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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, May 24, 1901, Image 16

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1901-05-24/ed-1/seq-16/

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16
ANOTHER DAY OF QUIET WAITING'IN WHEAT
The Market Eased Off Slightly on
Good Crop News, but Was
Firm at the Close.
RAINS COVERED A WIDE AREA
Exports for the Week 4.7»«,00O Bu.
—Local Stock* Will Decrease
About 300,000 Bu.
Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, May 24.
—Wheat held steady through the early trad
ing this morning against a run of news
generally depressing. After an hour the
market eased off and July sold to 71% c, but
showed tendency to recover on every sign
of encouragement. • The market was very
stubborn against decline. Liverpool was %d
lower to start and I»d off on second cables.
Paris closed wheat 5 centimes lower and
flour 10 centimes lower. Antwerp ■was %c
lower.
In a general way the northwest is getting
showers every day. The northern part of
North Dakota appears to be the neglected
portion. Rains were reported this morning
in the Dakotas, Minnesota, lowa, Illinois
and Miaaouri. The weather department pre
dict* light frosts for to-night. The Orange
Judd Farmer says the past week has been
the most favorable one of the season. Win
ter wheat conditions are fully maintained
at the high point, and the spring wheat ap
prehension has been entirely removed by the
receat good rains. The present position of
spring wheat is practically perfect.. It says,
further, that in 1898 a lower level than that
now evidenced in the general condition
brought a yield of 16 bushels to the acre,
and on the estimated acreage this year a
yield no heavier than this would give a
spring wheat crop of 820,000,000 bushels.
Hessian fly damage is now being reported
from Illinois, Ohio and Indiana.
Berlin advices say that from present indi
cations export business with Germany will
continue to be good all through next season,
as the present stocks are exhausted and with
the light yield anticipated Germany will have
to import wheat up to 1902. Argentine ship
ments for the week were 808,000 bushels,
Against 776,000 bushels last week and 2,248,000
bushels a year ago.
The market was very steady toward the end
•losing a shade under yesterday, July at
72c; September, 68%@68%c; May, 71% c. May
and July corn closed at 38% c.
The Bradstreet figures showed wheat and
flour shipments for the week 4,7*6,000 bush
els; last week. 3,985,000 bushels; last year,
4,418.000 bushels.
May corn opened at 3S%c and sold at this
figure and at 38% c.
Primary receipts were 355.000 bushels and
shipments 425.000 bushels. Clearances wheat
and flour, 257,000 bushels. Minneapolis re
ceived 181 cars and Duluth 8, against 247 and
113 last year.
Cash wheat sold well, millers taking the
selections and elevators the ordinary lots.
For choice cars %c over July was paid and
the ordinary Xo. 1 brought %c over. Some
very choice lots sold at a full oent over. No.
1 to arrive was in demand with trades re
ported at 72%<372\c. No. 2 northern was
also firmer all around and while 70c was
the average yesterday, the trading to-day
averaged He higher, some few choice lots
selling at TI%C No. 3 wheat sold from 65c
to 68c. No grade ranged from 60c to 65c.
There was very little rejected wheat in
sight.
THE CASH TRADE
Flax Steady—Flour Steady—Oats Ac
tive— Mlllatnfls Firm.
FLAX—The market was a trifle lower on
poor lots, but steady on the whole. Rejected
sold at |L6O. Minneapolis received s cars,
against none last year. Duluth had 5 cars.
Closing pi ices were: Minneapolis, cash,
$168; to arrive. $1.68: September, $1.28; Du
luth cash $1.70: to arrive, $1.70; May, $1.70;
September, $1.32; October, $1.30.
FLOUR—Conditions show no especial
change. First patents ire quoted $4^4.10;
Becond patents, [email protected]; first clears, $2.70®
2.80; second clears, $2.10® 2.20. Shipments,
43,938 brls.
MILLSTUFFS—The market is a trifle firmer
on all grades. Bran in bulk Is quoted at
$11.75; shorts, $11.75; flour middlings, $12.75
©13; red dog in 140-lb sacks, [email protected]; feed
in 200-lb sacks, $1 per ton additional; In 100
--lb sacks, $1.50 per ton additional. Shipments,
1,274 tons.
FEED AND MEAL—Prices are quoted un
changed. Trade is quiet. Coars* corn meal
and cracker corn is quoted' $15.50; No. 1
feed $15.75; No. 2 feed $16.25; No. 2 feed $16.75;
granulated corn meal in cotton sacks at the
rate of $1.95 per brl.
CORN—The market was fairly steady
around 39c for No. 3. There is fair demand.
Receipts were 12 cars and shipments none.
OATS—There was an active trade In oats,
No. 3 white is quoted [email protected]%c; No. 3 oats.
[email protected]%e. Receipts, 19 <rars; shipments, 8
cars.
BARLEY—The market was more active but
weak. Feed grades are quoted [email protected]; malt
ing grades, [email protected]; one car No. 5 barley sold
at 40% c; and a part car at 3Sc. Receipts, 1
car; shipments, none.
RYE—The market is lower. No. 2 is quoted
49% c; one car of No. 3 sold at ttffce. Re
ceipts. 3 cars; shipments, 1 car.
HAY—Choice timothy is quoted at $14; Min
nesota upland, $11.50612; lowa upland, $11.50
@12; choice mixed. $10#10.60; rye straw, $6.50
Q~. Recelp*s, 144 tons.
Puts and Calls.
2 O'clock Report— '.{
Puts, July wheat, 717 g c.
Calls. July wheat, 72%@72%c.
Curb, July wheat, 72c bid.
Cask Sales Reported To-day.
No. 1 northern, 2 cars, choice $0.72%
No. 1 northern, 4 cars 72%
No. 1 northern, 19 cars 72%
No. 1 northern, 2 cars 72%
No. 1 northern, 2 cars 73
No. 1 northern, 9 cars, choice 7314
Xo. 1 northern, 4 cars 72%
No. 1 northern, 1.850 bu, to arrive 72%
No. 1 northern, ".000 bu, to arrive 72%
No. 2 northern, h cars, choice 71
No. 2 northern, 20 cars 70%
No. 2 northern, 9 cars .70%
No. 2 northern, 4 cars' 70%
No. 2 northern, 5 ears. 70
No. 2 northern, 3 cars,, choice ~.... .71%
No. 2 northern, 1 car 71%
No. 3 wheat, 2 cars 68%
No. 3 wheat, 3 cars 69
No. 3 wheat, 3 cars 66%
No. 8 wheat, 3 cars 68
No grade wheat, 2 cars 62
No grade wheat, 3 cars 60
No grade wheat, 1 car .~... .65
No. 3 Corn, 3 cars .39
No. 3 corn, part car 39
No. 4 earn, 1 car 38%
No. 3 oats, part car 28
No. 3 oats, 1 car .'7
No grade oats, 1 car ; J9
No. 3 oats. 2 cars 27%
No. 3 white oais, 1 car 28%
No. 3 white oats, 1 car 28%
No. 3 oats, 1 car Z8
No. 3 oats, 1 car 27%
No. 5 barley. 1 car 40%
Part car barley 38
Rejected flax, 1 car 1.60
Part car flax 1.59%
State Grain Inspection.
May ti.
Inspected la —Wheat—Cars—Great Northern
—No. 1 northern, 16; No. 2 northern, 11; No.
3, 2; no grade, 4.
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul—No. 1
northern, 8; No. 2 northern, 13; No. 3, 9;
no grade, 1
Minneapolis ■&, St. Louis —No. 1 northern,
20; No. 2 northern, 5; No. 3, 2; rejected, 1.
Sco Line —No. 2 northern, 8; No. 3, 3; no
grade, 1.
Northern Pacific—No. 1 northern, 3; No. 2
northern, 3; No. 3, 3.
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha-
No. 1 northern, 17; No. 2 northern, S: No. 3,
6; no grade. 1.
Total —No. 1 northern. 64; No. 2 northern,
4s: No. 2, 25; rejected, 1; no grade, 7.
Other Grains—Cars—No. 3 winter wheat.
45; No. 3 yellow corn. 5; No. 3 corn, 3: No. 4
corn, 2; no grade corn, 1: No. 3 white oats,
7; No. 3 oats. 13; No. 2 rye, 1; rejected flax,
7; no grade flax, 3.
Cars Inspected Out —No. 1 northern wheat,
14: No. 2 northern wheat. 17; No. 3 wheat,
47; no grade wheat, 5; No. 2 winter wheat,
2; No. 3 yellow corn, 13; No. 3 white corn,
2; No. 4 corn. "1; No. 3 white oats, 3; No. 3
oats, 2; No. 3 barley. 1; No. 5 barley, 1; No.
1 flax, 1; rejected flax, 8; no grade flax, 2.
Receipts and Shipment).
■ : ... . ■ ", May -*■ . /■:•-:-.;">"
Received— 191 cars, 148,980 bu; corn.
