OCR Interpretation


The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, May 30, 1901, Image 9

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1901-05-30/ed-1/seq-9/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 8

8
ADVERTISERS PROVE CIRCULATION.
Another Record Which Proves Conclusively the Superiority of The
Journal's Want Page
Over Its Contemporaries, With Their Sunday Papers Included.
The greatest Number of Paid Wants Shows What Paper the
Public Wants for Results.
The Following Figures Represent the Number of Paid "Want" Ads.
Carried by the Three Minneapolis Papers "for Last Week.
May 19. Mon. Tiies. Wed. Thurs. Friday. Sai. Total.
JOURNAL 2S 308 333 390 327 325 580 2261
Times... 868 160 211 210 211 205 214 2079
Tribune 79? 154 231 230 220 19? 199 2024
The Journal Ran In 6 Days More Paid Wants than the Other
Papers Did In All 7 Issues.
The Journal's Want Page has been built up because it gives results. If you
want to get the most for your money use the Journal's Want Page. By read
ing it you will find that others have what you want; by using it you will dis
cover that others want what you have.
If you can't bring your Want Ad in, telephone it—both lines, No. 9—The Journal will trust you.
& s3FB nprLy
j W. S. CONRAD |
!W. S. DISTRIBUTOR, t
SOLE DISTRIBUTOR,
MINNEAPOLIS. _ST IF>ALJ
i
¥ft. WYATTj
tSUIT 3, 4 and 5,
230 Hennepin Ay., Mp!s.
The Oldest and Most Reliable
Specialist In the Northwest
for the cure of
CHRONIC, NERVOUS AND
PRIVATE DISEASES.
I WASTE NO TIME
When a man or woman, suffering with
weakness and disease, conies to me for treat
ment. I waste no time in useless experiment
ing. My wide knowledge of Nervous, Blood,
* Skin and private diseases acquired by thirty j
years' experience, enable me to give the I
proper remedies at once to cure these dis- j
eases. I attend all patients personally and
have been located in by present offices six- i
teen years. My home treatment is safe
and sure. Call or write for question blank.
Hours. » a. m. to Bp. m. Sundays, 10 a.
m. to 12 m.
iaminaiiHiK
Have you Sore Throat. Pimples, Copper Colored
Spots, Achew, Old Sores, Ulcers in Mouth. Hair
Falling? Write COOK REMEDY CO., 254
Masonic Temple, Chicago, 111., for proofs of
cures. Capital $600,009. We solicit the most
obstinate oases. We have cured the wont case*
in 16 to 83 days. 100-page Book Free.
p\ BARBERS' SUPPLIES
H^SSa-r AND CUTLERY.
jFi ' . Shears, Razors and Clippers
ground.
±l&f R. H. HEQENER,
<S?~S&' 20? NICOLLET AVENUE.
Are You Sick? Are You Afflicted?
With a Disease Which Ben
ders You Unhappy and
Your Life Miserable.
Proper Treatment and Skill
ful Service Are at Your
Disposal.
TJi« Hmz Medical Institute, 47-49 Washing
toa Aye. 8., Minneapolis, Mi«a., is an estab
lishment long and favorably known through
• out the Northwest, and limits its spitre of
practice to the treatment of Private. Nervous,
Sexual. . Blood and Skin Diseases of Men.
Its constantly increasing patronage is due
to strict sbher«nee to its business rules, as
- enumerated below. The physician in charge
is Dr. 3. E. Farnswortb. who has been a
practicing physician for over 33 years. His
extensive practice during that long period
offered him moat excellent opportunities
to penetrate into the mysteries of
the many various weaknesses and* afflictions
of men and to ascertain proper and safe
methods of treatment lor their cure. While
Dr. Farnsworth does not claim to be able
to cure ALL weaknesses and affliction* of
men, he nevertheless prides himself with
having cured very stubborn cases given up
by other competent physicians. He is a
gentleman' 68 years of age. active and thor
oughly devoted to his profession. The Hint
Medical Institute is the largest and best
equipped medical institute of its kind
in the the city of Minneapolis for
the treatment of diseases of men.
Dr. Farnsworth personally examines and
treats all patients. The Hins Medical In
stitute does not publish the pictures of other
doctors, but only of the one who treats the
patients. The picture below -is the likeness
of Dr. Farnsworth. No substitutes, bo shift
lag of responsibility.
