helmet. In spite of
this, Lieutenant Drew followed the Ger
man plane to a low altitude within the
enemy's lines and shot It down In
flames. During the latter part of the
oombat he courageously refused to
abandon the fight, although he had be
came separated from his companions
and his engine had become so hot, be
cause of the leak In his radiator, that
there' wis Imminent danger of Its falling
him t any moment. In spite of this
handicap he disposed of the enemey ma.
chin ana regamea nis own n.
' There sre thirty-two soldiers from
Philadelphia and Its vicinity named on
today's -casualty list, the total being
an of the smallest In two months.
this number two have been Killed in
action, two have died of wounds and one
of disease. A .
Twenty-one have been wound6d, four
are missing, one Is a prisoner and an
other, previously reported as missing
has returned to duty. The fate of six
of the seventeen local heroes had been
jrevleusly reported unofficially.
Sketchef of the Herpes
ttf!ar Abe Goldberg, who lost
an
arm during the capture . of Chateau
rm
Thierry, has returned to this country,
r Comin, Hon,"'"-,, parent.,
' & Maimed Hero Hutchinson street.
r . He believes that
:t will come wdii, nv weiaie ins
nans are on intir last egs ana ine
nsl conditions In the empire will
i th Kalaer and the'Junkers-to ac-
iFths terms of the Allies. "Th civil
'
CesUnnad sa Fate Three. Column One
. ' THE, WEXTHER VANE
"fair tonight and not much
t?, change,"
Bo urn hear Old Prob declare.
, Weather foreeatter are ttrangel m
V Jfow can ''lack 'of change" team
V "teAff
The Honor Roll for the
City and Its Vicinity Today
KIT.LE11 IN ACTION
CAPTAIX JOSEPH O, TJCSCAN. Cm-
v-vn (Unoftlctallv reported) ...
rotironAL w iimam r. hanrom.
North Fifty-third M
PRIVATE P. CRVMAOTA. 112l Cartrell
street. (Unofficially reported).
died or worsns
CAPTAIN T.oriS H. FlEt.nlNO. 1430
South Flftv.fnurth it. rrelouly re
wimM HTnfeiv
UBCTRNANT ALFRED B. LISTER,
Chestnut Hill. (Previously reported un
officially. DIED OP DISEASE
PRIVATE EDWARD P. MeKENNA. M
S5.m.1,rfv. t. (Prevtouily reported un
officially). WOrXDED SEVERELY
"MiVl? AnE OOLDRERO. 2M1 South
Hutrhinfon.it, (PreMously reported
rRJVATE r- GOODWIN. 240.0. South
Twelfth st. (Prlouly reported miss.
r'.VATE S M, Tt-RNER. 4R.. 1S1T
vtoir t. (PreMouoly reported rrtlln )
WOrNDED, DEGREE fNDETERMINED
MEITENANT IRANK STRONG. 3S0S
Xftrmt pt
LIEUTENANT ,1. P. TWADEM., Devon
LIEUTENANT W. W. HARTMAN. n02
.V.I!Ii0.u, ' (Unofficially rportod )
IJEKreyA.vT THOMAS A. tERR
WEATIIER. n.Vi Weft Venaneo st.
(Prlouly r-nnrtn! unofflrlllv).
4EROE.XNT 4AMES N. PARKER, SR2S
Hamilton street. (Unofficially report
ed) CORPORAL GORDON T RISKING. 1"4
North Slxtv.thlrd U (TreUoutly ro-
.!L'i:2.!""''i''i?iiv )
viini'i
ORAL JOHN II, KIRK. 1RU North
nth
CORPORAL JOSEPH W. STRAIN, 18
fifchnrnp t
CORPORAL HENRY SHAW. 021 North
Prsnklln t (Unofflclallv reported.)
PRIVATE HERMAN A. KIESEL, 4537
Tteno St.
PRIVATE T. A. WEICHARDT. 310T
North Eleenth st. (PreMoufly re.
porti mlsflnr )
PRIVATE ANTON PETR. 1210 Hurley
st rPrevloilv reported mllnr )
PRIVATE C. F. SNYDER. 4212 Ito-aln
tret (tTnofflclallj' reported)
PRIVATE WARNER F. BRUNT, 2MS
North Third street. (Unofficially re
ported) PRIVATE DANIEL CONWAY WEB
STER, 111 West Cumherlind st. (Pro
lously reported unofficially).
SLIGHTLY WOrNDED
CAPTAIN WILLIAM M. RLV10. 204T
o-ith Twentieth st.
PRIVATE THOMAS WEBSTER. "7
IlUnhardt st. (SerMne a.s an ambu
lance driver. Unofflelallv reported )
RETURNED TO DUTY. PREVIOUSLY
REPORTED MISSING
TRIVATE GEORGE L. KNOWTE1. 5341
Poplar st.
PRISONER, PREVIOUSLY REPORTED
MISSING
PRIVATE JOHN GROSS. 21S3 North
Sixth st. (At unknown camp.)
