OCR Interpretation


The Minneapolis journal. (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, January 16, 1901, Image 14

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1901-01-16/ed-1/seq-14/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 14

11
PRICEDOESNOTHOLD
Wheat Continues to Seek a Lower
Level.
SHARP DECLINE ON THE CLOSE
May Wheat Breaks Under 78c, a Ike
cliue of Five Cent* From the
. Recent High. Point.
CIOM CIOM
THE DAY'S RESULT To- Yes
day. *«*'*•
May wheat,. Minneapolis. 74% 75%
May wheat, Chicago..... 75% VI .
May wheat, Duluth 76Vi 77? a
May wheat, St. Louis.... 74%.
May wheat, New York... 81%
Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, Jan. 16.
—Continued weakness abroad and a dally run
of wheat into northwestern markets exceed
ing in volume receipts of a year ago, are
factors that bear heavily on wheat. Against
these bearish Items th« market is stubborn.
May opened this morning \*@V*.Q lower at
7594 c, and then dragged for a time in narrow
range. Minneapolis was relatively firm*
S and sold fractionally closer to Chicago. Liver
, pool was %d to Hi lower and dull. Spot
wheat in Liverpool was reported to %d
lower, with a Id decline on Argentine wheat.
Minneapolis and Duluth had 322 cars, against
231 last year. Chicago reported realizing at
the start, but principally of a scattering na
ture, and it was not thought any heavy long;
lines had been broken. Broomhall cabled
.that the sagging tendency in Liverpool was
due to liberal Argentine offerings. . Midway
in the session the market steadied under re
, ported buying in Chicago by houses thought
to .be identified with : long wheat holdings.
Minneapolis May recovered to yesterday's
close and sold at 75% c. Cash trade in Chi
cago was better, 175,000 bushels were sold
«arljr. Primary receipt* were 640,000 bush-"
els. compared with 343,000 last year. Clear
ances wheat and flour 474,000 bushels, corn
1,000,000 bushels. Minneapolis : received 278
cars and Duluth 43, against 192 and 39 a
>^ar ago. -
' The feature of the market was centered in
the last half hour of the session, when the
market went to pieces and May wheat broke
, a full cent. The market had been holding
steady around 75l for May. It broke sharp
ly to 74& C and closed at 74% c, July at 75% c.
The break demoralized the market.
The cash market was quiet. Millers wanted
a certain number of. cars, bought them and
then withdrew. Elevators took a large part
of the offerings and 1 bought some of the
best wheat. Near the close there were sev
eral lots of good No. 2 unsold. Low grades
did , not suffer" mu^h on the whole, and
some sellers who carried over lots of No. 2
and 3 ".were able to move their poorer lots.
Prices were weaker. No. 1 northern brought
74^g!75c, and 74*»c to arrive. No. 2, 71c to
72c; poor No. 2 going at 69c. No. 3 wheat
ranged from 60c to 68c. Rejected sold up
: from BOc to 67c, and no grade from 50c to 55c,
very poor lots going around [email protected] - j
THE CASH TRADE
Llgfbt Flax Receipts—Flour Outlook
;jfi Improved-Corn Active.
FLAX—The feature of the day in flax was
the drop in receipts. . Of th© 13 cars in this
■market several went on sale and offerings
were very light. The market held around
$1.80 for the best rejected. Sales of no grade
were reported at $1.55. No grade that showed
quality brought $1.57. Later sales of rejected
were at $1.62. Minneapolis received 13 cars
against 8 last year. Duluth had 3 cars- Chi
cago 4.
Closing Prices: Minneapolis, cash, $1.65%
to arrive, $1.64%; May, $1.71%; Duluth, cash,
$1.67%; to arrive, $1.67%; May, $1.73%; Sep
tember, $1.20. ■ • ■ -- ■
FLOUR—Prices, are lowered on patents in
conformity with the easier tendency in wheat
Clears are quoted unchanged. The mai»ket is
apparently ..working , into better shape, ' and
while; trade conditions at the moment 6how
■no marked change, millers are anticipating
improvement from now on, and are talking
hopefully. First patents are quoted $4®4.15
--second patents, [email protected]; first clears, $2.80
<g3; second clears, [email protected] Shipments 29,320
brls. •
-VIILLSTUFFS—The market is steady and
quiet, without new feature. Bran in bulk is
quoted [email protected];_ flour middlings, [email protected];
bulk shorts, [email protected]; red dog in 140-lb
sacks, $14; feed in 200-lb sacks, $1 per ton ad
ditional; in lOQ-lb. sacks, 41.5U Mr ton addi
tional. Shipments, 1,027 tons.
n FEED AND, MEAL—The market is quiet.
Coarse corn meal and cracked corn are quoted
$13.50; No. 1 feed, $13.75; No. 2 feed, $14.25;
No. 3 feed, $14.75; granulated corn meal in
cotton sacks at the rate of $1.90 per brl.
CORN— market was active on a range
%c lower. Choice lots held up with 35c as top
price for No. 8 yellow. Demand was good.
No. 3 yellow is quoted 34%@85c; No. 3 corn
34%e; No. 4, 34c. Receipts, 55 cars;' ship
ments, 12 ears. .
OATS—The market is firm and steady. Very
choice No. 3 white brought 26c, which was ;
top; No. 3 white is quoted 25% c; No. 3 oats, i
24%e. Receipts, 40 cars; shipments, 10 cars.
BARLEY—No. 5 barley sold at 48c. Feed
grades are quoted [email protected]; malting grades, 44
#53e. Receipts, 8 cars; shipments, 2 cars.
RYE— market Is quiet. One car was
/received and 3 shipped. Choice No. 2is quot
,ed 48%e; ordinary, 48c.
HAY—Receipts were 169 tons. Minnesota
upland, [email protected]; lowa upland, [email protected];
• coarse to medium, 1 [email protected]; rye straw, [email protected]
Minneapolis Wheat— Range of Price.
The following . was the rang© of price «tf
•wheat to-day: ... .
Jan. May. July. '
Opening ...... ....«.„ 75% 76%
Highest ...„..- 75% 76%
Lowest 74% 75%
Close- . - • :
To-day 74% 74% 75%
- Yesterday ...75 . 75%@% 76%
Year ago ......... 62% . 63%@% 64%@%
On Track— 1 hard, 75% c; No. 1 north
ern, 73% c; No. 2 northern, [email protected]%e.
2 p. m. report-
Puts, May wheat, 74%@74%0 bid.
Calls, May wheat, ?5%@75%c.
, Curb, May wheat, 74% c.
•'•' Cash. Sales Reported To-day.
No. northern, 2,090 bu, to ar......... .50.74% '
No. 1 northern, 3,000 bu, to ar .... .74%
No.. 1 - northern, 21 cars ......... 7414
No.'l northern, 7 cars .................. .74%
No. 1 northern, 1 car ........... .. .75%
: No. 1 northern,, -14 cars .................. .74%
No, 1 northern, 1 car .......'....... „... .75
No. 2 northern, 12 curs ......►:„..,.....,■ .7114
No. 2 northern, 11 cars .....». — .71%
No. 2 northern, 11 cars ..........;... ..„ 71 i
No. 2 northern, 12" cars ..'...-..:........":« .70
No. 1 northern, 1 car *.............»... .72% i
No. 2 northern, 7 cars ........ .72 •
No. 2 northern; -5 cars ........ '71%
No. 2 northern, 2 care ...... II.!.!. -(w
No. 2 northern, 8 cars M^M^. -7174
No. 2 northern. 2 cars .. M^«^. "~ .09
No. 8 wheat, 3 cars ......_............. . ci%
No. 3 wheat, 3 ears ..„..'...i, GO
No. 3 wheat; 51 car .................... 0$ .
, No. 3 wheat, 1 car ....^._..^. ' 59
No. 3 wheat, 7 car ........^...,'-' "* *63
No. 3 wheat, 4 cars ....... ._....._ C 6
No. 3 wheat, 6 cars ......_......... 62
No. 8 wheat, 3 cars ....^.... *"* "ci
No., 3 wheat, . 1 car-......^._.,.^..-^[*-.'g7 ',
No. 3 wheat, 3 cars -..».., ... * 65
No. 3 wheat, 1 car ........^...:.[., **" '^4
No. 3 wheat,, 1 car ...-....._..... "*" '69
No. B;wheat,*l" car I......^l**"*""*'**-*'gg
-Rejected wheat, 1 car „..__.% V -57
s Rejected wheat, 1 car .....:„ '..'.." " 5?
Rejected wheat, 1 car ...._.... """V 'gg: j
Rejected .wheat, 3 cars ....;_.. "50
No grade ; wheat, 1 car „.._ """"• 'r )8
"No grade wheat, 3 cars !""*"*'* *62
INo grade wheat, 1 car ...;..... •**••■••• •
:No grade wheat, 4 cars 1...-.-...**"" "47 j
No grade wheat. 6 cars ..^. ' -***r "55
•No grade wheat, 2 cars .... . _-.. ' *'" *: "59 •
No grade wheat, 2 cars .... ". '"*" " 4fi !
-No grade : wheat, 4 cars .... •••••-•• -™ i
.No grade wheat, 1 car ..":._;..;"""-*"* " MV i
-No grade wheat. 1 car ...,_.. . -* 54 •'
No. corn, 13 cars _; .'-;!*! !!!!''-"'* '. UK |
No. 3 corn,: 3 cars ..*.;»...V -***""" ':u2
h No. 4 ' corn, 1 , car '...;.. "■"-. " *'-''•'-V *' 041?