9,960 bu; oats, 25,270 bu; barley, «50 bu; rye,
2 310 bu ;■ flax,- 4,089 r bu: flour, 791 brls; mill
stuffs, 69 rtons; hay, 144 tons; fruit, 158,608
lbs merchandise, 1,966,710 lbs: lumber, 19
cars; posts and piling.. 1 car; barrel stock,
8 cars; machinery, 241,280 lbs; coal, 570 tons;
brick, 101.000; lime, 3 care; cement, 1,345 brls;
household goods, 24,000 lbs;. stone and marble.
9 cars; live stock, 1 car; linseed oil. 38.810
brls; logs, 7 cars; dressed; meats 16,000 lbs;
butter, 24,000 lbs: railroad materials, 1 7 cars;
sundries, 36 cars; car lots, 570. ■ - ..•'•„
Shipped—Wheat, 20 cars. 16.600 bu; oats.
RANGE OF WHEAT PRICE IN MINNEAPOLIS >V;
' "pul High. Low. To-day. v Yesterday. Year-Ago.
May..* .1..... $ ..;......^? v^i^l\7l%^ ' I^M- *$&sg&
July.. -.72y;- '• "; .72%@72% .72% ■ ' .72 ;,--. .72^72% •: . .65%
Sept.. .$&% v<^ .69 *" - .;. .68% ... ; .68%@68\ !68%^v • 5%.^.
On Track—No. 1 hard, 74% c; No. 1 northern, 72% c; No. 2 nfrthern, 70c.
THE DAY'S RESULT '
July Wheat. Minneapolis: ' Chicago. Duluth. 'St.>Louis. New York
Close to-day $ .It * .72%©78 $.74% \-;-l ■.»%", $ -78* ..:./.
Close yesterday./.. 72%@72y 4 .73% ' .74% . .69%®69% .79
9,200 bu; rye, T4U bu: flax, 8,400 bu; flour,
43.93S brls; millstuffs, 1.274 tons; fruit, 17,
--000 lbs: merchandise, 2,366,105 Its; lumber.
102 ears; machinery, 312,400 lbs: wcod, 12
cords; brick, 12,000; lime,2 cars; household
goods, 28,400 !bs; ties, 22 oars; stone and
marble, 2 ears; live stork, I car; linseed
oil. 242,000 brls; oil cake, 40.000 lba; hides,
pelts, etc., 20,000 lb»; wool, 40,»>0 lbs; rail
road materials, 2 cars; sundries, 31 cars; car
lots, 785.
Wheat Movement.
The following. are the receipts and ship
ments at the principal primary wheat . mar
.kets:
■ ■/ ■•-•' Receipts. Shipments.
Bu. Bu.
New York 266,£50 ; 80.191
Philadelphia ......;....... 22.55 L ,-. J- 72,800
Baltimore '. 39.110, • No,«
Toledo '. :...:.....;... 3,706 ' .^,700
Detroit ;^...;...;..v.:5.677. ■;.■ 3.000
St. Louis .'.;....:....!... 29.000 30,000
Boston ■....*.......:.:..... .212,830 None
Chicago 41,600 • 36::.320
Milwaukee ........ :...;:. 21,750 - -2,200
Duluth ...:.............. 7.870 ~ 263,692
Minneapolis ..;.......%.;.148.950 '.~ ;' 16,600
Kansas City .......>...... 96,000 ■.-:}.' 45,000
Wheat Movement by Roads. . . .
'Z May 24. .'' '' * :; '-
Cars—Milwaukee, 41: Omaha, '25;
St. Louis, 22; Great Northern, S3: Northern
Pacific, 7; Soo, 7. ■ "~\J>Z '■
Shipped—Cars—Milwaukee, 5; Omaha. 2;
St. Louis. 10; Great' Northern, 1; Northern
Pacific, 2. . •.. A«-7 -,
RANGE OF JULY WHEAT
<jgjo_jflg« |iBo tea,.- ~]ii
/? i
* \ inn Pi. rJrv\y\M
74 _^s^_l_
OTHER GRAIN MARKETS
CHICAGO GRAJX
Liverpool .. Influence Causes Wheat
' ( . -Ea«e,and Dullneiis. .
Chicago, May'24.—Wheat ruled dull and
easier to-day, owing to the fact that after
to-day there will be no Liverpool market un- i
til Wednesday. Lower cables and extensive
rains helped In the establishing of lower quo
tations: July opened unchanged to a shade
lower, at 73% cto [email protected]%c, rallied to 73% c
and declined to 72% c. Argentine shipments
were 808,000 bu, against 776.000 last week and
2,248,000 a year ago. Local receipts were 31
cars, none of contract grade. Minneapolis
and Duluth reported 199 cars, against 167 last
week and 860 a year ago. \. ■■ '. ■ ■ ■_■ -' ■' i
July rallied a trifle and closed steady, %@
%c lower, at 72%@73c.
Close: May, 73% c; July, 72%@73c. Cash: 1
No. 2 red, [email protected]; No. 3 red, [email protected]; No. 2
hard winter, [email protected]; No. 3 hard winter, 70%
@73% c; No. 1 northern spring, [email protected]>76c; No. 2
northern spring, [email protected]; No. 3 spring. [email protected]
Corn was as dull and easy with wheat. July
opened unchanged: to %c higher, at 44%@
44 1« 4 e, and declined to 43% c. May opened %c
lower, at 43% c, and sold off to 43c. Local re
ceipt?. 641 cars, 224 of contract grade.
July steadied and closed %c lower at 43% c.
May closed %c lower at 42% c.
Close: May, 42% c; July, 43% c. Cash: No. 2,
42*4£43 c: No. 3. 41%@42%c.
Oats were dull but steady. . July opened un- ;
changed to %c lower, .at 23%®28%c, to 28%@ :
28% c, and sold to 28% c. Local receipts were:
293 cars." -' ' '."
Close: May,- 29c; July, 28% c. Cash: No. 2,
25%@29c; No. 3, [email protected]%c. - ,
The following was the range of prices: <
Wheat— ( < v, May. July.
Opening 73% 73%(j?73
Highest [email protected]% 73%
Lowest 73% 72%
Close— ' *
To-day .". ...; 73% 72%@73
Yesterday ; 73% 73%
Year ago i ." 66% 67667%
Corn—' • • . ■ .
Opening 43% ' 44%@Vi
Highest 43% 44% ;
Lowest ....; 42% 43% ;
Close— :■ ■: - 1 J*v -'0'(
To-day 42% 43% ,
Yesterday .' ....-43% 44%
Year ago ; 36% 37%@%
Oats- . • - v r. >j'<:ii-
Opening 29 28%©%
Highest 29% 28%@%
Lowest ......... „ '28% 27%@28 (
Close- \
To-day 29 *! 28% 1
Yesterday 29% 25%@% >
. Year ag0............. 21% 21% j
Dninth Grain.
Duiuth, Minn., May 24.—Wheat ruled dull
and lower. July,opened %c off, at 74%e; i
September unchanged, at 70% c." July sold iv;
a small way and declined to 74c, after which
it advanced to 74% c. It closed at 74% c sales.
September declined to 70% c under small sales
and closed at that. Receipts—Wheat. 8 cars;
corn, 3; oats, 6;-flax, a; total, 22. Shipments
—Wheat, 263.592 bu; corn, 130,000. Wheat
stocks win decrease 2.150,000 bu for week;
corn.half r as much; barley, 200,000 bu. Close::
Oats, 29% c; rye, 51c; corn, 42c, nominal; flax,'
cash, $1.,*0; September, $1.32; September:
northwestern, $1.33; October, $1.30; No. 1
hard, cash, 77c; September, 71% c; • No. -I 1
northern, cash and May, 74c; July, 74% c;
September, 70% c; to arrive, 74% c; No. 2
northern, 700; No. 3, 66c. ._ _ j
Liverpool Grain.
Liverpool, May 24.— Close —Wheat—Quiet;
%@ 1«» d lower, July, 5s lid; September, 6s
10% d. Corn—Quiet; %d higher to %d lower;
July. 3s 10% d; September, 3s lid.
Kansas City Grain.
Kansas City, May 24.—Close: Wheat, July,
66%(@66%c; September, 64%@€4%c; cash, No.
2 hard. 69%@70c; No. 2 red,. 70% c. Corn, July,
40c; September, 40% c: cash. No. 2 mixed,
40c; No. 2 while, 41c. Oats, No. 2 mixed, 40c;
No. 2 white, 41c; No. 2 white, 31%@31%c.
Milwaukee Grain.
Milwaukee, May 34.—Flour, steady. Wheat,
steadier; No. 1 northern, 75%1c; No. 2 north
ern, 73%@74%c; July, 72%@73%c. Rye, easier;
No. 1, 54% c. Barley, lower; No. 2, 56%@
57c: sample, [email protected] Oats, lower; No. 2
white, 29%©30 c.
Chicago Seed and Coaxae Grain.
