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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, January 25, 1901, Image 14

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1901-01-25/ed-1/seq-14/

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14
BULL WHEAT MARKET WITH MAY I l-2c HIGHER
All the Early News Favored an
Advance, and the Market
Became Buoyant.
ARGENTINE NEWS UNFAVORABLE
Liverpool Strong- and western
Receipts IJght— 1 Sew»
of the Session.
Miuneapoli* Chamber of Commerce, Jan. 25.
—Wheat showed decided strength this morn
ing, took a higher range at the start and held
it. The early news had a strong flavor, and
the talk turned bullish. Liverpool was up
'gd. Argentine shipments fell off eurprising
iy, and receipts in the northwest were again
light at 204 cars, against 323 last year. The
figures showing light Argentine shipments
were supplemented by a report from Wash
ington quoting the American consul, who says
that conditions there are bad and that River
Platte shipments will probably be 60 per cent
below last year. Primary receipts were less
than a year ago. Minneapolis May opened %c
up, at 75% c, on thiß combination of strong
iieins, and held fairly ateady against selling
pressure. After the first hour renewed confi
dence was shown, and May sold to 76c.
Through the morning there were frequent
email breaks, but the market was supported
and recoveries were prompt. The Modern
Miller says some apprehension is felt in parts
of the winter wheat section on account of dry
weather and little rain or snow. Complaint
Is made that Uiere is insufficient moisture for
the plant in its present condition. Chicago had
a more active market than for some time.
There was a fair cash Inquiry reported there,
and good business in St. Louis. The local
caeh market was strong. Argentina ship
ments for the week were 168,000 bushels,
againat 648,000 last week and 760,000 last year.
Primary receipts, 372,000 bushels, compared
with 389,000 last year. Clearances wheat and
flour, 477,000 bushels; corn, 827,000 bushels.
Minneapolis received 173 cars, and Dulutb 31,
against 323 and 40 last year.
The market grew stronger towards the close
on increased buying and additional Argentine
damage reports. May sold up just before the
close, striking 76%@76%c, and July went to
77% c, both closing at these high points of the
day. January closed ai 76% c.
Cash business was good. Demand continues
brisk for the good millinc wheat. No. 1
northern was well taken at %c under May,
spot lots going around [email protected]%c, and on about
tht same basis for sales to arrive. Every
thing was in good sale, although on low
grades prices did not follow the firmer feeling
in equal degree, and while choice milling
wheat brought [email protected]%c over yesterday's aver
age, low grade stuff sold unchanged to a
shade Aimer. No. 2 northern averaged 72c.
ranging from 71% c to 73% c. No. 3 wheat
sold to 67c for the best, tough and smutty
at 60c, bin-burned [email protected] Rejected brought
fifiVClc, and no %rade [email protected]
THE CASH TRADE
Flax a Shade Easier—Floor Strong-
Corn Higher—Oats Firm.
FLAX— The market showed an easier feel
ing, although some lots sold fully up to yes
terday. Good rejected sold around $167
Buyers were less active and not disposed to
• pay top figures except lor selections. Th»
rumors of a coiner in May in Dulutk had no
effect on the spot market. Minneapolis re
ceived 23 cars, against 11 last year. Duluth
Jhipped Ca7 r8 C and ChlCag ° i . cars. Minneapolis
•nipped 7 cars.
Closing prices were: Minneapolis, »cash,
$1.69; to arrive, $1.68; May, $1.75. Duluth!
cash, $1.71; to arrive, $1.71; May, $.1.77; July,
$1.15. «_".*:'"
■ FLOUR— The market Is strong and shows
Increased activity. Millers are quoting un
changed but current figures arc very
firm- .^ ist patents. [email protected]: second pat
ents, [email protected]; first clears, [email protected] sec
ond clears, [email protected] 10. Shipments are increas
ing, and getting back to nearer normal quan
tity. Shipments, 54,123 brls.
MILL-STUFFS—Prices are easier. Bran in
bulk is quoted $11,[email protected]>0; flour middlings,
[email protected]; bulk shorts, [email protected] red
dog in 140-lb sacks, $14; feed in 200
-lb sacks, $1 per ton additional; in 100-lb
sacks, $1.50. per ton additional. Shipments,
1,260 tons.
FEED AND MEAL—The market is steady
and quiet, with quotations unchanged. Coarse
corn meal and cracked corn are quoted 113 50-
No. 1 feed, $13.75; No. 2 feed, $14.25; No. 3
feed, $14.75; granulated corn meal in cotton
■acks at the rate of $1.90 per br!.
_ CORN— market is strong and higher-
No. 3 yellow sold to 3fi»4r. There was busi
ness in No. 3 at 35\c, and at the same figure
for No. 3 to arrive. Quotations: No. 3 yellow,
3o^@36c; No. 3 corn, 35^c. Receipts 104
cars; shipments, 4 cars.
OATS— market is firm and steady No
8 white is quoted 25^c; No. 3 oats 24^c!'
Receipts, 24 cars; shipments, 11.
BARLEY—Feed grades we quoted [email protected]
malting grades, [email protected] Receipts 2 cars :
shipments, 1 car. •'
RYE—The market is quiet and stead y So
lls quoted 47% c. Receipts, 8 carE "' * '
, HAY—Minnesota upland, [email protected];'lowa up
land, [email protected]; coarse to medium $7(5,8- rye
straw, [email protected] Receipts, 18ti tons; shipments
145 tons. '
< a»h Sale* Reported To-day. !
No.' 1 northern, 19 cars ..'. $0.75
No. 1 northern, 1 car "* \' 75&
No. 1 northern, 1 ear .'....' 75y
No. 1 northern, 1,600 bu to arrive!!! ' '75
No. 1 northern, 800 bu, to arrive!!!!!! !75U
No. l northern,.l,2oo bu, to arrive...! '. 75
No. 1 northern, 3,800 bu, to arrive!".'. " "iw*.
No. 1 northern, 1,000 bu, to arrive....!! 751?
No. 2 northern, 37 cars !. \ . '"■>
No. 2 northern, 2 cars.... ..!!!!!" *73
No. 2 northern, 2 cars !!!'.!!!..! '7"*'
No. 2 northern, 1 car .'!!!!! 735/
No. 2 northern, 1 car '.'.!!" 71%
No. 2 northern, 2 cars '....!!!!!! 'ivX
No. 2 northern; 1 car !!!!!!' '711?
No. 3 wheat,, 2 cars !!!.'!!!" *67'
No. 3 wheat, 9 cars ....!!!!" .66
No. 3 wheat, 4 cars, smutty ..!.!!!!!!'* 'go
No. 3 wheat, 7 cars " * 65
No. .3 wheat, 2 cars !!!.!!!!!!! 63
No. 3 wheat, 3 cars, tough '.'.'. °60
No. 3 wheat, 1 car, bin burnt .. ..;* *63
No. 3 wheat, 1 car ;. '53
No. 3 wfceat, 3 cars !!!!!!!! 64
No. 3 wheat, 2 cars " '5514
No. 3 wheat, 2 cars *6414
No. 3 wheat, 1 car ."!.-*69«
No. 3 wheat, 1 car, bin. burnt .. '08
Rejected wheat, 1 car ............ "55
Rejected wheat, 1 car '..'.!!!!* > !ui
No grade wheat. 2 cars !!!!!!. *58
No grade wheat, 1 car !!!!!! {,9
No grade wheat, i car ..!!!!!!!!" '54
No grade wheat, 1 car !!!!!!!!!!!! '.55
No. .3. yelolw corn, 3 cars... '.'.".'. * '36
No. 3 yelolw corn, 1 car .._.....-....""j "mi
No. 3 corn, 31 cars !!' ■ "sf>si
No. 3 corn, 1 car 0. w. b............ * '36-
No. 3 corn, 10,000 bu. to arrive..!!!! 35%
No. 3 white oats, 3 cars .._.;■. '*" "0514
No. 3 oats, 2. cars !!.!!!" 25
No. 3 oats, 1 car ..............?...!.!! ; &ml
No. 3 oats, 1 car _ . ■■■'.' '231?
No. 2 rye, 1 car .!!!!!!!!!!"! '47%
Rejected flax, 1 car .....%.„..... " 1*69
Rejected flax, X car ...... """°"167
Rejected flax, 'i cars ..v !!!!.'!!' 168
Rejected flax, 2 cars "* l'egu
Rejeoted flax, 2 cars, to arrive. '.!'.. l! 68
State Grain Inspection.
-■ v> Jan.. 24. . - .