? No. 4 corn, ■1 - car ..;•■ "•-**-'*- '0./7
No. 3 yellow corn, 4 cars V.:!:' '■'%,
' No. 3 white oats, 1 car ....... " "2s
No. 3 white oats, 1 car ...v '*""-"*" 9?li
No. 3 white oats, 1 car '.'... iZ'iv''"";^-
No. 3 oats,;l"cßor ....... '-"Mi".' .'.'Sr':
No. 3 : oats,' 2 •cars .~...'l""'""” 23
• No. 3 oats, 14 cars '..'.'.'. U""""*-- 'Z 4 \>
No. 3 oats, . 1 car i .....,.......;*■"* -Jsl?
No. 5 barley., 1 ear .... '"^'■■•f,% ;
Rejected flax, 1 car ..........„?""""* Veo
v ßejected flax.. 1 car .'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'."'.'.'.'.'.'.'."'. lira
„' Receipts: and ' Shipment*.
:■ . ■ ,:. /'■ ■ Jan. 15.'.'<':'.■ ::.:\- ■
• Received— 279 cars. 225.78 C bu; corn
46,200 bu; oats, >53,6(iO>bu; barley, 6.C40 bu; ;
rye, 700 bu: flax, 7,580 bu; Hour, 904 brls- hay M
J169 tons; ; fruit, : 82,626 lbs.; < merchandise,^ 1,321,-' i
1 530 : lbs; >lumber,. 15 « cars: Vtarrel I stock, 6 cars- I
:machinery,j69»ooo lbs: coal; ],40C tons: wood :
1 572 cords; brick. H.Guo; cemient, 300 , brl9; salt, '
■■- 1 car; • dressed'- meats, 000 ■ lbs;' railroad sna- 1
\ • t :-•'■■ »:-■ .-:-:■:, '■ ■ ■ .:,y '* . .:Vi,-- • "■.• >■ \- •.'
teiials, 2 cars; sundries, 12 cars; car lotV,
07 i. i;: : -J ■ • ,-. ' ' • '.'---•■ ...••. [„.... .-. ,
Shipped—Wheat, ■' "0 cars, 23,800 bu; corn,
11,040 • bu; i oats, 13,100 bu; ; : barley, t- 1,460 bu;
rye. 2,190 bu; flax, 5,340 bu; flour, 29,820.br15;
millstuffs. 1,027 tons; fuel oil, 26,700 'gals;
merchandise," 1,408.630 lbs; lumber. ;45-cars;
machinery, 132,220 lbs; ties, 9 cars; v stone
and marble, >1 - ear; live i stock,', 2<- ours; lin
seed oil, 27,480 brls; "oil; cake, 65,000^1b5;
dressed; meat5,;24,990 lbs; bides, pelts, etc.,
760,000 lbs; railroad - materials, 6 cars; sun
dries, 15 car*; car lots, 562, .■ i :
State Uraiit Inspection.
Jan. L 5.
Inspecied lv—Wheat—Cars—Great North
ern—No. 1 northern, 36; No. 2 northern, uS:
No. 3, 22; rejected, 10; no grade, ST.
Chicago. Milwaukee & St. Paul—No. 1
northern, 17; No. 2 northern, 34; No. 3, 23;
rejected, 6; uo grade, 13.
Minneapolis & St. Louis—No. I northern,
lti; No. 2 northern, 9; No. 3, 1; no'graile, 2.
Soi> Lino Wo. 1 northern, 5; No. 2 northern,
Z; No. 3, 4; uo grade, 2.
Northern Pacific—No. 2 northern, 4; No. 8,
5; no grade, 3.
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha-
No. 1 northern, 1; No. 2 northern, 4; No. 3,
5 cars.
Chitaga Great Western—No. 2 northern, 1.
St. Paul & Duluth—No. 2 northern, 1; No. 3,
1; no grade, 2.
Totals —No. 1 northern. 75; No. 2 northern,
94: No. 3, 61; rejected, 16; no grade, 09.
Other Grains—No. 2 winter wheat, 3 cars;
No. 3 winter wheat, 32; No. 3 yellow corn,
16; No. 3 white com. 1; No. 3 corn, 36; No.
3 white oats. * No. 3 oats, 25; co grade oats,
1; No. 2 rye,^; No. 4 barley, 2; No. 5 bar
ley, 2; rejected flax. 12; no grade flax, IC.
Cars Inspected Out—No. 1 northern wheat,
27; No, 2 northern wheat, 16; No. 3 wheat 6;
rejected wheat, 4; no grade wheat, 18; No.
2 winter wheat, 3; No. 3 yellow corn, 8; No.
3 oorn, 1; No. 3 white oats, 2; No. 3 oats, 16;
No. 6 barley, 13; rejected flax, 7; no grade
flax, 1.
Wheat Movement.
. ■ ' . ■ . • „..■■
The following are the receipts and ship
ments at th« principal primary wheat mar
kets: , , -
Receipts, Shipments,
Bushels. Bushels.
New York 2*,300 121.016
Philadelphia 39,325 61,600
Baltimore ......; .......... 19.571 -Nono
•Toledo «;.'. 42,966 4,800
Detroit :. 10,376 None
St. Louis ......... 61.000 53,000
Boston ........... 42,600 7,982
Chicago ..........126,725 26,419 I
Milwaukee ................. 22,500 15,750
Duluth ....'.. , .......V...." 51,023 550
Minneapolis 228,780 25,800
Kansas City ............... 76,800 60,000
Wheat Movement by., Road*.
Jan. 15.
Cars—Milwaukee, 47; Omaha, 55:
St. Louis. 41: Great Northern, 105; Northern
Pacific, 2; Great Northern, 2; Great Western,
26; Sooy-3. v
Shipped—Milwaukee, 12; St. Louis, 2;
Wisconsin Central, 6; Great Northern, 1;
Burlington, 9. '
range: of MaY WHEAT
| Minneapolis.
<po pan (pa /&&> /if
A — ——
*¥ — -—
/^ ;_'■• nfi-r\n . ■•■"•■-■
r .ifLj v \
i 3i
'^;: r, . v-—-4/
7^[ 1 ) —I —q
OTHER GRAIN MARKETS
CHICAGO GRAIN ■■ ■ '
Wheat Opens Lower-Corn Is Dull
.. and Featureless.
Chicago, Jan. 16.—May wheat opened >[email protected]%c
lower at 76% cto 76% c, under the influence of
lower cables. It has been noted that Liver
pool has shown cheerful acceptance of de
clines on this side recently, but has ignored
any advances. The .depression of outside
markets further influenced the market and
May during the first hour dropped to 76%(g>
76% c, where the market steadied. ' Local re
ceipts were 63 cars, none of contract grade.
Minneapolis and Duluth reported 322, cars
against 291 last, week and 231 a year ago.
May rallied to 76% c on liberal export en
gagements but turned weak when longs - at
tempted to unload. | May slumped sharply to
I 75% c and olosed weak. l%c to l%c lower, at
!75%@75%c. ■ • / ;-. ■ ■ . : -•-. , -; ■.-.
i Cash Wheat—No. " t 2 red, 75%@76%c; No. 3
red, [email protected]; No. 2 hard winter, 70%ia>72%c;
No. 3 hard winter, [email protected]; No. 1 northern
spring, [email protected]%c; No. 2 northern spring, 72%@
76V: No. 3 spring, [email protected]
Corn was dull and featureless. May opened
%c to a shade lower at 33%©;28%c,
and sold to 38c in sympathy with the wheat
I weakness. Receipts were 421, cars, 2 of con
tract grade.
The close was weak with wheat; May [email protected]
%c lower at 38c.
Cash Corn—No. 2, 36% c; No. 3, 36c.
; Oats were dull and easier with wheat. . May
opened a shade lower to unchanged at 24%!§!
24% cto 24% c,, and sold to 24% c.
Receipts were 219 cars.
■ Cash Oats—No. 2, 240; No. 3, 2Z%c. -
The following was the range of prices:"-
Wheat— Jan. May.-"
Opening ... . 76%@%
Highest .—.„............ 76% ■■■
Lowest .— ...........,*.. ...,._. M 76%@%
Close— -
To-day ...................... 72*4 75%®%
Yesterday.. ...'.,'.►.;.... _.. 74% • 77
Year agg ►....^ „.►... 62Vg<g% 65%
■Corn—- ■ ■' • - — '.■■-.■ ■ ■- . ■ -:
0pening'............;.; ....^. 38^i
Highest _~..... ,—..„.„ 38%
Lowest «.„...,„,„,,„„,,„ ........
Close
To-day „_ M .. 36% . 38
Yesterday .................. 36% - ' 38*4®%
Year ago « M *.»....-.««.. 31»4 , 33%
Oats— . •
Opening „;■.„.......;......... [email protected]%
Highest ........ _...... 24%
Lowest «.j^..U.,«i^«.:».. ,v......:. 24%@%
Close— l
To-day ...„.«.,.„.!....;.., 2314 24%@?i
Yesterday ..„.„ 23% - 24%
Year ago ...........^..'... 22% [email protected]
Daluth ' Grain.
