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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, January 30, 1901, Image 12

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1901-01-30/ed-1/seq-12/

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12
MAY WHEAT MADE A DECLINE OF 1-2 CENT
X iquidation Began in Chicago on
the Indifferent Tone of
Liverpool Market.
DECREASE IN THE VISIBLE SUPPLY
Continued Good Demand Here for
Milliner Wheat-(ieneral \'ew»
of the S» salon.
Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, Jan. 30.
—Wheat" opened •on • lower' range, sold within
a shade of : 75c, and held weak through the
session. There was not much of leading In
terest in the early news. The corn market
•was weak. Foreign' advices carried an air of
indifference, turning later; to -weakness. Liv
erpool coming unchanged to %d off, and clos
ing ' %@%<3 lower. ' Temperatures over the
southwest were not so law as had been pre
dicted. Receipts at northwestern points ran
about the same as last year, 265 cars, against
281. What strength there was came: princi
pally from the expectation of a decrease in
the Bradstreet visible figures, and continued
good cash wheat demand, " especially in this
market. - Australian shipments;, omitted in
last week ■world's figures, were-placed at 544,
--000 bushels. Chicago had a ; weak and hesi
tating opening, and liquidation began at once.
Exporters at Chicago and St. Louis reported
foreigners unresponsive. to offers of wheat or
corn. Minneapolis opened %c off, at : 75% c,
and , sold to [email protected]%c, recovering in part to
wards noon. The Bradstreet figures were for
a' ; 650,000 bushel decrease. Primary receipts
•were 442,000 '. bushels, against 334,000. • Clear
ances wh«tit and flour, 372,000, bushels. Min
neapolis received 237 cars . and Duiuth 28,
against 247.and 34 last year.
The close was steady, and quiet, May at 75%
@75% c; July at 76% c January closed at
7i%c. BKHMMBPI
There was an excellent business In the cash
< market. The feature . for several days has
been the small proportion of No. 1 northern
In the offerings. There has been no material
Increase In receipts of poor stuff, but a large
part of the Incoming wheat is running to
intermediate grades, and only 18 cars of No.'l
northern were Inspected ,in. yesterday., Mill
ers drew on terminals again to-day .for part
of their top grade requirements. No. 1 north
ern sold at the full May price all through the
grade. A fair business developed in No. 1 to
arriva. No. 2 northern sold from at 73c for
the. bulk. No. 3 wheat at 67%@65c for good
lots. Rejected ranged between 55c and 65c,
averaging 62c, and no grade sold from 53c to
88c. " .' '.'/'
THE CASH TRADE
flax Sells Higher-Corn Lower—Oats
Easier—Feed Steady.
FLAX —The market was stronger and high
er. Several orders were in hand for seed
flax and buyers were obliged to pay top
notch figures for the selected lots. No. 1
■old at $1.75; rejected brought $1.72, and bo
Crade sold to $1.68. The run of offerings
went below these figures. Rejected seed,
lo arrive, sold at $1.68, and ordinary no grade
at $1.63. Minneapolis received 23 cars,
against 4 last year; Duluth had 1 car; Chi
cago, 24 cars.
Closing prices: Minneapolis cash, $1.71;
to arrive, $1.70; May, $1.76. Duluth cash,
|1.73; to arrive, $1.73; May, $1.78; July, $1.20.
FLOUR—The market is steady and quiet,
Without change in quotations. First patents
ere quoted [email protected]; second patents, [email protected]
4; first clears, [email protected]; second clears, [email protected]
Shipments, 47,292 brls.
MILLSTUFFS—The market is unchanged,
•with trade fairly active. Bran
in bulk Is quoted $11.25® 11.50; flour mid
dlings, [email protected]; bulk shorts, [email protected];
red dog in 140-lb sacks, $14; feed in 200-lb
sacks, $1 per ton additional; in 100-lb sacks,
$1.50 per ton additional. Shipments, 967
toss.
FEED AND MEAL—There are no changes
In prices. Trade is good on all grades.
Coarse corn meal and cracked corn are
quoted $14; No. 1 feed, $14.25; No. 2 feed,
$14.50; No. 3 feed, $15; granulated corn meal
In cotton sacks, at the rate of $1.95 per
barrel.
CORN—The market was active, but on
lower range throughout, in sympathy with
the weaker option. No. 3 yellow sold 35% c,
and No. 3 around 35c. No. 3 yellow is
quoted %c below yesterday, at 35%; No. 3
corn, 35c; No. 4, 34% c. Receipts, 133 cars;
shipments, 120 cars.
OATS—The market was steady to a shade
easier. No. 3 white is quoted 25% c; No. 3
oats, 25c. Receipts 21 cars; shipments, 15
cars.
BARLEY—The market is steady. No. 5
sold at 47c; feed grades are quoted [email protected]
46c; malting grades, [email protected] Receipts were
6 cars; shipments, 4 cars.
RYE —The market is quiet and steady; No.
I is quoted 48c.
HAY—Minnesota upland, [email protected]; lowa up
land, $9® 10.50; coarse to medium, [email protected]; rye
■traw, [email protected] Receipts, 225 tons; ship
ments, 31 tons.
Puts and Calls.
Puts—May wheat, [email protected]:VbC.
Calls—May wheat, 75% c.
Curb—May wheat, 75% c.
Cash Sales Reported To-day. .
No. 1 northern, 4 cars .....".'.;...... $0.75%
No. 1 northern, 6 cars 75Vi
No. 1 northern, 1 car .■.;.'..: 76
No. 1 northern, 4 cars ... .■....'..'......• 75%
No. . 1 northern. 1 car ......".......".....-.75%
No. 1 northern, 2,400 bu, to ar .....'.;... . .75%
No. 1 northern, 1,000 bu, to ar 7511
No. 1 northern, 2,400 bu, to ar .75%
No. 1 northern, 1,800 bu, to ar .75%
No. ' 1 northern, 5,000 bu, to ar .75%
No. 2 northern, 30 cars 73
No. 2 northern, 2 cars 73%
No. 2 northern, 1 car .73%
No.. 2 northern, 6 cars V.~..'...;...;..".'... .72%
No. 3 wheat, 10 cars , jig
No. 3 wheat, 4 cars C 7%
No. 3 wheat, 9 cars .69
No. 3 wheat, 8 cars 67
No. : 3 wheat, 1 car .69
No. 3 wheat, 4 cars 64
No. 3 wheat, 3 cars "" *62
No. 3 wheat, 1 car ...; . , .53
No. 3 wheat, part car .....;........... .70
Rejected wheat, 1 car 65
Rejected wheat, 2 cars ................. M
Rejected wheat, 1 car .......'....:......... '51
No grade wheat, 8 cars ..............; '53
No grade wheat, 3 cars .;............ *" '52
No grade wheat, 1 car „', ***| ' 60
No.grade wheat, 1 car ;..; " '5214
No grade wheat, 1 car ............ '54
No grade wheat, 1 car :.:.;...... "" 68
No grade wheat, 1 car ;... ' 55
No grade wheat, 1 car '.'.'.'." '59
No grade wheat,. 1 car ...; ..." '5314
No. 3 yellow corn, 7 cars ......,, '.353/
No. 3 yellow corn, 2 cars ........ .'*!!!!; '3534
No. 3 corn, 5 cars •■•••••• 'gg 78
No. 3 corn, 9 cars '" " '351/
No. 3 white oats,.- 1 ear ..; .1] "-"'-%■ .-Vvi
No. 3 white oats, 1 car .. *" V.a/
No. y 8 oats, 2 cars ..: ...; '* 05*
No, 3 oats,- 9 " cars .;...'.-...if!" *"!v"" * Vv
No. .. 3 oats, 2 cars .......... ;. "•" * '051?
No.--6 barley, 1 car ;•••••••• 47*
Rejected flax, 1 ear "'"" Ifi q
Rejected flax, 1 car- '""'^L": igq
Rejected flax, 2 car5'..;.....;; ;;-"•' Ifi ou,
Rejected flax, 1 car ....... ':;•.• J72
Rejected flax, 4 cars ...... ]"'"':'"' i''%:y
Rejected flax, 1 car ... \ •••....... i.oa .