Inspected In—Wheat—Cars— North
ern—No. 1 northern, 9; No. 2 northern 14;
No. 3, 23; rejected, 5; no grade, 10
Chicago, , Milwaukee & St. Paul—No 1
northern, 6; No. 2 northern. 22; No 3, •>■ re
jected, 1; no grade. 2.
Minneapolis & St. Louis—No. 1 northern 6-
No. 2 northern, 14; No. 3, 1; rejected I.' '
So© Line—No. 2 northern, 7; No. 3 1 > ■
Northern Pacific— 2 northern 3 • no
grade, 4. '
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis £ Omaha—
, No. 1 northern, 11; No. 2 northern, 15- No 3
8; rejected, 9; no grade, 4. ' , ' '
Chicago Great Western— No. 3, 1.
Minnesota Transfer—No. 2 northern, l; No.
3, 1.
Totals—No. 1 northern, 37; No.. 2 northern
76; No. 3, 37; rejected, 16; no grade 20.
Other Grains—No. 2 winter wheat, 4 cars;
No. 3 winter wheat, 4; rejected wheat 1-
No. 3 yellow corn, 32;- No. 3 white corn •■ 1;
No. 3 corn, 41; no grade corn, 1; No. 3 white
oats, 8; No. 3 oats, 18; no grade oats, 1; No.
,2 rye, 2; No. 4 barley, 1; No. 5 barley 2
no grade barley, 1; No. 1 flax, 2; rejected
i flax, 21; no grade flax, 6. . • •:
Cars Inspected Out—No. 1 northern wheat,
67; No. 2 northern wheat, 8; No. 3 wheat. 27 ;
rejected wheat, 5; no grade -wheat, 26; No. 2
winter wheat, 16; No., 3 white corn, 1; No.
3 ,corn, 2; No. ■. 3 white ; oats, 1; : No. 3 oats,
- 28; No. 5 barley, 1; rejected flax, 35.
Receipts and Shipments.
Jan. 24.
- Receipts—Wheat, 173 cars," 147,050 bu;:corn,
fe84,240 bu; oats, "32,880 bu; barley, 1,520. bu;
rye, ■• 2,190 i bu; ; flax, \ 14,260 , bu; hay, 145 tons;
fuel oil, 114,973 gals; fruity 52,128 k lbs mer
chandise^;; 1,930,385 lbs; • lumber, .17 cars; ' bar
rel stock, 2 "cars; machinery, 234,550 lbs; coal,'
1,625 tons; wood, 468 cords; pig iron, 25 cars;
railroad iron, 1: car; dressed - meats, 122,389
; RANGE OF WHEAT PRICE IN MINNEAPOLIS
Open. - • v . High. - . Low. : < Today. ■*■■. Yesterday. - V Year Ago, .
Jan..? .........!*$ "•.•••••••• '1.":..:-... $.75% ;.'L?I $.74 ' ' ' $.65%
May .. .75% .76%@76% .75%- = .76%@7a% .75 .65%.
July . .76% * • .77% '.76% .77% .75%@75%!; .67 @67%
On Track— 1 hard, 77% c; No. 1 northern, No. 2 northern, 72%@73c.
--- . . ■ • ■ .- ""'Jy'
- . , THE DAY'S RESULT.
May Wheat. Minneapolis, ' Chicago, Duluth, St. Louis, New York,
Close to-day $ .76&@76% $ .76%@77 $.78 $.75 $ ;.81H, • :
Close yesterday... .75 . .75% .76% .73^ .80% <
lbs; hidea, 91,600 lbs: railroad materials, 4
cars; sundries, 22 cars. Car lots, 661.
Shipped—Wheat. 44 cars, 39,160 bu; corn,
3,840 bu; oats, 15,180 bu; barley, 1,060 bu;
ilax, 6,720 bu; flour, 64,123 brls; millstufts,
1,250 tons; hay, 49 tons; fruit, 31,050 lba; mer
chandise, 1,500,490 lbe; lumber, 57 cars; bar
rel stock, 1 car; machinery, 24,000 lbs; brick,
11,000; ties, 3 cars; stone and marble, 1
car; linseed oil, 197,750 lbs; oil cake, 442,200
lbs, hides, pelts, etc., 33,000 lbe; wool, 31,900
lbs; railroad materials, 4 cars; sundries, 16
cars. Car lots, 707.
Wheat Muvemeut.
The following are the receipts and ship
ments at the principal primary wheat mar
kets:
Receipts, Shipments,
Bushels. Bushels.
New York 151,200 167,872
Philadelphia 9,239 None
Baltimore None None
Toledo 15,004 3,200
Detroit 8,369 1,408
St. Louis 41,000 89,000
Boston 21,550 None
Chicago 39,950 49,471
Milwaukee .'. 18,000 750
Duluth M,H7 11.754
Minneapolis 147,050 39,160
Kansas City 77,600 57,(iu0
Wheat Movement by Road*.
Jan. 24.
Received—Milwaukee, 68 cars; Omaha, 18;
St. Louis, 24; Great Northern, 31; Northern
Pacific, 20; Great Western, 3; Soo, 9.
Shipped—Milwaukee, 12 cars; Wisconsin
Central, 7; Great Western, 4; Burlington, 21.
OTHER GRAIN MARKETS
CHICAGO GRAIN
Wheat Market Opens Strong-—Corn
Quiet and Steady. .
Chicago, Jan. —Wheat started out strong
to-day, influenced by heavy cables, light Ar
gentine shipments, an unfavorable Argentine
report and moderate northwest receipts. May
opened %@%c higher at 75% c to 75% c, and
sold early to 75% c, there being a good com
mission house demand as well as buying by
prominent professional bulls. ; Selling was
scattered at the start but became a little
heavier at 75% c, and a reaction to 75%@75%c
followed. Local receipts were 40 cars, one of
contract grade. Minneapolis and Duluth re
ported 203 cars, against 250 last week and 362
a year ago. Argentine shipments were 168,000
bu, compared with 648,000 bu the previous
week and 760,000 bu a year ago. The United
States consul at Montevideo reported dam
age in La Platte provinces and expressed the
opinion that exports from these provinces
would fall off 50 per cent. .
On brisk covering later, May Jumped to
77c, closing strong 1%@1%c higher, at 76%@
77c. The light primary receipts., reports that
Kansas wheat showed a deterioration of 50
per cent, and buying presumably for foreign
interests, caused the bulge.
Cash wheat. No. 2 red, 75%@77c; No. 3 red,
[email protected]; No. 2 hard winter, [email protected]; No. 3
hard winter, [email protected]; No. 1 northern spring,
73%@76%e; No. 2 northern spring, 72%@76c;
No. 3 spring, [email protected]%c. ♦
Corn was quiet and steady. May opened a
shade to %c higher at 39c to 38%@39c, touched
39% c in sympathy with wheat and reacted to
3S%c. Receipts were 387 cars. J&%&
The market rallied later, with wheat, and
closed strong; May, %c higher, at 39% c.
Cash corn/No. 2, 37%@37%c; No. 3, 37c.
Oats were firm with wheat but featureless.
May opened a shade higher at 25% c, touched
25V 8 @25%c, and rallied to 25%@25%c. Receipts
were 209 cars.
Cash oats, No. 2, 24%@24%c; No. 3, 24% c.
The following was the range of prices:
Wheat— Jan. May.
Opening ..: .^oY-^'i,
Highest 77
Lowest ....................... 75% :.
Close-
To-day 74%% 76%@77
Yesterday 72% 75%
Year ago 66% 68% -
Corn—: , ... .* . .«-.- >',;,,
Opening .: 39
Highest 39%
Lowest 38%
Close — ■ -•..:•!,-■•■.--■---.- « - -.
To-day .37% 39%
Yesterday 37% 38%
Year ago 31%- 33y s @%
Oats —
Opening ,\ 25%
Highest ../ 25%@%
Lowest 25%@%
Close-
To-day 23% 25%@%
Yesterday. 23% j 25V 8 @y 4
Year ago 23% 23%
DulutU Grain.
Duluth, Minn., Jan. Wheat was higher
and more active to-day and by 1 o'clock had
gained a cent from yesterday's close. It
opened %c higher at 77c for May and 78c for
July and not once did it strike the opening
price, 77% c being the low point for May. It
firmed steadily to 77%c.f0r May and 78% c for
July. The last few minutes were still
stronger and May sold on. the close. at 78c.
Flax was quite active: May sold at $1.79%
early and then declined to $1.77. September
was steady and dull but closed 5c lower. Re
ceipts, wheat, 81 cars;. corn, 82: oats, 11; flax,
8; total, 132. Shipments, wheat, 11,784 bu.
