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Evening public ledger. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, September 08, 1921, NIGHT EXTRA, Image 14

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045211/1921-09-08/ed-1/seq-14/

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EVENING PUBLIC LEDaER-PHlDABELPHlA, THUBSBAT, SEPTEMBER 8,
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t'Gfie, Daily Movie Magazine
CLOSE-UPS of the MO VIE GAME
Uy IIENHY M. NEEIA'
The Little Chinese Cinderella of the Screen
SOME time ngo I told .vou nbont tho wonderful chnrncter part than I-on Chancy
plnys In Nellnn's now film, ,,Mts of Life." In fact. I rnved for nlinont two
columni of typo over the mnrvels of tills innn's work nnd his enreer.
A friend of mine out on tlie vviwt const writes me, however, thnt Chnney
rcolly isn't the nmrvel of "Kit of Life" ; he gives the honor to n little Chinese
girl, Annn Mny Won, whom we linvo nil frcen in other films.
If yon, (lornlilitic, lind onre been n drudge, keeping books nt night for your
fnthcr's dingy little Nhop and then Maidenly the moles hnd discovered jou nnd
jou had mndc such n success of It thnt jour earnings were twice the earnings
of your father's shop but otir fnther refused to regard tho movies seriously
nnd Insisted on jour still keeping his books nt night what would ou do?
Father would have to get out n search warrant to find you, wouldn't he?
You would turn up jour prettv little nub nose In independence and strut right
out and live your own life on mnr own sala'rj , wouldn't jou? Thnt would be
the way with most American girls
Hut Chlncc girls are bt ought up from childhood to regard their father's
commands as nltnost of divine orlum , the Chinese girl who disobeys her pnrents
Is dlsgrnted bejond snlnilon Ami Annn Mny Wong is n Chinese girl.
Annn Mnj could now buy her fnthor's little laundry if he would sell, she
hns made lots of innnev nnd mivimI It Hut fnther merely tolerates the movies.
They are an Intention of the foreign devils and. while he doesn't mind Anna May
earning money In them In the dnjtinie. he considers her first duty to him and that j
duty menns continuing to keep his books and check up the laundry each night.
The Oriental Cinderella of movielnnd Is Anna Maj. Movlclar.d holds for
her nil the thrills thnt fairyland offers her little sisters. Here hnndsome lovers
iihower her with nil the attentions of Homeos. Iitautlful clothes adorn her
Jewels sparkle from her jet black hair nnd motorcars are at her beek and call.
The thrill of the drama makes her forjet that the cntnorn is recording all this for
the benefit of tho amusement-loving public of the country.
ALL OF THE ELABORATE DETAIL OF THE REAL MONTE CARLO NOW STANDS ON CALIFORNIA SHORES
i
XT. f. II
Here arc some photographs showing the wonderful set
for Univcrsals mammoth production of "Foolish Wives,"
which was described on this page a few days ago.
Almost the actual Monte Carlo has men near Los Angeles.
Every tiny detail of construction and coloring of the original
on the Mediterranean Sea has been faithfully reproduced.
This is probably the most costly and painstakingly built sot
ever constructed for a motion picture.
OUE ltrr in fairyland until 5.30.
then her handsome suiiori no
home to their icives and babies, fler jewels arc placed in the studio
info overnight and her beautiful clothri arc taken back to the property
room. It i fAen that Anna May steps from fairyland to reality, pays
the conductor fire cents and trolley-cars to her home in Xorth Figucroa
street, above her father's laundry shop. Here there arc books of the
little laundry business U be kept and many shirts to be pinned before
they are xrrapped and placed on the ihelvc aicatting the call of the
customers.
THOSE who remember "Dinty" will recall the pretty Chinese girl who nssists
Wesley Barry rescue the white girl from the den of the Malay. This was
Anna May Wong, and It marked her first work ns n screen nctress. It was
while hunting "tjpes" for his production that Marshall Neilnn discovered Anna
May and finally induced her father to nllow her to forsake her shlrt-pinnlng
activities nt least during the day.