Business Principles: Fair dealing, faithful
and conscientious service. Nothing free, but
reasonable charges. No patent or "all-cure"
medicines dispensed. Special prescriptions
for each individual patient to suit each in
dividual condition. Only curable diseases
promised to cure. No worthless professional
or commercial references offered. Everything
• strictly corfidantial.
STUBBORN FACTS:
STATE OF MINNESOTA. Geuaty of Hen
nepin.—ss.
We, the undersigned, hereby certify that
we have visited all prominent Medical In
| stitutes located in the City of Minneapolis,
and consider the Hlnz Medical Institute the
largest and best equipped Medical Establish
ment In the City of Minneapolis.
la testimony \rher»cf we have hereunto set
lIIN7 MPniPAI INQTITIITF 47"*9 W»«hlngton *»».So.. Mtnn« ap *llt, Minn.
mrtL mtuiuAL. moi iiuib, lesm , 1.2,3,4,5.6,7,8,9,10,«,iC»,w,«.
WASHINGTON FIR RATES
COAST LIMBERMEN ACTIVE AGAIN
Extension of the Forty Cent Rate
Will Open Many Eastern Mar
kets to Them.
Tacoma, Wash., May 30.—The Pa
cific Coast Lumber Manufacturers'
association met here yesterday and
■ discussed the best means of disposing of
the present overproduction of Washington
and Oregon mills, amounting annually to
■100,000,000 feet of fir lumber.
Most of the lumber comprises common
j grades, which cannot be shipped two thou
sand miles to eastern markets because of
high freight rates. The lumbermen claim
the problem will be solved if the railroads
will extend the rate of 40 cents per hun
dred pounds from St. Paul, Minneapolis
and Alliance, Neb., to all Missouri river
points.
Such an extension will permit Puget
sound lumbermen to supply thirteen hun
dred lumber yards in lowa alone, besides
hundreds in Nebraska, Missouri and other
states. The lumbermen declare that with
the existing rate the eastern market for
common grades of fir lumber comprises
only one hundred and sixty yards in Col
orado, western Nebraska, Wyoming and
North Dakota, while southern pine reaches
markets, including St. Paul and Denver,
at a 34-cent rate.
The lumbermen first requested the pro
posed extension of the 40-cent rate last
year, but the Northern Pacific, Great
Northern and Burlington roads claimed a
40-cent rate was unprofitable. The lum
bermen have figures showing that each
train load of lumber yields the railroads
over §4,000 above operating expenses.
They will now renew their request, headed
by Senator Foster and other influential
lumbermen. The outcome affects 252 mills
in this state alone, producing daily 7,000,
--000 feet.
CABLC FLASHES
Peking—The Chinese have accepted the de-
I mand of the powers for 4 per cent interest
: on the indemnity pending payment of the
j principal.
London—At Willesden. an outlying suburb
of London, a man supposed to be suffering
from the lightest form of bubonic plague has
been discovered.
Paris—lt is reported that the Duke of
| Abrizzi and Dr. Xansen will shortly start
; on a joint polar expedition In one Italian and
j one Norwegian vessel.
London —Casualty lists issued by the war
j office Rive forty-two British killed and lul
j wounded. The majority of these casualties
j occurred from May 22 to May 25.
Dresden—Paderewski's three-act opera,
j "Manru," was produced at the Royal opera
I last night, and was received with every sign
lof popular enthusiasm. The libretto, by
Alfred Nossig, is after the composer's own
idea, and taken from Polish folk lore.
Baby's Diary.
\ A unique and handsome publication
j wherein to record the Important events
I in baby*s life, has just been issued by Bor
den's CbndenGed Milk Co., 71 Hudson st,
New York. It is not given away, but is
sent on receipt of 10 cents.
our bands and seals this 18th day of October,
188?.
WM. E. PIERRARD. Notary Public. (Seal.)
County of Hennepin. State of Minnesota.
WM. F. ROGERS, Notary Public. (Seal.)
County of Hnnneoiu, State of Minnesota.
N. O. TKORL. Notary Public, . (Seal.)
County of Hennepin, State of Minnesota.
C. P. J. GOHBEL, Notary Public. (Seal.)
County of Hennepin, State of Minnesota.
C. K. WILLKR, Notary Public, (Ssal.)
County of liennspln. State of Minnesota.
STATE OP MINNESOTA. Ccuaty of Hea
nepln.—ss.