Duluth, Mtnn., Jan. 16.—Wheat opened %c
oft, at 77c, and hung between 77c and 78% c
until after 12:30, when it slumped swiftly to
76Vio at 1:03 and closed at 76i4c.
-Cash sales were 8,000 bu. at 2%c under for
wheat to arrive and 4c under for wheat in
«tore. Wheat—No. 1 hard, - cash, ' 74Vic; ■to
arrive, 75% c; May, ■ 78% c; No. 1 northern,
cash,.72%c; to arrive, 73% c: May. 76% c; July,
77% c; No.i' 2 northern, 62^[email protected]»ic: No. 3
spring, [email protected]; oats, 25%e to 25% c; rye, 49c;
barley, [email protected]: flax, cash, $1.67%; to arrive,
$1.67%;: May, $1.73%: September, $1.20; , corn,
35% c. Car Inspection—Wheat, 43; corn, 45;
oats, 4; flax, .3. Receipts— 51,023 bu;
corn. 83,670 bu: oats, 12,081 bu; flax, 2,193 bu.
Shipm-ent*— 550 bu. .
.",■-■■.' - ■■"■ —"'■■.,' ' •■ ».-" ■ /. ■ •
Liverpool Grain.
Liverpool, Jan. 16. —Close—Wheat, quiet, Vz
@%d lower; February*, 6s %d; March, 63 l%d:
May, 6s l"»id. Corn, quiet, unchanged at M.d
lower; January, 3s 10% d; February, 3b lOd;
March, 3s 9d. " : ' .
' Milwaukee Grain. ' '"'lf
Milwaukee, Jan. 16.—Flour, dull. Wheat,
lower- No. 1 northern, 76%<j)77c :' No. 2 north
ern, 72%@73%c. Rye, lower, No. 1, 53c. Bar
ley, steady; No. 2, 60e; sample, [email protected] Oats,'
dull; No. 2 western, 26%<g>27c. - «
St. Loaii Grain.
St. Louis, Jan. Ifl.—Close—Wheat, lower;
No. 2 red, cash, elevator, 717^c: January,
71% c; May, 73%@73%c; July, 72% c; No. 3
hard, 69%@70^c. Corn, lower; No. 2 cash,
36c; January, 35% c; May, 37c; July, 37% c.
Oats, firm; No. 2 cash^ 25c; Januarj', 24% c;
May, 25»4c; No. 2 white, 27% c. Lead, nomi
nally $4.20. Spelter, nominal, $3.95.
New York; Grain.
New York, Jan. 16.—Close—Wheat, March,
79% c; May, 80^c; July. 79% c. Corn, Janu
ary, 46c; May, 43% c: July, 42% c.
Kansas . City Grain.
Kansas City, Jan. 16.—Close—Wheat, May.
C6%@6€%c; cash No. 2 hard, [email protected]\ie: No. 2
red, 69®71<\ Corn, May, 3554<ff35%c; cash No.
2 mixed, 34^c; No. 2 white, S6M>c. Oats, No.
2 white, 24% c.
Cate&KO Seed and Coarse Grains.
Chicago, Jan. 16. —Rye, January, 47% c; May,
49Mi®49%c. Barley, cash. 38<S€0c. Timothy,
per 100 lbs, January, $4.60; March, $4.70.
Clover, per 100 lbs, January, $10.75; March,
$11.25. Flax, cash, No. 1, $1.65; January,
$1.65; May, $1.70.
Chlcasro Previsions.
Chicago, Jan. 16.—Provisions opened weak
on heavy hog receipts and lower prices at
the yards and declined later on small demand.
May pork opened 2Vic lower at $14.25 and
declined to $13.95. May lard [email protected]%c down at
$7.52^^7.55. dropping to $7.45. May ribs [email protected]
7 s/fec depressed, at $7.17%@7.20, se4Hnc at
$7.12%.
Close—Pork, January, $13.90; May, $14.
Lard, January, $7.35; February, $7.35: March,
$7.40; May, $4.4714. Rlb». January, $7; May,
THE MINNEAPOLIS JOUKNAL,
GENERAL PRODUCE V
■ - , The Minneapolis Market,
*•-,• ':■- '-"Janr:l6.v'-"-'"-";;*-:;:--?-^>:
, Butter 'is . weaker * and ■ quoted -lSc ? flat for
extra creameries.';. Demand remains quiet,, re- '
tailers buying; moderately. " . „v
!,.* Eggs show a tendency; to recover from ""the-,
extreme weakness, and \ .quotations-, are &q <
higher. The . general market conditions ' are
unchanged, but prospect of colder weather
gives rise to firmer feeling. ■, iv .•-. ; -'V
■ BUTTER—Extra" creameries, lb, 19c;
seconds; [email protected]; imitations, firsts, [email protected];
I seconds, 14c; dairies, exars,,- 17c; firsts, [email protected]
15'^c; - seconds, < 12c; roll, r fancy, 14c; i seconds,
ll^c; ladles, firsts, * 16c; seconds," 12c; packing
stock, fresh,.sweet, [email protected]
EGGS— Strictly fresh, cases included, loss
off, ; 16®16 l/ic; storage, No. 1, 14c; lower grade
storage,'. [email protected] held fresh, 10c; dirty, fresh,
7c; checks, 7c.
■•: CHEESE—Twins or flats, fancy, U(n
twins <or flats, choice, lb, ■ [email protected] l,ic: »twins or;
flats, fair to good, 8^8^: brick, No. I, 13®
1814 c; brick, ' No. 2, j io®"llc; brick, Mo. ,3, 6®
7c; goat cheese, imported, - per • lb, 27c; llm
burger, No. 1, I2"&c; llmburger. No. 2, B^@
9}40; primost, No. 1, per lb, be; prlmost. No.
Z. per lb, 6c; Young America, fancy, lb, 12V*
@13e; choice, [email protected]:c; puitost, [email protected] Swiss,
No. 1, lie;, block Swiss, No. 1, 12»/[email protected]; No..
2, block, [email protected] .
DRESSED POULTRY—Turkeys, dry picked,
fancy, medium weight, per lb, ; J%c; turkeys,
dry .picked, young toms, 8c; fair to good
mixed, Tc; turkeys, thin, small, bruised, 4ssc;
spring chickens, fancy, 8c; fair to good, [email protected]
7c; springs, off stock, [email protected]; capons, 18©14 c;
fowls, fancy, 7c; fowls, fair to good, 4^;gsc;
ducks/fancy, 9c; ; ducks, ". fair -to good, 7®Bc;
geese, fancy, 8c; geese, fair to good, 6&@7c. .
DRESSED MEATS—VeaI, fancy,". 100®123
lbs, 7Hc; veal, fair to good, [email protected]>4c; poor to
overweight, 4%®i>c;. mutton, fancy, country
dressed, 6c; thin or ; overweight, sc; > lambs,*
fancy, 8c; lambs, thin or bruised, 6e; hogs,
according to weight, 5%c.
GAME— Jack, per doz, [email protected];
white rabbits, 80c; cottontail, [email protected]$l; squir
rels, gray or. black, per\ doz, [email protected]; red,
do?., [email protected]
PIGEONS—Live, per doz, 60c; dead, per
doz, 50c; squabs, per do*, $1. :. ' ~
. FlSH—Crappies, per lb, sc; pickers], [email protected]^c;
pike, [email protected]; eunflsh, ib, 2c; perch, per lb,
[email protected]; herring per lb, 2Vs4f3c; herring,
skinned, per lb, 46; lake trout, per lb, 10c;
frogs' legs,-per doz, as to size, [email protected]
POTATOES— car lots, [email protected];
Rurtls, [email protected]; Ohlos, [email protected]; mixed white,
[email protected]; mixed red, [email protected] , ,
SWEET POTATOES—Illinois, per brl, $3;
I Muscatines, per brl, $2.50.
BEANS—Fancy, navy, bu, $2.40; choice,
$2.15; medium, hand-picked,- bu, $2; brown,
fair to good. [email protected] . "
ONIONS— Red Globes, car lots, per bu, $1;
Red Wethersflelds, bu, 90c; Yellow Globes/
car lots, per bu, 90c. ,
DRIED PEAS— yellow, , [email protected] per i
bu; medium, [email protected]$l; green, fancy, [email protected]; ,
green, medium, [email protected]?l bu; marrowfat, bu, $2,
APPLES—Russets, [email protected];* Spttzenbergs,
[email protected]; Ben Davis, [email protected]; Belleflowers,
$3.5(Kg3.75; Kings, $4.50; Talman Sweets, $3;
Wagners, $3.50; Greenings, $3.25; : Baldwins,
[email protected]; . Northern Spy, [email protected]; Jonathan, $5
©5.25; western bo? apples, bu, [email protected]
CRANBERRIES—Cape Cod. ' per brl, • $9;
Jerseys, [email protected]; bu crates, $3; Wisconsin
cranberries, [email protected] -
FIGS—New California, 10-lb boxes, 85c.
ORANGES—California navels, ■ 80s, $2.50;
California navels, 965, $2.75; California nav
els, 1265, $3; Californiaa, 150s, $3.25; Califor
nia navels, 176s to 288s, $3.50; California seed
lings, all sizes, $2.75; Florldas, all sizes, $2.73
#3; California tangerines, half box, $2. , ..