Since then Anna Slay has foimd herself in great demnnd among movie
producers, for in addition to being an exceptional "tjpe" she has unu-ual talents
"Outside the Law" and "Shame" are other films in which she appeared, and
then Mnrshall Neilan again took her to his studio for the co-star part opposite
Lon Chaney in "Hits of Life."
Anna May Wong in her laundry home, my friend writes me, lookw just as
he docs on the screen. Quiet, beautiful nnd industrious, Anna May pins t.hirt
and adds figures with equal djesterity. Once at home her movie fairjland i
forgotten In the reality of hard work to be overcome before she again dons her
finery and plays the queen.
There is a difference, however, between this Chinese Cinderella of the movies
nnd tho Cinderella of old. Unlike her predecessor, Anna May Wong loves her i
mental duties at home. She has grown up in an atmosphere of industry, for
any one who has ever lost n collar knows that tho ramifications of a Chinese i
laundry demand ceaseless activitj. Anna May's laundry is a machine of human
parts, ns complicated as one of springs nnd wheels. The wash goes in one end
and vanishes, the shirts one way. the collars another, the socks here, the under
clothing th'ere. And then they all come out together in neat piles.
"Whether the producer needs n Chinese slave girl or a princess, Anna May
always qualifies In her inovla work. In "Bits of Life," ns the wife of. a rich
LOWLY ACCORDION
NOW HELPS STIR
SCREEN EMOTIONS
Anna May
Wong is the
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I
GARRY DISCOVER
GLORIA SWANSOK
SlMl'LY BESIEGKh
By HELEN KLUMPH
f """" ouuuiercu ncross th I '
VJ room, slid Into n chulr btgM. s
and with notlcenbln dlm,t . e.B,
Mm tnl.U n 1,1,.. I.l ...P "Cfl It
the table a blue Ipntlmr n. m.
trunk. I knew that she tiantej ;
nrnl( nbont It. ha T .ll.i-ti w M i
t ., ., . wiuil v.
Sho stood It as long as she rfiu
then remarked:
Ut
st, 1 tlilnk that was his name--7Ji i
it mnu'u who nnd little dauthw
i a man Interviewing her, and u'
icr ouo taking pictures ot Lcr, Ili
TABLOID TALKS
ON BREAKING
INTO MOVIES
By JOHN EMERSON nnd
ANITA LOOS
The authors of Am series are the
fatnoui l'merson and Loos, cho have
written some of the most successful
photoplays. They now have full
charge of all scenarios fur I'onstanio
Talmadye.
AMATEUR FILM -MAKING
A MATEUR theatrical clubs, theatre
CONFESSIONS
OF A STAR
As Told to
1XF.Z KLUMPH
guilds and the like have dune much
to mako tho modern drnmn the great
art that it is. But because of the
overwhelming expense heietofore at
tached to the making of motion pictures,
tncre nave been no attempts at any
similar activities in tho films. The
motion pictures linve never hnd the ad
vantage of the experiments of amateur
societies
Tnrillv Imwftvnf tlti trtnt tni nf mn.
Little Chinese i l'on pictures by amateurs is a dlftlnct
ZI .' . r I,",,l,l,lti" " ,ma."s rnllE journey back to Los Angelci w as
n motion iK'ture at comparatvely little I , , , ,
. , . expense were first drawn to nubile nt- X lonK drnNU1 out OBO'O-. It feemed to
L.inacrclla O tention live j ears ago, when two joung me that I could not enduro the at-
men, both of whom have become well- tempts nt oondolcnco made by the
Kiiutwi uircnnrp, innue u Hiuiiuie jiuuiu
plnv in their own bnck yard.