Chicago, May 24.—Flax, cash, northwest,
$1.68; No. 1, $1.68; May, $1.68; September,
$1.31; October, $1.28. Rye, May, 52% c; July,
[email protected]%. Barley, cash. 40<g53c. Timothy,
September, $3.40. Clover, cash, $9.50.
St. Louin Grain.
St. Louis, May 24.—Close—Wheat—Lower:
No. 2 red cash, 72% c; May, 72% c; July, 69% c;
September, 68% c; No. 2 hard, 73%@73%c.
Corn—Lower; No. 2 cash, 42c; May. 42c; July,
[email protected]%c; -September, 42% c. Oats—Lower;
No. 2 cash, 29% c; May, 29c: July, 27% c; Sep
tember, 25% c; No. 2 white, 00% c. Lead-
Scarce and strong; $4.30 bid. Spelter—Dull;
$3.80.
MISCELLANEOUS
Xew York Cotton.
New York, May 24.—Cotton opened steady,
three points higher to two points lower, and
at once passed into an unnatural position on
a bad scare of July shorts. Routine news
was against any marked improvement in
prices. Southern selling and some pressure
in August for foreign account had but a
momentary influence, as shorts were soon in
active competition for July cotton. Ten
minutes after the call, July climbed to 7.55 c,
around which figure profit-taking on a large
scale set in and forced it back to 7.Me. The
new crop months were neglected and changed
but little from last nighfs final bid.
Spot closed dull; middling uplands, B%c;
middling gulf, B%c. Sales, none.
Futures closed steady; May, 7.73 c; June,
7.75 c; July, 7.SOc; August. 7.26 c; September,
7.04 c; October. 6.96 c; November, 6.96 c; De
cember, 6.94 c; February, 6.97 c.
Boston Mining Stocks.
Boston, May 24.—Close: Adventure, 14%g15;
Allouez, 2%@3: Arcadian. [email protected]%; Arnold,
2%©3; Atlantic. [email protected]; BaLtic, 41©42; Bing
hain, 22#23; Montana, 430tff435; Butt*, 107V-H
108: Hecla> 822: Centennial, 28028%; Frank
lin. 1»»V2#18; Humboldt, [email protected]: Isle Royale,
44(9-46; Mohawk, 3i<?37%: Old Colony, 4
asked: Old Dominion, [email protected]%; Osceola, S7%@
S3; Victoria, 4%@4%: Utah, [email protected]%; Quincy,
3655175; Winona, 2%®3; Wohverlne, 57 1,2®58;
Wyandotte. l\kS2: Anaconda, 50(550%.
THE MUViSEAPOLIS JOURNAL.
SOME STOCKS STRONG
This Offsets Depression Brought
r Over From Yesterday.
MANY IMPORTANT GAINS MADE
General Market 1 Suffers Meanwhile,
-. - .• St.: Paul tuning a»^
Points,
New York, May 24.—There were traces of
yesterday's late depression remaining in the
market this ; morning, > but special : stocks
showed strength . as \ an , offset.- Chicago, In
dianapolis & Louisville rose 1%, Lackawanna
a point and American Tobacco 1%. ■ South
western railroads and the steel stocks; were
also rather | firm. The v losses were confined
to fractions. Business , was on a small
scale. ".■"• . ' ';'. r; - , :V'(tYv*- V■.■'!*'>• •
The purchasing, movement outstripped the
liquidating sales and many important gains
were made. ..These were largest in some of
the stocks which i were .weakest ; yesterday.
Trading was largest in the coal stocks and
Erie common, and the Readings were a point
or more better.: Lackawanna went up 5%
and Union Pacific, Texas Pacific, Missouri
Pacific, . Sugar and the Coppers were also
strong. American Tobacco gained 4- and
Continental . Tobacco 1%. A drive against
Union. Pacific carried 'it. down 2% and there
were . sympathetic I losses ' of over a point in
St. Pauf, Erie, Atohlson,-Amalgamated Cop
per, Reading and Missouri Pacific.
Support developed for i Union-Pacific.after
it touched . 98. The , general - market mean
while had- suffered sharply, St. Paul ex
ceptionally losing 2%. With a recovery to
above 99 In.Union Pacific, other stocks hard
ened, but the demand was small and the
only rise of consequence was :in : American
Tobacco. That stock was taken in round
amounts, a Block of 5,300 shares coming
out at 130. It was marked up to 130% and
then dropped. Lackawanna broke J4% and
Northwest 3.'.The market at noon was about
steady and was semi-stagnant. ',/,. ■. .
The market showed some strength in final
hour, but any notable manifestation was
confined to a few stocks. The Tobacco stocks
continued to advance, American Tobacco ris
ing to ,124. „ Atchison and Wabash preferred
rose strongly to near the best of the day—2%
—and 2 over last night. Union Pacific, Erie
and the New York public utilities also ral
lied strongly and prices generally were
marked up smartly on light transactions.
The United States Steel stocks, rose about
a point over last night. : The closing was
active and firm at the rally. .
Bonds were irregular.
Stock quotations reported for The Journal
by Watson & Co., Chamber of Commerce,
Minneapolis.
Closing figures are bid.
I j | ~ ' II ! —Close—
Sales Stocks— |- Hi- 1 Lo- I Bid. \ Bid.
:-.{•■.; : est. I eat. lM'y24|M'y23
■ Am. Express .. ' 190 | 190
Am. Cot. Oil ! 27% 27%
do pr ... ! ! 89% 89%
2.900 Am. Car 2.;% -26% 26% 26
400 do pr". 80% 80 80% ,79%
Am. Ice .....>. •• 37 «6%
, do pr .:.;... 73%, 73- 73% 72%
1,900 Am. Linseed .. -21 | 19% 19% < 21"
•do pr ....;.. 48% 48 47% 48%
Am. Malting -7% . 7 . 7% •6%
6,200 Am. Sugar .... 148% 146% 148 . ,146%
j do pr 122 121 122 121
Am. Smelting .. 56 55% 55 '55%
do pr 1 r.;.:.'96- 96
13C600!Am. Tobacco .. 134 126% 133% 125%
I do pr i 144 140
6.600 Amal. Cop .... 116% 115 115% .115'
9,900 Anacon. Cop .. .50% 48% 50% ; 48%
29,100 A.. T. &S.F. .78 75%! 77% 75%
14,000 do pr ...;... 97% 96 I 97% 97
4,500 Bait. & Ohio .. 102% 101% 102% 103
1,600 do pr ..5.... ............ 92% 93
7,700 Brook. Rap. Tr. 76% .75 76 75%
Brook. Da. Gas. ...:........ 215 213
100 Can. Southern.. : ...... 64 65
Can. Pacific | 102 102%
5,700 Ches. & Ohio .. 49% 48% 49% 48%
C. &E. 111..... .......:.... | 125 123
1 do pr ' ..... i 130 ......
1,700 Chi. & Alton ..' 41% •• 40%] 41.' 41%
1,500' do- pr ....... j 79%! 78%, 79% 79%
|Chi.» Bur. & Q 105% 195 . 196%] 195%
900 Chi. Gr. West 22% . 21% 22% .21%
-. | do pr A:... ..;... ....... 79% | 78%
400 do pr 8.... 45 44% 45 43
4001 do deb ..... 93 r 92 92 91
. " Chi., Ind -& L 33-4 . 32% .33% 32%
do pr ...... ..:...:...:. 71 71%
100 C..CC. & St. L ...... ...... 80% 80%
i do. Pr .' 115 115.
Chi. Term ....1 22% 21% i 22% 22%
r.M'=l I do pr .....: 43 41% .43 42%
: [Col. Fuel &Ir 93 92%! 92% <■ 93 ,
. • f do pr .........:........ 135 133,
2,300! Col. Southern .. 15 Vf;' 14% 15 15
■■v ' do Ist pr v:. ..:... ....i. -52 52
->■ , I do 2d pr.... .23% / 22% '23 23%
1,700 Consol Gas-'... £19 217 220 216%
57.500 Con. Tobacco .: - 62% - 5734 : 62% 58
400 do pr 110% 108% 110% 108
900 Del. & .Hudson 163% 162 163 - 162%
2,600 Del., Lr.ck & W 229% 225 v 226 223%
500 Den. & Ro Gr. «£ 44% 44% 45
200 -do pr . . .V.'-. ..'."•..;•.• 91% 92%
89,400 Erie ..>... . 41% 39% -41% 3:1%
2,200 do Ut pr... «8% -67% 68% «7%
do ■ 2d pr.:.. .55% 54% 55%. 55 <
' Evans. & Ter H ..:'.:: ! ...... 53 52 '
-. do- pr ...... .:.'... ...... 86 86
■ 300 Gen. Electric .. 223 220 222 220
100 Glucose ..\.i... ............ 53% 55
i do pr ;....: ....v. ...... 100 100
Great Nor., pr. 178% 178% 178% 178
400 Hocking Valley 53 ; 52% -53 | 53
. 100 do pr :.t: 78 77
1,000 Illinois Central. 138% 137% 138 . 139
lowa < Central ....... ....... 33% 33%
I do pr ..".:...:..... |...'...| -58, 58
I Inter. Paper .1 ..":.. | 23 23
I?.do pr ••...... | 78% 78% - 78% 78%
' IK. C. & South. | ...... ...... -19% : 19%
• ILaClede , Gas . ...'. 83% ......