Close: Oats, 26% c; rye, May, 49% c; corn,
I 38% c;. barley, 35c to 55c; flax, cash,' $1.71; May,
$1.77; September, $1.15; No. 1 hard, cash,
76% c; May, 80c; No. 1 northern, cash, 74% c;
arrive,. 75% c; May, 78c; July, 78% c; No. 2
northern, 64% C to 10 1 ; No. 3, 36V4C to C3%c.
Milwaukee Grain.
Milwaukee, Jan. 25.—Flour, steady. Wheat,
higher; No. 1 northern, 74 1 / [email protected]%c; No. 2
northern, 71%@73 1 / <:<\ Rye, higher; No. 1,
51V«c. Barley, steady: No. 2, [email protected]; sample,
[email protected] Oats, firm; No. 2 white, 27%@28c.
Liverpool Grain.
Liverpool, Jan. 25. —Close, wheat, steady,
higher: spot, 6s lV^d; -February, tjs
•^d; March, 63 H»d, May, 6s l« 4 d. Corn,
istuady, unchanged to Vid higher; spot, 3s
10% d; January, its lOVid; February, 3s lOd;
March, 3s 9%d.
Chicago Seed and Coarae Grains.
Chicago, Jan. 25.—Rye—January, 49% c;
May, 81%e. Barley—Cash, [email protected] Timothy
(per 100 pounds)— January, $4.50; March, $4.70.
Clover (per 100 pounds I—January, $10.75;
March, $11.25. Flax—Cash, [email protected]; Jan
uary, *1.76; February, $1.75;* May, $1.75.
Sew York Grain.
New York, Jan. 25.—Close: Wheat, March,
BU 4 c; May, Slftc; July, 81%e. Corn, January,
47^,c; May, 44V; July, 44% c.
St. Lania Grain.
St. Louis, Jan. 25.—Close—Wheat—No. 2
red cash, 73^®74c; January, 73% c; May, 75c;
Jul/, 74% c; No! 2 hard, 69V»@71c. Corn—No.
2 c-a9h, 3614 c; January, 36i4c; May, tJ34c;
July, 38%@38%c. Oats—No. 2 cash, 26c; Jan
uary, 26c; May, 26c; white, [email protected] Lead—
$4.17V4. Spelter-s3.B7i*.
Kauaaa City Grain.
Kansas City, Jan. 25.—Close—Wheat—May,
68V2C; cash No. 2 hard, [email protected]^c; No. 2 red,
[email protected] Corn—May, 37c; cash No. 2 mixed,
35% c; No. 2 white, 36% c. Oats—No. 2 white,
26c. •
PROVISIONS
Chicago Provisions.
Chicago, Jan. 25.—Provisions opened easy
in sympathy with a decline at the yards but
held steady on a good cash demand. There
was little trade early and opening prices re
mained unchanged for some time. May pork
opened a shade lower at $13.77}4(§']3.50; May
lard, 2V 2 c down at $7.35; May ribs 5c de
pressed, at [email protected]
Close: Pork. January, $13.87^; May, $13.92%
-lard, January, $7.32%; February, $7.32%-
March, $7.35; May, $7.42%. Ribs, January,
$6.87%; May, $7; September, $7.12%.
Midway Horae Market.
Minnesota Transfer, St. Paul, Jan. 25.—Bar
rett & Zimmerman report moderate receipts.
There was, however, a decent lot of farm
chunks weighing from 1,200 to 1,500 lbs repre
sented in the sale, with a large number of
prime drafters. The showing of active and
favorable symptoms in trade the last few
days Is expected to matrialize in a free out
let of all grade horses, especially of logging
horses, before the close of the market this
week. Values:
Draftere, extra [email protected]
Drafters, choice 120<g150
Drafters, common to good [email protected]
Farm mares, choice 100®125
Farm mares, common to good 65® 100
THE MINNEAPOLIS JOUKNAL.
LIST OPENS LOWER
Weakness in Some Stocks Acute in
the Early Dealings.
MET BY BUYING FOR ? SUPPORT
Toward Midday Prices Fall Away
From Best— Especial Press- 21*'
ure Anywhere.
'• : —-I ■ /:.. ' ' '"
New York, Jan. —Weakness was rather
acute in some stocks in the opening dealings,
and practically '. the whole list opened lower.
The opening in St. Paul, Federal Steel and
Brooklyn Transit was wide, quotations in the
last named stocks varying | a point ■ on jj the
sale of 4,700 shares at an extreme decline of
1%. St. Paul was carried' down I 1 on the
sale of 4,000 shares and Federal Steel de
clined a point. There- were losses of a
point also in Reading, Pennsylvania and
Pressed Steel Car. Changes otherwise were
fractional. :
■ The lower level .of prices at the opening
was met by.some buying for support. Fed
eral Steel, Brooklyn Transit and St. Paul
wiped out their opening losses and reacted
from % to Vi ] above yesterday's close. Pro
nounced strength in Sugar, Tobacco and Man
hattan sustained the specialties, while the
advance of 2 and 1% respectively in Missouri
Pacific and Kansas & Texas.preferred bene
fited the railways. Most of the stocks which
opened oft recovered fully, but the: demand
was slack.' Pullman advanced 2% and Inter
national Paper and C, C, C. & St. Louis lost
a point each. Northern Pacific was bought
heavily at 11 o'clock and rose 1%.
Prices eased off fractionally on realizing,"
but renewed buying orders for both accounts
were met and the tone became distinctly
strong. In St. Paul the rise from the lowest
was 2% and Brooklyn Transit got up 2%.
Special strength was noted in Tobacco and,
Sugar, both of which were 2 points higher.
Elsewhere improvements were over a point,
particularly for some of the Pacifies, trunk
lines, tractions and steel stocks. Toward
midday prices fell away from the best," but
there was no especial pressure anywhere. A
rise to 49 in Federal Steel brought the mar
ket up again. The most notable feature of
the market was the' smaller volume of deal
ings compared with the recent average. .
St. Paul, the Pacifies and Southwestern
touched th« highest of the day in the final
hour. Wabash preferred and Texas & Pacific
rose 1% above the lowest. The gains were
poorly held and the whole market sagged.
The closing was dull and irregular and
showed net gains for the majority of stocks.
Bonds were firm with especial strength to
St. Louis Southwestern 2s.
Stock quotations reported for The Journal
by Watson & Co., Chamber of Commerce,
Minneapolis, Minn.
) 1 "'■ f 1 —Close—
Sales Stocks- | HI- J Lo- | Bid. | Bid.
- I ! eat. I eat. |Jn.25|Jn.24
■iX-.\ [Adams Express I ! j 150 j
Am. Express .. ; 373' 172*4
. 800;A-n. Cot. 0i1...] 30% 30% 30% 30% <
( _ ! do pr ..i ' 88' £8 1
l,2oo|Am. Car ....... 21 20 =21' 20%
2,400 do - pr *...-.-.. .69 - 67. .68% 66%
Am. D. T. Co.. 31 32
600 Am. Hoop 26% | 25% 26% 26
iAm-" c« .'. -35% 38%
do pr • .... gg 69.V
400 Am. Linseed ... 6 5% "5% 5%!
I d 0 Pr ......! n% 31%
Am. Malting 4% 4%
do pr...... ...;..;...-. 1 21% 24%
13,200 Am, Sugar .... 134% 132% 133% 132%
A do „pr 1 118% 118
Am.. Smelting • . 63% 'fi2% 62% 62%
1 do pr ...... 98 ' 97% »8% 97
15,100 Am. Steel & W 41 I 3914 40% 39%
3,500! do . pr f 86% 85 i 80% 84
2>«*>jAm. Tin ... j 57%; 56% 57 .59
100 do ■ pr ] fisii so
12,600 Am. Tobacco : HrH 114% 113%
j.do. Pr ...... I 140 , 140 "
,«J Amal. Cop ... f&K 88%
2,300 Anacon Cop .... 41% 41 •- 41% 42%
9,800 do pr i% 84 '■ 84% jm'
15,300J8a1t. & 0hi0... 87% M i 87 MU
1,100 B^ok. Pr a p"Tr 85% SUM 77* 84%
4e,:ou.Brook. Rap. Tr "£ 1Z 77 S2f
Brook. Un Gas. ...... .....: 1704 ,s**
: Brunswick Co .... I 9' 91/
SooCan. Southern.. 57% ! 56% " 56% ! 56%
1 Can. Pacific i 88** ssi
l,7ooChes & 0b10.... 39% wA 5* m
C &' it,. 11l ...t.. - 4,2:.,! ->S2
I do pr 1 1 122 ■I V» '■
600 Chi. & Alton .. 38% 37% SB% .38 '
400 do pr ... 74%' 74 73% 72%
5,400 Chi., Bur. & Q. 142%! 141% 142% 141%
1,500 Chk. Or. West. 17% 16% . 17% .17%
do pr A ....: i 78 1 78%
I do pr^B .... -•.■;. ' ....... ' 43% -44%
■ ; 1 do deb ...... ! 91% 91%
:. Chi, Ind. &L. ............ j 24 24
- v ! do pr i 60 60
2,100 C..C..C. & 'St.L. 75 73% 74% 75
i do Pr i ' i IH% 116%
..*Jr. - Chi. Term | | 12% 11%
1 _d,° Pr •• 35% 34% 34% | So
Col. Fuel & 1.. 45% 44% 45% 44%
*■- do pr ....; I 116 j 120
200 Col. Southern .. ' 7 | 6% 6% 6%
„.. I do, lit pr ... ...... ...... 41% 41.