CHAPTER XV
the Screen
THE STORY BEGINS
tri( the early dayi in the old Fine
Arts studio in California, rhcn Col
leen Muore, the dish ijiils, licsiie
Love and a host of others xccre not
much more than cxtia yirls. Diana
Cheync relates the talc; she begin
irith the day in the studio tchen she
and Isabel Heath, not stars then as
they are note, tcere lilting on the
stairs tchen a strange man came into
the studio and looked at them. The
camciaman called them down to
meet him, and it proved the turn
ing point in Isabcl'i life. He teas
I'hil Craney, a famoui director from
the eastern studios, and he taught
Iiabrl to be the firit of the screen's
"baby vamps," and ennagrd her for
such a part in a photoplay he teas
piodueing.
liked to bo on their way to being starred
In pictures, ns I wns. Probably they'd
have Htippo&od that having such a thing
happen to you would mean absolute
happiness. Yet I cried myself to sleep
that night, unutterably wretched.
To be continued tomorrow
THE lowly accordion Is being elevated
to high esteem in screen art. Its
emotion-stirring strains nro running
through pictures, registered In the
swaying moods of the drama. Thesnis
Is being vamped by n squeeze-organ.
Music hns won a definite nnd neces-
rary place In picture making. The In
spirational sob melodies have Svengnlled
actors to new emotional heights where
tho coaxing nnd threats of directors
failed. The soul stuff has dripped from
tho bows of violins nnd cellos and out
of tho bellows of funny llttlo portnblc
organs. And now it's the piano accor
dion thnt Is taking up the siren song
in the studios.
Wesley Buggies, director nnd adapter
of "Slippy MeGee." Is one of tho dis
coverers of the accordion as the nwak
cner of moods. Not only is there some
thing peculiarly appealing in the soft
strains of tho Instrument hut It is such
a handy little thing to hnvo about that
the "orchestra" may bo placed in uny
handy niche.
But there must bo more than the
mere skill In "nccordloning." The nr
tist must be able to follow the tempo
of tho nctlon perfectly, even to the
slightest changes in the dramatic shad
ings. That Is the reason thnt In nil
of the studios in Ijs Angeles only two
accordion "professors" are in clamor
ous demand. One of these Ih Norman
McNeil, who gave Buggies first nld in
the highly dramatic scenes.
"I'icture-mnklng method, undergo
ing coustnut changes', nre nppronchlng
the 'silent nrt' literally," said Director
Buggies. "The. old noise, shouting and
confusion arc being eliminated. A per
son in u studio now hears only soft
music during tho tnklm; of a scene if
i he is within ten feet of the cuniern.
"Actors have learned thnt thoy lip
their words more 'expreiely' and pre
vent facial distortions if they speak In
low tones. The voice seldom is raised,
even In the more tense dramatic mo
ments. Wp now work in quiet. The
scenes quletlv are rehearsed before the
cameras begin. During the nctual
'shooting' of the action we really arc
engaged in silent drama."
'Tretty case, don't jou think iMt
I admitted that I did. r 1
"Well, lt'H exactly Hko on. ...'
Gloria Hwanson bought today, so wj J
. " .. "' . . ..V"-'"""' Ann I ka ,
vvnero mo tuinucnco came from (
r," ,"""....,... iri -Hi
yuu iu m iici iiuiui uj see her nA i.
....... (..,.. 111.. ...h.t , "s
nuo juoi .vu num. juu OIWUJS imfc.
ne stunt upartmenta ure, only tin I
uduiiii; urns,
"Tliero weru dozens of people arm,.
-her nice lather, who bZ5,
lightful, und another Mr. Svvaniwn-!!;'
least, 1 tlilnk that was his name--iiH i
tnat
and
other
two press agents, und u woman v?lu,
to talk to Her, and her companfcm
rushing urounu trjing to get her h
look at things that neonlo n, .
shops had brought for hur to tee 73
llouers nnd candy everywhere, and X
telephone ringing, und ail that bort !
,blio had on a gorgcoua sunset 1
chHise longia', and looked rather llw3
but perlectly bcautltul. Her cye ),
such a vvouuertul sea-blue, and her hair
is so brown, nnd she's so lovely I
"And 1 bought this Jowel can WU, '
wo wero lookiug nt the ones that bid
been sent lor her. Thcro wero four of
them, und her companion ami I ni.vJ
out one lor her, and then this one
me Gloria hadn't time to see them l
But when lier companion was buying i
bag for her own mother nnd rushed In
saying, uio, uon t jou thttiK this wouH
be pietty lor mother? bhe doesn't hit
bcatlbags, you know' why, Ulorla hi
invui) uj. ituiu iu luuii at n.
rQIIE camo East to shop, you krioi
but people are keeping her u
busy, being interviewed, that lis
hasn't had time to look at a thing, fa
tne snopscepers navo to send ererj.
thing up to the hotel for her. Nicemi
to shop, isn't it?"