I do pr .■....:..■...*.•..:.."'.. -99 ......
1 100! Lake E. &W. .. i.;. '.. .'.";!. 55 56
.. ; 1 do pr •.............'.'....'. 120 120
V'A;:',|Long Island „.'..'.... ...V.'. ,71. 70
4.soo:Louis. & Nash. | -102% 101% 102 101
100|M..St. P. & Soo| ...... : :...:. I : 22 ......
' . -I do pr ........1.....: | ..::.. j 57% :.....
5.8001 Manhattan ..... 114% 113% 114% 113%
B.9ooiMet. St. Ry .. 169% 165% :169% 167%
300!Minn. & St. L ' j 89% ',90%
I, do pr ....... .: ...... i 112 ! 112 ■
10,100: Missouri Pac. 106% 104%j .106% 104%
1,500|M., K. & T .... : 27% 26% | .27,% 27 "
1,9001 do pr %..%. 56% :65% ' 56% 56%
- I Mexican Cent . 26% 25% 25% | . 25%
IMex. Nat....... 11% '11 11% 11%
2,300! Nat. Biscuit .. 45 .44% '44% 44
I do pr ....:: ..v... 95 j 95
100 Nat. Lead . 19 | 17
. I do pr..... t........ 82 I 83%
„.-■ I Nat. Salt :-.'... .:.:•:-. :•■£.;.:. ,43 ..-.:..
) do .pr;...— .'.(..".....:•.". .75% '.*....
i 1001 N. J. Central ...... ....'.'• 158: '158
1,9001 Norfolk ** - W.. 50% 50% I 50% 50%
' ! do pr ..:.•.;:.'.?......... i 87 | 87%
• North Am. Co | | 85 r' | 85
-v- Northern Pacific :.-.«.. .....; I 172.- | 200
r- 600| do pr...::.. 98 ;-, 97% ' 97% 97%
'v 100 Northwestern .;.....". 193 -195
N.Y. Ari Brake :.:.:: ...... I 139 ,137
--1,600 N. :Y. Central.. 150 .148% 149% 149%
. - 100 N.Y.,C. & St.L. .X.... ...... 27 27 .
"-'">> ' d6..lst>pr'.... ;.?;.: .....: ; 101 106
- do 2d pr '...". .rtU. ...... ::62;. r..V..
" N.V..N.H. & H. ../.....: ; :'^214% 214
7,500 Ontario & W.. 33% ;' 32% - 3SW • 32%
Paper Bag .... ...;.-. :r./:. ', 12% 12%
| do pr-.... V... ;vf.V. ;68 69 -
-1,000 Pressed Steel .. 46% -.45 .1 :45 45%
200 do pr :;.-.»:":. -84% "83 84 - 83%
i--~ Pacific Coast .'....: :...'.. .78. ....;.
--"300 Pacific Mall .... ..r.......;:* 35 34%
Perm. R. R... 144 143% 143% 144
0,200 People's Gas ... 114% 112% 114% | 111%
500 Pullman ........ ..'/;.: .:.... 204 • | 205 .
12,400! Reading .1...... 42% 41%! 42% 41%
2.100 do Ist pr ... ' 76% 75% .76% .75%
5,900 do 2d pr .... 33% 52% -53% 53 x
600 Repub. Steel -7. ...... .. i r.: ; 18% 18%
' 600 do „ pr :...::.. 73% c- . 73% ? 73% 73
• 1,200 Rock Island .. 153 i 151% 153 152%
St. L. & San F. 45% 44% 45% 45
••- do Ist pr ....:....:„'... j81». . 80
I. do 2d pr .... 68%! 67% 68%' 68%
;- 200 St.L. & S. W,. 33% 33% ;33.-. j -32
,100 : do' pr ■.::...:.....-. \ ...... 62% ■ 62%
20,600 St. Paul'/....;.. 160% 157% 159% 1537,
. ! do pr,.".::... 184 184 -
. HSt-' Joe & Gr. I ..*.... .'.-..'.: .12% 13%
_ I do Ist pr... .;.;.. :;;::: .68 -68%
■ '■:■ v^do:- s 2d pr,.... ..w.V ,r.\-.: 27 ......
; 7,200 Southern Pac .. 47% 46% 47% 4«%
7.000 Southern Ry.-.. '29% 28% 29% 29
3,o<rt)[ do >; pr.;:.-....:: .83 ,81% 82% 82.
1. ITenn. Coal &I. 56% 66 j 65% 55%
6,Boo.Texas- & Pie .. 46% 45 v /<«% '■'{&%
•,. ' ■Tin Can „;.... ....v. .?;'.;. 25 ..".:..
'-i | ■ do pr;,.:..-.;.'...".■.;..'.';; ?75% ...;'..
','-■ s'-.'r Third Ay. Ry Vv... ...... m -;..:..
! > |T., St. L. &W. •■ 22% : 20% ,22% '. 22%
do *pr .::;:.- -zi- ■ 37 - '-37% 36
■•■'. 'Twin Olty R. T. < 76% '76% 75% :75%
81,600.jl'nlon Pacific V. : 101% ■ 98;. 100% lOOgt,
3,600[ do pr .*.... I'• 88% ' 87% -88' J .88
ic^U.- 8. Express. ...'.r. i.V.T. :80'' 80
:2,100U. 8. Leather.. 13% ' 13% 13% 13%
. .600 -do. Pr ......; '78 - 77% 78 77%
;600U.5.. Rubber 21% 20% 21 ■ 20%
: 900[ do :,pr....... 62% 61% .62 62%
23,700 U. :'-. S. > Steel... . 44 "A ' 43% 44«/» "43%
9,700 do pr .... 93% 92% 93% 92%
6,800 Wabash : - 22% ,21 % : 22», • 21%
27,900 do .pr ...... 42% "39 42%! - 40%
■ .-. k- Wells-Far.» Exp ...........'• HO 140 >
J 1,900 Western Union. 92% 91% : 91% ' 92%
Wheel &L. E. ...... ...... ''17% 17%
j do Ist pr ........;..• 49 ;50
-;vi do , '2d pr... .:..'. . 29% 30
1,600 Wisconsin Cent ............ 20% 20..
-.. ; ■' | do pr ...... 44% 44 . 44 43 ■
• Total sales,. 714,800. -■: ■ " .. ~^
j MONEY REPORTS :
, New York' Money. ',
New , York,) May 24.—N00n. —Money .on call,
nominally? 4 per cent: prime mercantile pa
per, [email protected]% per cent; sterling exchange, steady,
with actual business in bankers'* bills at
$4.88%@4.88% for demand and at $4.84%@4.85
for sixty days; posted rates, $4.85% and $4.89;
commercial bills, $4.84©4.84%; silver certifi
cates, nominally 60c; bar silver, 59% c; Mexi
can ". dollars,' 48% c; government bonds, nom
inally strong; refunding 2s, reg., 106%;
coupon, 106%; 3s, reg., 109; coupon, : 109;. new
4s, reg., 138; new 4b, coupon, 138; 'old 4s, reg.,
113%; old 49,. coupon, 113%; ss, res., ; 108%;
coupon,- 108%.
Minneapolis ; Money. -
\ ' MINNEAPOLIS — Bank clearings, .* $1,093.
--775.02; New York exchange, selling rate, 70c
premium; buying rate, 20c premium; Chi
cago exchange, selling rate, 50c premium;
buying , rate, par. ■ . • ' ' =
ST. Clearings to-day, $730,764.46.
.'.': •. . Chicago Money. ;:.: -\ . •> ■
: Chicago, May 24.— Bank clearings, $24,942,
--087; balances, $2,331,342;. posted : exchange,
$4.85%@4.89; New York exchange, 10c pre
mium. ■'.., — ,'.'..••'
London Consols.
London, May 24.—Consols for money, 94;
consols for the account, 94 1-16.
Peoria Whliky.
Peoria, May 24.—Whisky on the basis of
$1.27 for finished goods.
GENERAL PRODUCE
The Minneapolis Market.
"•'ir^V 1 ' ,'.-;,-.■ , Friday, May 24. ;.:, -.-.. .
•.The butter market this morning shows a
trace of better feeling. Quotations are the
same all around, nominally. The early call
for extras was a little more active and sellers
are holding for firm figures as quoted.