MISSING
CORPORAL W. J. JORDAN, 041 Win
ton it
TRIVATE JAMES P. MULLIGAN. 2206
Manning st
PRUATB JMES U. HARVEY, 1429
North Flftv.flfth st
PRIVATE ALFRED 11. IRV1N, 3233 Ql
rard ae.
October g.1. 1018
The above list 1? cbmpiled fiom
the official casualty records and
from unofficial reports recci:d by
relative? and friends of the men
overseas. .
POWERHEADSTRY
TO AVERT FAMINE
Philadelphia Electric Di
rectors Meet to Act on
Current Problem
POTTER DENIES LACK
Directors of the Philadelphia Electric
Company are today in ers'on trying to
work out a' plan that will relieve the
so-called power and light famine in
Philadelphia.
"Walter H Johnson, vice president of
the company, who has been the chief
figure in the light and power controversy
that Is being waged between the com
pany and the business Interests of the
city, would not receive newspaper men
today. At his office it was denied
he was In the building.
No electric current famine Impends In
this city and the only danger of one
lies In the efforts of the Philadelphia
Elect rlo Company Jo obtain a loan from
the United States on easy terms and at
a low rate to further Its own Interests.
This is the gist of statements by Wil
liam Potter, State fuel administrator.
and Charles Piez, vice president of the
Emergency Fleet Corporation.
'The trouble is that these corporations
won't limit themselves to Immediate
needs," said Mr. Pies, "and the Govern
ment has to have some check on expend
itures. They want to get money on
easy terms at low rates of Interest for
developments not needed at the present
tlma.
Hassllnr Causes Shortage
"A contract for additions to plant
eauloment based on the third survev
has been drawn up and Is now awaiting
the signature oi urmirman Kaward It.
Hurley, of the shipping board, in the
meantime there Is a distinct shortage,
which may be relieved by cutting out
nonessentials,"
After ordering the electric company
to 'produce Its books and charts, the
fuel administration rejected suggestions
for sweeping curtailments in service -and
Issued a statement tnat ,lf consumers
observe due economy during the peak
hours or p. m. to i p. m , tne load can
Otyie handled without Inconvenience to
anyooay.
Walter H. Johnson, vice pres'dent of
the Philadelphia Electric Company, was
sponsor for the statement that the city
was threatened with a serious power
shortage which would greatly Interfere
with war Industries. The original irmirce
of the report, however, was B L. Cole,
Contlnafrd en Pt Tw'o. Column Two
SAFETY HEAD ASKS ECONOMY
Wilson Orders Expense Cut, Aid
ing Wage-Increase Plan
Further aid In the campaign to ad
vance the wages of city employes was
given today by Director Wilson, of
Public Safety, when he ordered all
heads, of bureaus under his supervision
to cut expenditures to the bone.
The order stated that the Director
would not approve of deficiency bills
for 1918 In any bureau urlder him. The
order reads In Prt :
"Every bureau In th's department
must show a clean slate for 1918.
Kindly govern your expenditures so that
It will not be necessary to submit any
deficiency bills."
The notification Is In line with the
request of Chairman Qaffney. of Coun
cils Finance Committee, to discontinue
all expenditures not absolutely essential
to adequate and efficient public service
so that departmental appropriations
might be enabled to meet the expected
MM U.toflM-h -,
ROOSEVELT CALLS
WILSON PARTISAN
BEFORE PATRIOT
Colonel Condemns Presi
dent's Plea for Demo
cratic Congress "
t
PEOPLE'S RIGHTS INVAD
m
v
Vast Crowd Cheers Denuncia
tion of Selfish Course of
Administration
New York, Oct. 23.
Colonel Roosevelt last'nlght at Car
negie Hall Joined Issue with President
Wilson over the President's appeal to
the nation to elect Democratic Con
gressmen, Vthlle 4000 enthusiast ap
plauded him. Tho hall ordinarily ac
commodate about 3500, but last night
It was Jammed with a cheering, lost-
ling throns that occupied nil the floor
snace. while outside were other tnou
rand who wanted to but could not
get in to hear what had been forecast
as the address of the campaign.
it wa? a tremendous personal tri
umph for the Colonel. The vast audi'
ence remembered the four Roosevelt
boy? who enlisted as soon as war was
declared: thev remembered that Quen
tin had given up his life tor his
country, and thev remembered, too,
that the Colonel himself would have
been over there in the thick of It If
he had been permitted.
All of these, things, and more, too
came back to the shouting audience
when Colonel Roosevelt worked his
way to the front of the platform, and
the audience rose and cheered him.
Tlie Colonel seemed to be in splen
did physical condition, and while his
address required more than an hour
tn deliver the audience never tired,
Ha delivered it with intense earnest
ness. Over and over agan he was
compelled to pause by the applause of
people at his vigorous attacks on the
Wilson Administration and the poli
cies adoc.ited- by the President.
"If the President of the United
States is right In his appeal he has
lust made to the voters, then you and
I have no right to vote at this flection
or discuss public questions while the
war lasts," was a declaration early
In his address that provoked .tumultu
ous applause.