"But what aro you going to leep li
that case?" I demanded. "You know
perfectly well that you haven't a Jewel
to your name, except that wrist watch
jour aunt gave jou that doesn't to,
and the amethyst earrings your modm
won't let you wear because they make
you look so risque. So 1 don't ue
what-
"I'fn going to keep my beauty there,"
retorted dairy, haughtily. "I heard
Gloria telling an intci viewer all hir
beauty secrets using pleuty of cold
cream, and never putting water on h
face,' and keeping scrupulously clean.no
matter how often jou have to get
cleaned up,
"So 1 in going to carry all the
necessities of life arouud with me inJ
be a beauty if 1 have to wash my ftct
during the nature pictures when I to
to the movies. And furthermore, In
going to darken my eyelids the wij
Gloria does and look fascinating."
"You'll look ns if you'd put inascari
on jour eyebrows and it had run," I
warned her, bkeptlcally, but she titi
mo a languid glance and gathered op
her little ease.
"How do jou Know?" she inquired
sweetly.
"Because I b;iw G lot la in j self jet-
terday. and I tried it injself Int
night." I retorted, with a feeling cl
untold happiness. For once 1 had beaten
Garry to something !
Stars See Their Beginnings
When Eugene O'Brien was a leadiar
man in Hclznlck pictures his stars wen
the Talmadge girls. Now that he li i
star he can soon drop luto a pictur
theatre and see himself play opposite
Norman in "Toppy," and Constant 1
".Scandal. These early succocses w
the Talmadgcs nre to be revived IU
new prints, retltled n evcrytrung. j
lHOTOI'I..lYS
I'HOTOI'I.ATS
HIOTOPI.IYH
women who had been In the car that
These bojs had manv theories about caused the necident, or their Insistence
what a motion picture should nnd that I drive back in their car with
should not be. but they could never find ,i,, i Li,i,i i,.. ,,! if i
Ill . .I... !.! . ....!. I '"" """ ".- fc""- - -
a trial. Tinallv thev hit unon the , lma "na
original expedient of buying their own roau mat iveith anil I nau taKcn so i j,,(t tom Angdes the next day,
camera and making n picture in which I short n time before. nlono; my aunt could not very well go
nearly nil the actors were chl dren and u , t d t j t take wUh me. nnd Mr. Sandy had said that
which, therefore, cost very lltle money. , ' m to mQ j
.enny nil me scenes were exteriors, so - "- ..t. ... ...... Ncw Yofk nJ(j (nl(( mp t0 hpr ,10URe
rioro platF"
COMUNV y .
The following theatres obtain their pictures through the
STANLEY Company of America, which is a guarantee .of
early showing of the finest productions. Ask for the theatre
in your locality obtaining pictures through the Stanley
Company of America.
eoMMiir f A
. ., bodv knew me Hint wnnld he wonder
a trial. Finnlly they hit upon the , "uu """ lu " "ki "- "" """ , fnl.
cwper of gambling nnd opium joints in San Francisco's Chinatown, she is
asked to play one of tho most striking characters yet created by Hugh Wiley,
whose Chinese fiction in the Saturday Evening Post has established him as the
leading author of this typo of story.
Very often the studio exacts much of her vitality and It is not uncommon
for her to start work at 0 in tho morning nnd work until 0 In the evening
before tho glaring light thnt bap one's strength. Yet Anna Mny never misses
her work evenings nt the little Chin'-e laundry.
TUB call of the Neic "World nil uniiccrcd by Anna and still it docs
not cause her to octroy the filial duties of the Old. That is the
Chinese xcay. To the ichite gul this icould be an unusual procedure.