Eggs are also unchanged as to open quo
tations, but the market shows a trace of.
weakness. .Considerable stock is now going
into storage, but receipts are still heavy and
it" is difficult to clean up promptly at firm
prices. '■.:,"■" .." ••;';••' ■ ■
BUTTER—Extra creameries; "1b... 17c;
firsts, per lb, 16c; seconds, per ■"- lb, 14c;
imitations,, firsts, per lb, 14c; seconds, per lb,
12c; dairies,, extras. 15c; , firsts, ,12^®13c;
seconds,. lb 10c; roll, fancy, . 13014 c; choice,
lb, 12c; ladles, firsts, per lb, Jsc; seconds,
lb, ll%c;' packing stock, fresh, lb.lOc; stale
packing- stock, t>o7c; grease, 3<&>sc; tested j
butter - fat, r in separator cream, 16c. .• . •
- EGGS—Strictly fresh, , candled stock, 10®
,10& c; case count, 10c; " dirty, fresh, 8c;
checks, Be. , ■ . . . ,-
CHEESE—Twins or. flats, fancy, lb, 12c;
twins Vor i flats, I choice,' lb, 9%@loVic; twins
or. flats,-lair to good, lb, 6©7c;-brick, No. 1,
lb, 12c, brick, No. 2, per lb, [email protected]; brick.
No. 3, lb, 6®7c; limburger. No. 1, per lb,
13% c; ltmburger, No. 2, per lb, < 9c; pri
most. No. 1, per lb, 8c; No. 2, per lb, 6c;
Young America, fancy, lb, 12c; choice, lb,
[email protected]^ic; pultost. per lb,»©10c; Swiss, No.
1, lb, 13&@14c, block Swiss, No. 1, 1b,.14c;
block Swiss, No. 2, K>, 9©loc. v
LIVE POULTRY—Turkeys, hens, fat, per
lb, 9c; r young toms; 7&©Be; chickens, hens,
per"lb,"- 9%c; young ;, roosters, BV»@9c; old
roosters, sc; broilers, I l* to 2 lbs,,,per doz,
$04.25; peepers, per." doz, [email protected]; „ ducks,
.white, 7c;' colored, lie; geese, sc. -r
DRESSED MEATS—VeaI, fancy, 100 to 125
lbs, 6%@7c; fair to good 54<g60; thin or over
weight. [email protected]; mutton, raney, country dressed,
8c; thin or overweight. s&@6c; lambs, fancy,
8c; thin or - bruised, ,Ib,- 6c; milk lambs,
fancy, 11012 c; r choice, S&9c; bogs, .according
to weight; 6©7 c.
FlSH—Pike, per lb, 7c; erappies, per lb,
[email protected]; crap'piAs, small, sc; pickerel, drawn,
s©s&e; -. pickerel, J round, sunflsh. perch,
etc.; [email protected]; buliaeads,.skinned. sirac; turtles,
lb. [email protected]: buffalo. *&;*:. ': • ■■■■■;■ '■ •■'■■■
• POTATOES—Burbu-.y^. car lots, [email protected];
Rurals, ■:' 40c; Chios',' ' •*?16c;; mixed white.
3G©3Bc; "mixed red, irJ.^u 1.- small- lots sell at
5(87c per bushel hißti.. man these" figures.
BEANS— nary, bu, $2t2»; choice, per
bu. $2; medium, hand-picked, - per bu,- $2;
brown, fair to good, $1.5002.'.-.-'-.
ONIONS—Red Globes car lots, per bu, $2;
Red Wethersneld. bu. $2; Yellow Globes, car
lots.' per bu; $2: white. Der bu. $2. ■ ■'-'■■ -
DRIED PEAS— yellow, $101.10 per
bu; medium, [email protected]$l; green, fancy, (1.2501.35;
green, medium, SK)[email protected]; marrowfat, per J bu,
?2. .. ■ . .• ■•. . ..: .-■ -„■,
APPLES—Russets, per brl, $4; Ben Davis,
brl, 14.2504.50; Baldwins, [email protected]; Winesaps,
brl, $4.50. ■' ■•" ' ■■
CHERRIES— In 10-lb boxes, [email protected]
$1.25. '- •-•.■' ■" • ' ': "• •"•' '■-:■'
. ORANGES—California navels, 80s, $2.50®
2.75; California navels, 965, $2.50; Cali
fornia navels,. 1265, [email protected]£5; California navels,
150s. $3; California navels, 1765, $3; California
seedlings, all sizes, 2.75; California tanger
ines, half box, $2; Medlterraneon sweets, $3
03 50; grape fruit, SOs to 965, $2.25. -„ ■
LEMONS—Messlnas 300s, -or 3tsOs, fancy.
(4; choice, $3.50; California fancy, as to size,
$3.50; choice. $3.25. ■ '"
STRAWBERRIES— Case, 24 qts, $2.50. <]
:, PINEAPPLES—Per ..doz, as. to size, range
BANANAS— Fancy," large bunches,' ' $2.50;
medium bunches, $202.25;. small bunches,
$1.5001.75. ■■••-,■■ •' .' .■" ;r :..
HONEY— fancy white,- 1-lb sections,
19c- choice white, [email protected]; - amber, ; " 13014 c;
golden rod, [email protected]; extracted white, [email protected];
buckwheat, , 10012 c; < extracted amber, [email protected]
VEGETABLES— doz, . [email protected];
beans wax, t 2-3-bu crate. - $202.23: y heans,
string, 2-3-bu crate," $202.25; beets, 45c; beets,
new dozen bunches, s*v?f>6oc; cabbage; south
ern ' crates," about 160 lbs, - $303.25; cabbage,
Californiafi hundredweight $2.5002.75,; carrots,
new doz bunches, 40060 c; cauliflower, doz,
$1.5001.65; celery. Florida, dozen, 90c©$J.O0;
celery California, 9Oc0$l; cucumbers; home
grown, doz, [email protected]; egg plant, , doz, $1.75®
2; lettuce, dbi, 30c; lettuce, doz, [email protected];
mint doz'. 40p; onions, gr«-en, dozen bunches,
[email protected] ■ onions, Spanish, bushel crate, $2.50;
onions, i southern, bu V box, $1.7502; • pars
ley doz : 30c; parsnips, bu, 6w; potatoes,
new : per bushel, $2; peas, green, bushel,
$2; pit plai.t, per pound. [email protected]*£c; radisnes/
long dozen bunches, * 20c; • radishes,' round,
dozen bunches,. Js©2oc; rutabagas, bushel
30c; ■- salsify {. (oyster plant), i dozen, 50c; ■ spin
ach, bushel, 50c; turnips, new, dozen bunches,
[email protected]; tomatoes, E home-grown, S five-pound
basket, ' $1.25 r tomatoes;' Florida, 'six-basket
crate, $4; watercress, dozen, 35c. ' ' j-'"
\i ■■ . Nerr York Produce. 1; • ■;:;. -"- -
NewTork, May 24— Butter-rßeceipts, 4,537
pkgs; steady;- creamery, 15018 c; factory, 11
@13c. '■' > Cheese—Receipts, 3,843 pkgs; - firm;
fancy- large, colored, B%©B%c;j fancy large,
white, B%@B fancy small;, colored, 9c;
fancy small, white, 9c. Eggs—Receipts, 10,
--290 pkgs; steady; western, ungraded, 11^0
12& c; western, selected, 13©13% c. . Sugar-
Ray, firm j' fair refining, 3%c; •■ centrifugal,
96-test. 4 9-32 c; molasses. sugar, 3&e; ; refined,
firm; crushed, 6.05 c; powdered, 5.65 c; granu
lated, - 5.65 c. i Coffee—Steady; No. 7 'Rio,
6 5-16 c.
- Chicago Produce. . . . v
Chicago, - May 24.—Butter, steady; cream
eries, [email protected]%c; dairies, [email protected]%c. .'.: Cheese,
quiet; twins, [email protected]; Young Americas, 100
10% c; - Cheddars, • 9c; V; daisies. 9%c.: • Eggs,
steady; . loss j off. cases returned, Vlo%©lo%c.
Iced poultry, quiet; chickens, [email protected]; .tur
keys, B®9c. "' ': ' "','..;':'"-../ :;■""'..*,,-■..
v"j:7: INVESTMENT GOSSIP : -..-'._,
Earnings -' Chicago : Great •. Western, - third
week of May, ■ increase, $18,700. ";" . j..,
Waldorf -' Gossip to Watson: While senti
ment ; among . stock / exchange •-. traders "■ and
broker sthis > evening . was generally bullish,
there was decided: tendency; to .discriminate
in the matter of purchases, low-priced stocks
being - favored. - Two conditions that . are; ex
pected to prevail: for ■ some time are dullness
and easy money. , It I Is not believed by ;• the
best-informed houses that important Interests
will attempt, for the i present at least, to in
augurate a"bull; movement In * the general
• list." : But -i the same , authorities :' are quite
positlve«there will be exceptional = movements
In individuali stocks, ' and ' that the ?latter,' are
a purchase on '.the reactions. Industrials are
favorably referred; to >in this connection, par
ticularly :■ Steel 5 shares. Leather.' common.; and
American> Car Foundry common. : ...;. .: „ -
New :York'stock gossip: Buying of Amer
lean--Tobacco ' was i entirely - foreign. -t The
brokers that bought this morning very sel
dom '-i come in Tobacco; also ' same thing in
Continental Tobacco. i Henry •: Marquand sold
10 000 Union Pacific' and that demoralized the
railroad market.. I don't see anything to sell
market on. Marquand is selling short. .
