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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, May 21, 1901, Image 11

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1901-05-21/ed-1/seq-11/

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VERY FIRM UNDERTONE TO THE WHEAT MARKET
Some Talk of Dry Weather North
west Suggests Possible Damage
Unless Rain Falls Soon.
CASH SITUATION REMAINS FIRM
Conflicting Reports Front the South
weit, Some Good and Some
Very Bad.
Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce. May
21.—Llghi receipts were a feature in to
day's wheat statistics. Primary receipts were
small, while Minneapolis had its lightest run
for a long time with ouly s:'. tars inspected
In. Cables were tame, Liverpool varying %d
to %d, but closing unhanged from yester
day. Paris wa« a shade firmer. Antwerp un
changed, Berlin and Budapest V' to ?»e
higher.
There was more dry weather talk and
some northwestefn points reported seiious
need of rain. The Dakotas had a light and
•eattered rainfall and there mat some
■howers la Maultoba. It is dear generally
In the wact and southwest with heavy rains
east of the Ohio. Of the foreign outlook there
was llttla of Interest aside from a report
from Consul Mason ni Berlin, who has been
investigating the German situation and says
that In certain districts M to N per cent
of the whole winter wheut has failed, but
as he given no figures of acreage or intima
tion as to how extensive the districts are
there is little of weight in the report.
Minneapolis July opened %G%C up a:
anil sold to 72% c; September opened at 6S"*<§>
6SV-, and reachei t>9%c. Primary receipts
were 245,000 bu, against 370,000 bu last year.
Clearances wheat and flour 674.00 C bu: corn,
2X1,600 bu. Minneapolis received 52 cars and
Dulutb. 25, against 137 and 191 last year.
Bradstreet's figures are for a decrease of
4.192,000 bu in the visible.
Towards tha close the market eased off,
dropping to the opening, but reacting again
and closing steady, July at 72*i@72Uc; Sep
tember, C9>ic: May wh?at, Tie. Corn closed
at 40c for July and May.
In cash wheat offerings were bo light that
the volume of business was necessarily
limited. No. 1 northern sold at 73c for the
choice cars. Ordinary No. 1, spot or to ar
rive, brought 72*40; Nu. 2 northern sold at
7uc to 71u for choice, averaging Tu'ic: poor
lots of No. . fell below, tome going at 6l*c
and a few lots as low at (iv\ No. :> wheat
was salable over a range of 05 to o!<c. Re
jected was bcarce and there was Karcaljr
any trades reported and very little business
la no grade.
THE CASH TRADE
Flax Firm—Floor Quiet—Corn Re
ceipt* Light—oat* Steady.
FLAX—The market was firm and active.
Rejected sold at $1.6301.63% iov the average.
No grade sold a; (LSICLS2. Demand was
fair, coming principally from crushers. Min
neapolis received 7 cars, against 2 cars last
year. Duluth had 13 cars.
Closing prices: Minneapolis, cash, 11.73;
to arrive, $1.73: September, $1.72; Duluth cash,
$1.76; to arrive, $1.76; May, $1.76; September,
$1.31; October. $1.29.
FLOUR—There is no change to report in
the general situation. First patents are
quoted at [email protected]: second patents, $1.8003.90;
first clears, $2.70^ 2. so; second clears, $2.10t*
2.2". Shipments, 44,535 brls.
MILLSTI'FFS—Prices are steady. Bran in
bulk is quoted at $11.50-511.75; shorts, $11.50
©11.75; flour middlings, $12.50'g12.70; red dug
In 14v-lb sacks. $14.26914.50; feed In 200-lb
sacks, $1 per ton additional; in luO-lb sacks.
$1.50 per ton additional. Shrpments, 1,073
tons.
FEED AND MEAL—Prices are quoted un
changed. Trade is quiet. Coarse corn meal
and cracked corn are quoted $lti; No. 1 feed,
$16.50: No. 2 feed, $17; No. Z feed, $17.".0,
granulated corn meal in cotton Backs at tht
rate of $1.85 per brl.
CORN—There was not much life to the
market owing to the very light receipts. No.
I yellow is quoted 4Uc; No. Z corn, !»!§ 29';.._•.
Receipts, 2 cars: shipments, 1 car.
OATS—No. o white is quoted No.
$ oats, 27i@27Vsc. Receipts, 22 cars; ship
ments, 6 cars.
BARLEY—The market was quiet. Feed
grades are quoted 27@41e; malting grades,
42@4s*c. Receipts. A cars; shipments, Tear.
RYE—The market is quiet. No. 2 is quoted
4Ste@soc for choice. Receipts, 2 cars, ship
ments. 6 cars.
HAY—Choice timothy is quoted at $14; Min
nesota upland, $11.50^12; lowa upland, $11.50
©12; choice mixed, $10^10.50; rye straw, $C.50
Receipts, 91 tons.
Puts and Calls.
2 o'clock report:
Puts —July wheat.
Calls—July wheat, 72% c.
Curb—July wheat, 72% c
Cash Sales Reported To-day.
No. 1 northern, 14 cars, m. to arrive...
No. 1 northern, ti cars 72=1
No. 1 northern, 5 cars 73
No. 2 northern, 5 cars ■ 71
No. 2 northern. I car 63
No. 2 northern, 1 car, choice 71%
No. 2 northern, 1 car 70%
No. 2 northern, 3 cars 70 I/i
No. 2 northern, 1 car 71' 2
No. a wheat, 1 car 63
No. 3 wheat, 1 car C5',4
No. 3 wheat, 3 cars .06
No. 3 wheat, 3 cars 68
No. 3 wheat, 4 cars 67
No. 3 wheat, 1 car 69
No grade wheat, 1 car G-*
No. 3 yellow corn, 1 car 40
No. 4 cora, 1 car 39
No. 3 oats, part car '. -71
No. 3 oats, 1 car 28%
No. 3 oats, 4 cars 28$ i
No. 3 oats. 1 car 29
No. f. barley, 1 car .33
No. 2 rye, part ear ; 49
No. 3 rye, 1 ear 48',i
KejeeieU flax, 2 cars 1.63' i
State Grain Inspection.
May 20.
Inspections In—Wheat— Northern-
No. 1 northern, 10 cars; No. 2 northern, 2S; i
No. 3, IS; rejected, 6: no grade, 15.
Milwaukee No. 1 northern, 19 cars; No. 2
northern, 30; No. 3, 7; rejected, 3; no
grade, 'i.
Minneapolis & St. Louis—No. 1 northern, 20
cars; No. 2 northern, 12; No. 8, 3; rejected, 1;
DO grade, 2.
. goo— No. 1 northern, 1 car; No. 2 northern,
10; No. 3. 2; no grade, 1.
Northern Pacific— 2 northern, 2 cars;
No. 3, 2; rejected, 3; no grade, 2.
Omaha—No. 1 northern, 15 cars; No. 2
northern, 13; No. 3, 5; rejected, C; no
grade, 4.
Chicago Great Western —No. 2 norther^, £
cars.
Minnesota Transfer—No. 1 northern, 2 cars.
Total — 1 northern, 67 cars; No. 2 north
ern, 97; No. 3, 34; rejected, 18; no grade, 27. j
Other Grains —No. 2 winter -wheat, 4 cars;
No. 3 winter 'wheat, 45; No. S yellow corn, 4;
No. 3 cora, 6: No. 4 corn, 2; no grade corn, I
1; No. 'i white oats, 4; No. 3 oats, 19; no
grade oats. 6; No. 1 rye, 2; No. 3 rye, 6; No.
4 barley, 3; No. 5 barley, 1; No. 1 flax, 6; re
peated flax. 16; no grade flax, .
Inspections Out —No. 1 northern wheat, 11
cars; No. 2 northern wheat, 62; No. 3 wheat,
15; rejected wheat. 9; no grade wheat. 5; No.
2 winter wheat, 10; No. 3 winter wheat, 17;
No. 3 yellow corn, 2; No. 3 corn, 6; No. 3
white oats, 2; No. 3 oats, 8; No. 5 barley. 1;
no grade barley, 1; No. 1 flax, 8; rejected
lias. 14. -
"Wheat Movement.
The following are the receipts and ship
ments at the principal primary wheat mar
kets:
Receipts, Shipments,
bu. bu.