Rejected flax, 13,000 bu, to ar ''"*"" " I'fis '
No grade flax, 2 cars ......... "-"'""-' ,*,\
Ho. 1 flax, 1 car .......... "•'"•••'■' j^
State Grain Inspection. -- •-'•
Inspected In-Whe^-Cars-Great Northern
Inspected In-Wheat-Cars-Qreat Northern
' «^°" 1 northern, 7; No. 2 northern. 9; No. 3
:• 15; rejected. »6;r no grade, 18 ■■'■■■ •" -- .
_ .Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul — No 1
northern, 5; No.. 2.: northern, 36; No. 3 IS
rejected, 3; no grade. 14. „' ' 'I™.'.
Minneapolis & St. Louts-No. 1 northern 1
-7,N0. 2 northern. 9; No. 3, 7; no grade 2 '
Soo Line-No. 1 northern. 2; No 2 north
_ era, 11; No. 3, 6; no grade, 1. north
•.'^. Northern Pacific—No. 2 northern, 1;' No 3
Chicago St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha
?°- 4 "^i^ 13 ' 3; No" 2 norO»«rn. 4- No 3
4; rejected, 2: no grade, «?. ' 7
■ 8 ' Minnesota Transfer—No. 2 northern, 1; : No.
'St. Paul & Duluth— No. 3, 1 .'" ;•■- '• -
»„ x,al~; No- X northern, 18; No. 2 northern
60; No. 3. 54; rejected, 11; no grade 46
Otier Grains-Cars-No. 2 winter'wheat 2-
N0.3 winter wheat, 25; No. 3 yellow corn
No. 8 white corn. 5; No. 3 corn, 70; no grada
;: corn, 1; No. 3 white oats, 7; No.-3 oats 15
no i grade rye, 1; No. 5 barley, l ;iNo vr flax'
■ 2; rejected flax, 16;.i i0 grade flax X - "',
> m ?^ n IX? Pec%$ ' Out-No. 1 northern wheat.
60; No. 2 northern wheat. 30; No. 3 wheat
«, 84; rejected ; wheat, : 12; ~no grade whwTt %•
No. 2 winter wheat, 36; No TveUow Tl'
No. 3 corn; 7; No. oats. 23- No 5 barley 3
rejected flax, 8; no grade flax, l. barley '3'
Receipt* and Shipment*. '.
■'•' -V ;" Jan.: 29. » .-•■■' - :
,o?^f lyedWheat ' 237; cars 191,970 bu- ; corn:
| 123,090 bu; - oats, 27,350 * bu; baril>" 4 560 bu'
flax,' 16,790 bu; flour, 774 • brls;.- millstuffs 105
tons; hay, ; 225. tons; , fuel oil, 33 682 eals• fruit
12,928 lbs; merchandise, i,ZBOJS» Tbs- luml
ber,- 24 cars; machinery, 312.400 ; lbs- < coal.
RANGE OF WHEAT PRICE IN MINNEAPOLIS
:;. -i: Open. ; J High. Low. "<"■■ Today. Yesterday. ' Year Ago. r
Jan..5,....:...:.; *......„.. $ ;V..:... $.74% - » $.75% $ .C 5% •
May. .75% .75% - . .75; .75%@75% .76% ,•• • .'65%@65Vb
July. .76% . .76% ; . .75% ; .76% ? Y76%@76% .66%
On Track— 1 hard, 77% c; No. 1 northern, 75% c; No. 2 northern, 71%@72%c.
•'. - \ -; THE DAY'S RESULT; ' ■ v; ■
May Wheat. Minneapolis, Chicago." Duluth. i . Bt. .Louis. Now York,
Close t0 : day.....? .75%©75% / $:.76* @76% $ .76% ■• $ .74%@74% $ .80%:.
Close yesterday. .75% ,: ■ .76% .77%@77% ' .74% ■.-r> j .81%©81%
1,492 tons; wood, 475 cords; brick, 28,000; ce
ment, 845 brls; ties, 3 cars; stone and marble,
2 cars; live stock, 1 car; dressed meats, 100,
--000 lbs; railroad materials, 4 cars; sundries
30 cars; car lots, 74(f.
Shipped—Wheat. 46 cars, 38,180 bu; corn
111,600 bu; oats, 20,850 bu; barley, 3,320 bu;
flax : 5,760 bu; flour, 47,292 brls; millstuffs'
967 tons; hay, 31 tons; fuel oil, 52,000 gals;
fruit, 76,000 lbs; merchandise, 1,488,400 lbs:
lumber, 48 cars; machinery, 87,700 lbs; house
hold goods, 16,300 lbs; linseed oil, 26,500 brls
oil cake, 216,000 lbs; railroad materials, 2
cars; sundries, 12 cars; car lots, 746.
Wheat Movement.
The following are the receipts and ship
ments at the principal primary wheat mar
kets:
Receipts, Shipments,
Bushels. Bushels.
New York 84.60U 63,700
Philadelphia 2,797 None
Baltimore 23,662 23,816
Toledo 4.90S 7,200
Detroit 1,222 7,471
St. Loulg 49,000 60,000
Boston 45.100 None
Chicago 77,725 68,411
Milwaukee 23,250 None
Duluth 32,621 None
Minneapolis 191,970 -38,180
Kansas City ...66,800 96 ouo
Wheat Movement by Roads.
Received—Milwaukee, 48 cars; Omaha, 31;
St. Louis, 17; Great Northern, 81; North
ern Pacific, 4; Great Western, 30; Soo, 46.
Shipped—Milwaukee, 10 cars; Omaha, 2; St.
Louis, 7; Wisconsin Central, 2; Great North
ern, 3; Great Western, 2; Burlington, 20.
range: ok may wheat
-
fdo/o3o'~f/ae> /3.30 //S
7 Ji |
3? ———-'"•-:; .-.;r
/^W
4 Ir fl/T T
OTHER GRAIN MARKETS
CHICAGO GRAIN
Wheat Works Lower in the Early
Trading—Corn Lower.
Chicago, Jan. 30.—Wheat worked lower dur
ing the forenoon to-day under the influence
of Liverpool's continued indifference to ad
vances on this side. May opened Hfg^c
lower, at 76%@7GVic, and sold to 75% c. Sell
ing was general at the opening, but at the
decline there was less pressure and the mar
ket became steady. Local receipts were 34
cars, 3 of contract grade.
Minneapolis and Duluth reported 265 cars,
against 204 last week and 274 a year ago.
May later dropped to 76% c, but recovered
on the world's visible decrease to 76% c and
closed steady, %@%c lower, at 76®76%c.
Cash—No. 2 red, 75%<g76c; No. 3 red, 72Vi
.#74^i; No. 2 hard winter, [email protected]; No. 3 hard
winter, [email protected]; No. 1 northern spring, [email protected]
76c; 'No. 2 northern spring, [email protected]; No. 3
spring, 65#74c.
Corn sold lower on good weather and In
sympathy wtth wheat. May opened a shade
to %c down, at 39c to 38%@38%c, and de
clined to 38%@88%c. Selling was general,
although not on a large scale. Receipts were
289 cars. May oats opened a shade to %c
lower, at 25c to [email protected] B e, In sympathy with
wheat and corn, but held steady. Trade was
light and featureless. Receipts were 197 cars.
May closed steady, %c down, at 38%@39c.
Cash—No. 2, 37% c; No. 3, 36%@>37c
Cash—No. 2, 24%@24%c; No. 3, [email protected]>24%c.
The following was the range of prices:
Wheat— Jan. • May
Opening 73% 76%@%
Highest 73% 76%
Lowest 73% 75%
Close-
To-day 73% 76®76%
Yesterday 74% 76%
Year ago 65% 68%®%
Corn-
Opening 56% [email protected]%
Highest 36% 39
Lowest 36% 38%
Close —
To-day 36% 38%@39
Yesterday 37 [email protected]%
Year ago 30% 32%@%
Oats—
Opening [email protected]%
Highest 25%
Lowest 25
Close-
To-day 23% 25%
Yesterday 23%@% 25%®%
Year ago 23% 22%@%
• Dnlnth Grain.
Duluth, Minn., Jan. 30.—Wheat lost %-c
to-day. It lost %@%c for the day, after a
very dull market. May opened at 77% c and
declined to the close at 76% c. There was
little business in either cash or futures.
Flax gained %c for cash and lc for May.
Receipts—Wheat, 28 oars; corn, 44; oats, 3;
flax, 1; total, 76. Shipments, none.