To the Chinese girl f is tho molt natural thing m the tcorld, Anna
May has not yet been convinred thnt her studio icork is greater than
her duties to her family. If she ran arhieie a motion-picture icputa
Hon and still attend to her fathtr t afjntrn, hc cill alicays be happy
Otherwise she Kill havo to desert hir fairyland.
Answers to Questions by Movie Fans
good
JAZZ BABY It hns been ninmrod be well to register her with n
thnt Mine. Olga l'ctrova is through with ngent.
tne screen for "keeps bhe is soon tr
appear on the Broadway stage Tom I GEORGE MORWOOD Bessie Love
Mix, Eddie Polo, Conrad Nagi-l and iB Penny Sills in "Penny of Top Hill
Richard Barthelmess nro married. An- Trail." However, in the end it seems
tnnln Moreno. Hnrold Llovd. Euiretu I n tlmn.li ulm u nnlnv in Ko Mm I'.,.t
O'Brien nnd Harrison Ford have not J Walters. Wheeler Oakman plays Kurt
yet given up their bachelor npiirtincntH.
FILM FAN Alice Lake is at present
appearing In "Over the Phone."
Pauline Frederick plajs a dunl role In
"Salvage." She is Bernlce Ridgway,
wife of a very wealthy mau, and Mrs.
Kate Martin, wife of n convict. Jack
Holt Is married. Yes, it was reported
that Mary Miles Minter wns engaged to
Orrvlllu Errluger, a business man of
Portland, Ore.
MRS. JAMES LEWIS I don't like
to nocm pessimistic, but p.lense don't
bo too anxious to get your slx-yeni -old
daughter in pictures. Studios are sim
iily swamped with such appltcnjions
But If you insist there is onlj one
IV 'i tmng io un aim mai is 10 iiuie inu mini
4r ." 1, lot ot photographs to Now
i',4" V-I " '8Ai H) the castW directors at
E IV );BWp studios. Jt might uko
iJl
ftf
bV
'J.V.
t? J
v alters. Gloria Swnnson's first
starring vehicle has been released.
vviinda Hawley is married to J. B.
Haw ley. She is twenty-six years old.
G. ('. M. Conbtance Tnlmadge's lat
est picture is "Wedding Bells."
Her next release will be "Woman's
Place." Norma's latest production is
"The Sign on the Door." I can't tell
vpu what "The Sign on the Door" is.
No, jou nre not a nuisance You know
I always like to please my friends.
VIRGINIA H Kntherlne MncDon
ald has not gone to Europe. Site Is biiHy
on her new jiicturo, "Tho Infidel " The
picture, "bntan's Paradise," was the
working title of "Regeneration Isle,"
the scenes of which were taken In Ja
maica. Norma Talmadge plays the lead
supported by Harrison Ford. The pic
ture uasoot oecn reicaseu.
that nrncticnllv no scenery wns re
quired.
The picture was most original nnd in
spite of their technical shortcomings
they found n fairly profitable sale.
Amateur theatricals on the speaking
stage have proved n stepping stuue to
success for some prominent motion-pic
ture stars of today. They have aroused
tho imagination, stimulated tho enthusi
asm nnd increased tho desire of these
amateurs to learn and to do better. And
they have frequently revealed, if not
actuallj developed, real talent.
rlL Talmadges, as children, used to
get up shows of their own nnd stage
them In the cellar or garret of their
Brookljn home. Norma always wrote
and directed these plays nnd usually
placed herself in the leading role. Con
stance was nlwaj-s given an importnnt
part and sometimes the lead by her big
sister.
But Connie was usually at her bebt
In trapeze work or turning somersaults
and was quite content to lenvc the
heavier dramatic roles to Norma.
Natalie also acted in these productions,
but huo genernlly preforred to confine
her activities to collecting tne nnmis
sion fees, which ranged from a specified
number of pins to a penny or u stick
of candy. "Ma" Talmadge was quite
frequently the entire audience and she
nlwajs encouraged the girls in this
pleasurable "work."
Charlie Raj, as n boy. used to get
up a circus or wild West show and
btago it in his father's barn. Ho al
ways called these performances "The
Greatest Show on Earth."