New York 282,150 150,171
Philadelphia 29,561 8,000
Baltimore 44,185 71,942
■Toledo 8.375 18,000
Detroit 3.000 None
St. Louis 29,000 118,000
Boston 77,937 None
Chicago 67,675 334,236
Milwaukee 2,625 5.250
Duluth 2,846 833,584
Minneapolis 41,340 3,403
Kansas City 60.500 56,000
Wheat Movement by Roads.
- Received—Cars—Milwaukee, 20; Omaha, 8;
St. Louis, 12; Great Northern, 4; Northern
Pacific, 3; Soo. «.
Shipped—Cars—Milwaukee 8; Omaha, 5; St.
Louis, 23; Wisconsin Central, 1; Great North
ern, .1; Northern Pacific, 3.
Receipts and Shipments.
May 20.
Received—Wceat, 58 cars, 41,340 bu; corn,
1,660 bu; oats, 29.260 bu; barley, 1,980 bu; rye,
1.640 bu; flax, 8.570 bu; flour, 293 brls; mill
ituCa, 30 tons; hay, 91 tons; fuel oil, 80,000
gals; fruit, 421,224 lbs; merchandise, 2.577,836
lbs; lumber, 73 cars; posts and piling, 1 car;
barrel took, 2 cars; machinery. 414.950 lb»;
coal, 330 tons; wood, 60 cords; brick, 87,000;
lime, 1 car; cement, 1,870 brls; household
goods, 21,400 lbs; live stock, 2 cars; salt, 2
oars; - drassed meats,l3o,4Ss lbs; railroad mate
rials, $ cars; sundries, 62 cars; car lots, 531.
Shipped—Wheat, 41 cars. 34,030 bu; corn, 940
bu; oats. 5,760 bu; barley, 830 bu; rye, 4,440
bu; flax, 10,080 bu; flour, 44,635 brls; mlll
stu2s. 1.073 tons; hay, 10 tons; fruit,. 107,6.00,
RANGE OF WHEAT PRICE IN MINNEAPOLIS
fpttt High. Low. To-day. - Yesterday. Year Ago.
May. ..........$ ** ..........' $.72 $.71% $-65%
July.. .71*4 .72% .72% .72%@72% .717>@72 , .65
Sept. .65%@63% .69% .68%@68% .69% .GB%@6S% .65 (g6s^
On Track—No. 1 hard, 74%' c; No. 1 northern, 72% c; No. 2 northern, 70®70%c.
THE DAY'S RESIXT
July Wheat Minneapolis. Chicago. Duluth. St. Louis. New York
Close to-day $ .72%@72% $ .73* $.74% I .69H®69% $ .79%*
Close yesterday 71?i@72 .72*4 .74 .69%@69%: .78%
lbs; merchandise, 2,361,670 lbs; lumber, 7S
cars- barrel stock, 1 car; machinery, 251,650
lbs- wood 12 cords: brick, S.imO; railroad
lroii It! cars; linseed oil. 301.000 brls; oil
e*ke 170,409 Iba; wool. 40,000 lbs; railroad
materials, 4 cars; sundries, 24 ears; car loU,
7C2.
RANGE OF JULY WHEAT
fy - —._
Aw -fin- r -I ii'y t
7*f- I 1 ■ 1
OTHER GRAIN MARKETS
CHICAUO CiRAIX
Agtfresaive Geuerul Buyiutf Raises
'Wheat v Notch.
! Chicago. May 21.—Wheat developed consid
i erable strength to-day under aggressive gen-
I eral buying. Despite lower cables, July
1 opened %<B%c higher, at 72% c, and rose to
■ 73% c, where pront-taking checked the ad
j vance. Local receipts were 39 cars, two of
; contract grade. Minneapolis and Duluth re
! ported 72 cars, against 128 last week and 328
a year ago.
; July touched 73%@73%c, but under profit
i taking reacted to 73% c. The close was firm
%c higher at 73% c.
Close—Wheat—May, 74',c; July, 73% c. Cash
i —No. 2 red, 75@76c; No. 3 red, 70@74%c; No.
12 hard. 74%©75 c; No. 3 hard' winter, (3%0
74% c; No. 1 northern spring, 74%@75%c; No.
I 2 northern spring, 74%@"75%c.: • •
Disappointing cables and heavy receipts
were offset in the corn market by a vigorous
general demand. July opened unchanged to
%c higher, at 44%@45c, and sold to 45% c.
May opened unchanged, at 4Sc, and sold to
49% c. Local receipts were 942 cars, 331 of
contract grade.
July touched 45 3ic; reacted to 45c and
j closed steady %c higher at 45% c.
Close—May, 49% c; July, 45<&45%c. Cash—
No. 2, 49%@50c; No. 3, 43%@44%c.
Oats were quite and active and strong on
outside buying. July opened a shade lower,
at 28% c, and sold to 2f%c. Local receipts
were 442 cars.
Close— 30% c; July, 28%@29c; August,
27% c. ■ Cash— 2, 30%@30%c; No. 3, 30c.
The following was the range of prices:
Wheat— May. July.
Opening 73% 72%@72%
Highest 74% 73%573%
Lowest 73% 72%
Close-
To-day 74% 73%
Yesterday 73%@73% 72%
Year ago 65%@65% 66%
Corn- l*'<■",'
Opening 48 44%@45
Highest 50% 45%
Lowest 48 44%
Close— ••■>■'<■■ :^ %
To-day 49% 45 ©45%
.Yesterday 48 44%
"Year ago 36% 26%
Oats-
Opening 30% 28%
Highest ~ 30% 29%@29?g
Lowest 3U% 28%
Close-
To-day 30% 28%@29
Yesterday ..... 30% 28%C28%
Year ago 21% 21%
Dulutb l.rain.
Duluth, Minn., May 21.—Wheat gained a
cent to-day on light trading. July opened
%C up at 74% c, and sold up to %c, weakening
a little toward the close which was, however,
strong at top. September opened %c up at
70% c and advanced a cent to 71% c Later it
weakened to under 71c, where it closed. Re
ceipts—Wheat, 25 cars; corn, 5; oats, 2; rye, '
2; flax, 13; total, 47 cars. Shipments—Wheat,
833,534 bushels; corn, 77,105 bushels; rye, 50,
--000 bushels. Close— 29% c; rye, 51c;
I corn, 41 %c; flax, cash, $1.76; September, $1.31;
September northwestern, $1.32; October, 29;
I No. 1 hard cash, 77V >; September, 72c; No. 1
1 northern, cash and May, 74% c; July 74% c;
No. 2 northern, 70% c; No. 2, 66% c.
Liverpool Grain.
Liverpool, May 21.—Close—Wheat—Steady;
unchanged to %d lower; July, 5s lid; Septem
ber, 5s lOd. Corn— Steady; unchanged to %d
higher; July, its ll%d; September, 38 10% d.
Kansas City Grain.
Kansas City, May 21.—Close wheat, July,
66% c; September, 64%c@65c. Cash No. 2 hard.
We; No. 2 red, 70@71%c. Corn, July, 40%e;
September, 41c. Cash No. 2 mixed, 41c; No. 2
white, 42c. Oats No. 2 white, 31 1 2 1g31%. .
Milwaukee Grain.
Milwaukee, May 21.— Flour—5@10c higher.
Wheat—Firmer; No. 1 northern, 75% c; No. 'i
northern, 73%@74c; July. 72%@73%c. Rye-
Firmer; No. 1, 55c. Barley—Dull; No. 2,
57c; sample, 40#52%c. Steady; No. 2
white, 30%@31c.
Chicago Seed and Coarse Grain.
Chicago, May 21.— Flax—Cash northwest,
$1.71%; No. 1.51.71%; May, $1.71%; Septem
ber, $1.28; October, $1.28. Rye— 53c;
July, 52c. Barley—Cash, 43@55c. Timothy
—September, $3.2263.35. Clover— $9.60.
. St. Louis Grain.
St. Louis, May —Close—Wheat higher:
No. 2 red, cash, 72% c; May, 72% c; July. 69% !
669% c; September, C9c; No. -2 hard, 72%©
73c. Corn firm; No. 2 cash, 43% c; May, 43% c; \
July, 43@43%c; September, 43% c. Oats high
er; No. 2 cash, 30% c; May, 30' 2 c; July, 28o;
September, 26% c; No. 2 white, 31% c.