I, C. N. DICKEY. CLERK OF THE DIS
TRICT COURT, for the County of Hennepin,
Fourth Judicial District of the State of Min
nesota, the same being a Court of Record
and having: a seal, do hereby certify that
Wm. E. Pienrard, N. O. Thori, Wm. F.
Rogers. C. F. J. Goebel and C. H. Wilier,
whoie names ape subscribed to the foregoing
certificate, are notaries public in and tor said
HfLnepia County.
IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have here
unto set my hand and affixed the Seal of:
said District ■ Court, at. the City of Minne
apolis, in said .County, this 39th day of
October, A. D. 1895.
. . . C. N. DICKEY.
, Clerk of District Court.
C ON SULT
DOCTOR FARMS WORTH. ..
'*'^*ifc-
/HE MINNEAPOLIS JOUBNAL.
FATHER CLARK THERE
STATE C. E. CONVENTION ADJOtRNS
Rev. W. C. Lyons of La Moure,
Elected President in North
Dakota.
Special to The Journal.
Grand Forks, X. D., May 30.—The state
Christian Endeavor convention closed last
night. The second day developed great
interest owing to the presence
of Dr. Clark, founder of the order.
At the morning session the world's presi
dent spoke on the work being accomplished
by Endeavorers throughout the world. In
the afternoon Dr. Clark gave an address
and in the evening spoke on "How Chris
tian Endeavor Girdles the World,"
The convention decided to appropriate
$25 per year for five years to extend the
work in foreign lands. This sum was
duplicated by several delegates present.
The following officers were elected for the
ensuing year:
President, Rev. \V. C. Lyons, LaMpure;
first vice president, Rev. D. Matheson,
Walhalla: second vice president, Miss
Mary McKean, Wahpeton; third vice pres
ident. Miss Sadie Eggleston, Graf ton; cor
responding secretary, Harry L. Simmons.
Fargo; treasurer, A. G. Burr, Bottineau;
recording secretary, Miss Edith Owen,
Ellendale; superintendent missionary de
partment. Mrs. E. G. Sellars, Mayville;
superintendent junior, Mrs. Ella Eik,
Devils Lake; district secretaries—Grand
Forks, Miss Edith Herrick, Grand Forks;
Devils Lake, Miss Hunter, Minot; Fargo,
Miss Minnie Neilson, Valley City; Wahpe
ton, Miss Williams, Hankinson; James
town. Miss Nellie Sanford, Jamestown;
Bismarck, Miss Ella Lorin, Mandan; Pem
bina, Gilbert McWhirler, Minot.
MANY GRADUATES
Opening Feature* of Commencement
Week at Mankato Normal.
Mankato. Minn., May 30.—The closing
exercises of the training department of
the normal school were held yesterday.
The annual sermon will be preached Sun
day by F. M. Rule, D. D., of St. Paul.
On Tuesday evening. June 4, the class
play, Sheridan's "The Rivals." will be giv
en. The faculty reception to the alumni
and the graduating class will be held on
Wednesday evening, June 5. The class
day exercises will be held Thursday morn
ing. The commencement exercises will
be held at 8 o'clock in normal hall; and
James K. Hosmer, Ph. D., of Minneapolis,
-will give the address. There will be
about 130 graduates.
NORTH DAKOTA
HARVEY—Fire destroyed seven buildings
in the south part of town. Andrew Schatz,
H. McGraw, Adam Leismaster, John Hezel
are the heaviest losers.
GRAND FORKS—The county authorities
are puzzled over a man who has been in the
county jail for a week. He refused to an
swer any questions or give any information
regarding himself.—He declined all food ex
cept dry bread and cold water. The insanity
board ordered him committed to the insane
asylum..
MEN
YOUNG, MIDDLE
AGED AND OLD
Who think they are afflicted with NERVOUS
DEBILITY, or Failing Vital Strength, com
monly called "Lost Manhood," Exhausting
Drains, Pimples, Lame Back, Inflammation
of the Bladder and Kidneys, Highly Colored
Urine, lmpotency, Despondency, Failing
Memory, Loss of Ambition, Mental Worry,
results of excess and overwork; Piles. Fis
tula and Hydrocele, or signs of physical,
mental or other weakness, which' absolutely
unfit them for Study, Business. Pleasure or
Marriage; who are afflicted with Weak Back,
Painful, Difficult, Too Frequent, Bloody or
Milky Urine, Irritation of the Bladder, with
Functional Diseases of the Heart, Lungs,
Liver, Stomach and Kidneys, are invttedi to
call at the HINZ MEDICAL INSTITUTE,
at once. There may not be much the matter
with them. Dr. Farnsworth will examine
you and render an honest opinion, which j
may save you a great deal ot worry and
your rtoney for unnecessary medicines be
sides.