LEMONS—Messinas, 300s • or 3605, fancy,
[email protected]; choice, [email protected]; California, fancy,
as to size, $3.50; choice, $3.25. -
PINEAPPLES— doz, $2,25.
BANANAS—Fancy, large bunches, $2,250
2.50; medium bunches, [email protected]; small bunches,
[email protected]
GRAPES— grapes, keg, [email protected];
extra fancy, per keg, [email protected] - r.
HONEY— fancy white, 1-lb sections,
1,8 c; choice white, [email protected]; amber, [email protected];
golden rod, [email protected]; extracted white, [email protected];
buckwheat, [email protected];- extracted amber, [email protected]
ClDEß—Sweet cider, per brl, [email protected];
sweet cider, half brl, [email protected] : ~
VEGETABLES—Beets, per bu, 40c; cab
bage, crate, $1.50; carrots, per bu, 40c; celery,
per doz., [email protected]; Californias, [email protected]; cucum
bers, per doz., $2; egg plant, : per doz, $2;:
green onions, doz., 50c; Spanish onions,
per bu - crate, $2.00; lettuce, per doz.,
[email protected]; head lettuce, floz., 85c; parsley,
40c; parsnips, per bu, 60c; rutabagas,
bu, 35c; watercress, doz, 30c; wax beans, per
bu, $3.7504; hubbard squash, per doz., [email protected]
$-1.00.
NeTT Yorlc Produce.
New York, Jan. 16.—Butter receipts, 4,719
pkgs: firm. CreameTy, [email protected]; June cream
ery, [email protected]; factory, [email protected] Cheese receipts.
2,359 pkgs; firm. F»ncy large fall made, 11*4
@ll%c; fancy small fall made, 11%@12c.
Eggs, receipts, 7,079 pkgs; easier; western
average packed, at mark, lß@l9Vsc; western
loss off, 19%@20c. Sugar, raw, steady; re
fined steady. Coffee, steady; No. 7 Rio, T^ic
bid. Molasses, steady.
Chicago Produce.
Chicago, Jan. 16.—Butter, fairly active;
creameries, 14§20c; dairies, ll(&lSc. Eggs,
active; fresh, 18c. Dressed poultry, quiet;
turkeys, B%c; chickens, 7&@Sc.
Hides, Pelt», Tallow and Wool.
Andersch Bros., Minneapolis, say: "There
is a firmer feeling in hides resulting from
tanners entering the market and buying a
few ears at current prices. However, pres
ent conditions are unstable, and it is felt
that the market owes its firmness principally
to the attitude of the tanners, and should
they again withdraw their support declines
may be looked for. The packers are also an
important factor to be reckoned with, as the
market is hardly in condition to withstand
much pressure, and should packers decide to
push sales prices will probably ease off. The.
latter pressure is perhaps the most to be
feared. While tanners want cheap material
to work on, yet thej' are not out to break
the market, as a general lowering of hide
values all around would force lower quota
tions oil leather. The demand is good for
heavy and light hides. Dry hides are some
what neglected which is true also of dry
calf skins. G. S. skins show a little more
activity, but kip of the 8 to 25 lb. grade are
dull and almost unsalable at this time.
Owing to weakness in wool values of pelts
have receded, notwithstanding the fact that
late receipts carry a heavier percentage of
wool owing to advance growth. Prices to-day
are even lower than 30 or 40 days ago. We do
not look for any Improvement in values un*
less wool advances.
The tallow market last week was steady
and higher, but late reports show recession
ofy y e per lb. all around. Sellers are show
ing disposition to meet buyers in their lower
views, and considerable business has been
done on the lower range. Krom a statistical
point of view both tallow and grease are in
stronger position than at any time within
the past six months.
Receipts of wool are light although larger
than at this time last year. The dullness and
decline in prices has brought forward some
good sized lots, as many holders have sized
up the situation as pointing to still lower
prices eventually. Reports from abroad and
from Canada are not encouraging. It would
seem that consumption Is too light to warrant
stability, and in some quarters it is argued
that the effect of heavy importations before
the present tariff became effective is still
felt.
In furs lower prices have been established
for mink and skunk. Reports from London
sales to occur *on the 26th inst. will be
awaited with great interest and will have
much to do with shaping the course of the
market in this country.
No.l. X 0.2.
Green salted heavy steer hides 9 S
Green salted heavy cow hides 8 7
Green salted light hides f% ti%
Green salted heavy cow and steer
hides, branded T'i 614
Green salted bull and oxen 7 6
Green salted veal calf, 8 to 15 lbs.. 10^4 9
Green salted veal kip, 15 to 25 1b5.... 9^ 8
Green saKed long-haired or runner
kip • BVt 6%
Green salted deacons, each 50. 40
Green cattle hides and skins. [email protected]^4c per
pound less than above quotations.
Green salted horse or mule hides,
large 13.00 2.25
Green salted horse or mule higes,
medium .- ,2.40#1.G0
Green salted horse or mule hid
small [email protected]
Dry flint Montana butcher hides 14 fl4',i
Dry flint Minnesota, Dakota and
Wisconsin hides HVi 10
Dry flint calf skins 16 13
Dry flint kip skins 14& Uhi
Green 'salted pelts, large, each...... •: 90®1.15
Green salted pelts, 1 medium, each <dl)@ .75
Green salted pelts, small, each....... 25® .50
Dry flint territorial pelts, butcher.... 11%@12/
Dry flint territorial pelts, murrain. [email protected]
Dry flint '■; territorial-. shearlings v.'..'.''_ 7' <B 9 H
Tallow, in calces 4%" 4% ;
Tallow, in barrels 4% 3%
Grease, white: .V..."......;.............." *\k „ 3%
Grease, dark A...........:... — .-:.. 3% ,2^t
Wool, medium, .unwashed ...........16. @17
Wool, | coarse, unwashed .*...",'... ? 15 ■ @18 -~:.
Wool, fine,; medium, unwashed '.".;.. *[email protected]
Wool, fine, unwashed ......":.""; ■.;.:'.*.. ll^lS^
Wool, broken fleeces, • unwashed 13 (515^
Wool/seedy,: burry, unwashed ......12 '014.=-:
. Bright Wisconsin and similar grades, X [email protected]
higher than' above quotations. ", u ' ';-/.'
Died of Old Age.
Special to The Journal. . .: • V
'- WykoC.) Minn.; -v; Jarw 16.—Mrs. o Elizabeth
Stewart of ;FiUmore,t died 'yesterday ;"aged' 82
years. V She ■ was the ? mother of r- Alexander
Stewart of .'■ Minneapolis and 1 had-lived' hera
aince 1g56. Shd,die4 of old age. .' '-■'■'
CHANGES ARE MIXED
Opening Prices in the Wall Street
Stock Market.
ST. PAUL UP NEARLY SIX POINTS
Litter It Dropn and the General Tone
llroomesi Reactionary In a ■
,' "'-:■-:■■■■ - . '■'-■■■■ --.TT- :\ -.'*?...• .-' .:■ '
Duller .Market.
New York, Jan. 16.—Federal Steel was
forced down to iv on running sales of 8,000
shares at the opening, compared with 61»4
last night. The stock was supported and ral
lied feverishly and there was a demand from
the shorts in the other steel stocks. Steel
and Wire and Tin Plate rose about a point
each. -Manhattan, Burlington and St. Louis
& San Francisco rose from 1 to 1M and Erie
was in large demand at a fractional advance.
The general list showed opening changes
much mixed.
Speculation became quite uneven under the
movement in special stocks. Manhattan
managed 10 rise 2 poinfs and helped the
tractions. Burlington's progress to 144 stead
ied the grangers, and there was some recov
ery in the Pacifies. Liquidation was very
general in the steel stocks, a rally to 51 and
a subsequent, dip to near 49 in Federal Steel
unsettling the group. At 11 o'clock the rail
ways were improving all around while the
specialties were receding.
St. Paul became conspicuous and rose vig
orously to 100/ i, almost ti points above yester
day's close. The adroit manipulation of this
stock caused uneasiness among the shorts in
other properties and the demand to cover ad
vanced many stocks from l\<t to 3 points.
Delaware & Hudson, Sugar, Illinois Central,
Northern Pacific, Burlington and St. Louis &
San Francisco second preferred were ab
sorbed heavily. The steel stocks made inter
mittent rallies, but did not hold well. Fed
eral Steel met large offerings on the rallies.
St. Paul came back to below 153 before miU
day and the general tone became reactionary
in a duller market.
j The ■ renewed weakness of the steel : stocks
affected the \ whole; market again i after ■ some
show' of ", resistance, i i Federal Steel fell to 47
and Tin Plate to 57%. The-Pacifies and the
coalers were very heavily sold, the extreme
declines running from 1% to 3 points. a St.
Paul lost all but a fraction of the advance
and Burlington fell back below 144. Very few
stocks regained any : net gain. ': There- jvas a
quick rally of 2 points in Federal, Steel and
a point or more in Northern Pacific, Mis
souri Pacific and Manhattan, but the general
market continued | very irregular and closed
near the bottom.
The bond market was quiet but firm.
Stock quotations reported for The Journal
by Watson & Co., Chamber of Commerce,
Minneapolis: s .
*~T" j > ~ ~~ j "7* i —Close— "
Sales . Stocks— ..... Hi- ( La- ; Bid. I Bid.