MISCELLANEOUS
Xew York Cotton.
New York, May 21. —Cotton opened quiet
and 1 to 3 points lower in sympathy with
weak English cables, clear weather news
from Texas and heavy port receipts. July
opened at 7.58 c and the rest of the list around
yesterday's closing. Heavy buying of July
sudenly set in, ofterings were scarce, and by
leaps and bounds July shot up to 7.82 c.
Southern, .western and foreign orders for
other options' caused pronounced gains theft
as well. Profit-taking forced July back to
7.73 by 11. o'clock, after which the market
was very feverish and irregular. Spot closed
quiet and l-16c higher; middling uplands,
&%c; middling gulf, Sfgc; sales. 17 bales.
Futures closed steady: May, 7.65 c;, June,
7.69 c; "July, 7.73 c; August, 7.32 c; September.
7.11 c; October, 7c; November, 6.99 c; Decem
ber, 6.98 c; January and February, 7c. -
. .- Boston Mining: Shares.
Boston, May 21.—Adventure, 15@15%; Al
louez. 2%@3%; Arcadian, 16%@17%; Arnold,!
2%@3; Atlantic, 30@32; Baltic. 41@42; Mon
tana, 420@425; Butte, 105@107; Hecla, —; Cen- 1
tennial, 25®28%; Franklin, 18@19; Isle Roy
ale, 48%(gr?8%; Mohawk, 38038%; Old Colony,
4 asked; Osceola, 87%@88; Quincy, 165®172;
Rhode Island, 4@4%; Winoua, 3@3%; Wolver
ine, 55%@56%; Anaconda, 45@45%.
\ INVESTMENT GOSSIP
Waldorf gossip to Watson: According to
views expressed in stock exchange circles to
night, the market is likely to continue irreg
ular, but with good stocks a purchase on all
reactions. It is argued that securities arc
now In strong hands, and so many deals have
yet to be consummated that the great finan
cial interests cannot afford to let the prices
decline seriously. The winter wheat crop has
been much improved by rains and damage by
Insects checked. Spring wheat is getting a
fine start. Corn planting Is late, but trust
worthy advices are that there is plenty of
time for it to make up lost ground. So the
agricultural phase of the situation is consid
ered a legitimate bull factor of great impor
tance, while money Is expected to work easier
and the general business outlook brighter.
Verhoeff, from Milmlne: London Inactive;
Louisville & Nashville, Union Pacific trifle
higher, other stock!! %@l% lower. General
gossip bullish on all breaks for good stocks.
Union Pacific, St. Paul, Missouri .Pacific, Gas,
Erics should be bought on dips; big short
Interest in these .stocks. »
Logan, New York, to Jolley: Two years
ago, when Northern Pacific common was sell-
Ing under 40. President J. J. Hill advised the
vice-president of a prominent eastern trunk
line to buy the stock and hold it (or par.
Mr. • Hill now says: "You remember that
talk on Northern Pacific? Well, now buy
some Erie common; It will sell at par or
better. The company is not only doing well,
but it has most excellent prospects, and I can
foresee for It a' most brilliant future. I re
gard Eria: common very highly."
New York to Lewis: J. J. Hill great be
liever: in . Erie. . He predicts big prices : (or
the common. ;", . ~
THE MINNEAPOLIS JOUBtfAL'.
STOCKS SINK A BIT
They Are Decidedly Under Pressure
at the Opening.
LOSSES WERE NOT VERY SEVERE
Then Some Stocks Advance Above
Yesterday's Close and Trad
inji Become* Dull.
. New York, May 21.— Stocks were under
pressure at the opening, but only in a few
cases were the losses severe. Missouri Pacific
fell 3 points, Manhattan 2% and Pennylvanla,
Norfolk & Western, Kansas' S: Texas pre-
I ferred and Amalgamated Copper 1 to 1%.
j Union Pacific ran down % and then rallied
a point on large transactions.
Buying orders were met as prices declined,
; and as good support appeared in the stocks
: which were weakest at the opening, short
: lines were covered, causing a general and
] substantial rally. Quite a number of im
portant stocks • advanced above yesterday's
close, the rally from .the lowest reaching 4
! in Missouri Pacific, 3Vi in Union Pacific, 2 in
> Manhattan and a point cr over in St. Paul,
Pennsylvania, Atehison, Louisville, Reading,
Sugar and People's Gas. Renewed selling of
i Amalgamated Copper forced it down C points
i and there was some realizing in Union Pacific
: which upset the market. At 11 o'clock specu
-1 lation was mixed, members of various groups
! giving contrariwise and the general list about
balanced between up and down.
Business became very dull, but the tone was
more stable and strengthened for some of the
railroads and industiials. Atchison and St.
Paul improved to 7& and If- respectively, the
best prices of the morning, and Amalgamated
Copper made a, full recovery of its earlier
loss. - There was a large demand for Ameri
can Linseed Oil lue and they were 1%®4
higher on the publication of the terms offered
for its absorption by the newly organized
Union Lead # and Oil company. National Lead
was strong* on hopes ■of benefit from that
transaction. Mexican, roads were bought at
rising prices.
Further advances carried Union Pacific up
5 from the lowest, Amalgamated Copper 4%,
Sugar 314, Rock Island 2%, and Erie stocks
from 1% to 2. The market was without ani
mation and prices fell back again. The close
was dull and heavy below the best.
Bonds were easier.
Stock quotations reporter for The Journal
by Watson & Co., Chamber of Commerce.
Minneapolis.
Closing prices are bid. '
I j II -Close—
Sales] Stocks— Hi- | Lo- | Bid. i Bid.
i est. [ est. My 21! My 20
loOjAm. Cot. Oil 1 I 26%| 26%
I do pr ; 89% "•■.:..
50* Am. Car 24% 24% j 24%,\ 24%
500 do pr , 79%;- 79
I Am. D: T. Co 34 '
Am. Ice 37% 87%
i do pr ...... 71% 71%
16,100" Am. Linseed.... 26% 24% 25% 24
do pr | 55% 50% 54 ! 51
Am. Mailing | 5%j..".;...
do pr 23%!....:.
■If.'-.* Am. Sugar 149% 14« 147%; 145%
, do pr 121 121
•Am. Smelting.. 65% 54% i:.'» 54%
'■ do pr ' -96% 96 i 96 96
8,000 Am. Tobacco... 126% 124%) 125% -->
I do pr..'.... ! I 140 I 143
31,600 Amal. Cop 115%! 110% 114 1 113%
2,7oo!Anacon. C0p.... 47%: 46% 46% 47%
At., Top. & S.F. 78% 76% 77% 77%
8.700 do pr , 98% I 96% I 98% »7%
10,100 Bait. & 0hi0... 105%' 103% i 106% 104%
1,300, do pr 93% 92% 93% 93
11,800 Brook. Rap. Tr. 76% 7.5 . 75% 75%
Can. Southern , 66 . 66%
460 Can. Pacific... 103%, 102% 102% 103%
3,600 Ches. & 0hi0...; 48%! 48% 48% 43%
C. &E. 11l '...... 123 125
1,900 Chi. & Alton... 42% | 41% 42% 42
300 ,do pr 80 : 79% 79%, 79
100 Chi., Bur. & Q. ! i 197% 197%
1,400 Chi. Gr. West. 21*4.1 20%. 21% 20%
.do pr A ....! i ! 79 78
100' do pr B .... .46% 45 46% 44
; do deb 1 90 91
Chi., hid. & L. 33 1 32% 32% 32%
do pr , 71 ; 70 •
1,800 C..C..C. & St.L. 81%; 80% 80% 80%
100 do 'pr ' i 113 115
Chi. Term j 21%, 21 21% 20.
do pr 42% 4- 1* 42 41%
Col. Fuel & 1.1 96% 96 96 97
| do pr I ' 132 I 133%
1,400 Col. Southern „j 14% i 13% 14%! 14 I
, do Ist I>r ... 51 • 49% 50% • .48%;
- . , do 2d pr .... 22% 22% 22% 22%
1.900,C0n501. Gas ..: 220% 220 i
3,500 Con. Tobacco .'. 56 | 55% 55% I
500 1 do pr I 10S I 107 108 ! 106%
700iDel. & Hudson. 163 1 162 162% i 163%
200 Del., L. & W. 215 ! 216
Dec. & Rio Gr i 44% 44%
100. do pr I ! "92% 91
51.700 Erie 38% 36% 38% 37
3,900, do Ist pr ... 68% : 66%; 68% 67%
1 do 2d pr .... 53% 51% 53% 62%
Ev. & Terre H 52 | 53
' do pr i 1 86 86
200 Gen. Electric .. 222% I 220% 221 221%
200 Glucose I 57"i 57% 57% 57
, do pr ...... 99 101
Great Xor., pr. 180 , 179% 179% 180
200 Hocking Valley. 53 i 52 52% j 52
6001 do pr ...-.-.. 76% 76 76 ' 76 .