No 0. O. D. paokages. No exorbitant
oharnes for medicines. All medlolnea
prepared by the Doctor himself and fur-.
nished to patients.
BLOOD POISON
(Syphilis), contracted or hereditary, in aX
its stages, producing lose of hair, ulcer* in
the mouth or throat, eruptions or copper
colored spots on face or body, decay
of flesh or bones, etc. Ail skin diseases,
blood impurities, scrofula, ecerma. eruptions,
etc., etc., TREATED ACCORDING TO THE
LATEST AND UNIVERSALLY APPROVED
METHODS.
RUPTURE
Dr. Farnsworth has a treatment for this
infirmity, which has proven satisfactory.
Some Ruptures are curable ao-d others are
not. Doctor Farnsworth WILL CHARGE
YOU NOTHING for treatment of any caw
of Rupture which h« promises and fails to
cure.
Electrical Appliances and Machines
Used Whenever Required.
Uf _!|a ■ FatleuU residing: at a distance
ft MIC ■ should write and describe their
troubles. All letters answered promptly and
reliable information given.
ADDRESS LETTERS: HINZ MIDICAL IN
STITUTE. MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.
OFFICE HOURS: Wetk days. 9 to 12
a. m. 1 to 5 and 7 to S:3O p. m. Sundays
acd holidays, 10 to 18:30 p. m.
IRON TRADE STATUS
It Has Drifted Into an Attitude of
Expectancy.
MAKERS ARE BEING CROWDED
Anticipation of Deliveries Asked.
Knpeclally by Farm Imple
ment Makers.
New York, May 30.—The Iron A«e says:
The iron trade has drifted into an attitude
of expectancy, which in some quarters is
verging upon uneasiness. As one of the leadiug
iron merchants in the country puts it, the
trade generally fails to realize that the rate
of buying is one thing and the rate of con
sumption is quite another. The buying usual
ly comes in pronavneed waves, there having
been such a "rush this spring. The consump
tion, which is, after all, the dominating fac
tor. Is less subject to violent fluctuation and
unfortunately cannot be so quickly and so
accurately gauged. The first evidence that
consumers have overbought appears in the
form either of protests against rapid deliv
eries or of demands to delay shipments. Ap
plying that to the present situation, the facts
are that important consuming Interests are
rather crowding the makers, often asking
for anticipation of deliveries. That, for in
stance, is true of the western farm implement
makers. Incidentally, this shows, too, that
consumers are not carrying large stocks of
raw material.
Another proof of the current heavy con
sumption is furnished by the condition of the
order books of the mills. A little Incident
It cited to throw light on the situation from
this point of view. The story has it that
one of the large works of the United States
Steel corporation was found to be oversold to
the extent of fOO.OOO tons. The tonnage was
diverted to another very large plant, which
filled that one in turn to overflowing up to
Nov. 1.
The steel rail manufacturers have accepted
orders during the current fiscal year aggre
gating 2,600,000 tons, exclusive o* seconds,
that being by far the greatest year in the
trade. It must be understood, of course, that
this total represents all the orders booked
for delivery during the year beginning Oct. 1,
1900. A large part of this tonnage has, of
course, been delivered, but it is quite clear
that the^mills will be forced to keep running
at top speed to fill their orders if, in fact,
they are at all able to do so. Under the cir
cumstances a prolonged lull in buying should
cause no uneasiness, because evidently th*
heavy consumption is going on right along.
The export trade is very dull in all branches
of the heavy iron trade.
HOW VERY SAD THIS IS?
MARYLAND DEMOCRATS SPLITTING
Rival Ambitions That Mix Xo Better
Than OH and
Water.
Urn York Sun Snmotml Sttrvloa
Baltimore, May 30.—A serious break is
threatened in the democratic state organi
zation and one which former Senator Gor
man may be unable to avert. It developed
during the meeting of the state central
committee yesterday and was precipitated
by former Governor Frank Brown, who, in
a published interview, declared that the
party could not win unless new men and
new methods were employed. He advised
the shelving of the present state leaders
and was particularly severe upon Chair
man Van Diver of the state central com
mittee.