1 -■■--'■ est. j eat. |Janl6:Janli
; Adams Express. ......]......| 145 , 145
!•— Am. Express ;:.....!......( 172 1170 '•:
,600 Am. Cot. Oil-.. 29 I 28% i 28% [ 29%
15,700 Am. Car ....... -20% 20% 20% 20%
, .do pr ........... ; 69% 69%
2,200 Am, Hoop ..... 2914 26% 27% 29
' ,Am. Ice :. i ; 39% 39 ■,
, I do.: pr .......1...... \ ...... - 67% f6B
200 Am. Linseed .. | 6% 6%
; do pr ....... 86 | 35% 35% | 35%
Am. Malting";. I ••• | 4% 4%
i do pr , 25 I 25%
33,000 Am. Sugar .... 135 I 132% ' 133%1 133 l
! do pr ...A.. :. ! I 118% | 118
; , . Am. Smelting ..' 64% 62%! 62% 64%
do pr :. | 100 99 | 99% 99
11,700 Am. Steel &W. 41% 39% 39% 40%
1,1001 do pr ....... I 85 84 84 85%
20,100 Am;> Tin ....... 61% 57% .:.... 60%
14,800 Am. Tobacco .. 115% 113% 113% 114%
, do pr j 140- ......
Amal. Cop ..... 91 90 I 90% * 90%
12,600 A.. T. & S. F. ...... ...... I 45, | 45%
12,000 do pr ...'..:. i ...... ...... | 85 " j -.85%
21,900 Bait. & Ohio .. 92% 91% 91% 91%
1,200f do pr ....... 86% 85% 85% 84%
41,600, Brook. Rap. Tr j I 83% ' 84%
Brook. Un. Gas 7. 175 177
Brunswick Co ..........:. 9% 9%
■ l,3oo;Can. Southern.. 57% 57 | 57%| 57
4,300.Che5. & Ohio .. 40% 39. i 39% .39%
- v C. ft E. 111-... 95 | 94% 94% "94%
| do pr ....... 122 | 120% 120 119%
4,200 Chi. - & Alton .. 40% 38% [ 38% 39%
1,200} do ■<pr.W«.: I '75% -74- , 74 ! 75 .
67,900 Chi., Bur. &-O. 14y6T4! 143%| 144% 142%
14,300 Chi. Or. West..; 18% | 17% | 18 17%
300 do pr'A'-;.'.. 79% 78%. 78% 78%
300 do pr B ....'■ "45.% 44% 44% 44%
■100 do deb .« I .91% 92 ,
1. - Chi., Jnd. & L. 25% 25% | 25 j 25
i do pr w...:.. .60% 60% 60 I 60
1,200 C.,C.,C. & St.L. 79% .78. \ 1 78% 79
•--'•-do pr ...........;.,..... | 118 | 118
-'- Cle., Lor. &. W. ...... ...... I 28 | • 27
I do pr "..: .. ..68 88
-- • • rChi. Term .....:... 11 I 11
i -do pr ................... 34 33%
■ • Col. Fuel & I. ............ 47% ; 49%
Qol. Southern 7% 7%
• | do Ist pr ... ...... ...... 42 I - 42%
<;■'■■■■ ] do 2d pr :.......:.;..... 16% , 16%
4,000 Consol Gas .... 192% 191 '1 191%......
23,300 Con. Tobacco .. 45% 43% 44%| 44%
600. do pr:...;... 95 94 84% 94%
2,500 Del. & Hudson. 155 152 . 152% 152%
1,900 Del.. Lack & W 193% 193 193% -94
'1,200 Den. & Rio Or. 31% 30% '31 31%
800 do pr ....... ! S3 82% 82% 83%
. Dcs M. ft Ft.D ...... ..... 18 18%
'"" ! do pr ...:... ! .....". 1 .'..... 115" 115
47,400 Erie.::,...;.:... : 30% | 29 29% 30%
! do Ist ■pr ... 67% 65% 65% 67%
. i do 2d pr ;... 45% 43 j 43%| 44%
■Evans ft Ter H-! ..-..;....:..T 42 | 42%
1 do pr | | .) 80% 80
122400! Federal Steel .1 51 | 47 }■ 48% | : 51%
8,900! do pr ..,....[ .74% 70% 70% 72%
Gen. Electric .............. 189 i&2%
400 Glucose .............. ...... 47/2 48
i do pr ..;.....;... ...... 9*% 94".
Great% Nor., pr..[ 195% 194 192 7 194%
1,700 Hocking Valley 447*1 43% 43% 45
a 800 do pr ...... 72 71 71 [ 71%
2.500 Illinois Central. 132% 131 131 130% »
- lowa Central... .24 23% .23* 24
. -| : "do pr ..." '•••• 50 00%
800 i Inter. Paper .. 24 23 22% 22%
I do pr i 70 ! 71%
. K. C. & South.. 1 , 14%,. 14%
,| do pr ; I ...... )37 T 39 :
iLaClede Gas ....... 70 70 . :
; do pr ..' ............ 95 98
200 Lake E. & W. ..."... ...... 43 43%
- ; do pr'..........:....... 111% 111 ,
Long Island ...... 1 ...... .67 69
10,800 Louis. ft Nash.. 90 |•■ 88% 88% I 88%:
, fM., St. P. ft & ............. 18 19
( do pr ... i^t • ••"•• • ...... 53 ! 53 .j
84,000 Manhattan „... 123% 119 | 119%, 121 i
• 100 Minn.v ft St. • L ....' 1 69 »59% !
21,500 Missouri Pac .. 86 84 ! 85% 84%;
-*v Mobilew&-Ohio. 1 .....45 46 :
[Mexican - Cent.. 14% •14 14 .14%
. 1,600; M., K. ft T....! 1*5% 16% 16 j 16%
16,700 do pr ! 48% 47 47 .47%:
■ -:...;.. I Mex. Nat .....'. ! ...... .—"• 3% i. *"-•
1400! Nat. Biscuit ... 37% 32% 37% 38%
, i do pr ...... ...'.. ...... 92 ! 92
Nat. Salt ...... ! 45% 43% 43% 44%
' ' I do pr .... '5 ; 743£[- 74 ' .„:..
200 Nat. Lead ...,;..,..! -| 16% l -16% 1
-. , t do ."""pr ,;.. .".:...|."V.."'. I 84% 85%
4,300 Nat. Steel ..... \ 41%; 40 ; 40 40%
: do pr .... 92 ! .91% 91% 92
I Nat. Tube .... 57% | 56 j ' 56% 66 ;
'■"■ :■'< I do pr >.... ...... ! ....... 98% 99
300 N.J. Central.. 155 r.V.r. 164 155 '
6,300 Norfolk & W.. 45%| 44% | 44% 45%
200 do *- pr ...., 84%1 83%1 -83 83
1 iNorth Am. . Co. 20% 20 \ 20 j 20%
46,100 Northern Pac.. .85 j 82 j 83% 82 ->
4,900 do -* pr ....| 86%. 86% 86; j -86%
IN. T. Air Brake ;...'.. 1 ..'.... 150 154 +
8,300 N. Y. Central.. i 144%! 142% 142% U£
Wx.Y.,C. vft St.L. 23% 22 21%; 22
:'-■•■ I do , • Ist pr.| ....'.. ...... 105 I 105
-do " 2d pr. ..:......*... r63 ;..."..
Omaha ..'...'.... i 135 133% 133 135
1 do pr .... i 180 180
19,500 Ontario & W...i; !•••••• 31% 32%
■■^.«.-: Paper" Bag -..-.• ...... ...... 15% 15%
I do pr ....;............. 71% :71
• m Pressed Steel,.. .....'• :.•••; 42% 43%
200 do <\ pr .;....i ...... ...... 79 i 79%
: 300 Pacific Mail .. 42% 41 |; 40 j 42 f
' 7,000 Perm. R. R....' ...-. .-..*..■. 147%| 148%
.-..■., P..C..C. & St. L, ;..:". ! 55 I ,57,
-. "f „do pr !'.'.'. ;.'.i..••*•• .■••■• ; 85 ; -81?
36 800 People's /Gas 102 .99 • ! 100 ; 101%
■1001 Pullman :........ : .-•'• ! 397 ■ ! 198:
27,300iReadin«ir/K.... 39% 31% 31T' S L 33%
35.000 do Ist pr.v. ..'..'•■ , ...... !i' 71 72%
300 do • 2d pr.... 44 i 42% 42%! 43%
-900 Repub. Steel ... 14% 14% ; 14% 14%
. ■■ 500 -do •■•■ pr ..*.... 80 : ,9 '; > 59% 59 r
20,000 Rock Island :. .< 125% 122% 122% 123 -.
. :';■:; St.' L. & San F. 28% 27% 27% 27%
. vC : do. Ist pr •••••• 79% 80
I.:;/, ! do 2dpr ";.:.. ' 59,% 57% 58 , .57%
11.400 St. L. ft 5.:.W... ..:.';• .:■••-• 22% -»i,
10 600 do pr ;,;.'.... 1 -•• 50% ,50%
89 000 St. ? Paul i ;■;■■•: 155% 149% 150% 149%
* 900 do pr;:...;... ...•'•• :*•"•"•■'• .189 ' 188 :..