Close: Oats, 2«% c; rye, May, 49c; barley,
[email protected]; corn, 36% c; flax, cash, $1.73; May,
$1.78; September, $1.20; wheat, No. 1 hard,
cash, 75% c; May, 7i%c; No. 1 northern, cash,
73% c; May, 76%e; to arrive, 74% c; July,
77% c; No. 2 northern, [email protected]%c; xo. 8,
55%@62%c.
Kansas City Grain.
Kansas City, Jan. 30.—Close—Wheat —May,
68c; cash, No. 2 hard, 68c; No. 2 red, 70c;
No. 2 spring, 67% c. Corn—May, 36% c; cash.
No. 2 mixed, [email protected]%c; No. 2 white, 36% c.
Oats—No. 2 white, 26% c.
Milwaukee Grain.
Milwaukee, Jan. 30.—Flour—Steady. Wheat
—Lower; No. 1 northern, 75%®)76%c; No. 2
northern, 72%@74%c. Rye—Firmer; No. 1,
[email protected]%c. Barley—Quiet; No. 2, 58®60c; sam
ple, [email protected] Oats—Steady; No. 2 white, 27%
®27% c.
Liverpool Grain.
Liverpool, - Jan. :? 30.—Close—Wheat—;
unchanged to %d lower; February, 6s %d;
March, 6s l%d; May, 6s l%d. . Corn—Quiet;
%@%d lower; January, 3s 10% d; March, 3s
9%d.
New York Grain.
New York, Jan. 30, —Close, wheat, March,
80% c; May, 80% c; July, 80% c. Corn, Janu
ary, 49c; May, 44% c; July, 44c.
St. I.oulh Grain.
St. Louis, Jan. 30.—Close, wheat, No. 2 red,
cash, 73% c; January, 7:>%c: May, 74%®74%e;
July, 73% c; No. 2 hard, [email protected] Corn" pasy;
No. 2 cash, 37c; January, 37c; May, 37% c;
July, 37% c. Oats, No. 2 cash, 26% c; January,
26% c; May, 25%@26c; No. 2 white, 28V.C.
iLead, $4.17%. Spelter, $3.82 V-
Chicago Seed and Coarse Grains.
Chicago, Jan. 30.—Rye, January, 49c; May,
50% c. Barley, cash, [email protected] Timothy, per 100
lbs, $4.55; March, $4,65. Clover, per 100 lbs,
January, $10.75; March, $11.25. Flax, cash
No. 1, $1.76; March, $1.75; May, $1.75.
SPECULATIVE GOSSIP
Cash business yesterday in Chicago was
50,000 bu wheat, 200,000 bu corn and 300,000
bu oats, At the seaboard exporters bought
80,000 bu wheat and 112,000 bu corn.
Logan, Chicago, to Jolley: Cable from Liv
erpool says Argentine wheat, 62 lbs to the
bushel, offered free.ly, 9s per quarter cheaper
than American.
Australian shipments, delayed last-week
were large, 544,000 bu.
Bradstreet's figures: Wheat, east of Rock
ies, decrease, 550,000 bu; Europe, decrease,
100,000; corn. Increase, 3,511,000; oats, in
crease, 370,000.
Midway Horse Market.
Minnesota Transfer, St. Paul, Minn., Jan.
30.—Barrett & Zimmerman report a steady
and satisfactory Inquiry on all classes. The
Increasing arrivals of farm horses and light
grades in general is aiding the trade in that
line. Prices are holding more firm and
steady except on heavy horses, which weak
ened materially. There was a brisk inquiry
for mules, but few were found on the mar
ket. Values:
Drafters, extra [email protected]
Drafters, choice [email protected]
Drafters, common to good [email protected]
Peoria Whisky.
Peorla, Jan. 30.—Whisky on the basis of
$1.27 for finished goods.
THE MINNEAPOLIS JOURNAL.
STOCKS AND BONDS
Early Trading Largely Congested
in a Few Stocks.
ST. PAUL WIPES OUT EARLY LOSS
BuHlaenH Become* Quiet in the Early
Part of the Second Hour—
Honda Firm.
New York. Jan. 30.—The market was fever
ish and irregular in tone in the opening deal
ings and trading was largely congested in a
few promnieut stocks. Five thousand shares
of St. Paul sold at 150 to 150%. compared with
151% last night, and s,ou> shares of Northern
Pacific sold at 81% to 82, compared with 82%
last night. Steel and Wire broke %, and Erie
first preferred 1%.- The opening sales of :
Southern Pacific were of 15,000 shares at 47%
down to 47, compared with 47 last night.
Mobile & Ohio rose buoyantly Zl/n and-Hock
Island advanced 1%. The Chicago Terminal
transfer stocks were up a point each.
Rock Island was the overshadowing feature |
of the market, advancing strongly to 126% on
large buying. Other stocks were pushed
steadily upward, including the Afchisons, j
Southern and Kansas & Texas. Early losses i
were wiped out in S;. Paul, Northern Pacific |
and Steei and Wire, these stocks selling from
% to % above yesterday's close. But little
interest was manifested in the specialties, and
the railroads generally did not respond not-!
ably to the strength of the few most active I
stocks. Southern Pacific encountered very j
large offerings. When Rock Island reacted
1% prices fell back, St. Paul dropping to be
low the opening level.
Business became quiet dying the early part
of tho second hour and the general pressure
ceased. A rise to 57 in Kansas & Texas pre
ferred encouraged bidding up elsewhere and
St. Paul and Federal Steel responded sharply, j
Later Kansas & Texas preferred dipped to '■
54%, but the advance was taken up by Louis- i
vllle, Brooklyn Transit and New York Cent
ral. The earlier strong stocks did not recover
fully to best.
The steel stocks came in for an advance
late in, the day, Steel and Wire rising 3% from
the lowest, Federal Steel % and the pre
ferred 1%. Mobile & Ohio rose further to 61,
and Baltimore & Ohio advanced 1%.
The general market trung suspended with
out animation. The closing was moderately
active and steady and showed mixed net
changes.
Bonds were firm all around.
Stock quotations reported for The Journal
by Watson & Co., Chamber of Commerce,
Minneapolis, Minn.
j j | -Close-
Sales Stocks— | Hi- ( Lo- [ Bid. Bid.
| | est. | cs t t. |Jn. 30 Jn.29
| Adams Exp ...| 153 j 150
Am. Express | 179 j 175
400 Am. Cot. Oil .. 31% 30%j 30%f 31
do pr j 89 | 89
300 Am. Car j 21%| 214
100 do pr j | 69%| 69V 2
1,000! Am. Hoop .... 26%j 26 26% 26V*
I do pr 70 70
| Am. Ice 39 38% 38 38
I do pr 68 I 68
300; Am. Linseed 6%| 6%
do pr 32% 32
|Am. Malting 4% 4%
do pr 25 j 25
5,500! Am. Sugar 134%j 133% 134 ] 133%
do pr | 119 I 119
Am. Smelting.. 59 | 57% 58%j 58%
do pr | 97%| 97%
42,700 Am. Steel & W 42% 39%| 42%[ 40%
1,6001 do pr 86% 84 j 86% | 85%
1,800 Am. Tin 56% 56 [ 56%| 56%
do pr i 87 j 87
22,400 Am. Tobacco . 115% | 114% 115% j 114%
do pr , 136 I 140
(Amah Cop .... 89 88% 88%| 89
300jAnacon. Cop . 42% 42 41% l 42%
46,200 At., Top. & S.F 47% 46 47 I 45%
22,900 do pr 86% 85 86 |85
8,000 Bait. & Ohio . 89% 88 88% I 88
500 do pr 86 [ 85
Brook. Rap. Tr 78 76 76% 76%
Brook. Un. Gas 175 176
|Brunswick Co 8%)
300|Can. Southern . 57% 66% 57 | 57%
jCanadian Pac 89 | 88
600Ches. & Ohio . 39 38% 38% j 38%
C. & E. 11l 92 92
do pr 122 122%
8,500 Chi. & A1t0n.... 40% 38 39% 38%
2,100] do pr 751/ a 74% 7514 74%
12,600:Chi., Bur. & Q 144%] 143% 143% 143%
4,900!Chi. Gr. West.. 18% 17% 18% 17%
do pr A 77V4 77%
400 do pr 8.... 45% 45 45 44%
100 do deb 91% 91%
Chi., Ind. & L.. 25 ! 24% 24 25
do pr 60 59
lOOC.C.C. & St. L 75% 75%
j do pr 116 116
Chi. Term 13% 13% 13% 12%
do pr 38 36% 36% 36%
I Col. Fuel & Iron 46 44% 45% 44%
j do pr U6 116
ICol. Southern P4 7%
do Ist pr... 42% 42 41% 41%
do 2d pr 16% 16%
2.G6oJConsol. Gas .... 194 192% 193% 193%
17,800 Con. Tobacco .. 45% 43% 45 44%
800) do pr 95% 95 95% 95
SOOiDel. & Hudson 153 151% 151% 153
Del., Lack. & W 195 195
21,000 Den. & Rio Gr.. 32 31% 31% 31%
do pr 82% 82%
500lDes M. & Ft. D 18 18
do pr 115 110
19,000 Erie 27% 26%! 27% 27%
4,500 do Ist pr... 63% i 62% l 62% 62%
do 2d pr.... 41%! 41 41 11%
Evans. & Ter H 4X%\ 41 41 41%
do pr 80 80
19,900' Federal Steel... 44% 42 43% 42%
600 do pr 70% 70 70% 70
100' Gen. Electric 189%| 191%
lOOjGlucose 49 49
do pr 1 96 96
Great Nor., pr.. 194% 194% 193 194%
100; Hocking Valley 43 42%
2001 do pr I ! 71 ! 71
l,loo| Illinois Central. 130% 130 129%j 129%
lowa Central... 25 | 24% 24% 24%
do pr 1 49% 49
800 Inter. Paper.... 21% 21% 21 21%
do pr 70 69% 69%j 69%
K. C. & South.. 16% 15% 16% 15
1 do pr 39% 38% 39% 38
La Clede Gas. 72 72
do pr i j 93 1 97
Lake E. &W...1 | 40%| 40%
do pr !....; 110 I 109%
Long Island ■ 67 67
13,400 Louis. & Nash. 88% 87%| 87% Bfi%
M..St. P. & Soo 18% 18'/. i«
do pr i 50%! 5l"
18,200 Manhattan 117%j 116% 116% 117
lOOMet. St. Ry I ; 161% 161% I
100|Minn. & St. L 69 69
i do pr 106 106
21,6001 Missouri Pac... 87% 85% 87 86
73,400jM., K. & T 19% IS 19% 18 1
13,600] do pr 57 53% 55 54%!