1,600 Illinois Central. 140 . 139 | 139% 139%
. lowa Central ...| 34 ( 33% 33%| 34
' do pr .:.. • I 60 | 60
400 Inter. Paper .. 23% 23 23% 1 .23%
': do pr 79% 78 | 78% j 78%
IK. C. & South. 21 | 20/i| 20% 20
do pr ; I 42 j 43
LaClede Gas VI, .' j 72% 1.,..*..
do pr ..; 98 i
Lake E. & W ' 56 i 58
do pr 123 j 122 | 120 | 115
! 5,100 Louis. & Nash. 103 I 101% 1 103% 101%
M.. St. P. £ Soo 21- 21
i do pr ' 53' 53
9,900 Manhattan | 114% 112 i 114%.....:
5,200 Met. St. Ry ... 167% j 165% 167% 165%
900 Minn. & St. L | 91% 92%
! do pr ....- ; i i 112 ' 110 !
17,400 Missouri. Pac .. 104% 100%! 103% 103%
2,600 M..K.&T 29 j 26% 27% 27%
3,300 do pr 57% i 55% 56% 56%
' Mobile & Ohio 26% 80%
Mexican Cent . 26% 24%| 26%1 23%
Mex. Nat ...... 12% 10% 11% 10%
900 Nat. Biscuit 42% | 43
do pr * 195 99%
9,500 Nat. Lead". 23% 21% 22% 21%
200 do pr 89 j 87% 89 ! 86%
100 N. J. Central . j 158 | 156
1,500 Norfolk & W.. Bl%| 49% 50 50
i do pr '....'.....'. | 87%|......
North Am. Co. 83% 83%| •83 | 82%
400 Nor. Pac ! 160 ! 154% 160 154%
1,100 do pr j 98% 98% 98 98%
Northwestern ..] .' ! '. 195 195
N. Y. Air 8r...- 143 143
1,100 N. Y. Central .. 151% 150% 151% 150%
X.Y.Chi.& St. L . 34% 28
Omaha .'. I 180 '■
7,600 Ontario & W... 33 31%; 32% 32%
Paper Bag 12% 12%
do pr ' 70 70
■ 100 Pressed Steel ...... 43 44
i do pr ... .. 84 84
Pacific Coast ............... 60 ■ I 60
do Ist pr ; 92 I 92 ■
do 2d pr i ' 65 J 65
200 Pacific Mall ... 35 34% 34 ' 33%
4,900 Perm. R. R.'.... i 145% 144 145% 146
12,100 People's Gas.... 115% 113% 114% 113%
8,500 Reading .. ..... 42% 40% 41% 40%
4,400 do Ist pr .... 76% 75 75%! 75
.6,600 do 2d pr .... 52%' 51% 52% 52
600 Repub. Steel .. 19 I 18% 18% 18. .
200 do pr ' .74 - 73 74 72%
3,300 Rock Island ... 154% 151 154% 151
St. L. & San F. :..... ...... 44% 44%
; do Ist pr ....:. 82 82
do 2d pr .... 68% 63 68% 68%
100 St. L. & S. W I 33 33
800 1 do pr | 63% 62% 62% 62%
33.000 St. Paul • 162% 160% 161% 160%
I do pr ....... ..T.;....... '185 186
St. Joe % Gr. Is ...•.....:... | 12 12%
do Ist pr ... 70 I 69 68 ..'....
do 2d pn 28 27%
20,900 Southern Pac . -48% 46% 48 46%
1,000 Southern Ry . 30% j 29% 30% 29%
2,300 do pr ....... 83 I 82% 82% 82%
Term. Coal & I. 56% 55% 56% 55
--5,200 Texas * PaTC . 47% 46 ' 46% 46%
Third At Ry | 121 | 120%
Tot., St. L. & W 24 ' ; 23% 23% I 22%
, do pr .. 28% 36 37%1 35%
78,100! Union Pac ..T.. 104% 99% 103^100%
5.100 do pr ....... 89% .88% | 88% 90 .
2,300 U. S. 4 Leather.. 13% ', 12% 12% 13 :
1,400 do pr 77% . 76% .77% 76%
600 U.S. Rubber... 22 21 .21 21%
300 do pr......... 64% 62% 62 • 63%
32.700 U. S. Steel .... 1 44%] 43% . 44% ■ 43%
,9,000| do,pr 9314 92*4 93% 92?»
7.6OO,Wab«sh .*.... ' 21% 20% 21% 20
29,300 do pr ..... ..] ' 40% ' 37% 40% 38%
-. Wells-Far. Exd ..*....?: 140 140
2,100 Western Union ' 92% 92 92% 92%
300 Wheel. &L. E. 17% 17% 17% 17%
200 do Ist pr .... 50 49' i 49% 52 •
do 2d pr .... .V. 29% 29%
• 500 Wls. Central ;. 19% 19 19% ' 19%
IJo pr .... ..■ 42 43
Total sales, 65l7;!Oo~shares. : "
MONEY REPORTS
New York Money.
New York, May 21.—Noon— on call,
flrin at 5 per cent; prime mercantile paper,
4@4% per cent; sterling exchange steady, with
actual business in bankers' bills at $4,88<g
4.88% for demand and at $4.84%@4.85 for sixty
days; posted rates, $4.85% and $4.89; commer
cial bills, $4.84@'4.84%; silver certificates,
nominally 60c; bar sllver,'69%c; Mexican dol
lars, 49c; government bonds, steady; refund-
Ing 2s, reg., 106%; coupon, 106%; 3s, reg., 109;
new 4s, reg., 138; coupon, 109; new 4s, reg.,
138; ' coupon, 138; old 4s, reg,
113>i; coupon, 113%; ss, reg., 108%; coupon,
108%. . ■
Minneapolis Money.
MINNEAPOLIS-Bank clearings, $1,394,
--290.40; New York exchange, selling rate 70c
premium, buying rate 20c premium; Chicago
exchange, selling rate 50c premium, buying
late par; London 60-day sight documentary,
$4.84%.
ST. PAUL—Clearings, $846,100.02.
Chicago Money.
Chicago, May 21.—Bank clearings, $25,428,
--267. Balances, $3,477,467. Posted exchange,
$4.85%<g4.89. New York exchange, 20e pre
mium.
London Consola.
London, May 21.—Consols for money ,94 1-16;
consols for the account, 94 I*.1*.
GENERAL PRODUCE
The Minneapolis Market.
Tuesday, May 21.
The butter market continues to show easy
tendency under pressure of the heavy re
ceipts. This morning 17c is about the best
price obtainable for extra creameries, except
tor something very choice.
Eggs are steady and quiet around loglO^e
for strictly fresh, case count.
BUTTER—Extra creameries, lb, 17c;
firsts, per lb, 154@16e; seconds, per lb, 13% c;
Imitations, firsts, lb, 14%@15c; seconds, lb,
12Vit?13c; dairies, extras, 16c; firsts, 14@13c;
seconds, lb 10c; roll, fancy, 13@14c; choice,
lb, 12c; ladles, firsts, per lb, 15c; seconds,
lb, ll%c: packing stock, fresh, lb, 10c; tested
butter fat, in separator cream, 16c.
EGGS—Strictly fresh, candled stock, 10@
10% c; case count, 10c; dirty, fresh, 8c;
checks, Be.
CHEESE—Twins or flats, fancy, lb, 12c;
twins or flats, choice, lb, 9%@10%c; twins
or Bate, fair co good, lb, 6@7c; brick, No. 1,
lb, 12c, brick, No. 2, per lb, 10@llc; brick.