"5 New York, . to: C. E. r Lewis &' Co: The
bank statement Will probably be fairly good.
The banks have^ more than held their own
in \ subtreaßury X operations, notwithstanding
the gold exports. "No gold exports announced
bo far to-day. ,■< The f statement, £ also, ought
to show a- gain in cash, as last week's state
ment, did not. apparently, reflect} all the, re
celpts " from.. the interior. ■'
FIVE TO IOC HIGHER
Hog Supply To-day Moderate and
Prices Advance.
A GOOD DEMAND FOR LAMBS
The Cattle Supply Was Small, hut
.-- There 1 Wum No Change
in Price*.
South St. Paul, Minn., May 24.—Receipts
to-day were 100 cattle, 60 calves, 1,500 bogs
and 100 sheep.
The following table shows the receipts from
Jan. 1, 1901, to date, as compared with the
same period a year ago:
Year. Cattle.Calves.Hogs.Sheep.Horses.Cars.
1901 53,072 19,d50 239,691 72,984 2,117 5,614
1900 ....40,041 19,652 204,704 100,566 9,190 5,411
Dec 27,582 7,043 ....
1nc....13,031 298 34,987 '. 20
The following table shows the receipts for
the month of May to date, as compared with
the same period a year ago:
Year. Cattle.Calves.Hogs.Sheep.Horses.Cars.
1901 8,939 4,650 40,314 1,581 I,4U'> 932
1900 .... 7,921 5,749 37,080 2.7R1 1,668 958
Dec 1,099 1,180 93 26
1nc.... 1,018 .... 3,234
Receipts—
Date. Cattle. Calves. Hogs. Sheep. Cars.
May 17 „.. 261 83 942 2 21
May 18 .... 451 54 1,176 ... 32
May 20 .... 325 248 1.77J 5 38
May 21 .... 953 610 4,392 145 98
May 22 .... 541 478 2,429 250 60 |
May 23 .... 585 IGI 1,277 13 36
Estimated receipts by cars to-day of the
railroads centering at these yards: Chicago
Great Western, 5; Chicago, Milwaukee & St.
Paul, 8: Minneapolis & St. Louis, 4; Chicago,
St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omalia, 6; Great
Northern, 4; Chicago, Burlington & Qulncy,
1; total, 28.
Disposition of stock May 2C:
Firm— Cattle. Hogs. Sheep.
Swift & Co 172 1,201 9
Cudahy Bros 11l
Estate of I. Staples .... 1
Slimmer & Thomas .... 57 .... . ...
Peter Evans 6 ....
J. E. Bolton 20
Hankey Bros 15 ....
J. B. Fitzgerald 7 •
King Bros >... 3 ....
Leo Gottfried 6
J. R. King .... 4
Country buyers 409 .... ...
Other buyer* 5
Totals 696 1,317 13
CATTLE—The eupply here was very small.
Supplies east, were very small, with no
change quoted in prices. Included in the sup
ply here was one load of only fair beef steers
tbat sold at $5.
There was very little trading in stock and
feeding cattle. The fresh supply was very
small. Buyers were looking for only the good
to choice grades. Sales:
Butcher Cows and Heifers —
No. Ay. Price. II Xo. Ay. Price.
1 980 $4.00, 1 970 $3.00
1 860 3.00 I 1 y 1,040 2.75
Beef and Butcher Steers —
Xo. Ay. Price. II No. Ay. Price.
17 1,305 $5.00 ii 2 1,025 $4.20
Milkers and Springers-
Two cows and two calves for $65.
One cow and one calf for $18.
Stockers and Feeders-
No. Ay. Prke. No. Ay. Price.
14 558 ?4.00 II 1 ........ 340 $4.00
1 310 3.90 j| 3 5€6 3.85
2 295 3.75 i I 3 643 3.00
9 240 3.00 || 3 236 2.75
C 270 2.76 H 2 390 2.50
Feeding Cows and Heifers —
No. A/. Price. || No. Ay. Price.
1 260 $3.25 jj 1 180 $3.00
15 285 2.90 ! S 290 2.25
2 350 2.50 !|
Feeding Bulls-
No. Atf. Price. No. Ay. Price.
1 760 $2.85;; 2 720 $2.50
Veal Calves—
No. Ay. Price. || Xo. Ay. Price.
1 110 $5.25 |L 5 118 $5.00
.1 100 4.00 !• I 136 3.75
HOGS—To-day's visible supply was only
fairly moderate. The supply here was only
fair and prices opened 5® 10c above yesterday,
while conditions elsewhere only warranted
a strong to 5c higher market. Quality was
fair, with the bet on sale selling from $5.67Vs
to $5.75. Mixed grades sold from $5.62 1.& to
$5.65, and roughs at $5.30. Sales:
Hogs-
No. Ay. Prlce.||No. Ay. Price.
47 231 $5.75 ||59 264 5.72^
82 192 5.70 J77 232 5.70
69 208 5.70 24 - 192 5.70
59 230 s^o 160 191 5.67%
69".. 223 5.67y 2 ||6o 208 5.67tt
64 193 5.67V4! 87 195 5.67%
60 183 5.65 79 215 5.65
40 217 5.60 [50 198 5.60
Pigs and Culls—
NO. Ay. Price, | No. Ay. Price.
4 467 $5.80 | 2 285 $5.3$
2 500 5.00 j| 2 6Uo 4.75
4 107 4.50 || 3 86 4.50
SHEEP — The few received fresh .in the
yards were largely on the mixed order. A
few spring lambs sold at $6. The demand
was good at steady prices. Sales:
Sheep-
No. Ay. Price.
1 spring lamb' 60 $7.00
8 lambs 94 4.85
168 shorn yearlings 88 4.50
101 shorn ewes 75 4.00
On the market: E. Mark Live Stock Co.,
Princeton; John Hegerle, St. Bonifacius; Abe
Newash, Silver Lake; Schwartz & Co., Lester
Prairie; F. Remes, New Prague; G. Nold,
Nelson, Wis.; J. S. Green, Goodhue; W. N.
Anderson, Mazeppa; H. H. Robinson, Zum
bro Falls; H. Lauretson, Tyler; M. S. Boyle,
Lismore; G. W. Dodge, Madelia; C. W.
Chamberlain, Amboy; Taylor & Emerson, El
more; A. D. Sackett, Janesville; H. Ander
son, Madison; S. Swenson, Dawson; Louis
Anderson, Hazlerun; Nels Erickson, Hanska;
Skahaa Bros., Adams.
. . Sioux City Live Stock. .•rr;
Sioux City, .lowa, May . 24.—Receipts, ; 2,700
hogs. 300 cattle. .-«•.- .. ■--... :
,- Hogs— higher. Sales:
No. , „:•'-. Ay. Price.
............!.... 210 $5.50
72.. .....~ 233 .5.55
|69 .......;...... .........'.....;. 240 J*'s.S7%
66 .....:........ ................ 250 - 5.60
65 J.."......•.:.....•■./.....i..\.. 290 - 5.65
Cattle—Steady. Sales: : ..::'v,r:
No.- " * Ay. Price.
18 beeves M....1,250 . $4.95 ,
17 beeves 1,350 ■ 5.30
• 2 canners 920 2.75
3 cows ............. 1,020 _ 3.50
6 stock heifers ■...» :..... 550 ■'-■ 2.75
8 stock heifers 500 ... 3.50
■> bulls t ...... ..■'. 1,020 - 3.00
' 4 bulls .....950 3.50
2 bu115".... .1,000 3.75
1 6 stockers .......:...............800 '. 3.50 :
10 5t0cker5.:....................... 190 4.25
' 6 yearlings ....:.....':.......-.. 560 : 3.75
16 year1ing5......*......;...... 590 4.50
• 6 calves ;.'........................ 300 • 4.40
; 5 calves ...:. V 330 . ; 4.70.
. Sheep—ln ;.?3.50??4.90.-, '
St. Louis Live Stock.
St. . Louis. May 24.—Cattle, receipts, 700:
steady; native steers, [email protected]; stockers and
feeders, [email protected]; cows and- heifers, - [email protected];
Texans, [email protected] •,--•. •. ■•. ,:■ • - - .
'.' Hogs, receipts, 4,000; strong and 5c to 10c
higher; pigs, [email protected]; packers,' [email protected];
butchers, [email protected]%. • :.-.: ';r»;-r.ir,. .
'Sheep.-receipts, 5,300; steady; native mut
tons, ■; [email protected]; lambs, [email protected] ,
Kantai City Live Stock.