jMobile & Ohio.. 6i 55% 61 54% i
Mexican Cent | 13% 13% I
Mex. Nat j 3%j 3% •
200 Nat. Biscuit.... 39 38% 38%| 38% j
I do pr 92 92 I
lOOj-N'at. Lead 16% 16%!
100! do pr 1 85%j 85 !
j 2,2oo]Nat. Steel j 40%| 39 40% 39%
; do pr I 90 90 1
Nat. Tube j 59%| 5S 68%' 59
Ido pr 99%| 99 95 | 98%
Nat. Salt 42%1 42 41%| 42%
do 2ds j 73 I 74
500 N. J. Central.. 150%j 149% 149%| 148%
10,300 Norfolk & Westj 45% 1 44 | 44%j 44%
do pr 1 83 83
North Am. Co.. 19% 19% 19% 19%
56,500 Northern Pac .. 82% 81% 81% 82
do pr 87 86% 86% 86%
200 Northwestern .. 173 172 172 171
N.Y. Air Brake 150 150
7,300 N. Y. Central..! 143% 141% 142%1 142%
N.Y..C. & St.L.j 18% 18% 18%: 18
do Ist pr 98 I 98 I,
do 2d pr 49 j 48 I
Omaha 130 | 130
do pr 180 ! 182
5,400 Ontario & W. 31% 31 30%| 31%
Paper Bag .... 17 16 15% 15
do pr 70% 69% 69 69%
2,100 Pressed Steel .. 38% 37*4 38% 37%
600 do pr 80 79 I 80 78
300 Pacific Mail ... 46% 46%1 45 46%
10,400|Penn. R. R.... 146% 144% 146% 145%
P..C..C. & St.L. 57% 57 57 55
do pr 95 92% 92 91
8.100 People's Gas ... 100% 99% 9S%i 99%
700 Pulman 200 199 1
3.soo!Reading .| 31% 31% 31% 31%
■ ; 4.5001 -•: do «; Ut pr ...I 71*| To%i 70%| 71 i.
7,2(W|/dO: 2d pr .... :; 41*| 41 | 4i%| 41%
100,Repub. Sieel ...%..i:....'".|>vl3^| 13%
300| do pr.;/..... ..;...1.... | bs%{ 58 -
70,6O0iRock island ■;;.-. 126%) 122%ri25'/S| 122%
200 St. L.>&- i>an'-Fr-29vi|:-2*7*l '\^y*\\ 28-»
Ido Ist pr...i ..;.....-.I 7".» | 19%
•:?)■•• do ad pr....j 68%> 58 | 68%| 57V*
1.700,5t. L. ; & A. \V| 23 I 22%j l 22%) ' 22%
l.oOOj do >\- pr ..:v..i 51%| isl • 1 5iy 4 | • 61%
91,200,8t. Paul .".-:;^.-.| ■ 151-v 4 | 14U%| "160%| 161%
; i do J pr '.-...'.. Ii 93 | 192 l4j 192 | 193 ■-
•-. iStund. rt. & TwK;.:..[.....-.| 3?ip-,3%
lu29ooiSouihern Pac ..j "49%| . iC%\ 46&|: 46%
, 4,Goo|Southern Ry :.".|- 21^| 20%| 21%| 20%
6,900| do ,;. Pr t V...:..| 72%, 7i:jii| 71^1 71
2,Uoo,Tenn. x Coal & lj 58;s| 5?%| 58% i 57
Texas ; & ■ Pac..| 28 j. 27% | 27%f 27%
luo ; Third Aye. Ky..| j. | 120 -| 120
v*': ITwin City R. T|......r.....\| 69%| 70.
21,800Unlon:;Paciltc...| 84%; 83%j 83%j 83%
2.100| rdo /prr-:..;:.| 83%! 83*»| 83%| 83%
14,^0U,U. S.; Leather .|l4%i 13%| 13%| 14 ;
; 2001 : do-.pr-.:....; j 76 I -75?i| '751 75%
1,200|U. S. Rubber.., • 2U%| l»%r 20 I. I*%
•-900; do pr ...:...|..;...|......j ■60 | GO
" |U.-S.*Express. l...*.-.'.|..'..'..{'54 | 53
. 600jWabash ..\.....i 13%| 13% l ' 13-| 13%.
6,100j do pr:.....\.| 28%| 27 Vi | 27%| 27V
i jWell-Far. ,Ex;.i:.....|......| 135 . j 134 ■
..200|Western Union.r' 84 | 83%j 83%| ' 83%
i,oo,Wheel. &. L. K.J ll%| 11%| 1 11%| 11%
;*;=| , do; Ist pr ... ....]...... | 54 i 54
|•' do- M pF-\':..i 28%| 28%| -"28% 28%
• \ Wisconsin Cent) 16%\ 16 ; | 16%| 15%
1 '.ri I do -pr,...;.'.. 43 | 41%) 42 40%
Total sales, 1,064,960.
Chicago stocks: Diamond Match, 135%;
Linseed, common 6, preferred 33; Biscuit,
common 38%, preferred H3%; Steel, common
40%, preferred 90; Tin Plate common 56, pre
ferred 87.
Peoria & Eastern 2ds, [email protected]; St. Louis &
Southwestern 2ds, 75%.
•I GENERALJ>RODUCE ;
.'. " The Minneapolis Market.
' ■_• >;; Wednesday, Jan. 30. • .
The butter.-market is steady and quiet at
unchanged quotations. „ ■ . ,"», ' *.
Eggs show a little firmer feeling and prices
I are higher by %c all around. • *' •: ■
! BUTTER— ■ creameries, lb, [email protected]%c;
firsts, [email protected]; seconds, [email protected]'16c: imitations,
j firsts,. [email protected]; seconds 12c; dairies,' extras 17c;
: firsts/:l4©lt>c;'seconds,size; roll, fancy, 14c;
■■;choice, lie; ladles, firsts,. 14c; seconds, lie;
,i packing .stock, fresh, sweet, I lie.
I ■ EGGS—Strictly !tresh. cases included, loss
off. 18c; dirty, fresh, 10c; checks, 10c.