No. 3, lb, 6@7c; limburger. No. 1, per lb,
13% c; limburger, No. 2, per lb, 9c; pri
most. No. 1, per lb, 8c; No. 2, per lb, 6c;
Young America, fancy, lb, 12c; choice, lb,
10@10%c; pultost, per lb. 9@10o; Swiss, No.
1, lb, 13%@14c, block Swiss, No.. 1, lb, 14c;
block Swiss, No. 2 lb, 9@loc.
LIVE POULTRY—Turkeys, hens, fat, per
lb. 9c; chickens, hens, per lb, 10@10%c; young
roosters. B%@9e; old roosters. sc; broilers,
1% to 2 lbs, uer doz., [email protected]; peepers, per
doz, [email protected]; ducks, white, 7e; colored, 6c;
«reese. ac.
DRESSED MEATS—VeaI, fancy, 100 to 125
lbs. 7%e; fair to good, 6@7c; thin or over
weight. 4@sc; mutton, fancy, country dressed,
8c: thin or overweight, sc; lambs, fancy,
7H@Bc; thin or bruised, 6c; milk lambs,
fancy. 11® 12c; choice, 8(&9c; hogs, according
to weight, 6@7c.
FlSH—Pike, per lb. 7@Bc; trapplee, per lb,
406 c; crappies, small, 4@sc; pickerel, drawn,
i\v@ov: Dlckerel. round. 4c; suuflsh, perch,
etc.. 204 c; bullheads, skinned, 3<gso; turtles,
lb. 2<a3c; buffalo, :>@3c.
POTATOES—Burbanks. car lots, 41@44c;
Rurals. 40©41 c; Ohios, 44&46 c; mixed wnlte,
mixed red, 34038 c: small lots sell at
s<S7c per bushel higher than these figures.
BEANS—Fancy liavy, bu, $2.25; choice, per
bu. $2; medium, hand-picked, per bu, $2;
brown, fair to good, $1.5062.
ONIONS—Red Globes car lots, per bu, $2:
Red Wethersfield. bu, $2: Yellow Globes, car
lots, per bu. $2: white, per bu. $2.
DRIED PEAS-Kancy yellow, [email protected] per
bu; medium, 90c(&$l; green, fancy, [email protected];
green, medium, 9Uofisl; marrowfat, per bu.
APPLES—Russets, per brl, $4; Ben Davis,
brl, [email protected]; Baldwins, $454.25; Wlnesaps,
brl, $4.50.
CHERRlES—California, In 10-lb boxes, 75c@
$1.25. . .
ORANGES—California navels, 80s, $2.50®
2.75; California navels,- 965, $2.50; Cali
fornia navels, 1265,.53@3.£5; California navels,
150s, $3; California navels, lT6s, $3; California
seedlings, ■ all sizes, 12.76; ! California tanger
ines, half box, $-; Medlterraneon sweets, $3
©3.50; grape fruit, 80s to 965, $2.25. -
LEMONS—Messlnas 300s, or 3605,. fancy.
V 4; choice, $3.50; California fancy, as to size,
$3.50; choice. $3.25.':
STRAWBERRIES—Case 24 qts, $2.
PINEAPPLES—Per doz, as to size, range
$1.75 to $2.25. - -,
BANANAS— large bunches, $2.25@
2.50; medium bunches, $1.75@2; small bunches
$1.50.
■ HONEY—New fancy white, 1-lb sections,
20c; choice white, 16® 17c; amber, 13@14e;
golden rod, ll@12c; extracted white, 10@llc;
buckwheat, 10®12c; extracted amber, B@9c. ■
VEGETABLES— doz, 60@75c;
beans, wax, 2-3-bu crate, [email protected]; beans,
string 2-3-bu crate, $2; beets, bu, toe; beets,
new, dozen bunches, 50@60c; cabbage, south
ern, crates, about 150 lbs, $3.50; cabbage, Cali
fornia, hundredweight, $2.50@2 75; carrots,
new dozen bunches, 40@C0c; cauliflower, doz.
[email protected]; celery, Florida, dozen, 90c@$1.00;
celery, California, 90c@$l; cucumbers, home
grown, doz, [email protected]; egg plant, doz, $1.75@
2; lettuce, doz, 30c; lettuce, head, doz, -Js@soc;
mint, doz', 40o; onions, green, dozen bunches,
18©20 c; onions, Spanish, bushel crate, $2.50@
2.75; onions, southern, bu box, $1.75@2; pars
ley, doz, 30c; parsnips, bu, 50c; potatoes,
new, bushel, [email protected]; peas, green, bushel,
$2; pie plai.t, per pound, 191 He; radishes,
long, dozen bunches, 20c; radishes, round,
dozen bunches. lS@2oc; rutabagas, bushel,
30c; salsify (oyster plant), dozen, 60c; spin
ach, bushel, 50c; turnips, new, dozen bunches.
40®45c; tomatoes, home-grown, five-pound
basket, $1.25; tomatoes, Florida, six-basket
crate, $4; watercress, dozen, 35e.
Xew York Prodnce.
New York. May Butter—Receipts, 14,
--453 packages; steady; creamery, 15@19c; fac
tory, ll®l3i-. Cheese—Receipts, 8,303 pack
ages; Irregular; fancy large colored, 8c; fancy
large white, B%e; fancy small colored, B%c;
fancy small white, B%c. Eggs—Receipts, 25,
--405 packages; irergular; western ungraded,
11@12%c; western storage packed, 12%@13%e.
Sugar, raw firm; fatr refining, 3*ic; centri
fugal, 96 test, 4 9-32 c; molasses sugar, 3%c;
refined, quiet: crushed, 6.05 c% powdered.
5.65 c; granulated, 5.55. Coffee, dull; No. 1
Rio, 6e.
Chicago Produce.
Chicago. May 21.—Butter steady; cream- i
cries, 144g1!i%c: dairies, 14@16%c. Cheese
dull: twins. 9Vic; Young Americas, 10@10%e; ;
Cheddars, 9c; daisies, 9%c. Eggs steady, 10%
@10?ic Iced Poultry—Chickens, B@9c; tur
keys, B@9c.
PROVISIONS
Chicago Provisions'.
Chicago, May 21.— Provisions were easier,
in sympathy with' large receipts and lower
hogs. July pork opened 7%c lower, at $14.55.
and sold to $14.90; July lard 2%c lower, at
$8.15, and July ribs 2'/£c lower, at [email protected]%.
Close: Pork—May, $14.87%; July, $14.97»i@15;
September, $14.95. Lard—May, $8.25; July,
! $3.2038.22%; September, $8.22%. Ribs—May,
|$8.22%@5.25; July, $8; September, $7.97%. .
Hides Pelts, Tallow and Wool.
No. 1. No. 2.
j Green salted heavy steer hides 8% 7%
Green salted heavy cow hides 7% . 6%
Green salted light hides 7&- ' 6%
Green salted heavy cow and steer ;
hides, branded ...i 7 ': 6
Green salted bull and oxen 694 5%
Green salteO veal calf. Bto 15 1b5.... 10% 9
Green salted veal kip, 15 to 25 lbs... 8% 7
Green salted long-haired or runner
kip .:. :... 7% 6
Green salted deacons, each 45 35
Green cattle hides and skins, l©l%e per
pound less than above quotations.
Green salted horse or mule hides, ..
large :: $3.00 2.25
Green salted horse or mule hides,
medium '. 2.50 1.75
Green salted horse or mule hides,
small 1.50 1.00
Dry flint Montana butcher hides. .12%@14%
£>rv flint Minnesota. Dakota and
Wisconsin hides 11 9
Dry flint calf skins 16 . 12
Dry flint kip skins 14 „ 11
Green salted pelts, large, each — [email protected]
Green salted pelts, • medium, each.. .50© .70
Dry flint territorial pelts, butcher.. 10 011
Dry flint territorial pelts, murrain.. 9 ©10 ■-•
Dry flint territorial shearlings 6%® 8%
Tallow, in cakes ..................... 5 ■ 4%
Tallow. In barrels 4%@ 3%
Grease, white ..:............ ...4 3%
Grease, dark ...3% 2%
Wool, medium, unwashed .....14 @15
Wool, fine, unwashed ....10 @12'
Wool, broken fleeces, unwashed ....11 @13
Wool, coarse, unwashed 12%@H :'
Wool..fine, medium, unwashed 12%@14 .-.