-™„do 2d pr i.......... 16 1 16
-500Consol. Gas ... 194% 189 | 192 189
6,100 Con, Tobacco .. 44% ; 43% 44% 43%
600 do pr .......; 93% 94
200 Del. & Hudson 150% I 150
,Del.; Lack. ft W .. ...... 191 | 191
1,500 Den. & Rio Gr. 32% 31% . 31% 30%
.800 do pr 82% .82 . 82% 81%
Dcs M. & Ft. D .....17% 18
do pr ..........:.....-.. no 110
29.500 Erie ............ 28% 27% 28% 28
9,800 do Ist pr .V. •■ 63% •62 i 63% 62%
I do 2d pr .... 42 40% 42 41 .
Evans.. & T. H. ' ..... j 41% 41%
i do ' pr 1 80 i 80
34,500 Federal Steel .. 49 1 46% 48 47%
200 do pr .. 70 • 69 1* 68%: 69%
300 Gen. Electric .. .. ...| 187 . ! 187
Glucose ........ I 48 | ..47%| -48' j 47
■1 do pr.......... ; j......| ,96 1 96 '.
(Great Nor., pr.. .....| 192 | 192 ,
Hocking Valley.! 42%: 42% j 42%J 42%
100 do pr.......... ; . '.- I 70% 70%
Illinois Central.] 131%' 130 ; 131% 129%
lowa Central...l 24%1 24 j24 23%
I do pr ........j... ■';': 149 49
Inter. Paper....; 21% 21 j 20% 21%
I do pr.......... I 7u%| 70% 70 I 70
K. C. & South |...:.. j 1414; 14 i
i • do pr ,| j 36% l 36%
La Clede Gas ; j .72- 72
i do pr...: ..j............. 1 92. i 92
100 Lake E. & W..| 42 | 41%] 41% 42%
% I do pr ...-.....;....;. ! .-.:;r.| 108 ; 108 ■•
Long 151 and....)*..... ....... ; 67 67 :
7,BoojLoius, & Nash.; 88% 87%, 88%; 88%
M., St. P. ft Sooj |...,..| ,18%| 18 "
I do pr ........].; 1 ...... 1 50 . 51
9,3oO|Manhattan .....j 114% 113 j 114% 113%
I.2oojMet. St. Ry.....| 162% 161- | 162% 161%
800|Mlnn. & St. b.. 69% 67% 68%' 67%
600 do pr/.........k ! ' 105 ' 103
10,4001 Missouri Pac...: 87 j 80 ; 36% 85*
12,8001 M., K. & T.... 18% 16% 18% 16%
"i-40°. do pr 1 51%| 48%j tl%\ AS\
,•* ; Mobile ft Ohio.. I 47 | 46%! 46% 45%
Mexican Cent...; .|.'.*...,J 13%) 13
|Mex. Nat. .. , ........:... 1 3*4 3%
100! Nat. Biscuit ...... V..... \ 37% 38,*
1 do pr...... ; 1 92 : 92 !
500 Nat. Lead ......|...... 17 "16%
200 do pr... , 86; 85% 85 85 i
600|Nat. Steel....;. | 39% 39 i 39% 39
3,200 i do ".pr.'.Vr.....: I ......1...... 90 ; 90
Nat. .Tube...... •59%) 58%] 59%| 58%
I do pr.......... 98%| 97%j 98y«| 97
!Nat. Salt ; 43%, 43 j 43 j 43%
|. do pr ....... , 1 1 77 I 77 ..
100 N. J. Central ...... j 148 I 145
200 Norfolk ft West j ...... ...... ' 43% 44 i
400 do pr ........ 1 ... .v. '; ...'... ' 83 I 83
:North Am. Co .| 20% 19% ' 20%1 19%
37,100 Northern Pac . 82% 80 j 82% | 80%
j do pr ....... I 86%, 85 j 86 • | 83%
Northwestern ..| ...; , 1 170 j 170
N. Y. Air Brake j 150- 148 1
1.100. N. Y. Central.. 141% 141 1 141% 140%
1,300 P.,C.,C. ft St.L. |. •..". 54 54
I do Ist pr ... ...:.. j .;...•. 198 99 i
j do 2d pr .... ............ 1 50 50%
Omaha . .... | ....f. j ...... j 133 . j 130 .
i do -pr j j ...... 180 1 ISO ■
8,100 Ontario ft W | 31% -30% , 31% | 30%
[Paper Bag .... ............ " 14 | 13%
I do pr .-..r... ::-..: :\::.r.: 69% 69%
i 1,900 Pressed Steel .. 37 I 36 36% 37%
1 ,300 do pr ■:.'.-.-.':. '■■78%." 78 • :»7.v .-78%
••:■.-■ Pacific; Mail •'.'.-; f.*..iKv..;-. --.42% .42%
8,200 Perm. ,R. R. .. 145% 144 • , 145%; 144%
i LSOOj P., C, & St. L. ............ >54 54 :
" '; 1 do pr „,,,..! 807 91 I si : I 92;'
1 2,Boo]People'a Gas „| - 99%j " 98% 98%| .'98%
560 Pullman I 1 | 199 | 196
5,700 Reading..-....;... 31% -81 j -31% 31%
'■■'■•,*;*■ IVdo I Ist pr ... 71%| To%i .-,71% 70%
'.'■' I .do. 2d pr .... 42 I 41%} 42 > | '41%
400|Repub. Stee 1.. 13%| , 12% • 13% • 13%
I- do pr ....;.. i ...;.....;:. 57 1*57 ■
•£,100; Rock Island *.:.119% 118% 119% 118%
..■ IBt L. & San P 27% 26% : 27% ;. 26%
I do Ist pr ... 80 i 79%j '79% 79
-■ IMnB do ' 2dfcr.... ' 57% | 56% i 57% 56%
4,20015t. L. & S. W. 23%1 ?■ 82-.^22% 22%
13,8O«| do pr ......' 52%! 60% 51% | • 52%
69,80Q|St..Paul ....... 149% 145%|149% .147%
200) do pr ! 188% 187%, 188 | 187
jStand. R. &Tw ' .':;.:( ; 3%| 3%
18,300 Southern Pac. 43% 42% i 43% - 43%
■4 600ISouthern Ry . 19% .18% 19% 19%
1,9001 -'do vpr......... 1 70% 69%, 70% V 69%
4.2oojTenn. Coal &1. 68 I 56%; 57% 56%
12,400 Texas & Pac .. 28% ( 26% I .27% 26%
lOOlThird Ay .' .....]..••••! 120 | 121
28,700 Union Pacific ..] S3 I ' 81%! 82% 82 V*
1 1,700 do " "pr ...... 183 82% , 82% \ 81%
4.200 U. S. '■; Leather;. 12% 12 | 12%! 11%
6,000, do pr .... I 73% 73%
- U.S.- Rubber/. ;.;■.: | I 20% 20%
• COO do pr ....... ;, | 60% 60%
U. S. Express.. ...... | ...... 54 54
s.4OOWabash .............. /.;... 13% 12%
12,900 do . pr : ...... 27% 26%
!Wells-Far. Exp ...... .. ."V.: | 130 130
600 Western Union. 83 82% | 82i 82%
1,300 Wheel. & L. E. 12% -11%! 11% 11%
,[ do Ist pr..;:..:.. .1..:. I 53% 54
1 •do- 2d pr.... 28% 26% 28% 28%
Wisconsin Cent. ...... .....: | ' 15%'"14
i do pr ...... j 40 ] 39% | 40% .36
Total sales, 638,500~ : .■:-... "* . - "
Chicago stocks: . Diamond Match, 135; Lin
seed, common 5%, preferred- 31%; Biscuit,
common 38, preferred 93%.
• Peoria & Eastern 2ds, [email protected]; St. Louis &
Southwestern 2ds, 75%@78.