Another statement made by tne
Colonel was:
"So far as I know, no Democratic
Congressman has resigned his sent to,
go to war. But six Republican Con
gressmen have lesigned to go into the
army, and already one has died."
"Seeks Partisan Success
In repudiating his own announce
ment that "politics is adjourned," tha
President hnd, In Mr. Roosevelt's
opinion, cast the gravest doubt on
the sincerity of that announcement.
For months, "with naked eagerness"
and with a "complete, subordination of.
national interest to 'party " welfare
never before known in our history
during a great war,1' the Democratic
organization had been working for
partisan success.
, "Supple eagerness to serve Mr. Wil
ron personally and to serve Mr. Wil
son's party In so far a.s such serice
benefited Mr. Wilson," had been the
sole test of appointment to positions
most vital to the conduct of the war,
was Colpnel Roosevelt's charge. And
now the President, casting off thf
mask, was appealing to pure parti
sanship, and making the sole test, of
fitness servile loyalty to himself.
Rebuking what ho terlned the
"servility" of Democratic leadership
the Colonel said it was' "small won
der that in the cloakrooms of the
House the bitter Jest circulates:.
'Here's to our Czar, last In war, first
toward peace, long may he waver! ' "
Colonel Roosevelt's Speech
Colonel Roosevelt said:
"This meeting Is held under peculiar
circumstancs. If the President of
the United States is right In the ap
peal he has Just made to the voters,
then you and 1, my hearers, have no
right to vote at this election or to dis
cuss public, questions while the war
lasts. If his appeal is justified, only
that faction of the Democratic party
which accepts toward the President
the rubber-stamp attitude of com
plete servility Is entitled to control
Congress; and no man who is a Re
publican, and no man whether a Re
publican or not who puts loyalty to
the people ahead of loyalty to the ser
vant of the people, Is to have a voice
in determining the greatest questions
ever brought before this nation.
"In this election appeal which the
President has issued to the voters of
the country he states that he 'earn
estly begs' the voters to return 'a
Democraic majority to both the Sen
ate and the House of Representa
tives,' and that although 'the leaders
of the minority in the present Con
gress have unquestionably been Pro
war they have been antl-admlnlstra-tlon'.'
and that 'the return of a Re
publican majority of either House of
Congress would certainly be Inter
preted on the other side of the water
as a repudiation of my (President
Wilson's) leadership.'
Wllaott Changes Mind
"This Is an extraordinary document.
It Is an emphatic repudiation and re
versal of the President's annouce-
ment of a few months back that poll
tics is adjourned,' It casts tho gmv
est doubt on the sincerity of that an
nouncement; and Indeed for the last
few months the Democratic party or
ganization, acting with the support
and direction of. the Presidents
closest advisers, suteh as Messrs. Bur1
leson and Creel, has been working
with nakedagerness (or partisan sue-,
cess, and hasdisplayed a greedy un
scrupulousness as to methods and a
complete subordination of national in
terest to partisan welfare never be
fore known In our history during a
great war.' -
"When this wr broke out I, and all
Centlnced on Pas Mi. Cotnron One
LIGHT WORK FOR QLDER MEN
Training Course Modified to Suit
New Dratt negistranw
, By the Associated Press
Wa.hlprton. Oct. 29 Older drafted
men are to be jut Into shape for service
Srourh modified physical training ex
erelasa less Bfduous than the course de
signed for men between twenty-one and
Camp commanders were ordered today
to train the older men gradually, es
pecially In the early stag es. so they will
suffer no ill effects from too strenuous
SSJ&Tor over work. , f f -.
TURKEY MAKES
PROPOSAL FOR
SEPARATE PEACE
Constantinople Reports That Ne
gotiations With Entente
Will Soon End
fly the Assnciated VeM
London, Oct. 29.
Turkey has independently present
ed peace proposals to the Entente
nations, according to a report from
Constantinople forwarded by the cor
respondent at Copenhagen the Ex
change Telegraph , Company.
The negotiations are expected to
end soon, It Is added.
HINDENBURG AT ANTWERP
Germans Reported to Be Prepar
ing Strong Defenses
Special Cable to Evening Public Ledger
Cepuripht, JJU, by .Vetu Vork Tlmrt Co.
Mula, Holland, Oct. 29. The Xew
Tork Times correspondent learns here
on tho frontier that Hlndenburg has ar
rived at Antwerp. Elaborate prepara
tions for defense are in progress, and
all German civilians are ordered to leave
at once.
Small detachments of fully equipped
Germans continue to cross the frontier
at Pluls dally. Many are boys of se en
teen The correspondent was struck with
the extraordinary Ignorance of the Gr
man officers and soldiers on political
affairs In Germany. They appeared
not to have heard the rumors of the
Kaiser's abdication, and were all con
vlnced that Germany had always fought
a war of defense.