. CHEESE—Twins or flats, fancy, lb, 12c;
twins or flats, choice, ib, 9%@10c; twins or
flats, : fair ;to g00d,.7%@8c;-brick,.-No.- I,lb,
| 13c; brick, No. j 2, lo^llc; ; brick, No. .3, ■ b(£z>
i goat cheese, imported, per 10, 2ic; lim
-1 burger. No. 1, 12% c; limburger. No. 2, B%@
' 9%c; primost; No: 1, per lb, 8c; primost;. N«
'2, per lb, 6c; Young America, fancy,- lb, 12%
choice, [email protected]',i>c; pultost, [email protected]; Swiss,
No. 1, 13% c; block Swiss, No. .1,: 12%@13c;:
t No. 2. block, [email protected]
| DRESSED POULTRY— dry picked,
[ fancy, ; medium weight, per lb, 8c; turkeys,
dry picked; young toms, [email protected]%c; fair to good
mixed, 6c; turkeys, thin, small; bruised, 4<g>
sc; spring chickens, fancy, [email protected]%c; fair* to
' good, [email protected]; springs, on* stock, [email protected]; capons,
j [email protected]; fowls, fancy, 7c; . fowls, lair to good.
1 5&6 c; ducks, fancy, , 9c; ducks, fair to good,
i 7©Be; geese, fancy, 8c; geese, lair to good,
6%@7c. ".■ ■■. ■-■:,•■' ••'• '; ."' ■■ ■■ "■-, . -
DRESSED MEATS— tancy/100 to 125
lbs, 7%c; veal, fair- to good, '6%c; ■ poor to
overweight, 4%@oo;.mution, fancy, country
I dressed, 6c; thin -or.overweight, 6c; lambs,
fancy,. 8c; lambs, thin or bruised, 6c; hogs,
I according to > weighT, 5%@5%c. ,'<']. " . :
i GAME— jack, per doz, 502)3;
i white rabbits, 80c; cottontail, [email protected]$l; squir
rels, gray or black, per doz,[email protected]; red, doz,
! [email protected] .■■•-:--• .. -^:.- ■'..■•.- .. . -„
I PIGEONS—Live, per doz, 80c; dead, per
I doz, 50c;- squabs, per doz, $1. • ' •
FISH-Crappies, per . lb, sc; pickerel, Ib,
3%c; pike, s®6c; .Sunflsh, lb, 2c; perch, per
lb, [email protected]; , herring,, per lb, 2%"c; , herring,
skinned, 1; per lb, 4c; lake trout, per lb, 10c,*
frogs' legs,', per doz, as 'to ■ size, [email protected]
- POTATOES—Burbanks, car lots,' [email protected];
Rurals, :[email protected];-:Ohios,. [email protected]; mixed-white,
[email protected]; i mixed red, ■ [email protected] , .. .V,
SWEET - POTATOES—Illinois, per brl, $3;
Muscatiues, per brl,. $2.50. ' ,
- BEANS—Fancy navy, bu, $2.40; choice, bu,
$2.15; medium, hand-picked, bu, $2; brown,
fair to -good, [email protected] '. '."
ONIONS—Red -Globes; car lots, per bu,
$1; Red:Wethersfield3, bu, 80c; Yellow Globes,
car lots, per. bu, 90c. x •:■:.« ■
§ DRIED ; . PEAS—Fancy yellow, [email protected] per
bu; medium, [email protected]$l; green, fancy, [email protected];
green, medium, [email protected]$l bu; marrowfat, bu, $2.
APPLES— [email protected]; Spitzenbergs,
$4.50<&5; Ben Davis,. [email protected]; Belleflowers.
[email protected]; Greenings, brr. $3.25; ' Baldwins, brl,
[email protected]? Northern Spy, [email protected]; Jonathan, $5
@5.25; western box apples, bu, [email protected]
i CRANBERRIES—Cape Cod, per brl, $9;
Jerseys, [email protected]; bu crates, $3; Wisconsin
cranberries, [email protected] • ,^. .
FIGS—New California, 10-lb boxes, 85c. .
' ORANGES— navels, 80s, $2.25;
California navels, $2.50: ' California na
vels, 1263, $2.75; California, 150s, $3; Califor
nia navels, 176s to 288s, $3.25; California seed
lings, all sizes, $2.75; Floridas, all sizes, $2.75
@3; California tangerines^ half box, $2. ./• -~
LEMONS—Messlnas, 300s or 3605, r fancy,
[email protected]; choice/'52;[email protected]; California, fancy,
as to size, : $5.25; choice, $3. •- - —
l GRAPES—Malagas, per keg, [email protected]:50; per
keg, -extra fancy, [email protected] :; ■ ■ ; .
STRAWBERRIES—Fancy Florida stock, qt,
60c. '■'' ~.i "■'. ; •- - :•", .. ■ :,.:■ s „.- , - :
"PINEAPFLES— doz, as to size, range
from $3 to $6. - :".. 4 .
BANANAS—Fancy, large bunches, $2.25<g>
2.50; medium bunches *[email protected]; small bunches
[email protected] .- :-■-■-■-■ ■■•-<*■' r -"•■■•- ■ --;•--:';,*•
HONEY—New fancy white, 1-lb • sections,
18c; choice " white, In(g;l6c; amber, [email protected];
golden rod, •ll(2'12c; extracted white, [email protected];
buckwheat, [email protected]; extracted amber,- [email protected]
' VEGETABLES— . per bu, 40c; cab
bage, crate, $1.50; carrots, per bu, 40c;;cauli
flower, . per: doz, -$1.25;" celery, per doz, [email protected]
35c; Callfornias; [email protected]; cucumbers/ per doz,
[email protected]; egg plant, per doz, $2; green onions,
doz, -50c; Spanish ■ onions, per bu crate/ $2;
lettuce, per doz. 35c; head lettuce, doz,
85c; parsley, [email protected]; parsnips, bu, [email protected];
rutabagas, bu, 35c; 1 watercress, doz, 30c; wax
beans, per bu, [email protected]; Hub bard squash, per
doz, [email protected]$l; mint/ doz, 40e. --
■ ■ vKew York Produce. ■
New York, Jan. Butter, 4,586 pkgs;
steady; creamery, [email protected]; June creamery,
[email protected]; factory, . [email protected] Receipts,
833 pkgs; firm; fancy large, fall made, ll%ig)
ll%c; - small/ fall made, 11%@12c. Eggs—
ceipts, 6,829 pkgs; firm; western at mark,
19%@20c; southern at mark, 18%@19%c. . Su
gar—Raw quiet; refined quiet. Coffee—Dull
and- easy; No. 7 Rio,: 6%@7c. :'•-*-
Chicago Produce.
Chicago, "30.—Butter—Active; cream
eries, [email protected];. dairies, ll%@lßc. Eggs—
fresh, 17c.\ Dressed Poultry—Active; turkeys
B%@9c; chickens, B%@9c. . „,:; ■, .
l Hides, Pelts, Tallow and Wool, "
i?3''4-' s 'A '' I ':■ • . ■'•'' ':.'-. ':: No.l. N0.2.
Green salted heavy steer hides...... 9 8
Green salted heavy 'cow hides..-..// 8 ' 7
Green salted light hides .... V.\'.l% 6%
Green < salted '.heavy cow and steer -'
• hides/..branded ........ K '..;;.: 714 •6%
Green. salted > bull and oxen 7 . c
Green salted veal calf, 8 to .15 1b5...10% 9
Green salted veal kip, 15 to 25 lbs::.. 9% 8
Green salted long-haired or run
ner kip ;.■."......;...."/..;. 8% 6%:
I Green salted deacons, each ..../..: 50 ■■'■ 40 '.
I , Green cattle : hides • and skins [email protected]%c per lb
less than above quotations. . * ■■--. :- •-■•
Green . salted horse or mule hides, *
large-..-.:/; ..;................. ...'...53.00. 2.25
Green . salted horse or mule hides, - * ' "~
--■ medium .:. 2.40 1.50
Green salted horse or- mule hides,
:, small ..............;.•; ..........a.75 1.00
Dry flint Montana butcher.hides.... 14 @UV>
Dry : flint Minnesota, Dakota; and .
Wisconsin hides ■'......;....V..:.:;.1i% 10 •
Dry flint calfskins i.i..............-.16-: 13
Dry flint kip ; skins 14% 12%!
Green"salted pelts, large, each: V...1 .,[email protected]
•Green salted pelts, medium/each.::*," [email protected] .75
Green salted pelts, small, each:-...:.'' .25® .50
Dry flint territorial 1 pelts, batcher....ll%@l2 j
Dry flint : territorial : pelts, « murrain.. 10%@ii .