Wool..seedy, burry, unwashed 11. @12
Bright Wisconsin and similar grades, l@2c
higher than above quotations.
Peorla AVhl«ky. ,
Peoria. May 21.—Whisky on th«; basis 'of
11.28 for finished goods.
VEAL CALVES ARE UP
They Rise 25c to 50c —Stackers and
Feeders Off.
HOG RECEIPTS ARE LIBERAL
Bid* Open Sc Under Ye«terday—Sup
ply of Sheep la
Light.
South St. Paul, May 21.—Receipts to-day
were 900 cattle, 500 calves, 4,500 hogs and
200 sheep.
The following table shows the receipts from
Jan. 1, 1901, to date, as compared with the
same period a year ago:
Year. Cattle.Calves.Hogs.Sheep.Horses.Cars.
1901.... 50,963 18,701231,593 72,576 8.147 B,»
1900.... 35.613 18,881 197,673 99,856 8,584 5,226
Dec 180 6,437
Inc 12,350 33,920 194
The following table shows the receipts for
the month of May to date, as compared with
the same period a year ago:
Year. Cattle.Calves.Hogs.Sheep.Horaea.Cars.
1901.... 6,830 3,401 32,216 1,173 1,465 738
1900.... 6.49S 4,778 30,069 2,051 952 773
Dec 1,377 878 .... 3o
1nc.... 337 .... 2,147 .... 513
Receipts-
Date— Cattle. Calves. Hogs. Sheep. Cars.
May 14 .... 629 578 3,088 79 6?
May 15 .... 430 337 1,924 438 45
May 16 .... 357 143 1,698 8 38
May 17 .... 261 &:! 'M- » 21
May 18 .... 451 54 1,178 .... 32
May 20 .... 325 248 1,773 5 38
Estimated receipts by cars to-day of the
railroads centering at these yards: Chicago
Great Western, 12; Chicago, Milwaukee & St.
Paul, 30; Minneapolis & St. Louis, 8; Chica
go, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha, 27; Great
Northern, 13; Chicago, Burlington & Quincy,
4; Soo, 3; Northern Pacific, 2. Total, 99.
Disposition of stock May 20:
Firm— Cattle. Hogs. Sheep.
Swift &Co 43 1,851 " 10l
Estate of I. Staples 1 . •••• ■
Slimmer & Thomas 169
Peter Evans 78 .... ••••
J. E. Bolton 14
Hankcy Bros 7
J. B. Fitzgerald 13
J. T. McMillan W
Weirs -' ••••
Country buyers 212
Totals 537 1,952 163
CATTLE—The supply here was fairly mod
erate for Tuesday. Eastern receipts were
rather light and did not warrant any change
In values. The demand was exceptionally
keen for beef cattle, but there was only a
small percentage here, and they sold luiij
steady. Veal calves ruled 25@50c higher than
the close last week. The stocker and feeder
trade ruled anywhere from 15c to 25c lower.
The supply was fairly liberal, but country
buyers were very scarce. Sales:
Butcher Cows and Heifers—
No. Ay. Price. 11 No. Ay. Price.
1 1,110 $4.75 ! 1 1,130 $3.50
1 950 3.35 |j 1 960 3.0U
1 730 3.05 l| 1 1M» jj.io
1. . . 970 2.50 1! i 930 3.00
I . ... 890 2.50 I 1 850 3.U5
1 . 860 3.75 2 1.010 3.15
•g. 1,073 3.85|! 2 1,005 3.40
i 730 1.75 ;,
Milkers and Springers—
Two cows and one calf for $-100.
One cow and one calf for $41.
One cow for Ml.
One cow and one calf for $29.
One cow and cne calf for $25.
Stockers and Feeders-
No. Ay. Price. II No. Ay. Price
1 370 $4.10 Ij 1 550 $4.10
33 276 4.25 ; 2 820 4.25
8 775 4.00 : 5 630 4.00
a 684 4.00 |l 3 740 3.40
1 860 3.85 T 1 000 3.65
1 810 3.25 |J 1 390 3.00
Stock Cows and Heifers-
No. Ay. Price. II No. Ay. Price.
1 540 $3.25 j 1 860 $3.15
2 610 3.15 1 540 3.00
2 850 3.001 1 "60 3.00
1 650 3.00 j : 1 9uO 2.50
I S6O 2.75 | 1 690 2.60
Feeding Bulls-
No. Ay. Price. II No. Ay. Price.
1 490 $4.00. i 2 885 $3.00
l" 730 3.00 |i 1 Buo 2.75
4 585 2.70,! 3 706 2.65
Veal Calves—
No. Ay. Price. II No. Ay. Price.
6 128 $5.25 8 146 $5.25
4 122 BJE [I 1 170 5.00
HOGS—Receipts at all markets were very
liberal. The supply here was very large and,
with prices at all other markets ruling lower,
bids here opened about 5c under yesterday.
Quality was considerably poorer. The best
on sale hold from $5.65 to $5.70, with choice
tops at 15.73%. Mixed grades sold from $5.0u
to $5.62%, and roughs at $5.25. Sales:
Hogs-
No. Ay. Price.llNo. Ay. Price.
57 266 $5.72%|| 59 259 $5.70
51 264 5.70 j 102 214 5.70
30 264 5.70 [I 78 227 5.70
65 249 5.67%| 87 214 5.67%
•17 264 5.67 V.>; 78 193 5.65
'43 243 5.65 I 57 247 5.65
28 251 5.65 j; 78 226 5.65
13 211 5.65 | 58 203 5.65
69 177 5.65 55 223 5.65
56 212 5.65 • 53 191 5.62' i
27 186 5.60 12 294 5.60
26 250 5.60 ]
Plgg and Culls—
No. Ay. Price.' No. Ay. Price.
6 346 J5.25 I 1 420 $5.25
1 500 5.00 I 1 420 5.00
1 100 4.50 II
SHEEP—The supply was again very light.
Offerings consisted entirely of killing sheep
and were mostly lambs. Spring lambs sold
from $4.50 to $6.50, and shorn ewes and weth
ers, mixed, at $4.25. Sales:
She©—
No. At. Price.
4 spring lambs 60 $6.50
2 spring lambs 65 6.5u
38 spring lambs 50 8.00
1 spring lamb 60 4.75
2 sheep 85 3.U0
sheep 120 2.75
On the market: Brabec & Mueller, Waver
ly; M. Sehuchart, Hutchinson; M. & J., Rash
City; Riley Brothers, Ellsworth, Wli.; G. W.
Maer, River Falls, iWs.; J. P. Bull St.
Michaels; A. L. McDowell, Hutchinson; F. H.
Damann, Plato; Charles Black, Welch; J. S.
Green, Goodhue; J. B. Talnter, Park River;
Guy C. Perkins, Cokato; Rohrer Brothers,
Cochrane, Wis.; Schneider Brothers, Alma,
Wli.; G. Nold, Nelson, Wis.; F. Johnson,
Cokato; Monaou Brothers, New London: Cox
& Miller, Kerkhoven; J. M. Hogan, Benson;
R. E. Peterson, Atwater; J. G. Gardner, Ham
mond, Wis.; Mabrey and Jacobs, F. W.
Miller, Lake City; Charles Black, Welch; G.
A. McConnell, Belle Plaine; A. Pettis, St.
Peter; E. J. Goetze; Carver; F. P. Fairthlld,
Garden City; Charles Stuebe, New Ulm; John
Dres, Wanda; J. J. Sturgeon, Marshall; E.
L. Starr, Tracy; Roesler Brothers, Otlsco;
H. M. Chrlstopherson, Hartland: 0. J. Han
son, New Richland; J. 11. Micholey. New
Prague; J. N. Scholtz, Bower & 8., Mont
gomery; Berg and Johnson, New Richland.
Sionx City Live Stock.
Sioux City, lowa, May 21.—Receipts—
5,200; cattle, 1,000; sheep, 200.
—s@loc lower. Sales:
No. ■ Ay. Price.
62 \ 240 $5.60
57 7............; 230 5.52%
60 .: 240 5.55
57 ;..... 250 5.57V2
65... 270 5.60
57 ....: 310 5.65
Cattle— Sales:
No. , . Ay. Price.