Both soldiers and officers agreed that
the war would be over In a month. One
corporal admitted that those who were
responsible for the war should be pun
ished, but ald "They must not atk too
much of us "
Most of the soldiers seem to be doun
on Tirpitz. who they say belongs to
the Pan-Germans and capitalists One
Socialist said, "You can hae Von Tir
pitz and two cents thrown In." One of
the rlncleaders of the Wllhelmshaven
mutiny said that the rebels had hoped
and trusted the army would follow them
He had only become a Socialist since the
war.
NEWBERRY CASE POSTPONED
Election Inquiry Waits on Su
preme Court Ruling
By the Associated Press
New York, Oct. 29 Government at
torneys obtained today an extension
from November 4 to 18 of sittings ot the
Federal grand jury which has been
Inquiring into expenditures of the Tru
man II. Newberry primary campaign In
Michigan. Their object, it is understood,
was to hold the grand jury In organiza
tion until a supcrme court ruling could
be made on the decision of the Federal
district court here adjudging three De
troit Republican leaaers in contempt iar
refusing to answer questions put to
them in the investigation,
The men held In contempt, Allan A.
Templeton. Chairman. Frank w. Blair,
treasurer, and Thomni P. Phillips, pub
licity director of Lieutenant Commander
X'jtu, i.-..,--aiTiiiv t HSiaaiMirjH,
their own recognizances pending their
.Departure today for Washington Ot
S. 11. Rush, special United States At
torney, to confer with Department of
Justice olTleials was cited as an Indi
cation that tlw inquiry bad not been
dropped, as had been rumored.
THROWS CHILD INTO SWAMP
Boys Rescue Little Camden Girl
From Tramp s Clutches
A tramp stole five-year-old Martha
Harris from in front of her father's
restaurant at 402 Kaighn avenue, Cam-
den, today, and taking her to a sis amp
in South Camden, threw her In.
The rhl!d was rescued bv Frank Nus-
tro, fourteen years old, 1333 Titan street,
this citv. and Peter Glteronl, friurteen
years old, 323 Division street, Camden
They saw tne man tnrow ner into inc
swamp.
The kidnapping occurred after tho
tramp refused to pay for a meal he had
eaten In the Harris restaurant. The
girl's father put him out.
The police of this citv ,and Camden
are searchlrg for the fugitive. He Is
about forty-fle years old.
GRIP ON THE WANE
Epidemic Ended in 10 Naval Dis-
tncts and LJeclining in timers
By the Associated Press
rl'aahlngton, Oct. 29. Surgeon Gen
eral Bralsted announced today that the
influenza epidemic Is over in ten naval
districts and that it is on the wane
in all other places except Paris Island,
S. C and Mare Island, Cal.
Reports for the 'week ending October
26 show a decline in the number of new
cases from 4373 to 2091. with 20? deaths
as compared with 387 for the preceding
week. ,
The surgeon general of the army an
nounced that vaccination against pneu
monia is available now for every officer,
enlisted man and civilian employe of the
ormv. Its extensive use Is expected to
lower materially the number of cases
or pneumonia in tne army una ynmc.
ALLIES FOR ARMED VICTORY
Resolutions Demand Complete
Overthrow of Enemy rowers
By the Associated Press
London. Oct. 29 Resolutions unani
mously adopted at the recent conference
of French, Italian, Belgian and British
sections of the Inter-AUled parlia
mentary committee recomntenaea tnat
the nations now unueo in im isiu "i
tihArtv ahouM maintain their close as
sociation until thet dangers threatening
them had been removed by ahe complete
nvrtlirnw nt the enemv rtowers.
Another resolution said the Allied na
tions should' prepare after-the-war-
machinery to aeveiop a -socieiy oi na
tions" for attaining a durable peace.
It was stated by the committee that
the losses of mercantile tonnage due to
submarine warfare should be made good
so far as possible by the transfer of
enemy tonnsge,
EVENING 1EDGER MAPS GUIDE
War Drawing Published Last Fri
day Used in High School
The war map printed last Friday In
the Eveninr Public Ledger Is being
used as a text In the West Philadelphia
High School and in several other public
schools throughout th city.
On the back page of thatUiue ap
pears a largo map of Europe showing
how boundary lines wll( be changed by
th only paac term the Allies wllf
aoeept from Germany. '
Bilow the map wer reprinted Prtfcl-
dnt' feuKMR point ncary to 'a
mi'W ;ut-pac.
ALLIES BREAK
WAVE FRONT;
TAKE 15,000
Last Austrian Line in Cen
ter Is Smashed by Gen
eral Diaz
-I
ITALIANS DRIVE WEDGE
NORTHEAST OF TREVISO
Troops Pour Across Stream
and Patrols Advance
Ten Miles
MANY TOWNS SEIZED
Entente Forces Press Forward
on Continuous Front of
Sixty Miles
Americans in Reserve
Along Piave Battle front
By the Associated Press
Italian Headquarters on the
Plave, Oct. 29. American soldiers
aro 'in reserve along the Plave
figh'tlng zone.
a The correspondent saw an
American battalion going through
its "setting up" exercises this
morning near the river.
By the Associated Press
With the Allied 'Forces on the Plave.
Oct. 29.