Dry ,flint..territorial shearlings../...7 @ 9 !
Tallow, in cake 5:....:...."...,...;..... 5. 41/
j Tallow, In barrels .7..... 4% 3% !
: Grease, white ........;..;....:..-..../4% 3%
I Grease; dark ;.:........•.......;.../.-. 3% ' 2% I
Wool, medium, unwashed :..'.. .15%@16%'
I Wool, coarse,: unwashed 1 .'.........■..15.015%
! Wool/ r fine medium, unwashed ......14 ©15
I Wool, fine; unwashed ;/... ..:... ll%@l3y>
Wool, broken fleeces, unwashed...... 13 . @15 "
Wool, : seedy, \ burry, 'unwashed..;...l2-". @14. "
i' Bright - Wisconsin and similar ■ grades [email protected]
higher than above 1 quotations. < / V
provisions ; -
■; Chicago Provisions..
'". Chicago. Jan. 30—Provisions were weak on
liberal offerings and -a drop in hog prices.
Trade was " quiet. U May * pork • opened • 2%c
down, $14.07%, and declined to $13.90.< May
lard, opened 5c lower, at $7.47%, and eased
to $7.42%. 5: May ribs opened 2%c depressed
1 at [email protected]%;rand'declined to $6.97%.
! Close: ;^ Pork—January, ;-: $13.22%: May
$14.02%. Lard—January; ■: $7.37%; February,
$7.37%; March, $7.40; May, $7.40. Ribs—Jan
uary, $6.92%; May, $7.02%; September/ $7,12%
Quite Likely. * ' v v
Detroit Tribune. - -
We ? have no = doubt * that the Hon. William
E. Chandler". has been; converted ". to the ; elec
tion ;of senators by popular vote. . ■■■.■±
CURED.
She—Did you ever take part In amateur
theatricals?
He—Once; but I'm all right now.
WEDNESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 30, 1901.
COWS ARE STEADY
Stacker and Feeder Trade Showed
Activity.
PRICES 10C TO 26C HIGHER
The Supply • of Host* Slightly, J tnder
the Requirement!* of the
, \ . Local Trade. „„,
South St. Paul, Minn., Jan. 30.—Receipts
to-day were 600 cattle, 200 calves, 2,500 hogs
and 500 sheep.
Tha following table shows the receipts from
Jan. 1, 1901, to date, as compared with the
same period a year ago:
Year. Cattle.Calves.Hogs.3heep.Horses.Cars.
1901 10,631 1,820 59.1U2 42,5>»8 234 1,374
1900 9,517 2,830 49,374 68,0<t0 394 1,400
Dec 1,010 25,002 160 26
Inc 1,114 .... 9,728 ..
Receipts:
Date. Cattle. Calves. Hogs. Sheep. Cars.
Jan. 23...-. 664 102 1,858 151 48
Jan. 24.... 330 46 1,393 212 30
Jan. 25 152 29 2,148 30 32
Jan. 26 103 18 1,513 48 23
Jan. 28 140 20 1,027 12 19
Jan. 29.... 814 252 2,917 385 76
Estimated receipts by cars to-day of the
railroads centering at these yards: Chicago
Great Western, 2; Chicago, Milwaukee & St.
Paul, 11; Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis &
Omaha, 12; Great Northern. 2; Chicago, Bur
lington & Qulncy, 3; Northern Pacific, 4;
Soo, 2; total, 47.
Disposition of stock Jan. 29:
Firm— Cattle. Hogs. Sheep.
Swift &Co 329 2,719 147
J. T. McMillan 188
Estate ef I. Staples 12 58
W. E. McCormick 1
Stiiumer & Thomas 164 ....
Leo Gottfried 3 .... 72
Elliot & Co 20
King Bros 2 .... 195
R. N. Katz 20
J. E. Bolton 21 ....
J. R. King 2
Weira 8
Country buyers 310 108
Totals 884 2,915 580
CATTLE—Receipts were only moderate and
there was a very small percentage of beef
and butcher cattle included, and quality ot
the few on sale was largely on the com
mon order. The market ruled fully steady.
The stocker and feeder trade developed con
siderable activity, and anything that was
fair to good sold readily at prices 10 to 2oc
higher than a week ago. Sales:
Feeding Cows and Heifers-
No. Ay. Price. |No. Ay. Price.
2 ....... .1,005 $3.75 I 2 825 $2.00
2 ....;...1,075 2.75 6 942 2.26
2 1,035 2.75 I 2 905 2.35
2 920 2.25 j 2 930 2.65
3 470 2.70 4 967 2.30
2 835 1.75 2 850 1.75
1 1,030 2.80 j 1 1,060 3.00
1 1,020 2.10 j 1 1,030 3.00
1 760 3.25 I 1 890 2.00
1 900 2.25 1 1,040 2.80
1 960 2.25 1 1,180 2.75
Milkers and Springers—
Three cows for $97.5 U.
Two cows for $55.50.
One cow for $25.
One cow and one calf for $25.
Stackers and Feeders—
No. - Ay. Price.!|No. Ay. Price.
6 965 $3.85j| 6 686 $3.70
2 1,025 3.70;| 1 980 3.75
18 608 3.40| 6 536 3.4.=".
9 702 3.25J 11 442 3.20
3 36<i 3.50; 3 563 3.60
1 740 3.00! 1 690 3.20
1 1,050 3.65;j 1 520 3.25
1 570 3.00: j 1 670 2.60
Butcher Cows and Heifers-
No. Ay. Price. I [ No. Ay. Price.
9 653 $2.75U 2 350 $2.70
2 685 2.75 2 790 2.5t)
1 850 2.50! j
Stock and Feeding Bulls-
No. Ay. Price.l! No. Av\ Price.
3 1,043 $3.00|| 2 885 $3.00
2 1,180 2.90; i 4 652. 2.40
1 640 2.65| j 1..... 620 2.25
1 570 2.50i| 1 1,160 3.00
1 500 2.00j|
Veal Calves-
No. Ay. Price. I j No. Ay. Price.
3 153 $5.00|[ 3 „.. 103 $5.00
HOGS—The supply of hogs at the leading
markets to-day aggregated about 60,000, or
15,000 less than last week. The supply here
was fairly liberal, but was still under the
requirements of the local trade. Conditions
east looked unfavorable at the early opening,
but bids here ruled fully 2%c higher right
from the start. Trading was brisk, with
best lights 'and mediums selling largely at
$5.20 and $5.22%, while light mixed sold from
$5.17% to $5.20 and rough at $4.95.
No. Ay. Price. .So. Ay. Price.
71 258 $5.27% 61 237 $5.25
80 ..191 5.22% 68 173 5.22%
81 197 5.22% I 14 245 5.22%
89 182 5.22% I 47 168 5.20
11 189 5.20 44 191 5.20
37 213 5.20 92 174 5.20
75 188 5.20 48 173 5.17%
62 154 5.17% 61 221 5.25
70 196 5.25 27 182 5.22%
40 ...184 5.20 42 254 5.20
28 223 5.20
Pigs and Culls-
No. Ay. Price. 11 No. A-v. Price.
3 363 $4.95 | 2 ..420 $4.95
1 520 4.95 I 1 470 4.50
13 99 4.35 I 7 98 4.35
5 98 4.85 Ji 4 102 4.35
SHEEP —Receipts were small and consisted
of fat lambs and fat sheep and a few stock
and feeding sheep. Fat lambs ruled about 10c
higher and fat sheep steady. Choice fat lambs
out of a local feed lot sold at $5.25 and a few
fair ones that arrived fresh sold at $6. Choice
fat wethers sold at $4.25. The few stock and
feeding sheep were picked up at steady prices. !
Sales:
No. Ay. Price.
24 stock ewes 90 $2.75
54 lambs 82 5.25
42 lambs SO 5.00
48 lambs H6 5.C0
82 lambs 81 5.00
3 lambs 70 5.00
11 sheep 61 4.25
100 wethers 116 4.25
17 lambs 86 4.60
13 sheep .» S<s 3.25
22 sheep 118 2.25
22 stock lambs 67 4.00
1 stock lamb 70 4.00
On the market: C. E. Brownlee, Sheldon, N.
D.; J. G. West, River Falls, Wis.; Larson
Bros., Stacy; Boner & Burg, Montgomery; I.