Katlierino MacDonald, Anita Stewart
and Miriam Cooper wero prominent in
school und homo talent shows. Scores
of others have found n place in the
motlon-picturo world, either directly
or indirectly, as the result of the dis
covery of their ability in entertain
ments of the non-professionnl variety.
It is only recently, however, that the
possibilities of amateur motion picture
making have been appreciated.
If you desire to write, direct or act
in the pictures, you can have no better
experience than trjing to inuke n pic
ture of your own, even, if at first, jou
nre not very successful.
(These "Tabloid Talks" are con
densed from the material for a book
by Mr. Hmetson and Miss Loos to be
published III the James A, MoCann
Company, A'oio York.)
at the little rnllway station, trying to'jut ,, tuc wnv to the train he added
break the silence which then I w el -. another suggestion
coined, but which made them so uneasy. ' "I wonder if jou'd mind stopping off
I had had to give mv name and address i "-'"K",; "V''"' , .ViY ""V"
. i i i i t .i ! '"K u motlon-pictuio exhibitors' con-
." mi- in-.iiJii- uu iuu& L-tiiub" " """!'' I veiillun there, votl Know
Ml 12th. MorrlB U I'acunk Ave.
lambra VrVt imiiy - k ''
COSVKIl'OI.ITAN I'ilHUli'TION
"THE WILD GOOSE"
GLORIA SWANSON
In "Till: GUIIAT MOVIKNT"
of couise, and evcrj' one looked at me
curiouslj when tbey knew who 1 was,
nnd who Keith hnd been.
It seemed queer that life wns going
and if you
could just, spend n few Hours there, long
enough to do down to tho Coliseum nnd
nppenr, It would be a good thing. You
can get several dnjs' lest before jou
get to Chicago, but if jou feel when
on jubt the same for other people, when "' KCt there that jou clou t want to do
it n sunlit .tun nun i Mutu n. a wiuin
mpai
Keith Gorham was lying in a rough
wooden box in the baggage car, and I
sat crouched on a dusty red car seat,
huddled down In the corner, feeling
like a beaten, broken thing.
I shall never forget the details of that
trip; the woman across the alslo, with
her three children, who fed them
bananas endlessly ; the slick-haired man
in front, who tried to pick me up the
haste with which he turned around and
the scared waj in which he glnnced at
inu over his shoulder nftcrward must
have been due to the stricken look in
my eyes. There were other people who
tramped up and down the nlsle to the
water cooler, nnd listlessly read mag
azines, and talked nnd talked and
talked, till it bccmed to me that I must
scream.
The news of the necident reached Los
Angeles before I did. nnd there were
rcortcts waiting ut the train when we
got in. But Malcolm Sandy was theie,
too; I wns so grateful when he made a
way through the crowd for me, and
then drove me strnlght to my aunt's,
without asking a single question about
It would be n good iiten, though the
mora jou go In for things and force
; (mi self not to hroixr on what's hap
pened the better it will be for jou. How
about it'-'
"I'll go," I told him. I didn't
exuetly see how 1 could, but he had been
so kind that I wanted to do nnythlug
that he asked.
Ho was very wise. IIo had put a
number of books and magazines in my
compartment and a great basket of won
del fill fruit. But. better still, he hnnded
mo tile scilpt of thu first picture I was
to vvorlc in, Just before the trnln pulled
out.
"You might glance through it," he
saw (llltdently. "It may interest sou.
It did, of course I rend It through
beforo I did anything else. I could see
it being screened; how each bit of busi
ness should be worked out, in my mind ;
just what play of expression would show
this change of feeling, what gesture
would supplement It. Unconsciously I
supplied the background tho lights nnd
half wnlls nnd "nroim" thnt clutter up
a studio ; the electricians shouting at
Anni 1 n SilD & THOMPSON HTfl.
ArULLAJ matimip. daily
ROSCOE (Fatty) ARBUCKLE
In "T1IK IHII.I.Ut A-YI'.Mt MAN"
ADrAHIA CUHHTNL'T Hoi 1GTI1
ArUALMA in a m to n ir. v. m.