The last lines of the Austro-Hun-garlan
resistance on the central posi
tions along the Plave River have been
broken by tho British, French and
Italian forces.
The Austrlans were dealt a smash
ing blow. It resulted in the Allies
making new advances, pushing for
ward as tar as vazzolas. which was
taken by the victorious Italians, not
withstanding desperate resistance.
Fifteen thoustnd prisoners have
been taken In tho advance across the
Plave.
By the United Pres
With the IUIIan Armies In the Field,
Oct. 29.
The .Italians are now advancing on
a continuous front of slstv miles, ex
tending from east of Mont Splnoncia
to Rocandelle. The Austrian lines
have been completely pierced east of
the Plave.
Italian patrols already have crossed
th Montlcano River, nearly ten miles
bvonH tVA Tliiv v
"f---jriTinWr' oTIaTtlonaTTrdgeTKave
been thrown across the Plave and
these are constantly being added to
as the engineers work llko madmen.
Across these bridges light Infantry
and other units poured ail night long
In Increasing numbers, to take up the
pressure against the enemy where his
lines have been j-hattered.
By the United Press
Borne. Oct. 29.,
Italian and British troops, continu
ing their offensive In the Plave re
gion, have broken through the Aus
trian lines on a wide front, the Italian
War Office announces.
The battle is proceeding on a front
of about sixty miles from the Aslago
region to a point on tho Plave be
tween Treviso and Oderzo. The Ital
ians and British are across the Plavo
on the whole thirty-mile front between
Valdobbladeno and Roncadelle,
The Allies have driven a great
wedge Into the enemy line northeast
of Treviso, advancing more than five
miles east of the Plave on a fiftcen
mllo front. Tho villages of Brogo,
Malanotte, Tezze, Rale, San Mlrhel dl
Plave, Clmadolmo, Ormelle, Ronga
delle, Templo and Blanche have been
captured. San Lucia dl Plave and
Vazzola have been entered, Italian
troops are within a mile of the Mon
tlcano River.
In the mountain region the Italians
have extended their gains north of
the Ornlc River.
Six Austrian divisions have lest more
50 per cent of their effectives so far.
The Italians have entered the Im
portant town of Alesslo, in Albania
(twenty miles south of Scutari) and
are advancing on San Giovanni dl
Medua.
By the Associated Press
London, Oct 29.
Progress toward Oderzo, on the east
side of the Plave River, Is indicated
in an official statement on operations
by British troops in the Italian of
fensive. Oderzo is a railroad center of im
portance, and its capture probably
would compel the Austro-Germans to
retreat along the Plave to the Adrl-J
ward.
A British statement concerning the
Continued en Psse Four, Celumn Tho
MAY MAKE P. & R.
U. 3. FREIGHT LINE
TO ATLANTIC CITY
Passenger Traffic to Be Diverted
to Two Penruy Roads,
Is Rumor
The Reading Railway's line to At
lantic City may be used for freight only,
according to rumors current today.
It is predicted that all passenger
trafle will be diverted to the steam and
electric lines of the Pennsylvania sys
tem. The Reading route, from Kalghn's
Point, Camden, is six miles shorter than
the Pennsy's.
Railway officials ray they have no
hint of such an Intention on the part of
the Federal railway administration. The
report persists, however. Work has been
started on the reballastlng of trackage
In the Pennsy station st South Carolina
avenue.
There Is unrest In the Atlantic City
downtown business circles over the pos
sibility 6f tho cloalng of th Readlnlr
terminal at Arkansas avenue as a pas
senger station- The hops In that sec
tion haa been that tha Government
wquld make; the Reading station a union
depot.
Lille Hails British Fifth
Army as Savior of City
Great Demonstration for General Birdwood
and His Men Battle Flags Presented to
Flanders Capital as Thousands Cheer
Dy THILIP
Special Cable to Evening Public Ledger
rapurtoht. 1)1. ny Sew York Tlmts Co.
With the Ilrltlali Arrolea, Oct. 29.
German gunners and machine-gun
rearguards are obeying the order re
cently transmitted to them from Gen
eral Headquarters that they must not
allow their fighting spirit to be lowered
by the prospects of peace or politics.
Hlndenburg approves these peace ef
fortssayg this older, but expects the
German army to obey hltn In bad days
as In good, and the soldiers are afked
to go on fighting hrai-!y, fo that even
nT,,hey maJ' oh,aln an honorable peace.
The German rearguards are fighting
L'frd aml hnlVf'y ,0 make a pcrcen be
hind which nrenar.itlnns for .a cenernl
retreat mn- u ;,,i .i ...- tv..,..
Ml and Valenciennes 'they are holding
out stuhbornlv to gain time.
All Sundav and Simrinv ,,r, thn
uerman artillery mosilv. I hellevc.
w-ith slngln guns left from batteries on
the m"oo nttntnlrcd a heavy barrage
fire on the positions and villages along
thn Urltish Second, Third and Fifth
army fronts, and there was a German
counttr-attark on the village of Famars,
south of Valenciennes, as the result of
w-hlch th enemy succeeded In gaining
the northern part of that place.