M. Hall, Dallas, Wis.; C. Schneider, Delano;
Brabec 4 M., Waverly: F. Johnson, Cokato;
W. H. Helberg. Nestrand; P. H. Holton,
Kenyon; N. B. Thompson, Fergus Falls; Nels
Morrow. »Battle Lake; Hines & Thamert,
Owatonna; G. Nold, Nelson, Wis.; Wesley
Anderson, Hammond; Cogswell & R., Lake
City; L. O. Jacobson, Darfur; H. H. Sorits
mier, Bloomer, Wis.; J. & W., Spring Valtey;
Lewis Bros., Annandale; O. R. Sengnales,
Glenwood; A. H., Lidgerwood; S. Sanby,
Wendeli; E. Sanby & Co., Elbow Lake; N.
Aiiderson, O. O. H., Brooten; A. Linderholm!
Belgrade; Olseon & Taylor, Mapleton.
.■_.r : /; Sioux City Live Stock.
o Sioux City, lowa, Jan. 30.—Receipts—Hogs,
! 2,700;, cattle,,;4oo; sheep, 1,000.
! • Hogs—Strong. " Sales:
I No. ■ . . ■ Ay. Price. ]
67 „;.................... 182 $5.10
71 ..;.::.-....-..•.::....... .;..: 224 5.15
[79 .....: ..'. 201 tins •
82 .^.. 196 5.20
76 .............:;.... 241 5.22%
75 :... .........:.:............ 230 5.25 |
I 5 Cattle—Steady. Sales: < '
No. » ..• . Ay. Price.
2 canners 850 $2.25
2 cows .../..........,........ 1,020 3.50
1-5 stock heifers 668 2.85:
2 stock heifers -/.-.:..TTr/.:/..... 800 3.00
2 bulls ~. ..........1,410 2.75
2 bulls .....T..< .....1,010 3.00
2 bulls .1.......... ......1,210 - 3.35
3 stocker3 './...... 756 3.25
119 Btockers 1,007 4.23
- 27 yearlings■■'/..'.'...* 572 3.50
1 10 yearlings 500 4.00
13; calves 572 „. 2.75
2 calves .•.»........../. 665 4.10
■Sheep— sales, [email protected]
Omaha Live Stock.
South Omaha, Jan. 30.—Cattle—Receipts,
3,000; steady; native steers, [email protected]: Texas
steers, [email protected]; cows and heifers, [email protected]
Hogs—'Receipts, none; 5c lower: heavy,
$5.22%@5.35; mixed, $5.22%@5.25; light, $5.20
@5.27%; bulk of sales, $5.22%@5.27%.
Sheep—Receipts, 3,000; alow; muttons, $4<B>
4.75; lambs, $4.50<g5.30.
Chicago Live Stock.
Chicago, Jan. SO.—Cattle—Receipts, 17.500;
steady to alow; rood to prime steers, [email protected]
6; poor to medium, [email protected]; stockers aad
M. DORIM & CO.,
The Oldest Firm of |
Bankers and Brokers
IX THE XOKTII WEST. ; ':
'i:i" H&re removed from their old quarters
on Jackson Street to the
tier mania L.i*» Building, or. 4th
aud Minnesota »C St. Paul, Mian.
feeders, [email protected]; cows and heifers, [email protected]
4.40; Texas steers, [email protected]
Hogs—Receipts to-day, 28,000; to-morrow,
25,000; left over, 1,809; steady to 5c lower;
mixed and butcher*, [email protected]%; good to
choice heavy, [email protected]; rough heavy, $5.10
©5.20; light, [email protected]; bulk of sales, $5.25
@5.32%.
Sheep—Receipts, 15,000; steady to strong;
sheep, [email protected]; lambs, $4.25®5.46.
Official yesterday: Receipts—Cattle, 6,004;
hogs, 15,986; sheep, 20.597. Shipments—Cattle,
3,646; hogs, 3,494; sheep, 2,335.
St. Louis Live Stock.
St. Louis, Jan. 30.—Cattle—Receipts, 3,500;
steady; native steers, [email protected]; stockers
and feeders, [email protected]; cows and heifers, [email protected]
Hogs—Receipts, 6,500; steady; lights, $5.20
@5.30; packers, [email protected]; butchers, $5.35®
5.40.
Sheep—Receipts, 1,000; Bteady; muttons,
[email protected]; lambs, [email protected]
Kansas City Live Stock.
Kansas City, Jan. SO.—Cattle—Receipts.7ooo;
steady to lower; native steers, $406.35; Texas
steers, [email protected]; cows and heifers, $2.25®
4.75.
Hogs—Receipts, 14,000; 5c lower; bulk of
sales, [email protected]%; heavy, [email protected]; mixed,
$5.12%@5.32%; light, $5.05<@5.30.
Sheep—Receipts, 2,000; steady; lambs, $4®
5.30; muttons, [email protected]
INVESTMENT OOSSIP
New York Gossip: The people who do
business for Rockefellers are buying South
ern Pacific. Flower crowd buying Rock
Island. London bought 25,000 shares of Pa
cific stbeks.
1 New York, to Jolley: "The opening was
1 influenced by statements that the St. Paul
I deal was off and that Mr. Hill had returned
home. This information was offset to some
extent by the story that Mr. Harriman had
acquired control of Chicago Terminal. The
consequence was a somewhat irregular mar
ket, with St. Paul and Northern Pacific stock
weak, while Rock Island was strong. The
deal in Chicago Terminal is looked upon as
, likely to have a very favorable effect upon
I Rock Island. Mobile & Ohio advanced
I sharply, confirming the opinion of Wall
street that some one is trying to get eon-
I trol. Contrary to expectation, there was
j no serious break in Atehison Southwestern,
as the so-called Gates brokers were very
heavy buyers. Good buying of Southern
railway was noticeable, based, prqbably on
1 the supposition that the interests indentifled
j with this property were baying Mobile &
j Ohio for themselves. Insiders coniinue to
■ take considerable blocks of Southern Pacific.
; After the first half hour, the market re-
I acted somewhat and developed some decided
weak spots, among which were St. Paul and
Smelters. Trading became quieter on the
I decline, which was sure moderate rally.
Sentiment U bullish."
St. Paul income account for 1900 shows
surplus over all, $2,077,183.
New York, to I. G. Andrews & Co.: "Report
has been here that Smith, the largest in
dividual holder of St. Paul, refuses to sell
his stock less than 200, and it is that that has
blocked negotiations."
No session of the New York Stock Ex
change on Saturday, Feb. 2. Queen's funeral.
New York to C. E. Lewis: We are told
Atehison has made traffic arrangement with
Southern Pacific. Both stocks are a pur
chase on it.
New York to Edwards, Wood & Co.: Stocks
are irregular in movement, but in the main
strong. Rock Island and Atchisons being the
special features at advancing prices. It is
quite probable that Rock Island stockholders
will receive increased dividends before spring.
The road is earning lo per cent and is in
splendid condition with plenty of business in
sight. Atchisons look inviting on any reac
tions. The general market is rather dull and
acts firm in spite of assertions that the so
called St. Paul deal is off and an effort to
create bearish sentiment on it, but as a mar
ket factor it will soon lose its force and
stocks wili move on individual merit.
Strong, Sturgls & Co. to Watson: Our
market has been irregular and without fea
ture of particular interest, so that we may
justly describe it as a traders' market. The
slight exceptions to this statement may be
in the strength of Southern Pacific, which
has advanced a point on the very favorable
earnings which are reported, as well as the
strength in Continental Tobacco, which is
being steadily bought by people here who
have confidence in the future of the prop
erty and it£ largely increased earnings owing
to the reduction of the tax. Speculation
here is at the moment stationary, and it is
well for us to realize that the market has
exhausted itself and that the excitement has
died out for the present. What will be done
in the mailer of the St. Paul-Northern Pa
cific combination is yet uncertain, but a
steady improvement in the value of St.
Paul on its merits, and Chicago, Burlington
! & Qnincy, Rock Is!and. Atehison preferred,
the Northern Pacifies and Baltimore & Ohio
upon earnings is possible and probable. On
■ the other hand, Wall street is going through
the result of overtrading and is more or less
stagnant. A demand has been awakened for
I good bonds and the easy rates of call money
; will doubtless cause.a further improvement.
' We may therefore conclude by saying that
speculatively the market is not a purchase,
but from an investment point of view, good
stocks and good bonds will probably go
higher.
MONEY REPORTS
Xew '.-York Money.