;.: ■ ' 'Stand. R. ft Tw. 4% .- 4% .' 4% .■;? 4%
44.500 Southern Pac .. 43% 42% 42% 42%
8,000 Southern Ry ..I 20% 20 ■-. 20%, 20%
£400 do pr .*....... 72 .■ 70% 71 <■ j . 71%
53,700 Term. Coal I. s 55% 53 54 ( 55%
s,sOo!Texas ft 1 Pa<-... /27. ,25% 25% 26%
- 600 Third : Aye. Ry. 122 121% 121%: .121%
> Twiu City R. T.: ...... , .-.'... 66% 67% ■
50.900 Unionr Pacific. 85% | 83% 83% 84% :
3,3001 do pr „.-...:. 83% 83 83% 83%
3,800' U. S. Leather f..t. ...:;; 12% 12% ;
i #00-. do pr ..-...,/. :..'■•• .:.\.: 74 , ri 7B% -,;
-V,«M>|U. 3. Rubber... 21% 21% 21% -21% ,
•■ ■rtf 1 < <Ja p.- -■'•...... 60% I- 60 .60 80 - j
1000:Wal>*«h .. „... -12% 12 • 11%" 11^
6 300 ' So pr -.V..,..., 27 ! 25% , 25% 26%;
U.-'-M Wells-Far."? £xp. •..'... >>*•■• ■^■; ;1f?;r.
3,S«oiW>at. L»ioa .-! »* i **«*i ;«»» '
WEDNESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 16, 1901.
6,209 Wheel. & L. E.I 12& 11% 12 I 12
-"*:-* j :do; Ist pr .....^..'.... I .!:V.~;. 55 " j 5S
I. do id pr :...'.. 29% ; 28Vs 28% | 28Vi
Wisconbla'Cent. ; 16!/i 16 ! 1C \ 16
■•■^•■•hrdo-^prV:'.^:-.'. £40% *''39? i 4LJS*
- Total sales, 1,255,600:5hare5. ' ; -
AD N V COT. -. vß93jjosßL-%^4>^....
—x—x—x—x—x—x—x— x—
MONEY REPORTS
Nof York : Money.
New York, Jan. 16.—Noon.—Money on call
steady at :\ per rent; prime mercantile paper,
[email protected] per cent. Sterling exchange steady, with
urtua! business in bankers' bills at $4.87<g
4.87»4 for demand and at [email protected]>,4 for Ml
days: posted rates, [email protected] and $4.88.
Commercial bills, $4.82»/[email protected] Silver certlfl
'■ates, 64^@65'/io; bar silver, 63% c; Mexican
dollars, 49»ic. Government bonds heavy; re
funding 2s, registered and coupon, 105 V*; 3s,
registered 108Vi. eoupou 110; new 4s, regis
tered 136V2, coupon 137H; old 4s, registered
and coupon, n3>'«; ss, registered MO I*,1*, eoupou
UH4.
Minneapolis* Money.
MINNEAPOLIS — Bank clearings, $1,646,
--538.08; New York exchange, selling rate 60c
premium, buying rate 10c premium; Chicago
exchange, ' selling rate 60c premium, buying
rate par; London sixty-day sight documenta
ry, |4.82%. ..._ •■.-:.:,; : ; ■-._■-■.
ST. Clearings, $848,573.00.
Chicago Money.
Chicago, Jan. 16.—Clearings, $25,130,12«;
balances, $1,703,581. Posted exchange, $4.84&
4.88; New York exchange, par.
London Consul*.
London, Jan. 16.—Consols for money,
96 15-1(5; consols for the account, 97 1-16.
GOLD FOR PARIS
Million Will Be Shipped To-morrov
Front .\«mv York.
' New York, Jan. 16.—Heidelbach, Ickelheim
er & Co. announce that they will ship $1,000,
000 gold to Paris to-morrow. The gold wil
be taken from the assay office.
INVESTMENT GOSSIP
New York to C. E. Lewis: Money continues
very cheap aud another excellent bank state
ment is looked for this week. The Chicago
crowd is again arrayed on the bear side ot
People's Gas and will try to force it under
par. Should they succeed, it will be an ex
cellent purchase. On the weak 6pots would
advise the long side of Ontario & Western,
Readings, Erie, Wabash preferred, Union
Pacific and Northern Pacific common and
AHol preferred. The weakness ■ shown by
Sugar is disappointing to the bull pool formed
during the closing days of last week. To all
outward appearances the certificates have no
support. Insiders are quite willing to let the
bears continue their hammering until they
have, a.s they invariably do, sold themselves
luio a hole. When the market turns this will
be one of the first to shoot upward, and its
pace will be decidedly rapid. Tin Plate com
mon was so manipulated beforehand that the
declaration of an 8 per cent dividend failed to
produce any marked effect upon the stock.
Holders with big profits tried to sell out
around 65, but were glad to get 60%. Nobody
believes that the dividend is to be permanent.
If they did, there would be a scramble for the
stock at current quotations.
The directors of Federal Stegl declare a
cash dividend of 5 per cent, but as no an
nouncement was made until long after the
close of the session, it is hard to say what
Its effect upon the stock would have been. A
few curb trades were reported at an advance
of 2 points over the closing price. This divi
dend may create a little enthusiasm but it
will be short-lived. Every advance of conse
quence will be met with vigorous selling. The
speculator who makes Wall street his head
quarters is now as bearish on the stock mar
ket as he was bullish ten days ago. He can
sea nothing ahead but lower prices and is
selling nearly everything in sight. It is true
that surface indications strongly suggest a
continuation of the decline for a few days at
least, but It is well to bear in mind the fact
tnat there is great danger in getting short in
a market already heavily oversold. Since
Monday last many paper profits have been
swept away, just as was expected, and those
who have been compelled to take losses will i
not feel much like taking hold again for some i
time.
There has been no change in the legitimate
situation to create uneasiness on the part of
holders, but the load that has been hanging .
over the market proved too heavy, when the i
first evidence of weakness made itself mani- j
fest. It bad to be digested at the expense of I
values. The buying baa been of a mediocre
character for some days, and It was plainly
to bo seen that stocks were passing from the
hands of moneyed interests to those of people
whose finances would not carry them through
an emergency. A week ago holders of stocks
were urged to take profits, but the desire to
knock off the' extreme fraction proved too
great for the majority, with the usual result.
There are very few pyramids now left, and It
Is a good thing. After all the weak holders
and shoestring traders have been weeded out,
the market will be in position for another tig
advance, and those who will avail themselves
of the present low level of prices need not
fear for the outcome. The market will prob
ably sell off a little more, but when the tima
comes to realize the heavy sales of the past
two days, stocks will be very scarce. A mod
erate buying movement will cause a rapid
rebound and the entire losses will be recov
ered in a single session.
New York, to Lewis: "A director of Fed
etal Steel received the announcement of the
8 per cent divfdend with considerable amaze
ment and soon afterwards seemed quite active*
in the stock market. The fact that price*
broke soon afterward gave the impression
that he sold the Steel stocks generally. The
principle on which he acted, he refused to
divulge. Brokers said that his operations
lv the stock prices are yet to be made."
Waldorf gossip. New York, to Watson:
"If big men have made their turn, the
manipulation which heretofore has been to
facilitate the sale of stocks will from now on
have for Us object the depression and ac
cumulation of stocks. At least, such is the
view held by the most experienced observers.
The latter take the position that the sold
out interests are so large that such a mod
erate decline would not enable them to re
coup their holdings, and that this process will
be- slow and might involve a 20-point swing
in prices."
Goldman, Zacns & Co. will ship $500,000 gold
to-morrow to Paris. Total exports, $1,50u,
--000.
New York to Andrews: '"There is some
thing more coming out in Tin besides divi
dend announcement of yesterday. Believe
may be some consolidation. Inside pool owns
at least half common stock. A pool is in
strongest possible condition. Believe they
will mark up stocks. Talk of 85 in two
weeks. Tin did not show its lull earnings
in statement."
New York, to Andrews: 'Wall street had
a story yesterday that the Goulds are likely
to lose control of the St. Louis & Southwes
tern road. It will be remembered that a
fight was made at the last annual meeting
foT minority representation on the board of
directors, and that it was successful, but
those making the fight at the time declared
there was no intention to try and wrest con
trol of the road from the Goulds; and this,
moreover, ie not thought to be possible. The
stock has recently been quite active, but this
is said to be due to the reports of a consoli
dation of the roads in its territory." ■
New York, to Edwards, Wood & Co.: "Pres
ent financial conditions cannot be compared
with anything in tbe past, and th« stock
market is constantly surprising the traders
who are looking for an old-fashioned 'break'
of 10 points or so over night. It fails to
materialize because so generaly expected.
The strong people have not relaxed control
of the market."
New York, to Watson: "It is rumored
that Federal Steel is going to buy up T. C.
I. Co. and issue bonds to pay for same.
These bonds will, of course, take prece
dence over the stock, and accounts for weak
ness in Federal Steel, if true."
SPECIXATIVK GOSSIP
Chicago to Lewis: "There has been liberal
covering of short wh?at on the decline and
some investment buying, but sales by tired
holders have counterbalanced them and
the market shows little sign of recovery."
Minneapolis stocks of wheat will Increase
this week about 350,000 bushels.
Lohrke reports 35 loads of wheat taken so
far at the seaboard for export.
Logan, Chicago, from Jolley: "Inquiries at
New Yo:k for wheat for Lisbon may result
in a car-ro sale, but nothing done yet. A
steamer is. under engagement out to cover old
business of 20 loads."