The Gordon Highlanders went forward
from the southern streets of the place
to drl them out, and after fierco and
close lighting with machine guns and
baynneis, when miny of the enemy had
ocen KWf a. recaptured their positions.
Fierce concentrations of shell fire on '
'the hrldffohcads of the rler Rhonelle I
have marie tho crossing of that stream '
difficult and hiztrdou, but In spite of i
I this fire the Urlt!h engineers have es
tablished bridgeheads at sexeral points.
So far it seems only patrols have crossed I
EPIDEMIC FIGURES FLUCTUATE IN NEW YORK
NEW YORK, Oct. 29. The Spanish Influenza epidemic
showed an increase of 12G1 over yesterday's figures, but a de
crease of 824 below Sunday's in the 4073 new cases leported to
day. This is regarded as hopeful by health, authorities Tuesday
is usually the highwater-raaik of the week. Today's figures,
were 133 above last Tuesday's. Tour hmdred and twenty-five
deaths, an increase of seventy-five, were leported today. To
day's figures show 702 new cases and 350 deaths from pneu
' inonfa, an increase of 217 and 105, respectively over yesterday.
FIRST NEW TYPE SUBMARINE PATROL IN COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, Oct. 29. The Eagle-T, first of the new
type submarine patrol vessels ordered by the navy, was put
in commission yesterday at Detroit, it was announced today,
and will be sent immediately to the Atlantic-coast. Several of
"".the boats probably will be ready in time to get out before
winter elotca the inland waterways..
FRENCHTROOPS I
ENCIRCLING GUISEi
Penetrate Suburbs of Ger
man Base and Capture
First-Line Trendies
PURSUE FOE ON SERRE
By the Associated Press
Paris, Oct 29.
Oeneral Debeney's First Army con
tinues to close in on Guise nnd has
captured German first-line trenches
and the barracks and hospital south
of the chateau in the town of Guise,
according to the War Office statement
today.
(The French are in the suburbs of
Guise, a German base, and are rapidly
encircling the town.)
South of Guise the French have
passed beyond the Louvry farm. They
also continue to make progress oh the
right bank of the Peron River.
Between the Oise and the Alsni the
French are on the heels of the retreat
ing enemy.
(This advance is between Guise and
Marie and the French threaten to out
flank both towns by plunging com
pletely through thn Hundlng line)
On the whole front, between the
Oise and the Serre. French troops are
In fresh contact with the enemy lines.
West of Chateau Porclen the Allies
have made an advance north of
Herpy.
French aviators report fires at
many places on the right bank of the
Alsne, which are still In the hands
of the enemy, as well as In the Serre
valley between Marie and Montcornet.
Artillery fire has been lively In the
Oise region, especially opposite Grand
Verly. French patrols everywhere on
the Serre are In contact with the
enemy. (The Germans evidently are
continuing their withdrawal toward
Narle,)
General Debeney, since his advance
began between the Oise and the Serre
has gained more than five miles on a
sixteen-mile front.
By the United Press
London, Oct. . 29. French troops,
advancing along the rlpht bank ot the
L.ys, in Belgium, have, reached the
railway between Petaghem and Wae
reghem (a front of eight miles), Field
Marshal Halg reported in his special
Belgium communique today.
By the Associated Press
London, Oct. 29. Artillery duels and
patrol encounters were the only
activity on the British front during
the night, Field Marshal Halg reports
in his official statement today, A
further advance below Valenciennes
would threaten the whole Scheldt line.
nmfiKIl is nVLY
KaTxr. Pon'.t allow youra .11 or
calleran to
Xislly prepares.
CinilS
east and north of Marwehes, as ine
enemy Is still holding this line with
many machine guns.
Grim Towering for Itetrest
All this Is, as I have said, no Indi
cation of a German plan tr defend the
present positions to the last, but It Is
a coerlng battle for the eastward
moxement of material and men. It Is
a glim defend all the rame, and no
fun for troops like the Fitly-first Di
vision of Hlghlandrrs, who- have been
in thl3 army of pursuit following up, the
enemy and routing him out of his holes
nrsls from which come a deadly
spray of machine-gun bullets.
So the war goes en for a while; but
upon my word. It looked in I.llle Sun.
day as though ncace had already come.
For there was a
pageant In I.llle, ana
a.U h& towri ,wa? hunK, wUh. "aB; m
richly spread than when I went Into
l"" "iy Jne morning ni s . n
tlon, and hundreds of thousands of peo
ple were In the streets again, as on tint
day a week ago, and crowded In every
window and in every high batconv and
onlv the centre ot the Grand Place,
around the Statue of Liberty placed
there In the time of the French revolu
tion, was empty.