COHIMCFhjX GRADES
PROPOSED CHANGE OF THE RULES
Movement to Make the Newly Es
tablished \o. 1 Grade De
liverable. . ■■_ '
In local flax circles there is some discussion
as to the new grade of flax known as No. 1,
but recently established by the state board.
It is the wish of many that this grade be
made deliverable on contract. -Since the new
rule of grading making this No. 1 grade
does not be.come operative until June 15,"
i there is ample time to consider the matter.
While it is admitted that some dissatisfaction
might arise from making No. *1 the contract
grade, it is thought it would be a good thing
for the trade on the whole. The question is
whether present holders of future contracts
will.be.satisfied. ;Under the proposed change
No. . 1 northwestern would of course ■be de
liverable on contract also, but It is probable
No. 1 would become the ruling contract
grade, and No. l northwestern sell at a pre
mium, as in the case of No. 1 northern wheat
and No. 1 hard. The proposition has strong
backing and will probably go through. >"iv
MONEY MARKETS .
' >'e»v York; Money.
New York, Jan. 25.—Money on call nomi
nally at 2 per cent; prime mercantile paper,
3 1'[email protected]% per cent; sterling exchange steady,
with actual business in bankers' bills at
$4.87% for demand and $4.83 for sixty days.
Posted rates, $4.84%@4.88. Commercial 1 bills,
[email protected] Silver certificates, [email protected] Bar
silver/ 52. Mexican dollars, 48%. Govern
ment bonds steady; refunding 2s, reg. • and
coupon, 105%; 2s, reg., '109%; coupon, 110%;
new 4a, reg., 136%; coupon, 137%; old 4s, reg.,
and coupon, 113%; ss, reg., 110%; coupon,
113%; D. C. 3s. life, 135.
Minneapolis Money. ,
MINNEAPOLIS — Bank clearings, . $1,846,
-602.01": New York exchange, selling rate, 60c
premium; buying rate, 10c premium. Chi
cago exchange, selling rate, 50c premium;
buying rate, par. \. London sixty-day sight
documentary, $4.83.
ST. PAUL—Clearings to-day, $589,900.13. ...
; <
Chicago Money. .
Chicago, Clearings, $21,222,999. Bal
ances, $2,172,752; posted exchange, $4.84%@
4.88. ■■ New York exchange; 5c premium.
London Consols. >■■«- -
London, Jan. 25. —Consols for money and
the account 96%. !--
V SPECULATIVE GOSSIP
New York, to Watson: '-Reliable private
advices from, Argentine, just received by
cable, state thai the condition of the wheat
crop of that country has grown much worse.
In Rossario, ■ where they grow the most
wheat, the reports are distinctly bad. From
the south, where > the smallest amount is
raised, the reports are favorable. This in
formation has not yet become public, and
we give it to you now simply for what it
is worth as market news."
» Modern - Miller: "Some apprehension is
manifested in parts of the winter wheat sec
tion on account of dry weather, as very little
rain or snow has fallen lately. The com
plaints are that there is not enough moisture
for the plant in its present advanced condi
tion. . There also are more complaints. of
wheat fields being infested by tire Hes
sian fly."
Washington, D. C—Consul Swalm . reports
Wheat crop of River Platte provinces bad in
both Argentine and Uruguay. On Argentine
] side the yield is not over 13% bu to the hec
; tare (2.47 acres). In Uruguay, whether there
will be enough wheat for home consumption
is uncertain. River Platte exports will be
less than 50 per cent,of last year's.
INVESTMENT GOSSIP
. Uptown gossip to Charles E. Lewis & Co.:
"A prominent operator says the stock market
j receives its inspiration from the Waldorf
Hotel crowd. This clique of heavy traders
buy stocks liberally on all fair declines and
turn around and sell them on the bulges.
The members of this party are not wedded
to either side of the market. They are in
the business of . speculation. It is apparent
' from the peculiar actions of the market that
some powerful interests are taking advantage
of the upturns to feed out stocks, and it is
also evident that substantial parties are ■ ab
sorbing these offerings. Those who are tak
ing an active part in the speculation, should
not make, the common and costly mistake of
loading up with stocks after they have had
a sharp rise or getting on. top of them after
a material decline. While opinions differ as
to the " immediate course of the market, all •
agree the majority of securities have made
their record for the present. Another boom
is not looked for, except by the most radical
bulls. The Missouri Pacific bubble has ex
ploded and the: stock is rapidly receding
Frank Savin, who has. been active on the
bull side for some time, appears to have ° a
good many stocks for sale."
Texas Pacific, third week, increase $57 884
-from Jan. 1, increase, $155,607.
Boston to Watson: The St. Paul program
struck two or three snags. In the first place
the combination wanted to secure the stock on
a 6M: per cent guarantee. This was emphatic
ally declined by large stockholders who how
ever, were willing to sell their shares In
block at. 152. As we understand the matter
Mr. Morgan took option on the blocks and
bought a large amount in the stock market
at lower prices, whirh he turned to advantage
when stock was rushed above 160 The real
stumbling block in way of the 'trade was
Mr Smith, the nephew ard legatee of Peter
Geddes. Mr, Smith has been recently chane
ing millions of his bonds over into share*
He said the St. Paul was faming 11 per cent
on its stock and he would not take 15* or fiii
guarantee; 200 was his price.
Chicago Great Western, third week or Janu
ary, increase, $4,063; from July 1, increase.
Missouri Pacific, third week of January
increase, $89,000; from Jan. l, increase, $259 -
Th* Ci * O. earnings for this week In
creased $25,000.
New York, to Edwards, Wood & Co.:
"Storks are quieter than any day for weeks.
London sold some at the opening, but prices
were supported and the market rallies quick
ly; the tone 'is firm. Strong people have
the bulk of the floating" supply of stocks
not the speculative public, and while some
what further reaction may be viewed with
equanimity, it will be unwise to sell on the
breaks. Large plans are under way in the
railroad world for constant betterment and
increased value of this class of securities,
which will be unfolded from time to time."
New York, to I. G. Andrews & Co.: "Senti
ment has taken a bearish turn and we look
for lower opening and some further decline
in the early trading, to be followed by a
sharp rally. We advise buying on the de
cline to-day, but. only for a quick turn, as
the market has lapsed into a traders' affair."
Waldorf Gossip, to Watson: "Boiled down,
the views expressed on the stock market sug
gest little change in the character of the
speculation. The latter has dwindled down
to a professional status. Commission busi
ness is the smallest in weeks. Manipulators
who bid up special stocks no longer get a
following, and it is the criticism of expert
observers that whenever advances occur they
bring out long stocks in quantity."
Buffalo Lake Bmlneii Deal.'
Buffalo Lake. Minn., Jan. -,25.— Nagel &
Woelpern, general '. merchants, have sold one-,
fourth Interest in their stock of merchandise
to Adolph :G. Siewert, of \ Sibley , county, Min
nesota, and hereafter the firm will -, be known
a3 Nagel, Woelpern & Co.—lt Is rumored that
Buffalo -i Lake a will" have i two. new .* lumber
yards In the Bprine.'maglng"three in all. "
LIGHT RUN OF COWS
A Strong Demand Shown for Kill
ing Kinds.
A LIBERAL HOG SUPPLY
The Market Opens About Sc Under
/ Yesterday's Average— :
Receipt* Small.
South St. Paul, Minn., . Jan. Receipts
to-day were 150 cattle, 60 calves, 2,200 hogs
and 100 sheep. ....
The following table shows the receipts from
Jan. 1, 1301, to date, as compared with the
same period a year ago: .
Year. Cattle.Calves.Sheep. Horses.Cars.
1901 ..... 9,428 1,501 51,498 42,523 161 1,224
1900 .:... 8,038 2,265 42.CC5 52,894 '393 1,175
Dec 764 ..... 10,371 232 ....
Inc •.::.;: 1,390 .... ' $.833 49
Receipts: ...
Date. Cattle. Calves. Hogs. Sheep. Cars. ;
Jan. 18 177 20 1895 36 * 31
Jan. 19 ...... 34 4 1,738 3,598 45
an. '21,. 240 32 648 4.849 42
Jan. 22 ...... 83C 149 3,139 1,645 8b
Jan. 23 ...... 564 102 1,858 151 48
Jan. 24 ...... 330 it 1,393 '212-'- 30
Estimated receipts by cars to-day of tho
railroads centering at these yards: Chicago i
Great Western, 3; Chicago, Milwaukee & St. i
Paul, 10: Minneapolis & St. Louis, 2; Chicago, i
St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha, 14; Chicago,!
Burlington & Quincy, 1; Wisconsin Central, 1;
Northern Pacific, 1; total, 32.