Verhaeff. from Milinine: Cables again lower
and our market showing some weakne&s on
selling by scattered local holders. Corn a^Jso
easiev with some local selling. The same is
true of provisions.
Boston Mining Stock*.
Boston, Jan. 16.—Arcadian, 18; Arnold, 5;
Atlantic, 28%; Baltic, 34; Boston, 320; Butte,
80; Calumet, SSO; Isle Royale. 37; Osceola,
83%; Quincy, 177: Tamarack, 331; Wolverine,
49%; Winona, 5%; Old Dominion, 3IH.
M. DORAS & CO.
The Oldest Firm of
Bankers and Brokers
: IX THE SOUTHWEST.
H&Y9 removed from ttielr old quarters
. . - on Jaoksou Street to the
4>}«rmaula Life. Building, or. 4th
and Mlnseiota St., St. Paul, Mian
A STEADY MABKET
Cattle Held Quiet, Without Much
Feature.
HOGS HADE A SMALL DECLINE
Generally Dull . Day, Reported From
All the Market*—The Day*
Goxnlp.,
South St. Paul, Minn., Jan. IS.—Receipts
were 900 cattle, 300 calves, :',SU>J hogs, 200
sheep.
The following table shows the receipts
from Jan. 1, 1801, to date, as compared with
the.same period a year ago:
Year. Cattle.Calves.Hogs.Sheep.Horses.Cars.'
1901... 5,977 947 36,071 31.761 1 832
WOO ... 3,939 1,002 24,151 23,747 MB 600 ;
Dec ....... 65 '..... ..... $G4 ... i
Inc... 2,038 .... 11,920 8,014 ... ; 286
Receipts:
Date. . Cattle. Calves. Hogs.-Sheep. Cars.
Jan. »...,.. 844 102 2,629 306 64
Jan. 10 ..... 285 43 2,671 5,229 VI
Jan. 11 ..... 228 23 2,873 1,883 S3
Jan. 12 ..... 81 8 2,639 152 37
Jan. 14 ..... 141 ;' 10 1,686 10,605, -80
Jan. 15 1,159 103 2.48" 1,341 ,89
Estimated receipts by cars to-day of the
railroads centering et these yards: Chicago
Great Western, 8; Chicago, Milwaukee & St.
Paul, 10; Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis &
Omaha, 9; Great Northern, 17; Chicago, Burl
ington & Qulncy, 8; Wisconsin Central, 4;
Soo, 15; Northern Pacific, 7: total, 70. '
CATTLE— supply here was only fair
and trading was very brisk at prices, steady.
Receipts east wepe . very liberal, with prices
generally quoted lower. The demand for
good to choice beef 7 and ■ butcher cattle was
strong. The bulk of. killing kinds consisted
mostly of canners. Trade in stock and feed
ing cattle was only fairly active at prices
about steady with yesterday's brisk move
ment-Sales: - .'■■■.. , , ■.->:;
i Butcher Cows and Heifers—
! No. ; . . Ay. Price. No. . Ay. Price.
15 ........1,097 |3.1o; 5 1.096 $3.00
3 ........ 816 2.00 I 3 .. 1,133 8.35
2 ...945 2.25 'I 2 ........ 865 2.00
7 927 2.40 il 4 ........ 812 2.25
3 943 2.00 I 3 ........ 1,133 3.35
1 ........ 970 2.75 1 ........ 1,060 2.50
.'l-.. 880 2.25 | 1 ........... 1,080 2.75
1 BSO * 2.00' 1 1,050 2.50
1 680 2.75 1 .1,170 3.85
1 1,150 3.25 ] 1'„ 920 3.25
•Beef and Butcher j Steers— ■
No. Ay. Price. I No. V ■ Ay. Price.
7 ........ 1,068 J4.40 (! 1 ........ 1.130 $4.00
1 920 3.50 1 .910 3.00
Milkers, and Springers—
One cow and one calf fcr $65.
One cow for $25.
One springer for $20.
. Stockers and Feeders — \.,
No. *''"' Ay. Price. No. Ay. Price.
14 ........ 702 $3.40 ;10 .... 842 $3.50
6 .765 * 3.35 i 8 626 3.35
3 740 3.00 2 .-. 625.3.75
6 ~.. 403 3.25 5 722 3.45
3 ..,,.... 726 3.00 ;j .6 ........ 736 3.25
2 „ 765" 8.00 1 17 ........ 644 3.25
2 ........ 355 3.60 ! 1 ........ 700 ; 3.00
1 ;.•;: 510 3.40 1 600 3.75
1 280 3.75 II 460 2.85
1 640 3.50 |1
Feeding Cows and Heifers— „:,: ...
No. ; Ay. Price. No. Ay. Price.
1 ....:...' 420 $3.00 1 ........ 380 $3.00
6 440 2.90 3 ........ 630 2.75
*2i ........ 620 2.75 ' 3 ........ 636 2.60
1 ........ 510 2.60 i | 1 740 2.80
2 ........-415 2.25 II 2 ........ 270 2.00
Feeding Bulls-
No. Ay. Price, il No. Ay. Price.
.1 580 $2.60 II 2 ........ 1,023 $2.75
Veal Calves— *' v
No. Ay. Price. I! No. ' Ay. Price.
2 ......... 130 $5.75 l|l ........ 100 $4.50
HOGS— were large supplies at all
markets to-day. The supply : here 'was quite
liberal and while condition at outside markets
generally quoted sharp declines in values,
the market here ruled only about 5c lower.
There were a few cases possibly "Me under
yesterday. - Choice ones sold at $5.10 and
i 18.12%. Mixed grades sold from $5.00 to $5.05
| with common mixed kinds selling at $4.95
i and roughs at $4.85. Sales:
i No. . Ay. ■ Price No. Ay.' Price
101 201 85.12Vil 130 216 $5.10
26 205 5.10 |l 72 ....... 205 5.07*4
100 ....... 160 5.07^)22 ....... 203 5.07*6
88 185 5.07% 81 ....... 205 5.05
42 ....... 200 5.05 | 60 ....... 207 5.05
73 181 5.05 11 16 ....... 218 5.05
17 ....... 200 5.05 j64 171 5.05 ,
34 ....... 191 5.05 '71 ....... 197 5.06
18 ....... 171 5.05 ji 40 ....... 175 5.05
10 190 5.05 |' 72 ....... 172 5.05^
37 ....... 188 5.0514 '■ 19 229 5.00
'24 ....... 175 5.00 I, 4 192 5.00
Pigs and Culls—
No. ; , Ay. - Price I No. Ay. Price
4 ........ 375 $4.90 j 3-.V...... 380 $4.85
2 ...'..... 335 4.85 ] 2 415 4.85
1 " 410 4.85 ii 9 ........ 97 4.25
3 ; -.86-4.25 ; 6 .........95 4.25
-d 73 4.25 6 .'. 101
7%........ 85: I
SHEEP—There were only a' few. received
fresh to-day. The local demand was unsually
keen for all kinds of killing stuff and as a
result buyers were compelled to go to local
feed lots for offerings. The market did not
show any material change from the past few
days and the prices paid for the few on sale
to-day were considered fully steady. Practi
cally nothing was done in stock and feeding
sheep.. Sales:
No. V Ay. Price.
4 lambs .92 $4.75
2 lambs 85 4.75
1 sheep ..; 110 3.50
1 sheep ......................110, 3.00
5 ewes ......;................. 108 3.75
1 buck 130 2.50
On the market: O. Sssterrteher, Durand,
Wis ; J. S. Green, Red Wing; M. F. May
nard, H. C. Maynard, Long- Prairie; R. A.
Luedke, Ellsworth, Wis.; I. M. Hall, Dallas;
O. Folsom, Evausville; A. Taylor, Brandon;
E. Nelson, Alexandria; S. ! Co., Mclntosh; J.
Stewart, Euclid; Bank of Stephen, Argyle;
C. E. Nice, Warren; J. J. Hill, Northeote;
O. Ramatad, Wheaton, 111.; S. Klapperich, B.
Woeben, Brown Bros., Hanley Palls: M. Con
don, Clara City; A. L. Vickers, Claremont;
F. Remes, New Prague; Flitcroft & Thomp
son, Colfax, Wis.; Lewis Bros., Annandale;
If. Jacobson, Fingal, N. L).; K. #üby, El
bow Lake; E. Sauby. Wendell: M. J. Elling
9ou & Son, Barrett; Ormseth & Begum, Far
well; A. Linderholm, Belgrade- Bauson $
Weaver, Lowry; N. Anderson, Brooten; W.
P. Blasdell, Paynesville; Ruhland & Co.,
Amoy; Gilchrist Bros., Buffalo; R. Snell,
Klmball Prairie; Ed Oaffney, Glenwood:
Schneider Bros., Alma, Wla.; G. Nold, Pe
pin, Wis.; Anderson Bros., iiazeppa.
Sioux City Live Stock.
Sioux City, lowa, Jan, 16.—Receipts—
3,400; cattle, 600." Hogs—Shade lower. Sales:
No. * " Ay. Price.
81 - 205 $5.15
52 ...'.'.. 300 5.17V4
70 -■;.;.-..;.■......•:....••• .■'.;.. 265 5,20
--57 :.......... ...:....„....... 279 5.22 V*
Cattle— Sales: / .