It was empty beciure it had been
left free for the' entry of British troops
in triumphant procession when the city
of Llll- was to receive the flags of the
Fifth army from its commander. Gen
eral Birdwood, as a seuenlr of the
men who hid liberated it from hostile
rule. '
It looked like peaee, and the pagean
try of peace, although onlv a few miles
away men were still falling under ma.
chine-gun lire There was a glint of
sunshine In all tlii windows of Lille,
and blue sky above the housetops, and
Continued on Tate Four, Column Three
THREE NEW SHIPS
GLIDE INTO RIVER
Tavo Merchant Vessels and .
Destroyer De Long
Launched
ONE STICKS ON WAYS
I Two new units to America's merchant
marine and a fighting craft WfTe launch
ed today in Delaware River shipyards.
One of the merchantmen, the South
Rend, a giant steel carrier, stuck on
tho ways at the Sun shipbuilding yards
at Chester, and it required more than
an hour for crews of workmen to jar
the vessel loose from Its frame nest.
At Hog Island the Sarandaga, a 7500
tnnner, slipped out of 'Way Xo 2 at 9.50
o'clock this morning. Tho keel of this
ship was laid March 26 of this year.
Th" fighting unit to th' navy, dipped
for the first time, Is the torpedoboat
destroyer De Ixing, Hunched at the New
York S'hlpbulldlng Company's yard at
Gloucester, It is a sister ship to the
four destroyers that left the ways in
the same yards last month.
The delay In the launching of the
South Rend was due lo the tallow on
the ways becoming chilled. The ship
was scheduled to make Its first plunge
at 8:55 this morning, but when work
men knocked away the blocks the big
steamer, a 13,500-ton craft, remained
fast In its frame. Jacks and wedges
were utilized for nearly two hours be.
fore the new addition to the merchant
fleet was Jarred out of the way, leav
ing at 10:60.
The South Bend was originally
scheduled for launching last Sunday,
but the arrangements were postponed
until today because of a heavy fog.
Miss Audrey Pryor, daughter of L.
Pryor, assistant manager of the dv.
slon of steel ships. Emergency Fleet
Corporation, was sponsor of the South
Bend. Hundreds of guests', workmen
and officials of the fleet corporation
were present at the christening. This
Is the fifth ship built In the Sun Ehln
yard at Chester as part of the war
nroaram.
The South Bend Is one of the largest
merchantmen ever built In an Ameri
can yard, She has a length of 471
over all, a sixty-foot beam and a depth
of hold forty feet eleven Inches It is a
new type twin-screw, turbine-propelled
ship.
Naval officials and workmen were the
only persons In the sponsoring party
at the launching of the De Long, which
moved out of Its ways at 9:50 this
morning, amid a deafening shrill of
whistles. .......
The sponsor of. the destroyer was
Miss Emma De Long Miller, of New
Tork, a descendant of the former naval
officer, Captain George W, De Long,
after whom the new fighting ship was
named.
Captain De Long, commanded the
steamship Jeanette, which unsuccess
fully attempted to force a northwest
passage from th Pacific to the Atlantic
Cestlases ea rase Twe, Cela
HUNGARY CI
BONDS F0RG1
BY HAPSBURI
Form Independent an'v
A -
A..ai r e
iti-Dynastic Sta
Dispatches Say
!.'
.-in i-uviiiiKiir. .-tiaip. i" .
, , ,
, ; iG
COUNT KAROLYI CHOS1
HEAD OF NEW STA1
:.1AX
jt. .,
n r j- fi tjaLj
t3
jieai crowns uneer ijeiaKKu
upon nis Arrival at
Budapest
-ml
EMPEROR TOLD OF PI
i'r
Charles Refused to Sanctifpl
j.. Jt i ; itm
Severance of Relations, ScinMsi
the Politiken Asserts
;M
n.'j "jf
L -Sftf O
By the Associated Press iV ?pj
Copenhagen, Oct. itJSfypjM
An Independent and antl-dvnaatsrir
State h.is hepn formed Ir, IT iiMMtH3n.
tinder the leadership of Count MlehaWi'
ruiroiyi in agreement with the CzeOtlg
and south Slavonians, aeeordlnr ,tas
VlOrlhl HAnrtwn hkasIiiaJ ! ! 41aI "V. j"1. 5 1
...,ii. icfoiu ".-HCU UJ HID JTUU-JSM ;"
r""" lepui-ui icucivca oy uio jrouu&y '
In a speech at Budapest, Karow3i
clared he had presented his pro-Y- '3
tiKun.
gram to Emperor Charles, who Mftrt-sAjJ
ed to accept It. Karolyl thereuOB't?fi''j1
put into effect, his plan for an imlfc-'.ifS,,
pendent State.