' Disposition of stock Jan. 24:
_ mi'^ Cattle. Hogs. Sheep. I
Swift & Co ... 132 1,196 1061
J. T. McMillan 190 • ...
Estate of I. Staples .... 2 .
Stimmer & Thomas.... 17
J. E. Bolton 7 '""*
J. B. Fitzgerald . 4 """.
J. R. King -, ""I
Country buyers ..;...... 207 .... '..'.
Totals 371 1,386 106
CATTLE—There was a very light run re
ceived in the yards to-day. The supply else
where was light and prices were generally
quoted unchanged. There was a very strong
demand for killing kinds, and in the absence
of these kinds, several pretty decent feeding
cattle sold as killers at prices about 20c per
100 lbs. more than they would have com
manded from country buyers. The stockera
and feeders trade was more or less slack on
account of the small supply in the yards.
Sales:
Butcher Cows and Heifers—
»•■ Ay. Price. 1 1 No. Ay. Price.
19 990 $3.78||.l -960 $3.60
4 457 2.25|| 3 916 2.25
2 1,035 2.50; j 1 1,000 2.75
1 970 2.00 I 1 1,050 2.15
1 1,050 3.651 1 900 210
1 780 2.00!)
Beef and Butcher Steers—
No. Ay. Price.l No. Ay. Price.
-' 1.080 $4.00jj 2 1.040 $3.65
22 1,084 3.70: l 5 1,100 3.60
Stockers and Feeders—
No. Ay. Price. 1 No. Ay. Price.
19 616 $3.3611 2 655 $2.75
6 321 2.50; 3 820 2.90
2 510 3.00: 1 480 300
1 660 3.251 7 344 3.25
1 510 -3.35| 1 610 3.35
Veal Calves—
No. Ay. Price. j| No. Ay. Price.
3 100 $5.70!| 1 100 $5.00
Feeding Cows and Heifers—
No. Ay. Price. No. Ay. Price.
12 703 $3.00 ! 2 355 $2.75
1 740 2.76
Feeding Bulls-
No. Ay. Price. I] No. Ay. Price.
1 570 $2.75| 1 .1,060 $2.80
1 740 2.75| I
HOGS—The supply of hogs was fairly lib
eral at all outside markets to-day. The
supply here was fairly moderate, and, while '
reports from the east quoted prices 5c to i
10c lower, the market here opened only about «
uc under yesterday's average trading. Quality '.
showed some improvement and trading all |
through was very brisk. Best lights and me- ;
diums sold from $5.07% to $5.10, while light '
mixed sold from $5.05 to $5.07% and roughs
at $4.85.
No. Ay. Price. !|No. Ay. Price.
76 219 $5.15 !| 60 177 $5.15
78 211 5.12% | 71 218 5.12%
87 192 5.10 ij 84 200 5.10
78 ....• 809 5.10 53 207 5.10
88 200 5.10 i6B 187 5.07%
48 185 5.07% j55 151 5.07%
60 187 5.07% j| 93 ....177 5.07%
71 198 5.07% 11 89 188 5.07%
72 184 6.05 Ii 23 151 5.05
48 273 5.05 |j 24 192 6.05
Pigs and Culls-
No. Ay. Price. I! No. Ay. Price.
2 355 $4.90 |! 4 430 $4.85.
•1 .535 4.85 !' 1 370 4.85
1 470 4.85 1 630 4.75
3 116 4.35 l\ 3 83 4.35
SHEEP —Receipts to-day were very small.
The few on sale consisted of sheep and lambs,
mixed, of only fair quality. The local de
mand was very strong for all kinds of killers
at prices fully steady with the recent
strength. There was nothing offered in the
line of stock and feeding sheep, and conse
quently trade in that division was at a
standstill.
No. Ay. Price.
103 ewes 116 $3 87%
1 sheep 110 4.00
On the market: Larson Bros., Etter; Win.
Crofot, Stanley, Iowa: J. Kilroy, Goodbue;
Kenyon Mercantile Co., Colfax. Wis.; ,T. S.
Larson, Farrlngton; Hines & Thamert, Owa
tonna; Schneider Bros., Alma, Wis.; M. Kin
sella, Thielman: J. S. Green. Red Wing; T. A.
Rude, Sacred Heart; Wm. Fox, Bird Island -
G. W. Pettis, Jr., Renville; Babcock &. X.,
Vernon Center; Schuldt it. Walthers, Owaton
na; Scoville & Donavan, Meridan; A. D.
Sackett, Jonesville; Hans Lauritsen, Tyler;
Paul Gundersou, Miller & Steele, Porter;
Steges &. Gummer, Courtland; A. pettis. St!
Pater; Livermore & Merritt, Northropr Dun
ham &. C, Janesville.
Sioux City Live Stock.
Sioux City, lowa, Jan. 25.—Receipts—
2,200; cattle, 300. Hogs— 5c lower.
Sales: .1 . ,
No. " Ay. Price.
81 ; 193 $5.02^
t63 — ........ 266 5.05
175 ..:....:....-...; 242 5.071 *
51 275 5.10
Cattle—Steady. Sales:
] N0.f;:%,;-)'.v< itZiSZVT*. Ay. ■ Price.
[1 cannera .. 910 $2.2S
i 3 cows ................1,020 3.25
i 6 stock heifers , 550 2.50
5 stock'heifers 450 3.00
2 bulls ....;.... 920 2.50
2 bulls 1,020 2.90
2 bulls 910 3.00
4tsockers. 850 3.50
3 stackers:....'. ........... r . 900 3.75
5 yearlings 690 • 3.50
6 yearlings 650 3.75
6 calves V....... 300 2.45
4 calves ............:............. 300 3.45
4 calves- -.. 240 3.85
Sheep—ln demand, $3.25<&5. ;,\v
Chicago Live Stock.
Chicago, Jan. 25.—Cattle, receipts, 2,500:
slow, shade lower; good to prime steers, $5.20
@6; poor to medium, $3 5<><5&5.10; stockers and
feeders, [email protected]; cows and heifers, [email protected];
Texas steers, $3.35®4.75.
Hogs, receipts to-day, 26,000; to-morrow,
20,000: left over, 6.807; [email protected] lower; mixed and
butcher*, [email protected]; good to choice heavy
[email protected]; rough heavy, £95.10; light, $5
©5.22V4; bulk of oales, [email protected]
Sheep, receipts, 6,000; steady; ghe«p, $3.40
<3>4.50; lambs, $4<@5.40.
Official yesterday: Receipts, cattle, 10 660
-hogs. 24,585; sheep, 10,809; shipments, cattle'
4,157; hogs, 2,695; sheep, 1,535.
Kantian City Live Stock.
Kansas City, Jan. 25.—Cattle—Receipts,
3,000; steady; native steers, [email protected]; Texas
steers, [email protected]; cows and heifers, [email protected]
Hogs—Receipts, 12,000: s(§>7%c lower; bulk
of sales, J3.12M:<§j5.20: heavy, [email protected]; mixed
[email protected]%; light, [email protected]&.
Sheep—Receipts, 2,000; steady; lambs, $4®
5.40; muttons, [email protected]
St. Loali Live Stock.
St. Louis, Jan. 23.—Cattle—Receipts, 1.400;
steady; native steers, [email protected]; stoekers
and feeders, $2 [email protected]: cows and heifers,
[email protected]; Texas aud Indian steers, $3.40<g4.6t>.
Hogs—Receipts, 7,5u0; market 5c lower;
pigs and lights, $5 [email protected]; packers, $5.15#
5.20; butchers, [email protected]
Sheep—Receipts, 600; firm.
Omaha Live StocU.
South Omaha, Jan. 25.—Cattle—Receipts,
1,900; steady; native steers, [email protected]; Texas
steers, [email protected]: cows and heifers. [email protected]
Hogs—Receipts, 9,800; [email protected] lower;
heavy, *5.12^@5.1"H; mixed, $5.12V»@5.15;
light, $5.1005.15; bulk of sales, [email protected]
Sheep—Receipts, 400; unchanged.
M. DOR AX & CO.,
The Oldest Firm of
Bankers and Brokers
IX THE NORTHWEST.
Bare removed from their old quarters
' -■• -* on Jackson street to the ;■;-
VemnU Mfb Bulldlny. or. 4th
and Minnesota St., »t. Paul. Mian.
FRIDAY EVENING, JANUARY 25, 1901.
GENERAL PRODUCE::"
The Minneapolis Market.
-, 'Friday, Jan. 23.; ' !--. ■'i.v.