No. ;-,,: v - Ay. Price.
Scanners ...795 $2.50
cows 990 3.50
4 stock heifers 760 2.50
6 stock heifers .:..........'. 540 3.00
2 bulls ..........;.........:...*.. 880 2.50
4 bulls 1.090 2.75
i 7 bulls .' 1,015 3.00
10 stockers ....760 3.40
19 stockers ...... $09 ' <0Q
10 yearlings 580 3.50
12 yearlings .............:........ 500 ■ 3.85
'6 calves ..;..........;...."......... 330 3.75
i 4 calves ........;........ 300 3.90
I*, Sheep—ln demand, [email protected] „ . , ;„. ;,
Chicago Live Stock.
Chicago, Jan. 16.—Cattle—Receipts, 17,500,
including 500 Texans; stockers and butchers'
stock, generally steady; market strong to 10c
higher: good to prime steers, [email protected]; poor
to medium, [email protected]>; stockers and feeders,
[email protected]; cows, [email protected]; heifers, $2.60®
4.25; canners, [email protected]; bulls. [email protected];
calves, [email protected]; Texa* fed steers, [email protected]; Texas
grass steers, [email protected]; Texas bulls, $2,50
@3.65.
Hogs—Receipts to-day, 40,000; to-morrow,
30,000; left over, 4,238; .')@lop lower: top, one
car, $5.35; mixed and butchers, [email protected]; good
to choice heavy, [email protected]; rough heavy,
$5(35.10; light. [email protected]; bulk of gales, $5.10®
5.25.
Sheep—Receipts, 15,000; sheep, steady;
lambs, [email protected] higher; good to choice wethers,
[email protected]; fair to choice mixed, $3.40f?3.80:
western sheep, [email protected]; Texas sheep, $2.60
@3.50; native lambs,[email protected]; western lambs,
$5®5.6C
Ofßcial yesterday: Receipts—Cattle, 6.042;
hogs. 30,565: sheep, 11,716. Shipments—Cat
tle, 1,637; hogs, 739; sheep. 1,821.
Kansas City Live Stock.
Kansas City, Jan. 16.—Cattle—Receipts,
8,000; steady to weak: native steers, [email protected];
Texas steers, [email protected]; Texas cows, [email protected] j
3.50; native cows and heifers, [email protected]; |
stockers and feeders, |[email protected]
Hoes—Receipts, 16.000; weak to 5c low*.*;
bulk of sales, [email protected]>,..; heavy, $5.17 14iJ?
5.30; packer*, [email protected]; mixed, [email protected]&;
"'. ■".'-;", '' '" ' ' r.." ■ 3 bstABfcISHBD 1879 - ' „■ ' S~——— . ■
WOODWARD & CO.
««" QRA/N COMMISSION *»»■
-.iv-'^:: „.„:,* „ ■:-'-' ;■■•■■■■■ ■' . »• •• .-*•/.. <;
Kj: BBANOHES—CWcaeo «aA MUm*k—. Or««» for future daliTtry »xecut»4 la "»U*a?keM, '
MINNESOTA
LOAN & TRUST 60.
MIWUfOLU. Mill.
Capital ::.;.. $500,000.00 '$;
Guaranty Fund. $100,000.00 i
Interest 2%as
\\lowed on 9Uo.
Deposits. «*B2£*
.sgai Depositor)' 3i ql ■'" ■
> 0 .,r^......: **saa»
NVESTMENTS—ExceIIent First Mort
gages and Municipal Bonds for sale.
RUSTS—AII classes of Trusts care
fully administered, t
SAFETY D£I»«MIT VAI'I.Ta.
CIAS. L LEWIS
SCO.,
GRAIN COMMISSION
add STOCK BROKERS,
1,2 and 5, Chamber of
Commerce.
Private Wires to AH Market*.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OP MINNEAPOLIS.
Phoenix Building, 4th St. and Ist Aye.
U. S. BEPOSITQBY.
CAP1TAL................ $1,000,009
Surplus and DadlTidea Profits. oo,ooo
John Martin, President. C.T.Jaflray.Caihlor
F. M. Prince, Vice Pres. D. Maekerohar.
J .S.PlUsbury, ad vice prw. Asst. Ca»hiar.
DIKECTOBS.
John B. Martin. Q.T. Swett, F. M. Prlne*
John 8. Plilsbury, J.L. Record, tfeo. C. Bagler.
John B. GUnilau, S.I). Carglll. K. Peunlngtoa.
C. X. Jaffray, R. M. Chute. F. B. Wells.
A. M. Woodward, ». a. Palmer.
THOMAS & Go
Spain Commission and Stock Brokers.
Write for our daily market letter, whloh we
mall FREE on application. " -: '
Members Minneapolis - Chamber of Com
merce. Telephone— Main 18J7-J.
6 uHAKUXB Or QOm.MjM9Z.
E: A. BROWN & CO.
MIHVBAPOZtXS, Miirar.
Grain Sommission.
Choice Seed Oats For Sale. Write for prices
and samples:
light, $5.05^5.22^; yorkers, $5.20<@5.22;4; pigs,
! [email protected]
; Sheep—Receipts, 2,000; steady; lambs, [email protected]
I 5.50: muttons, $2.50® . . '-r~,
ma ha JLive Stock. -
South Oaiaha. Jan. IS.—Cattle, receipts,
2,200; steady; steers, $4155.-10; ecus and heif
ers, $2.81 "§..'>.75; canners, [email protected]; mockers
and feeders, [email protected]
Hogs, receipts, 9,800; 5c lower: heavy.
$5.17%@5.25; mixed, ?f...0ti;..22»5: light, [email protected]
5.22%; bulk of sales, $5.20<|5.22>0.
Sheep, receipts, 2,200; steady; -westerns, [email protected]
4.50; lambs, [email protected]
St. Louts Live Stock.
■ St. Louis, Jan. 10.—Cattle, receipts, 2.500:
steady to slow; natives, $3.50(^5.80; stockers
and feeders, [email protected]; cows ancl heifers, $2
@4.75; Texas and Indian steers, $3.30<&4.75;
with choice- at $5; cows and heifers, |2.30®
i 3.50. ' •' • '
! Hogg, receipts, 9,:oO: 5c lower; pigs and
| lights, $5.1i«@5.20; packers, [email protected]; butch
ers, [email protected]"5.30.
Sheep, receipts, 10,000; steady; muttons.
$464.25; lambs, $4.75#5.40.
Midway Home Market.
Minnesota Transfer, St. Paul, Minn., Jan.
16. —Barrett & Zimmerman report heavy
horses moderately active. There was an ap
parent falling off in the wholesale demand
from the northern logging country. Buying
was restricted to the retail basis. A num
ber of representatives from different lumber
firms were present and bought to nil out va
cancies in their respective logging camps. The
Commonwealth - Lumber company, ; Frazee,
Minn., and Musse-Sauntry company, : Still
-1 water. Minn., bought several carloads of leg
ging horses', being the only wholesale buyers.
There was a noticeable decline in values on
1 the best grades. Quotations:
Drafters, extra [email protected]
Drafters, choice ...:...... 10<"gH;>
Drafters, common to goad 850100
Farm mares, choice , 100<§125
Farm mares, common to good 5(§lOQ
MISCELLANEOUS
Xew York Cotton.
New York, Jan. 16.—The cotton market
opened steady with prices ?• to 5 points high
er on room and moderate outside buying of a
covering type, and also absence of long cotton
offerings. Firm Liverpool cables were the
main cause for the advance though shorts
were naturally uneasy owing to the belief
that the long interest had been pretty thor
oughly liquidated, thus leaving the Market
in a position to respond to anything in the
way of positive bull support. Following the
call the market slowly worked upward oa
nervous demand from shorts and light for
eign buying.
Spot closed dull; middling uplands, 9T,'-1
middling gulf, 10%e. Sales, 1,500 bales.
Futures closed steady; January, 9.64 c; Feb«
suary. 9.4.1 c: March, 9.40 c: April, 9.36 c; May.
9.56 c: June, 9.34 c; July, 9.33 c; August. 9.0T0,
September, 8.57 c: October, B.2tk; November,
8.14 c.
Peoria Whi«ky.
Peorla, Jan. 16.—Whisky on the basi* of
$1.27 for finished goods.
Watson & Co
Brokers in Grain, Provisions,
Stocks and Bonds.
Members N. Y. Stock - Exchange
Chicago Correspondents— Schwartz, Dupee & Co.
Private wire Chicago it York. Tel. 90C Main.
35 : Chamber of Commerce*
\ EDWARDS. WOOD 11l CO.\
\ STOCKS. BONOS. GRAIN. PROVISIONS. \
A uruBCDC /BOABO OF tRADE CHICAGO. \
\MEMBEKS tgHAMBERCFCCK.V.ERCEMPLS. \ ,
\3|2 GUIRANTY LORN BLOC MINNEAPOLIS. V.
V 8 CHftMBER CF COMMERCE MiriNEfooUSA'
.' ■'"■ ' >. '■ v" ''~ *'-.'*..',. ■ .1,- .'; ■.♦-' .' i
Geragbty.Doran&Co
SMs BAN™ and Im!
Bonds ; iJKUKbKSl .'; Prorlslons
Cotton »*»«•»<»"■• Cofiee
UUUUII 1 (Century BuUdlng.V.l " I

xml | txt