Kansas City, May 24.—Cattle—Receipts,
1,500; steady to strong; native steers, $4.70
@s.7s;'Texans, [email protected]; cows and heifers, $3.25
©5.20; stockers and feeders, [email protected]
Hogs—Receipts, 13.000; 5s higher; bulk of
sales, [email protected]; heavy, [email protected]; packers.
t0.75'g!5.90; mixed, [email protected]; yorkers, $5.35®
5.70: pigs, [email protected]
Sheep— Receipts, 4,000; steady to 5c higher;
muttons, [email protected]; lambs, [email protected],
Chicago Live Stock.
Chicago, May 24.—Cattle, receipts, 2,500:
generally steady; good to prime steers, $5.50
@tj- Door to medium, [email protected]; stockers and
feeders [email protected]; cows [email protected]; heifers, $2.90
04 90; tanners, $2.25^2.90; bulls, $3®4.40;
calves $4 [email protected]; Texas fed steers, $4.25<g5.40;
Texas'bulls, [email protected]
Hogs receipts, 22.000 to-day; to-morrow,
15 000- left over, 1,025; active, 2>/4c to 5c
higher- top, $6.95; mixed and butchers. $5.62^
©5 90-' good to choice heavy, [email protected];
rough heavy. [email protected]; light, [email protected];
bulk of sales, $5.77%@5.90.
Sheep, receipts, 5,000; strong; good to choice
wethers, [email protected]; fair to choice mixed.
$4 [email protected]: western sheeo, [email protected]«5; year
lings, [email protected]; native lambs, [email protected];
western lambs, [email protected]
Official yesterday: Receipts—Cattle, 9.396:
hogs 32,473; sheep, 15.619. Shipments—Cattle,
4,916; hogs, 6,141; sheep, 1,127.
ML DORA* & CO.,
The Oldest Firm •€
Bankers and Brokers v
IK THE SOUTHWEST.
Uav* removed from their old quartan 'I
> on Jackson Street to the ; "•■y't-.l
<|}«raMi« JLtre ;St din C«r. 4th; I
and Hta»e»ot* »t* »t. Paul. Minn. I
FRIDAY EVENING, MAY 24, 1901.
PROVISIONS
Chicago Provision*.
Chicago, May 24 —ProvUions opened higher
on light bog receipts. July pork was 2V4c im
proved at 114.75, and sold to $14.80; July lard
a shade higher at and July ribs 2&e
higher at $7.97 l/[email protected] Close: Pork, May, $14.60;
July, ?14.67'^; September, $14.62^4; lard. May,
$8.15; July, $8.12%; September, $8.12%@8.15:
ribs. May, $8,26; July, [email protected]; Septem
ber, $7.82^.
Hideit Pelta, Tallow and Wool.
:■ . .if; No. 1. 2.
Green salted heavy steer bides.;— 8% ;• 7%
Green salted heavy. cow hides .;..... 7Va -6%
Green salted light hide5;..:....V:.";.'..',?% £.6%:
Green ' salted heavy cow and steer ;
hides, branded .....:........;'.......:7 - -6 ■ •;
Green salted; bull and oxen .:.:%;..." 6% 5%
Green salted veal calf. Bto .15 lbs .. .10V4 9■:
Green salted veal Kip. 15 to 25 lbs... 8^; 7
Green salted long-haired or runner . '.
kip .:.,..%>.,,.^:.".".-.T^i'.-.:;y?,f«;..-"7% -6
Green salted deacons, each *..■.... 45 . 35 ; . ,
Green cattle hides 'and skliis,T,[email protected]^4o per
pound, less than above . Quotations.
Green salted horse or mule hides,
large ....S3.(JO 2.25
Green salted' horse or mule hides,
medium 2.50 1.75
Green salted horse or mule hides,
small 1.50 1.00
Dry flint Montana butcher hides.... [email protected]%
Dry flint Minnesota, Dakota and
Wisconsin hides 11 9
Dry flint calf skins J6 12
Dry flint kip skins 14 11
Green salted pelts, large, each [email protected]
Green salted pelts, medium, each.. .50® .70
Dry flint territorial pelts, butcher. .10 @11
Dry flint territorial pelts, murrain.. 9 (&10
Dry flint territorial shearlings 6%@ 8%
Tallow, in cakes 5 4%
Tallow, in barrels 4 1/[email protected] 3%
Grease, white 4 3Vj
Grease, dark 3^4 2^
Wool, medium, unwashed 14 @15
Wool, fine, unwashed 10 @12
Wool, broken fleeces, unwashed 11 @1«
Wool, coarse, unwashed 12%@14
Wool. fl«e, medium, unwashed [email protected]
Wool, seedy, burry, unwashed 11 <&12
Bright Wisconsin and similar grades, [email protected]
higher than above quotations.
SPECULATIVE GOSSIP
Broomhall fabled: Realizing owing to ap
proaching holidays caused an opening de
cline of %d this morning. Later in the
session prices steadied %d on covering by
shorts, due to the unfavorable reports from
Argentine. Corn opened lower in sym
pathy with decline in America yesterday, but
recovered on development of good sgpt de
mand.
Seaboard exporter wires from Philadelphia:
Big export demand for wheat. Just sold full
steamer, cargo to go abroad, and lots of
parcels, mostly Duluth wheat.
Modern Miller: Reports of damage by Hes
sian fly are coming from scattered sections
of Kansas, Oklahoma, Illinois and Indiana
and south of the Ohio river. A few localities
also complain of jnjury by chinch bugs. The
damage as a rule 4£ more or less local and
taking the whole breadth of the winter wheat
area the outlook is still very promising.
Chicago to I. G. Andrews & Co.: Argentine
shipments liberal; general crop news favor
able; bull possibilities contained in rapidly
decreasing supplies; bear factors in brilliant
crop prospects. Scalping action likely with
either side for quick turn profitable. Looks
as though corn would work lower, but we
would advise long side on further recessions.
Grand Forks message to Lewis: I drove
out in the country.from Grand Forks yester
day. The wheat looks fine and this cool
weather is just what they want. The ground
is full of moisture. If we get rains in two
or three weeks North Dakota will raise a big
crop of wheat. This is the general opinion
of the best posted grain men. We may get
complaints as some of these people have
calamity on the brain. They all carry a
Hicks almanac, which predicts hot winds in
day time and frost at night during June.
St. Louis receipts: Wheat. 29,000 bu, against
22,000 bu last year: corn, «3,fjiO, against 36,000
last year; oats, 75.000, against 50,000 last
year.
Clearances: Wheat and flour, 257,000 bu;
corn, 380.000: oats, 43.000.
Verhoeff. from Milmine: Wheat steady,
light trade, without special feature. Decline
in cables about equal to our decline. Corn
steady. Phillips continues to sell the May.
Oats easy.
Louisville, Ky., wired: Several large mill
ers tell -us they are getting reports from all
over Kentucky that fly is working damage.
Chicago grain letter: The report of takings
of 6C loads of wheat for export at yesterday's
close caused little further bullish sentiment
to exist among those who are believers that
our stocks are going to be reduced very mate
rially before the ]?t of July. There was a
good deal of evening up, selling of long wheat
and buying in of short immediately before
the close, so that this morning's news will
probably have but little effect on values. The
.northwest have been complaining of lack of
flour demand, their market evidently showing
such the past few days. Weather conditions
are favorable. Our visible supply likely to
show a very heavy decrease this week, al
though hard to judge as to what amount will
turn up on the lakes and canal.
GOOD RAIN "ROUND EUREKA.
Eureka, S. D., May 24.—Rain fell steadily
yesterday from the northeast. The ground
had become very dry. Two weeks of warm
south winds with no rain had begun to make
it look like a repetition of last year, as the
weeds had got the start of the grain on the
poorly worked fields, which are In the ma
jority. All grain put in on clean ground is
looking well.
OIL IN THE CROOK BASIN
MAXY FILINGS BY OUTSIDERS
Much Activity Along the Foot Hills
of the Black Hill* in
Wyoming.
Special to The Journal.
Hot Springs, S. D.. May 24.—Just across
the state line in Wyoming, along the foot
hills of the Black Hills, there is much
stir over the oil prospects, which are most
promising. An idea of the enormous
scale of oil operations in that new region
may be formed when it is stated, as tl^e
records in the county clerk's office of
Crook county show, that since February
last 250 filings have been made on land
in that vicinity. These lands comprise
approximately 40,000 acres in what is geo
logically termed the Crook county oil
basin. These deposits have been pros
pected on an extensive scale in the past,
but on account of inadequate transpor
tation facilities the work was suspend
ed. However, it was found that the oil
sand lies at an average depth of 300 feet
and that a good quality of lubricating oil
can be secured by means of pumping.
It is said one hole was sunk to a depth
of 2,000 feet without finding brighter
prospects for oil, though this does not
cause others to lose faith, gained through
well-informed geologists, that & subter
ranean lake of oil will some time be
tapped and an immense flow obtained.