The ■ butter market is barely steady.;: The
market shows a -quiet feeling- general,/with
prices unchanged but I wavering in some
grades. ■ " jfltlffrariEttl
Eggs are steady and firm as quoted, with a
fair demand for good, stock.:.. . > . . .
BUTTER—Extra ?creameries, ib, [email protected]%c;,"
firsts, [email protected]; ■ seconds, [email protected]; imita- i
tions, firsts, [email protected]; seconds, 12c; dairies, ■
extras, [email protected]; firsts,. [email protected]«e; seconds, 12c; ;
roll, fancy, 14c; choice, ll%c; ladles, firsts,.
14c; seconds, lie; packing stock, fresh, sweet, :
IUHc. : -r ■- --'•■-.■ ■
EGGS—Strictly . fresh, cases ■ included, loss
off, IB<gli*c; storage No. 1, [email protected]; lower grade
storage, 10%@l*c; dirty, fresh, 9%<010c;
checks, 9%@10c. . - '
CHEESE—Twins or flats, fancy, [email protected]&c;
twins or flats, choice, lb,[email protected]^c; twins or
flats, fair to good, S<ij;B^c; brick. No. 1, li(g
13}4c; brick, .no. 2, luigiic; brick, No. i, am
7c; goat cheese, Imported, per ib, 27c; Urn
burger, No. 1, 12V&c; limDurger, No. 2, S l/2®' '■
9%c; primost, No. 1, per lb, ac; primost, No.
2, per lb, Be; Young America, fancy, lb, l^Vs
<&l3e; choice, 10®lOftc; pultost, [email protected]; Swiss,
No. 1, 13% c; block Swiss, No. l, 12 l/[email protected]'4c;
No. 2 block, 10c..- .. * ../. -•. . ..* -«v
DRESSED POULTRY— dry picked,
fancy, medium .weight, per ib, 8c; turkeys,
dry picked, young toms, [email protected]&c; fair to good j
mixed, Be; turkeys,, thin, small, bruised, 4(aoc; ;
spring chic Lens, fancy, 7%@Bc; fair to good,
sta6c; springs, off stock, 3©4 c; capons, Vi'U}
14c; fowls, ; fancy, :'c; fowls, fair to good, 4V4
| @sc; ducks,' fancy, 9c; ducks,' fair to good,
j [email protected]; geese, fancy, 8c; geese, fair to good,
[email protected] ":''-: • ■-v-:-.;-, ••. — ;-•-■:■:• -,-:.-■ •■■.-•'-
DRESSED MEATS—VeaI, fancy, 100 to 125
lbs, [email protected] l,£c; veal, fair to good, [email protected]>Vic; poor to
overweight, 4^@sc; mutton, fancy, country
dressed, 6c; thin or overweight,-6c; lambs,
fancy, 8c; laanbs, thin or bruised, tic; hogs,
according to weight, 5%c.
GAME—Rabbits, jack, per doz, [email protected];
white rabbits, 80c; cottontail, 80ci&$l; squir
rels, gray or "black, per doz,: 50©60 c; red,
doz, £[email protected]
PIGEONS—Live, per doz, 80c; deal, per
doz, 50c; squabs, per doz, $1.
FlSH—Grapples, [email protected]%c; pickerel, lb, 2^c;
pike, o'&tic: suuflsh. Ib, 2c; perch, per lb, 20
3c; herring, per lb, 2 1, 2 c; herring, skinned,
per lb, ie; lake trout, per lb, 10c; irogs 1 legs,
per doz, as to size, [email protected] -
POTATOES—Burbanks, car lots, [email protected];
Rurals, [email protected]; Ohios, [email protected]; mixed white,
[email protected]; mixed red, [email protected]
SWEET POTATOES—IIIin-ois, per brl, |3;
Muscatines, per br!. ?2.50.
BEANS— navy, bu, $2.40; choice, bu;
$2.15; medium, hand-picked, bu, $2; browc, i
fair to good, [email protected] ■ - '
ONIONS—Red Globes, car lots, per bu, $1;
Red Wethersflelds, bu, " 90c; Yellow Globes,
car lots, per bu. 90c.
DRIED PEAS— yellow, [email protected] per
bu; medium, [email protected]$l; green, fancy, [email protected]; <
green, medium. [email protected]$l bu; marrowfat, bu, $2. |
APPLES—Russets, [email protected]; Spitzenbergs,
[email protected]; Ben Davis, i3.5U«3.75; Belleflowers,
[email protected]; Greenings, brl, $3.25; Baldwins, brl,
[email protected]; Northern Spy, [email protected]; Jonathan, $5
@5.25; western box apples, bu, [email protected]
CRANBERRIES—Cape Cod, per brl, $9;.
Jerseys, [email protected]; bu crates, $3; Wisconsin
cranberries, [email protected]
FIGS—New California, 10-lb boxes, 85e.
ORANGES—California < navels, 80s, $2.50;
California navels, 965, $2.75; California na
vels, 1265, $3; Californias, 150s, ?3.25; Califor
nia navels, 176s to 288s, $3.50; California seed
lings, all sizes, $2.75; Floridas, all sizes, $2.75 i
@3; California tangerines, half box, $2.
LEMON'S— SOOs or 3605, fancy,
[email protected]; choice, [email protected]; California, fancy,
as to size. $3.50; choice, $3.25.
GRAPES—Malagas, per keg, [email protected]; per
keg, extra fancy, $8®5.25. ■■
STRAWBERRIES—Fancy Florida stock, qt,
60c. :-:':t>-.-f:
PINEAPPLES—Per doz, as to size, range
from $3' to $«.
BANANAS—Fancy, large bunches, $2.25®
2.50; medium bunches, $2<&2.25; small bunches,
[email protected]
HONEY— fancy white, 1-lb sections,
18c; choice white, [email protected]; amber, [email protected];
golden rod, [email protected]; extracted white, [email protected];
buckwheat, [email protected]; extracted amber, [email protected]
VEGETABLE'S—Beets, per bu, 40c; cab
j bage, crate, $1.50; carrots, per bu, 40c; cauli
! flower, -'per doz, $1.25; celery, per doz, [email protected]
i 35c; Californias, [email protected]; cucumbers, per doz,
i $2; egg plant, per doz, $2; green onions, doz,
i 50c; Spanish onions, per bu crate, $2;
lettuce, per doz, [email protected]; head lettuce, doz,
85c; parsley, 40c; parsnips, per bu, 60c; ruta
! bagas, bu, 35c; watercress,- das, 30c; wax
beans, per bu, [email protected]; ■ Hubbard squash,
per doz, [email protected]$l; mint, doz, 40c.
New York Produce.
New York. Jan. 25.—Butter—Receipts, 4,565
pkgs; steady; creamery, [email protected]; June cream
ery, [email protected]; factory, [email protected] Cheese—Re
ceipts, 1,689 pkgs; steady; fancy large, fall
made, ll^iigill^c; fancy, small, fall made,
11%@12c. Eggs—Receipts, 6,834 pkgs; steady;
western average, packed at mark, [email protected]'/ic;
western, loss off, 2O 1 / £@2lc. Sugar—Raw
quiet; • fair refining, 3%c; centrifugal, 96 test,
4%c; molasses sugar, S'/je; refined steady;
crushed, 6c; powdered, 5.60 c; granulated,
5.50 c. Coffee —Steady., Molasses—Steady.
Chicago Produce.
Chicago, Jan. 25.—Butter—Dull; creameries,
[email protected]; dairies, liy 2 @lBe. Eggs—Quiet;
fresh, 18c. Dressed Poultry—Dull; turkeys,
[email protected]'2o; chickens, [email protected] 1/ic
Hidea, Pelts, Tallow and Wool.
Andersen Brothers, Minneapolis, say: Hides
were firm and tendency upward at the close
of last week, but since then the markjet has
lost the strong tone and prices are now
ateady at practically an unchanged level.
! The market appears strong at current figures,
although tanners show reluctance to buy and
it is hard to Interest them, especially buyers
for tanneries in the eastern states. The
supply has diminished somewhat, and re
ceipts show a falling off. Quality is rapidly
deteriorating and it is in part this fact
that inferior hides make up a large part
of daily recipts that makes tanners indiffer
ent, and shows determination on their part
not to take the present receipts at the full
prices quoted. Dry hides and skins show
no material changes. Receipts are light and
demand slow, conditions to be expected at
this time. Horse hides are active at prices
quoted, with noticeable falling off in re
ceipts.
In consequence of the quiet wool market,
little interest is shown in pelts. Pullers find
it impossible to move scoured and brushed
wools. Prices have fallen off gradually dur
ing, the past thirty days, under pressure of
accumulating stocks, but the trade expects
Improvement after Feb. 1.