ELSIE FERGUSON
In "rOQTI.HIHTS"
ACTrvD FIUNKI.1N A (URAHD AVK.
A3 1 UK MATINIIK DAILY
THOMAS MEIGHAN
In MMIITK AND INVIAKItli:i"
P. I ORE" sul MARKET ST.
VJl-WDn. u.;)0 ,, oao to 11
.,J,!i JAMES M. HARKIE'H
"SENTIMENTAL TOMMY"
GRANT 40-'- 0,UA"D v!r,
niii.Y
tSXHSL MEM-OKD'S I'llODl.TI ION
THE FAITH HEALER"
GREAT NORTHERN S W're
BEBE DANIELS
In "(INK WILD KKK"
Tho NIXON-NIRDLINGERfn
THEATRES Ul I
1MPFR1AI C0T" WALNUT ST3
UYll L-llrtLi jintu na,, KvK 7 & u
(- MOI'OI.ITAN I'KODI'CTIOV
"THE WILD GOOSE"
BALTIMORE, oVIa?
dokis via nml roritiKNAv roini:
"THE BRONZE BELL"
DPMKl U4TII AND WOODLAND AVE.
OC.1NIN MATINI3I1 DAILY
I'lltHT WKST l'HII.XnEIjI'llIA S1IIVWINO
"THE WILD GOOSE"
Lehigh Palace u"Sr"J
AM.-ijTAKjl-AHT IN rosMIII'OI.ITAN'H
"THE WILD GOOSE'
I IRFRTY l"OAD & COLlMlllA AV
uhju.i i i matinee daily
WALLACE REID
In "TOO Mt'(H SI'KKD"
FOUD
OVERBROOK ,)3Di llAvt
WILLIAM 5. HART
In "THE WHISTLE" It'. I'arnmount Wffk
131 I I IT DID rv llrottd & Duiquehanna
DL.U,UL i uiIihioi. L until 11
WILLIAM S. HART
In "THE WHISTLE"
BROADWAY B?1iW?'..:
ROSCOE (Fatty) ARBUCKLE
In "CltA.V TO MAHHY"
how I liad happened to be out with ! '""''h other, the carpenters hammering
Keith, or why 1 hadn't kept my word
to him.
"How soon can you go cnt.' ' ho
asked, as his car drove up to our door.
"I'm not working now, and I never
hnd n contrnct In comedies; I've .just
been working by the picture," I nn
swered. My voice didn't sound like
mine nt all ; it was dreary nnd thick.
"Then how about leaving tomor
row?" ho suggested. "I can mako all
the arrangements, and jou can go ut
once. It would bo good for you," he
added, glancing down nt me keenly.
I wns so grateful to him. To hnvo
stayed there at home, and had people
questioning me, nnd wondering Just
what there was between Keith and me,
would havo been Intolerable. Hut to
leave it all behind and start qut on
new work, in o ucvtt piaeo, wncre uo
carpenters nro always hammering in a
studio, it seems to mo! l pictured the
star I was to play with, iu his part,
Would ho provu to bo a camera hog ;
would he mako mo givo him tho center of
the stage nlwajs, and would ho insist on
having anything l did tnat wns very
good cut out beforo the picture was
shown?
That night I sat in tho darkness as
tho train went hurtling on its way,
looking out at tho scattered homes and
thoso that were clustered into towns that
we passed. I wondered If any of those
people had ever heard of me If even
now they vvcio reading iu tho newspa
pers tho account of the tragic death of
a young millionaire in. Callfornm, who
had been out riding with "one of those
movie nctrewses,"
I wondered, too, how,many gills there
"t iuuh uvuien who 'vvoum URVC
ii
PAPITHI 7 market bT.
GLORIA SWANSON
In "THE (lltKAT MOVIKNT"
rvvi ru At am
JU.Jl'ilt-L 'SO
A M'Hpleuond Ave.
7 nml li V. M.