20 beeves 1,150 $4.75
18 beeves 1,275 5.20
3 canners 870 ' 2.25
12 cow* ". 805 3.50
29 stock heifers 403 3.25
8 stock heifers 611 3.50
2 bulls 1,230 3.20
2 bulls ...: 1,050 3.40
,2 bulls 1,080 3.60
12 stockers 825 4.00
4 stockers 712 4.50
8 yearlings 566 3.40
11 yearlings 638 4.65
10 calves 350 4.25
12 calve* 340 4.65
Sheep— demand; [email protected].
*~~"~^~~~~~"^~"~~ x •
Chicago Live Stock.
" Chicago, May * 21.—Cattle—Receipts, 3,000;
generally- steady; good to prime steers. $5.10
©5.95; poor to medium, [email protected]; stockers and
feeders, $3@5; cows, [email protected]; heifers, $2.90
@4.8o; canners, [email protected]; bulls, [email protected]:
calves, 50c lower than week -ago; [email protected];
Texas-fed steers, $4\[email protected]; Texas bulls,
[email protected]. ,
—Receipts to-day, 27.000; . to-morrow,
30,000; left over, 2,150; weak, top, $5.92%;
mixed and butchers, [email protected]; good to
choice heavy, [email protected]%; rough heavy, $5.60
©5.75; light, [email protected]; bulk of sales, $5.75
@5.87%. .
Receipts, 13,000; steady; Colorados,
$5.75; good to choice wethers, [email protected]; fair
to choice mixed, [email protected]; western sheep,
[email protected]; yearlings, $4.50© 4.75: native
lambs, [email protected]; western lambs, [email protected].
M. dorax & co.
: The Oldest Firm of
. Bankers and Broker*
IN ; THE NORTH WEST.
Hat* removed from their old quarters
,•- on Jackson Street to the # -
Uermuia Life ' Building. C»r. 4th
and Minnesota St., sit. Paul, Minn.
TUESDAY EVENING, MAY 21, 1901.
Official yesterday: Receipts—Cattle, 25,842;
hogs, 34,064; shwp. 18,85». Shipments—Cattle,
0,643; hogs, 6,864; sheep, 3,219.
Kansas City Live Stock.
Kansas City, May 21.— Receipts,
10,000: generally steady; native steers, $4.60®
5.70; Texas steers; [email protected]; cows and heif
ers. [email protected]; stockers and feeders, $3.55<g>
4.85; bulls, 13.2604.50. .^^HflimMW*
Hogg—Receipts, 25,000; market, 5@7%c low
er; bulk of sales. $5.60®5.80; heavy, - $5r75©
5.85; packers, $5 70®!;.80; mixed, r [email protected];
pigs, [email protected]. ■
• Sheep—Receipts, 4,500; market.steady; mut
tons, $3.7&@4.90; lambs, [email protected].
St. Louis Live Stock.
St. Louis. May 21.—Cattle—Receipts, 4,000;
steady to strong: native steers, $4.00<f5.80;
stockers and teeders, [email protected]; cows and
heifers, [email protected]; Texaus and Indian steers,
$3.«0(gfj.05.
Hogs—Receipts, 8,000; 5c lower; pigs, $S.GO@
■r <. T5; packers, |5.«[email protected]; butchers, $5.80<&
Cheep—Receipts, 800; strong; native mut
tons, $4.20<&4.65; lambs, $5.50<&6.25.
"PY" MAY "POST" CORN
POSSIBLE ACTIOX TO BE TAKEN
If the Dispute an to Deliveries
From Elevator "B" In \ot
Settled.
There has been a report that the Peavey
concern has threatened, if the grain in its
house is not accepted by the inspection de
partment, to avail of the state law permitting
a regular warehouseman to "post" as "out
of condition" any grain which he discovers
in his house in bad condition. The loss then
falls on the holders of the oldest receipts
out. Chicago elevators have not "posted"
any grain for almost twenty years. Invari
ably protecting their patrons by caring for
deteriorating grain at their own expense.
The only instance of corn being "posted"
in this market has been when it has
"heated." The feeling in the oorn trade is
ttiat the controversy between Phillips and the
Peavey company will not result in any ex
treme action.
A Chicago dispatch to Andrew 3 & Co. to
day said:
The continued strength of the May corn is
supposed to be due to that controversy which
has arisen between Phillips and the Peavey
elevator concern over the 600,000 contract
corn in its warehouse, Phillips refuses to
take this corn for shipment and the state
officials so far have supported him. Late
yesterday he refused to take Peavey corn re
ceipts on delivery. If this 600,000 No. 2 corn
in the Pv house should not be accepted by
the state officials as contract it would neces
sitate the covering of that much May in the
pit.
BUT LITTLE DAMAGE
Low Temperatures and Frosts With-
out Much Effect.
Weather Observer Outrani's weekly crop
bulletin No. 7, >ssu«Rl to-day, says of th.
Minnesota crop situation:
There were showers early in the week in
Hubbard, Becker, Clay, Norman and Polk
counties, and in the extreme southeast. Those
showers extended over small areas, and they
were generally light except in western Nor
man county, where they were locally very
heavy. Early in the week the temperatures
were low, being near the freezing point on
the morning of the 14th In some exposed
places. The low temperatures of the 11th,
12th, 13th and 14th do not seem to have
caused any injury except to a little barley,
some garden vegetables and a few fruit blos
soms, which were somewhat frostbitten. In
the Red river valley, oats, barley, flax and
and millet are being sown as the land is be
ing prepared for them. South of the Red
river valley, the planting of corn and po
tatoes has been going on during the week,
and in many places it is finished. Early
planted corn and potatoes are up. Flax seed
ing is going on and new breaking is being
used largely for this crop. Winter rye la
heading, but it is said to be thin. Wheat,
oats and barley are growing splendidly, with
good stands, the recent cool weather having
been very favorable for stooling. The sur
face soil is dry, and, though there is sufficient
moisture for the present at a depth, rain is
much needed, especially for the late-sown
grains, grass and pastures, the need being
greatest in southeastern counties. Pastures
are yielding abundantly and grass promises
a good hay crop. Chinch bugs are appearing
in large numbers In the southeast, and some
pieces of bailey and rye infested by them
have been plowed under to be sown to other
crops.
SPECULATIVE GOSSIP
Chicago to I. G. Andrews & Co.: There are
features to the drouth situation in the west
and north out of the ordinary. These do not
show so clearly on the daily weather map as
on the weekly summaries furnished by the
weather bureau. The northwest is beginning
to suggest drought. The table of actual pre
cipitation and or normal rainfall discloses
that there is some basis for the dry weather
complaints. The precipitation map covering
the period from March 1 to May 13 shows no
table deficiency In the Dakotas, Nebraska and
Minnesota up to a week ago, and there has
been no recovery since then. For instance,
the three official stations in South Dakota
show marked deficiency in rainfall, Huron
only 55 per cent of the normal, Vankton only
79 per cent, Pierre 6o per cent. The station
at Dismarck, N. D., reported only 31 per cent
of the normal rainfall, Willlston only 43 per
cent. Of two Minnesota stations, Duluth 61
per cent, and St. Paul 87 per cent. Minne
apolis has had only 32 per cent of its normal
rainfall through May. These deficiencies are
so extraordinary they can be regained only
by unusual spring downpours. The dry
weather talk, just beginning, from the spring
wheat man, is not without basis.
Austin, Minn., to C. E. Lewis ft Co.: Gen
eral crop outlook fair, but need rain. Getting
very dry; hay crop already damaged 25 per
cent by dry weather.
Chicago to Watson: Lo >k< like Phillips
crowd was scalping in wheac on long side.
They are credited with moat of the selling on
the late bulge. St. Louis also sold after buy
ing early. Corn has turned easier on local
traders selling. They got long on the rally.
Chicago wired: An expert, who it cover
ing Kansas for a prominent local operator,
is reporting lets favorable condition and pre
dicts a decided drop in the next government
report.
Total clearances wheat and flour, 674,000
bu; corn, 231,000 bu: oats, 170,000 bu.
Springfield, 111.—Illinois weekly crop bul
letin: Wheat generally, doing well except
Increased apprehension on account of dam
age by Hessian fly. Dry weather appears
to have favored those pests. Hay prospects
not good. Corn planting mostly completed,
liarly corn up and doing well.. Some re
planted on account of bad seed. Consider
able complaint of cutworms. Oats have suf
fered considerably from dry weather, some
fields being plowed up for corn. Oats gen
erally looking yellow.