The men now engaged in development
work are from Butte, Mont., and Spokane,
and they propose to ascertain to a cer
tainly just how much oil exists in the
basin. A large amount .of machinery has
been ordered for development work.
ABERDEEN'S \EW SOttMAL *
General Description of the Building
Which the State Will Erect.
Special to The Journal.
Aberdeen, S. D., May 24.—Plans for the
northern normal and industrial school
building in this city have been completed
as far as general design is concerned.
The building will be about 60x100 feet,
two full stories high, with basement and
commodious attic. The style will be
Romanesque. The foundation stone will
reach to the grade line. Above this there
will be six feet of dark brown pressed
brick, upon which will res ( t the cut stone
water tables. Above the' water tables
and extending to the spring of the arches
over the windows of tne second story,
light mottled pressed brick will be used,
and from this point to the top will be of
pressed brown brick. Cut stone will be
used for the trimmings. The interior fin
ish will be of southern prhe.
The main entrance will-be on the grade
line through a stone archway, and the
main corridors will be twelve feet wide.
The basement will contain rooms for
model classes No. 1 to No. 4, cloak rooms,
lavatories, etc.; the main floor rooms for
model classes No. 5 to No. 8, also offices
for the president and secretary, library
and assembly rooms; the second floor,
class rooms for students; the attic, rooms
■ ■■ s SSTABLIBKB3S 18?9 a
WOODWARD & 00.
*«>«««,.« GRAIN COMMISSION «*«"•
/ BKjLXCHKS— ChIcazo and Milwaukee. ■ Orders ft/ future delivery 'executed In ctt mark**. - :
.---•■.- i.. .-■. •--- ■s. \h iwiim ii ii i —■■ mtMf in>i i*»tfi~i ■iifuri iTk»T*iWlMirfinriirvdrfirn^MgMllftTWmflrf
Bhas. E. Lewis stocks,
&0°- Bonds,
;.! 1, 2 and ;. 3 Chamber of: \ 'Cq./
. Commerce, Minneapolis. ,; [!()tt(j|| "
GRAIN, PROVISIONS.
' New York Correspondent*.'• V
Clark, Dodge & Co. v..:,--.-;
; : Chicago " j ♦ Bartlett. PraxUr * Co.
Correspondent*, (t J. F. Harris. .-*■'.;' " . .'
.;•'-- Dally • Price Current mailed fres on ap
plication.V■■', '.-■' _'?".'-V^.---'-.v:.'-' .-' ..^--s ,
, :"; ESTABLISHED 18S*. ; T;
LT.SOWLE&SONS
■ Rrnlrtrc !■ I Grain*, Provisions,;
: -IBrokers U ) st ook» and Bond*. .
■ Chicago - and V New .York : Correspondents, i
'•'• Long Distance Telephone, 634 Main. 1 '
21 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.
for chemistry, physics, Industrial train
ing, art work, sewing and cooking.
The regents will meet here in June to .
decide upon details, and the members in
tend to complete the structure within the
appropriation. The building will center
on one of the principal residence streets
and will be "arranged for the convenient
erection of additional buildings as they
may become necessary. The grounds ara
being planted with trees and shrubbery.
VETERAN SOLDIER AND MI.NKR
Death at Seattle of Nathaniel Wai-
lace Kuown In the Hills.
Special to The Journal.
Deadwood, S. D., May 24.—News come 3
from Seattle of the death of Nathaniel
Wallace, known in the Hills as "Nat"
Wallace. Mr. Wallace was one of the
first locators of the famous Blue Lead
mines, a group of valuable copper mines.
He received $7,000 at the time the mines
were sold and also 2,000 shares in the
company. He was for a long time in the
Soldiers' home at Hot Springs. He was
60 years of age and had one son.
Make* a Fortune In Oil.
Special to The Journal. *
Fort Dodge, lowa, May 24.—Captain Terrill
of Belmond, who is the owner of 3,600 acres
of land in the new Texas oil region, is one
of the many who have struck it rich. He
recently sold 400 acres for $84,000, or $210 per
acre. On the remaining land he has just
located a large gusher' and the prospects are
that he will be a millionaire before- hp is
through.—The little daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Emil Dryer of Fenton suffered the loss of a,
finger through catching it in a lawa mower.
Armour's Graduating? Class.
Armour, S. D., May 21.—The commencement
exercises of the Armour high school were
held in Slettebak's opera-house. The class
consisted of the Misses May Wohlford, Myra
Renshaw, Mollie Duel, Emiale Schmidt and
Clark M. Tapp.
Oldest Woman Settler.
Special to The Journalr
La Crosse, Wis., May 24.—Mrs. S. A. John
son. who had the distinction of being the
oldest female settler of La Crosse, died
yesterday at the age of S6. —The La Crosse
Railway company will build several miles
of extensions this summer, thus giving the
city stret car service in all parts.—C. 11.
Horton. formeily president of the H-orton
Bridge and Steel company of this city, and
patentee of the Hortou bridge, will remove
to Vincennes, Ind., where he will organize a.
bridge construction company.
New President Chosen.
Special to The Journal.
Slbley. lowa, .May 24.—N'ate Derby, mer
chant, has been chosen president of the Os
ceola County- Pioneer Agricultural society.—
Mrs. David Whitney, a pioneer woman of
Osceola county, has been taken to the Cla
nnda state hospital for treatment.—Miss Mary
Redmond of Sanborn, sister of County Su
perintendent Redmond, has been chosen as
teacher of the firet primary grade to take the
place of Miss Bond, who goes to the pufclij
schools of Carroll, lowa.
520.000 for Hills Claim*.
Special to The Journal.
Lead, S. D., May 24.—Martin Johnson has
sold five of his mining claims adjoining this
city for $20,000, receiving $500 in cash, the •
remainder to be paid within sixty days. The
ground lies along the Black Hills'* Fort
Pierre railroad, and the purchasers will be
gin extensive development immediately.
Waseoa High School Graduate*.
Special to The Journal.
Waseea, Minn., May 24.—A class of four
teen will be graduated from the Waseea high,
school June 4. The baccalaureate address
will be given Sunday, June 2, by Dean Pattee
of the university.' The following are mem
bers of the class: Guy Babcock, Mac F.
Stewart, Denni3 Bowe, Mabel M. Olson, Her
bert Brown, Enoch Peterson, Lydia R. Grapp,
Edward C. Johnson, Lottie B. Snyder Ar
thur M. Latham, Clara A. Swenson, Irma J.
Latham and Anna V. White.
Violated Quarantine.
Special to The Journal.
Pierre, S. D., May 24.—The first arrest for
violation of the quarantine, which has been
established against Stanley county, was made
yesterday, that of T. E. Phillips, a sheep
raiser from the west side, who came In to
visit his family.—Adjutant General Conklin
has promoted Roy L. Sharpe, of Detdwood,
from captain of Troop A to major of the First
squadron, South Dakota cavalry.
Cadieux Damage Suit Continued..
Special to The Journal.
Jamestown. N. D., May 24.—The suit of
Louis Cadieux goes over to the next term
of the United States court. He was injured
while at work in the Jamestown yards, about
a year ago, and it was found necessary to
amputate a portion of his foot.—Judge Lauder
of Wahpeton will preside in New Rockford
during the term of court beginning May 2".
Judge Glaspell goes to Ellendale.—The Arte
sian hose company will attend the Dickinson
tournament, in June, and will compete for
the prizes.—The petition of Ingraham & Son,
of the Capital Hotel, has been filed in bank
ruptcy court. The schedule of liabilities
shows that over $7,000 is due creditors.
One of the Pioneer*.
Special to The Journal.
Monticello, Minn., May 24.—Mrs. Julia Ber
tram died yesterday, aged 79 years. She
was one of the oldest settlers in Wright
county, having come here in 1856, and was
one of the charter members of the Congrega
tional church. She leaves a Urge family.
Two children, George , Bertram and Mrs.
Spenee, live in Minneapolis.—L. H. Meßee,
superintendent-elect of the schools, was in
town yesterday looking over his new field.
He will move to Monticello as 'soon as his
school in Shakopee closes.—Cards are out for
the marriage of Miss Emma Sroidth. of Brain
erd, formerly of this place, and Ami Shanks,
a Monticello business man.—Rain has been
falling since Wednesday.
THOMAS A Co
Grain Commission and Stock Brokers.
Write for our dally market letter, which we
mail FREE on »pplJoatlon.
Members Minneapolis Chamber of Com
merce. Telephone— Main 1897-J.
6 CHAMBER OF COMMEftSE.
Watson & Co
Brokers in Gnain,Pi*ovi*3on»,
-■ Stocks and Bonds, :
Members H. V, Stock Exchange
Chicago Correspond -aofcwarts. J 3 ?-
Private wire Chicago iTOew York. Tel. 908 Main
36 Chamber of Oommeroo»}
.

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