New York, Jan. 30.—Noon—Money on call,
nominally at 2 per cent; prime mercantile
paper, 3%@4Vi per cent; sterling exchange
firm, with actual business in bankers' bills
at $4.87%@4.88 for demand and at [email protected]%
for 60 days; posted rates, $4.50 and $4.88%;
commercial bills, $4.83 [email protected]%. Silver cer
tificates, 63%@65c; bar silver, 60% c; Mexican
dollars. 47c. Government bonds steady; re
funding 2s, registered 105%, coupon 105%; 3s,
registered 110, coupon 110%; new 4s, regis
tered 137, coupon 138; old 4s, registered 113%,
coupon 13%; ss, registered 110%, coupon 111%.
Minneapolis Money.
MINNEAPOLIS—Bank cleftrings, $1,791,
--408.49. New York exchange, selling rate,
60c premium; buying rate, 10c premium.
Chicago exchange, selling rate, 50c premium:
buying rate, par. London sixty-day sight
documentary, $4.83%.
ST. PAUL—Clearings to-day, $623,051.44.
Chicago Money.
Chicago, Jan. 30.—Clearings, $21,050,633;
balances, $1,636,437. Posted exchange, $4.84%
®4.88. New York exchange, par.
London Consols.
London, Jan. 30.—Consols for money and
for the account, 96 11-16.
MISCELLANEOUS
New York Cotton.
New York, Jan. 30.—Cotton opened barely L
steady, with January 5; points - higher and
other months unchanged to 3 points lower/
After the call the market was very irregular
and feverish; with a generally weak under
tone under liquidation ,; and short selling.
Sentiment seemed . to • have swung around .to
a; positvely bearish 2 viewpoint and I few ! buy- ■
I Ing orders were in hand to check the down
| ward tendency of values. '**■ Even January,
, after advancing to 12c on the opening, • felt
j the depression in the later, months and went
I off sharply. As-the session progressed, weak
ness; in the local pit increased and liquida
tion '"• became :; more i energetic; on - weak i late
Liverpool cables. " ! '.; ■■*' . J~ -,':=■-
Spot closed dull and irregular; middling' up
lands, 12c; middling gulf, 12140. Sales, 4 753
bales.
; - Futures closed easy; January, nominal-
February, 9.25 c; March, 9.19 c; April, 9.l(ie;
May, 9.11 c; June, 9.04 c; July, 9.04 c; August,
8.74 c; September, 8.30 c;» October, 8.050- No
vember, 7.95 c.•■ ■''■'■■' ■ ' i/- •■
INSINUATION. \ A;V ;
Softleigh—They— aw—say there's a fool
In evahwy family, doncher know.
Miss Cutting—Yes,;and you are an only
son, I believe. ■> .
. •_• ajia
C^ (Fb fST A f%4% -We Buy or Sell ' for Cash or
■ v--- LpUEL «: CO., futute delivery, any commod
■ 5 ity or security dealt in on the
DEALERS IN principal exchanges of the
_ . -_ v United States. We guaran-
Grain, Provisions, : JS«?S!? frSl«^ IOSf
; Stocks and Bonds. SKS.&2*" """ "mlt3
Instantaneous Service. Courteous Treatment. Reasonable Margins;
Qermania Life Building, Bank of Commerce Building,
- ST. PAUL,. MINN. v ><• MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. ■"..■. ';v
,- ... : .!..■■■» ! — '.;;', _ ; —: — ." .'.;.«• "—'— , ' ' '.'•
''■ ' V..". ' "... ' = HSIAaMSKSip 1879 :a^. '■ J' „'"- 1 ' „' ,'.'; .. :
WOODWARD & CO.
QRAIN COMMISSION oulutm
BBjLKCEES—Cbiecso *&« MUw»ttk««. . Orders (or funu« deUrenr executed la all aj&r&Sts. &'■
MINNESOTA '
LOAN & TRUST 00.
MI.tXKAPULIM. MIXV
Capital; ...^;V; $500,000.00
Guaranty Fund. $100,000.00
Interest • "'V 2* as.
ISi IWI CM .: fc'° Balance*.
Allowed on Olrao" -^
Deposits. MESSSS.
Legal Depository ''-QLOrVSu'"''.•.
for Court and : *?> t"3&*
Trust Funds
INVESTMENTS— ExceIIent First Mort
gages and Municipal Bonds for sale.
TRUSTS—AII classes of , Trusts care
fully administered. ' "'. •; :
SAFETY I»EP«KIT VAULT*'
CMS. E. LEWIS
&CO.,
GRAIN COMMISSION
and STOCK BROKERS,
i,2 and 3, Chamber oi
commerce.
Private Wires to All Markets.
FIHST NATIONAL BANK
OP MINNEAPOLIS.
Phoenix Building, 4th St. and Ist Ay*
IS, S. DEPOSITORY.
CAPITAL .$1,000,000
SurDlns and UadlMel Profits.. $100,000
John Martin, President. | C.T.Jaffray.Cashlw
F. M. Prince, Vice Pres. D. Maciierchar.
J.S.PlUsbury,2d Ttce pres. I Asst. Cashier.
DIRECTORS.
John B. Martin, O.T. Uwett, F. M. Prlnoa.
John 8. Plllsbury, J.L. Record, «co. C. Bailer.
John B. Gllflilan, S.D. CarglU, E. Pennin^oa,
C. T. Jaffray, R. M. Chute, f. B. Weilj.
A. M. WoodwarJ, b. U. Palmer.
THOMAS & Go
Grain Commission and. Stock Brokers..
Write for our daily market letter, which we
- mall FREE on application. ■ - -. ■ ■ -
Members Minneapolis Chamber of • Com
merce. Telephone—Main 1597-J. : .
6 CHAMBER or OOAtM*a»J3.
3. A. BROWN & CO.
MIWNEA.POI.ia, ," ; MlKtf. .
Grain lommission.
holce Seed Oats For Bale. Write for prices
and samples. -
Vermilye&Co.
BANKERS,
Nassau and Pine Sts., MeW York;
13 Congress Street, Boston.
Dealers In
U. S. GOVERNMENT BONDS
and other
INVESTMENT SECURITIES
Deposits Received and Interest Allowed oo
Balances subject to draft at sight.
Apropos of the discussion which has
been going on for some time between the
manufacturers of seamless and welded
boiler tubes and the government experts,
it is interesting to note that experts of
the French government have insisted,
after making careful examinations of a
shipment of lap welded boiler tubes
shipped by the National Tube Co, that
they are seamless and are demanding the
payment of customs accordingly. During
the months of May and JuDe the National
Tube company shipped 4,000 4-inch lap
welded boiler tubes to the Caippagnle
Francaise Babcock & "Wileox. Havre,
France. The tubes arrived at the cus
tom-house at Havre in due time. They
were entered as la© welded, but thf
French custom officers had some doubtf
about the correctness of the entry, am
refused to pass them without a more car?
ful examination. They were undt-r tin
Impression that inasmuch as the duty oo
seamless tubing is higher than oo *a
welded, the NatloaAi Tube company taM
endeavoring to get the better of thj fQv
ernment by making a false declaration.
The expert? were then called in, aa4
after very careful examination and a
number of test» It wts decided tnat the
tubes were seamless and not lap weld, and
that customs must be paid accordingly.
If some of the prolix speakers In con
gress would tabloid their remarks, the
public would be much relieved.
Watson £ Co
Brokers in Grain, Provisions,
Stocks and Bonds.
Members N. Y. Stock Exchange
Chicago Correspondents— Bchwartz,l)upee & Co.
Private wire Chicago & York. Tel. 906 Main. ,
35 Chamber of Gommoroo,
\e6wArds.wood c co!\
\ STOCKS. BCHfIS, GRAIN. PROVISIONS- \
1 ,-m _PBIVftTR WIRE mcZ. C \
" V ucubcdc / BOARD CF TRADE CHICAGO I .'\ •
= \ MEMBERS \ CHAMBER op commerce mpl^. \ f.
\3]2 GUARANTY LOAM BLOC MINNEAPOLIS. \
\6 CKAWBER OF emMet rtIHNEAMLIsA
M. E. DORAN & CO.,
Successors to Geraghty, Ooran 6 Co.
Stocks BANKERS and Mi
Bonds "ROKERS. provisions
■- - - 410 First iveaut S _ '
Cotton M^«po"«. ; Coffee
-• " v (Century BuUdlng.) L___l___

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