Chicago stocks of grain in all positions:
Wheat, 12,316,000 bu; decrease, 1,817,000 bu.
Corn, 7,989,000 bu; decrease, 1,234,000 bu.
Oats, 4,451,000 bu; increase, 95,000 bu.
Wlnona wired as follows: "Our reports
as to crop conditions from Tracy west and
south are good. Sufficient moisture and
crop growing finely. From* Owatonna east,
tßere is a good deal of complaint on account
of the dry weather. All grain sown on
spring plowing is growing more or less yel
low from the drought, and the weather is
perfect for the work of the chinch bugs, it
being hot and dry, and we understand they
are hatching out by the millions. The re
port of the American Malting company, which
I read this morning, would indicate very
serious damage to the barley crop through
this territory."
Verhoeff, from Milmine: "We Seel that,
with heavy shipments of No. 1 northern from
this and the Duluth market, that they will
not get much of a break in July wheat."
Counselman, to Pettit: "Cables still show
declining tendency. Weather is clear and
cool in the southwest and northwest. Heavy
rains in the south. Northwestern arrivals
lightest on the crop. American consul gen
eral at Berlin reports 50 to 90 per cent short
age in the German wheat crop in a number
of districts."
The directors of the Board of Trade have
pronounced the Peavey elevator B, of Chi
cago, irregular until further investigation.
Chicago, to Johnson: "Crop reports from
the northwest and southwest confirmed this
morning with buying orders. Phillips still
selling July through brokers."
Milnor'n Heaviest Shipment.
Special to The Journal.
Milnor, N. D., May 21.—Morse Bros., of
Veblin, S. D., shipped 346 head of young stock
over the Northern Pacific to their ranch in
Kidder county. The cattle filled nine Streeter
stock cars. This is the heaviest shipment of
stock ever made from this point—The cele
bration billed for May 17, Norway's Inde
pendence, was not heM because Dr. H. H.
Emanuel, chairman of the county board of
health, posted notices prohibiting all public
gatherings on account of smallpox, which is
rageing in Lake and Tewankon townships.
WOODWARD & CO.
■««■ GRAIN COMMISSION «*««•
BBA^CHKS— and Mil wank-*. Orders v, future delivery executed in all g»rlM»
6has. E. Lewis - jjtuji^
&Co Bonds,
1, ?. and 3 Chamber of
Commerce, Minneapolis, jjj)tt[)||
GRAIN. PROVISIONS.
New York Correspondents,
Clark, Dodge & Co.
Chicago 5 Bartlett, Frazler * Co.
Correspondents, (J. P. Harris. ■
Daily Price Current mailed free on ap
plication. J^ ..'.-" ■■. .. y
ESTABLISHED 18Si.
LT.SOWLE&SONS
RrnL»rc \m {.Grains, Prov'sions,
CrOkvrS II ; S t oo ks and Bonds.
Chicago and New York Correspondents.
Long Distance Telephona, 634 Mala.
21 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.
Duluth, Chicago.
E A. BROWN & CO.
Grain Commission.
WHOLESALE COAL.
Consignments Solicited, Prompt Returns
Ouaranieed.
Minneapolis, ...... Minnesota.
FIFTY CE.NTS OX THE DOLLAR
All That Depositors Are Likely to
Get From Canton's Bank.
Special to The Journal.
Canton, S. D. ( May 21.—Public Exam
iner Cooper has sent his report of th«
condition of the defunct Canton state
bank to Governor Herreid. An examina
tion of the report shows that affairs ara
substantially as reported in The Jour
nal. Mr. Cooper says that with an as*
signee who will push matters depositors
can be paid about 50 cents on the dollar.
The stockholders are, under the law, liable
for double the amount of stock owned.
There will be a summer school here be
ginning July 15, and continuing four
weeks. Professors C. G. Lawrence and
George H. Ellingson are the promoters
and Professor Clark of Yankton will be
conductor.—Mrs. Louis Johnson and
daughter and Mrs. lver Hetletvedt, of
Lincoln county, started for Denmark to
day. They will sail from New York city.
—A surfacing gang of 100 men is at work
on the Milwaukee roafl near here. —The
Canton Epworth Assembly Herald was is
sued to-day. It announces the Chautau
qua assembly to be held in Canton July
3-14. Among the prominent speakers if
Coe I. Crawford of Huron.
COUNTING THE COST
Expenses of Smallpox Epidemic at
Went Superior Over $13,000.
Special to The Journal.
Wat Superior, Wis., May 21.—A report
of the amount of money expended in tak
ing care of the smallpox epidemic in the
past year has been made and will be sub
mitted to the governor and state board of
health. The report shows that 324 cases
have been under the care of the local
board of health. Of this number 186 were
patients outside the city who came here
and 138 were local people. The total ex
pense in caring for the epidemic was $13/
367.47.
POWER FOR MIXES
Rapids of the Seine River to Be De
. ; veloped.
Special to The Journal.
West Superior. Wis., . May 21.—The
water power on the Seine river in the
Rainy Lake region is to be developed and
the power is to be used in working the
mines in that neighborhood. The.water
power consists of rapids about a half mile
in length. It is estimated that more than
enough power can be bad to operate all of
the machinery in all the gold mines in.
that vicinity. Work will be started on
June 1. Men have already been employed
and sent up. A dam will be put in.
It is also reported that Colonel Hillyer,
of the Alice A mine, has completed a deal
in London whereby $250,000 will be se
cured for the purpose of developing the
mine. ■'•iKVV:
i ST. LOUIS RIVER WATERPOWER
Company's Annual Meeting Renew*
Speculation at W. Superior.
Special to The Journal.
West Superior, Wis., May 21.— an
nual meeting of the St. Louis River
Waterpower company will be held to
morrow afternoon at the office of the man
ager, James Bardon. The directors will
be elected and at a later meeting the di
rectors will elect officers.
It is the expectation that the company
will this year take some action to develop
the power. What will be done is not
known, but there have been the usual ru
mors of options on the property to out
side persons, and there is said to be a
possibility of something being done.
Jay Cooke is one of the principal own«
ers and his representative, J. M. Butler,
•will probably be here from Philadelphia,
Mr. Cooke is said to hold his property
at a million dollars. .
Railroad riiauees at Fargo.
Special to The Journal.
Fargo, N. D., May n.—lmprovements are
planned to the Milwaukee station in this city.
The passenger station will be enlarged and
all the offices placed under one roof. This
•will necessitate some changes in the track
age.—The Northern Pacific has decided ta re
move its switch yards to the west side of the
city and will open up Eleventh street across
the present yards. With the long trains now
being operated the present yards are inade
quate for freight business. The down town
yards will be used only for passenger trains.
—The Rescue Hook and Ladder company has
decided to attend the North Dakota firemen's
tournament at Dickinson. The members will
charter a special car and go in a body. A
running team will be put in and some fast
time is anticipated. The other Fargo com
panies will probably attend.
Died in a Barn.
Special to The Journal.
Marshfield. Wis., May 21.—Anton Bach, a
man about 40 years of age, was found dead In
a barn back of Mike Bart's saloon. He Is
supposed to have lived in Oshkosh and had m
been in the city about a week sweeping chim
neys.
THOMAS & Co
Grain Coamissioa mi Stock Brokers.
Write for oar daily market tetter, wUioa we
mail FREE on application.
Members Minneapolis Chamber of Com
merce. Telephone—Midn 1887-J,
5 CHAMBER OF COMMERSE.
Watson & Co
Brokers in Grain, Provisions),
Stocks and Bonds, >
members H. Y. Stock Exchange
Chicago CorrespondeijJa -ftAwartz. Dupe«& Co.
Private wire Chicago &.™xew Yort. Tel. 906 Mala
35 Ohambor of Oommoroom
\ EDWARDS. WOOD & CoA
\|£!£|^iSgsMf^ovispA
Amembers /BOARD CF TIADE CHiPAGOi. 1
\MEMBERS commerce mplS. \
\312 GUARANTY LOAN BLDC MINNE/WllS. \
\8 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE HIHNEAPOLISA
H3TABI.IBHSD 1879

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