' wn ? --at
Count Michael Karolyl is presldent-acTsk'tiri
the Hungarian Independent party, ana1 jsJ $M
nas long been an opponent of the QvwiS EM
ernment party of Count Tista. He hartjSB
been In favor of Hungarian Independable XSf'i
w.. ..,uv. --, .,uu,.....v. a. (.tuwOTa.-lb. Ki
ln tha Trunt-nfnn Untie. T , "1 Vl
the disunion of Hungary from Austria. 0, i j j
In addition to heln antl.npmai'Jifi
Count Karolyl has appealed to Austria-. iS-fcl
Hungary to make peace since December, 5T
1915. On -several occasions he has da-l?J$
manded in the Hungarian Parliament $&'!
inai Hungary mai,c peace. Iast Fa,jj;
ruary Count Karolyl was accused oliM
high treason by his cousin. The Htm-M A
garlan mlnjstry ha3 never taken actfon Jjffc,
on the charges against him. "Iff
Shortly before the outbreak of the wsiv fj
Count Karolyl was lecturing in thIfc
Unjted States He sailed for Europe Utf
in July and was detained at Borde.uxK
for several months, finally being allow4,.Si j
to return home. ' tej&frs&SW
Hungary, one of the most anclarflj- M
m
Kingdoms of Europe, was founded abi
8S9 by the then savage Magyars'
ungi. Kiegmuna, who was
Hungary from 1392 to 1437, andr
crowned Kmperor of the Holy
Empire In 1433, was the first HnVi
twten the crowns ot Hungary and1,
trla. In lSIfi the sovereignty of'1
gary was conferred upon Ferdii
Archduke of Austria. Ferdinand;
eiectea umperor in io&. .tsveryl
that time it has remained with the".
trlan archdukes, and In 1687 the
dom was made hereditary In the Ha
bur? Mmllv. In 1848 the HuneariaAaT '
under Kossuth, made a desperate eftortfei
I to regain Independence. The dual mopj
i archy was consolidated under FranatopS'
Josenh in 1867. "
The population of Hungary in 191fe
was 20,886, 487, 'of whom 10.050.S75 WftwV&-4;
Magyars. :,949.032 Rumanians, l.SST.-Qra
1 970 Slovaks. 1.833,162 Croatlans, l.lM
106,471 Serbians,
472.587 Ruthenes
2,037,435 dermam
n.. .i. rr..:,j d,.. VJSJS6
Uy MB -f ,- M ,w, 'K.i
rt-. on r,..,-. Vjft-,i-t-
r.Iyl, who has been elected head of WJJrc2SHB
Hungarian National Council, was rtv.JW,j
en an ovation at Budapest, according: &&
to a Vienna dispatch to the Poll- ' -d?
tlken. He told the crowds, which iQMJ
rumbered tnousanas, uui smyr, ,
Karl had refused his program for a J3
Austria and Hungary, wherefore an JSfi
i.nnDniian, Q.ntn wna necessary. .ftyfl
nmi-i'r'nw- -v--v w -- j'a
NF.W AUSTRIAN PREMIER gfj
r Tnpc CPECTDV PEACE -i4$?
r i
By the Associated Press
Copenhagen. Oct. 23. A dispatch frosa
Vienna says the Tmperor accepted tha fcgBf,
resignation of Baron von Husswek jg .
m Ti.i..l.t, T nrnrvtianVi .1 Vila Ut J-
According to dispatches. Professor I'fetf
Lammasch will form a liquidation sajf ij'j
I.,-.. mm.pH nt Imnartlal officers. Ik tiSi
order exclusively to bring about a sp4er fA
peace and the transfer of affUlfa tiemi,?t'4
,h. Mntni ..-, thn nitlnnal eovernmeswa J. i
rtitrlnir the transition Derlod. jSC'S J
Czecho-Slovak deputies, In the court JrfW fl
of an nudlence with Emperor Charlsa etiS&si
SlUBiria aSKCU lJV rfMfcw-v. law -.
troops he removed from their pertlwril
rT Ha smnlrA .inn inar l ill IIIHIMsIM I H i i
regiments be returned, accordm t,sjg&jfi,it
dispatch from Vienna, it is saio iaa.ji.i ,
they made It clear to the Emperor UW'fCjy
an Internal revolution mlgnt ensue" ll,5t
the request was not granted, " 'VSy
Baron Chemecky, the Austrian fuh.T
Heist, has arrived In &witsrland;.,a '
cording to the Neue Zeltung of ZtWMtV -1
which cava that before he left Vienna. Si ?:
had an audience with Emperor Chiflisj'aS
2il2"
r.ru, uck jirt..-"A wammrr sV
I, UN UJ Wit? .-t&l.UJ!,!. -U,h bUILUW
handed to M. Benes, Minister
e'gn Affairs ot tne uiecno-Bio
Paris, an address giving a
fraternal solidarity on tha oe
the proclamation of independenMJ
Czecho-Slovaks. H, Trumblel ate
Continued on Faze Two,
Cal
Follow the Boys
Bound for
Vi ,
,
.12
You can do it on the map, -fi
Full Page War Map
of the 'Western
It Is the "liveliest" and
fascinating picture in all;
world. ,juO
It has more human intermMf
any dramatever enacted sin
wvfiu vcgs.li. i?
Order at Once
It will appear in every
tomorrow or the
Cuming public
.-i.A..i-
Til, .Wefi
rJ&5
" J3J
m
WiT
.KiJ!
Vi
T.
'"S.OT-'-.i.
"' '?V &"'
tf
rii- IV r.
Jrf
.r'.-S'
jfKi
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