Tallow is easier and hesitating, owing to
the suspended auction sales in London. Local
demand is light and prices fairly steady.
The wool market continues weak, without
support fr©m manufacturers. Xoiwithtsand
ing the dullness, however, dealers and hold
ers in general refuse to make concessions.
It is argued that wool is cheap at present
quotations, and apparently many are tend
ing that way iv their views, judging from the
steadiness shown in the face of the present
dullness and the fact that holders are. dis
posed to carry stocks along in preference to
letting go at concessions. Manufacturers
claim their lack of support is based purely
upon their limited requirements, due to light
business in finished goods.
Owing to the death of tbe queen, and the
consequent general disarange'ment of busi
ness lines, reports from the London fur
auction sales are incomplete. In the Hudson
Bay sales, beaver declined TVi per cent and
niuskrat 10 per cent from prices of Januacj
a year ago; skunk lost 20 per cent and civet
cat, 10 per cent. Lynx brought in the neigh
borhood of 40 per cent and mink 5 to 10 per
cent above prices of the sales last March.
More complete returns will be at hand in a
few days.
Xo.l. N0.2.
Green salted heavy steer hides 9 8
Green salted heavy cow hides i 7
Green salted light hides 7% e^
Green salted heavy cow and ateer
hides, branded 714 3%
Green salted bull and oxen 7 6
Green salted veal calf, Bto 15 lbs. .10% 9
Green salted veal kip, 15 to 25 lbs 9i,j s
Green salted long-haired or runner
kip • 8% 6%
Green salted deacons, each 50 40
Green cattle hides and skins 1-SHic per
lb less than above quotations.
Green salted horse or mule bides,
large -... V 13.00 2.25
Green salted horse or mule hides,
medium 2.40 1.50
Green salted horse or mule hides,
small '. 1.75 1.00
a ' ' — • ■
Dry flint Montana butcher hides.. 14 <2>14%
Dry fliut Minnesota, Dakota and
Wisconsin hides ................... 11^ 10
Dry flint calf skins ......1...:....... 18 13
Dry flint kip skins, ........;....14% 1254
Green salted pelts, large, each...... .9001.15
Green salted pelts, medium, each .60® .75
Green salted pelts, small, each „ [email protected] 50
Dry flint territorial pelts, butcher.... 11%@12
Dry flint territorial pelts, murrain. [email protected]
Dry flint territorial shearlings ..... 7 @ 9
Tallow, in cake 5......!............."..,. 5 414
Tallow, In barrels .................... 4ȣ 3%
Grease, white :.:...... 4*| 3%
Grease, d?rk 3% 2V2
P, medium, unwashed [email protected]
. coarse, unwashed 15 @15V4
, fine medium, unwashed 14 @is
, fine, unwashed 111 / £@l34
, broken, fleeces, unwashed 13 @15
' ■ — ■ == MfAßtllllß 1879 ; "■ ■ ''~' ''"'"' ""'"'>'
WOODWARD & CO.
mmupous QRAfN COMMISSION ««»»
B&4KChicago *M HUwmk««. Orders for futur* d«UT«u executed In hU auuket*,
:i^?%9^i^^EflßflßBffißMflßnßßßflßsßHMeß^:^' ' ;3--^^n^>'lT ;- '" ' , ' -■*r*f-. ■■■ ■■-■.-■-■■■ -■ .-.
CMS. L LEWIS
liilHl i
GRAIN COMMISSION
*-o STOCK BROKERS,
i, 2 and 3, Chamber or
commerce
Private Wires to All Markotm,
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF MINNEAPOLIS.
Phoenix Building, 4th St. and Ist Ay*
U.S. DEPOSITORY.
CAPITAL ......V;..:;..... $1,000,000
I Surplus aad UndlTldd Profits gj $100,000
John Martin, President. I C.T,Jaffray.Cashier
F. M. Prince, Vice Pre*. ID. Mackerchar,
J .s.JPlUsoiiry, Tloeprei. f Aait. Cashier.
DIKECTOB3.
John B. Martin. 0.1. Swett, F. M. Prlno*.
John S. Plilsbury, J.L. Record, tfco. C. B*zUr. :
John B. QUfiUan, B.D. C&rjcltl. E. Peimlngtoa,
CX. Jaffray, R. M. Chute, F. B. Well*
A. M. Woodward, 8. G. Palmes.
THOMAS & Go
Grain Commission anA Stock Brokers.
Write for our dally market letter, whioh we
mall FREE on application.
Members Minneapolis Chamber of Com
merce. Telephone— 1597-J. -.^
5 CHAM USB OX* OO^KJia«a
E A. BROWN & CO.
Grain Commission.
Choice Seed Oats For Sale. Write for prices
and samples.
Redmond, Kerr & Co.,
BASKEKM. ,:
41 Wall Street, New York.
Transact a general banking business.
Receive deposits subject to draft Dividends
and Interest collected and remitted. Act as
Fiscal Agent for and negotiate and issue loans of
railroads, street railways., gas companies, etc*.
Securities bought and sold on commission. ■
, Members New York Stock KxcUaug*.
DEAL IN
Hill-Grade
Investment Securities.
List of current offerings sent on applica
tion to our .....
ST. PAUL CORRESPONDENTS: ,
PEABODY & 08-,
Merchant*' National Bank Building.
Wool, sedey, burry, unwashed 12 @14
Bright Wisconsin and similar grades l(g^a
higher than above quotations.
MISCELLANEOUS
New York Cotton.
New York, Jan. 25. —The cotton market
opened steady with prices unchanged to 5
points lower, the Liverpool public cables be
ing a disappointment and the movement over
topping initial anticipation*, hater the mar
ket developed resistance to further declines
and slowly rallied to last night's close.
Spot closed dull, *4c higher: middling up-
I lands, 10^c; middUng gulf, 10% c. Sales, 1,310
bales.
Futures closed steady; January, 10.06 c:
February, 9.46 c; March, 9.39 c; April, 9.34 c;
May, 9.34 c; June, 9.31 c; July, 9.32 c; August,
9c; September, B.5Sc; October, 8.30e; Novem
ber, 8.22 c.
Peoria Whiaky.
Peoria, Jan. 25.—Whisky on the basis oj
$1.2? (or finished goods
Boaton Mining Stocks.
Boston, Jan. Arcadian, 18: Arnold. 4;
Atlantic, 28; Montana, 312; Butte, 78; Calu
met, 850; Centennial,22%: Franklin, 16; Os
ceola, 81; Quincy, 167; Tamarack, 330; Wol
verine, 49; Old Dominion, 30%; Parrott, 48.
YANKEES FROM SEW ENGLAND
Annual Meeting; and Banquet Held
at Fargo. .■ •.-; ■' ■'■■':' :. ''■■;
Special to The Journal. ; .". :,^
. Fargo, iX. D., Jan. 25.—The New Eng
landers made merry last. night at their
annual meeting and banquet. A program
of exceptional interest to the former resi
dents of the northeastern part of the
United States had been prepared, Lieuten
ant-Governor Smith of Minnesota being
down for an address on the New England
type. The banquet represented an old
fashioned New England feast. ■■ ■ .■•■-. .
David Larson of Erie has been sent to
the city for examination by the Insanity
board. . Miss Mollie Vaag jof • Lake * Park,
Minn., who has been in the city for some
months, was adjudged insane 1 and taken
home by her father. She seems to have a
religious mania".
NO OPPOSITION
J. T. Gordon, Cattle Exporter, Elec
. ted to Parliament.
, Winnipeg, Man., Jan. 25.— J. T. Gordon,
the great Canadian cattle exporter, has
been elected a member of parliament for
South Winnipeg unopposed.
Stabbed In the Arm.
Special to The Journal.
Hibbing, Minn., Jan. 25.—Henry Westman
was held to th« grand jury by Justice Lekoe
for stabbing Sam Corka in the arm with a
jack knife, and John Lawrie was recom
mended to be prosecuted for selling liquor on
Sunday. Corka and Westmau were in Law
rie's saloon and, in a drunken mix-up. West
man made two attempts to stab Corka. The
knife entered the arm and mad£ a deep gaan.
Westman denies all knowledge of the crime,
as he was dead drunk.
Watson & Co
Broker* In Grain, Provisions,
•Stocks and Bonds* -
Members N. Y. Stock Exchange
Chicago Correspondents—Sehwartz.Dupee & Co.
Private wire Chicago New York., Tel. 906 Main.
38 Chamber of Commerce,
PBSXSESS\
A MEMBERS WiS^mKAl
Geragwy,Dopan*£o
mcb ™f aill MB
Bonds i™L.. Pr n oTf ns
Cotton I £2£rߣ«--ffii.

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