GLORIA SWANSON
In "THBOHEAT MOMENT"
DARBY THEATRE
ELSIE FERGUSON
In "SACKED AND I'HOPANE I.OVE"
rriwpRFcq MAI 8T- manayunk
DOROTHY DALTON
In "IIEIIIND 51ASKH"
FAIRMOUNT .tfi'SMS
SI I..NA (IVM.N mill IC. U. LINCOLN In
"The Woman God Changed"
FAMII Y THEATRE 1U MARKET
1 -MVllL. 1 HAM TO MIDV OUT
DAVID I'OWELI. AND SITCML f ST
"THE MYSTERY ROAD"
PA1 APR r-'H MARKET bTKEET
.E; 10 A- M ,n " '5 !' M
BETTY COMPSON
In "THE END OF THE WOULD"
PRINCESS
10IS MARKET BTUEET
S an A M. in 11 .1.1 l M
MARION DAVIES
In "IH'HIKD TltEASt KE"
RFCiFNT MARKET HT IMuw 17TII
lL-Vjrii i 0 s
ENRICO CARUSO
In "V1V rot'HIN"
RIAI TO UEItMANlOWN AVU.NUK
-' x v-' AT TIJLPEHOfKFM ST
(JKOROE MKLFOIUFB 1'RimilCT -ion T
"A WISE FOOL1'
RURY UA"ET UT. HUIAJW 7TI1 '
ETHEL CLAYTON
In "WEALTH"
SAVOY 18U 'ARKET brRKKT
Apoi.ITASIM,,?,rlIT
"The Woman God Changed"
SHERWOOD B'AV W
, JACK HAIITJii DE MILLK.'M '
"THE LOST ROMANCE"
M
STANLEY .HA?KT.T.
--V,jcpurii.';
333 MARKFTflTnisi:T'J,IKATlvS'
ROSCOE (Fatty) ARBUCKLE
in "cuA.y to vivitnv"
VICTORIA MAKET T. ab. OTli
I he ureat Impersonation"
irvTH T THEATRB-lllow Spruce
30 1M ALL..TAU PACT UA'V
"WHEN DAWN cXME"
lKAINK.rOKD ",0A? l0,u,WM. HENN 4i.1 , hr"W.
-,-.TO (AlUfiyiuji III "LESHONS IN Uivv..
BELMONT, III ,A?ff,""tfSSV
GLORIA NVVANSON und MILT0.N9!y.41
"THE GREAT MOMENT''
:sr
PmAD COTH A CEDAR AVENJJS
LtUAK , 80 and 8. rt'4V to UF.
THOMAS MEIGHAN
In "WHITK AND UNMARRIED"
COLISEUM o'hwE I
THOMAS MEIGHAN
In "THE CITY OF HILENT ME.N"(
fl uinA t.Minn ut t. nll LTlTi ATI
JUMliU VimtaJuJe onrVinkhriir
DOUGLAS MacLEAN
In "THE KOOKIKS' IlKTl'n.V
LEADER iimZjti&&jl
JANE NOVAK In JAH.OLIJI.
"ISOBtL
I)
i nn i;t r'-D AND iocuST .fu
LULUil Mnts j 30i a,3o Evk. $ jj
(.LORIA NVVANHON nnd MILTOVHlUfl
"THE GREAT MOMENTA
RIVOLI C2D AND S&
WILLIAM S. HART, ;
In "THE WHISTLE"
STRAND3JS?T&fi
ui.uniA nt rtrtnn, imu '"iiV irklTl
"THE GREAT MUmtr
AT OTHER THEATRES
MEMBERS OF M. P. T.O.A-
- . 6510 Oi)rmntoT'.'
Uermantown matinee dai
BEBE DANIELS A
In "ONE WILD NinilT" ,
JEFFERSON atWS?'
THOMAS MEIGHAN
In "THE CONUHKHT 01" CANAA-,
park ?g? a;;r mi r
AI.I-nTAI 7 '"
"Lltt."
V.
"ir- i
WEST AIITfiHENY "t1h,..lAii'1
w iLmcmJUkWl
In ''VUITB ANlJ UNMABBIW,
M
.
f V
..-?:
,'J.'iA&
4. I1-'i! J J
taA

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