It has been known for some time that
I. Freeman Rasin, the local leader and
•Mr. Gorman's chief lieutenant, was not
on the best terms with Governor Smith
and Chairman VanDlver, while he has been
particularly friendly to former Governor
Brown. The latter has national ambitions,
but would be willing to wait until two
years hence when Senator McComas' term
expires. Governor Smith is understood to
have similar aspirations, and is said to
be slated. Governor Brown is, therefore,
•willing to tie up with Mr. Gorman. Mr.
Rasin's rupture with the governor dates
from the time of the appointments by the
executive. The city leader claimed he was
not given proper consideration. He also
blames Mr. VanDtver for the slight. Now,
the former governor and Mr. Rasin have
joined hands against Governor Smith and
Chairman Van Diver. Mr. Rasin is still
the friend of Mr. Gorman and the break
will not affect the latter's relations with
him. but it may have a serious effect on
the election this fall. The new state cen
tral committee is to be named by the
state convention Aug. 1. It is generally
believed that Mr. Gorman will not consent
to Van Diver's displacement.
POLICE PROTECTION
Chief Deitsch of Cincinnati Denoun-
ces the Practice.
New York, May 30.—A. H. Leslie of
Pittsburg presided at the second day's
session of the Association of Police
Chiefs.
Chief Sylvester, of Washington, D. C,
urged on the association the necessity
of the passage by congress of the bill
providing for the establishment of a na
tional department of identification.
Chief Deli of Cincinnati read a long
paper on police organization and disci
pline, the prevention of crime and • the
treatment of criminals. ? The dis
cussed the question of the social evil and
favored localization and careful control.
Objection was made to the paper and after
some confusion an attempt was made to
shut it off by vote. The convention de
cided to hear it through, however, and it
was read.
Chief Deltsch, in his paper referring to
money paid for police protection, said: i
"A man who profits in this way is noth
ing lees than a common loafer. He should
be publicly disgraced and sent to the
workhouse. A poor devil who steals to
satisfy his hunger or to keep his family
from the workhouse is far superior."
PRAISE LINCOLN
Grateful Tribute From the United
"Confederate Veterans. ..
; Memphis, May 30.—General John B. Gor
don was re-elected commander-in-chief by
the United Confederate Veterans. The re
port of the historical committee, which was
adopted unanimously, contains this:
"■ We southern people once regarded Abraham
"Lincoln as one of the most despicable crea
tures that ever lived. Now while we do not
indorse the policy which he pursued, we hon
or him for his unquestioned sincerity, patriot
ism and. ability.'" On the other hand, the peo
ple of < the . north - once regarded Jefferson
Davis as the incarnation of selfishness and
disloyalty. Now, wherever disabused |of
prejudices, they regard him, using the lan
guage of one of their ablest scholars, as one
of the purest, ablest, most patriotic and most
consistent of all American statesmen.
AUSTRIAN PITCHES
Reich strath Session Resembles a
: Democratic Convention.
Vienna, May —The government's ca
nal bill has aroused bitter, opposition and
the debate in the reichsrath, continuing
until early this morning, was marked by
stormy . scenes. The Pan-Germans so
fiercely abused Dr. Lueger who supported
the bill, that the sitting had to be sus
pended, the president being quite unable to
quiet the tumult. Prince yon Schwartz
enburg in opposing the 1 bill declared that
the - construction of ■ canals provided "an
open door for foreign invasion and that
it would seriously prejudice agriculture.
Finally, the Pan-Germans walked out of
the house, Dr. •• Lueger denouncing them
as "contemptible traitors to the country."
PLANT PARTLY TAKEN
Dabuque Woodenware Company Has
. a Lous of 95.000.
„ Dubuque, lowa, May 30-.—Fire last night
partly destroyed the plant of the Dubuque
Woodenware ; company. - Loas.^aOjJJOQ," j
CONSTIPATED
OLD AGE
jMy%%&&%tj&Z£&ffij&S^z>^ Means misery on the eve of life. Nine out
, .•aS |P^^^s S^i^ of ten old people arc constipated because the
'^^liiHßfik—^ — 313 Ba^ muscles of their intestines have become
WNm/r'~^^'^' vM?Si&iit^'- weak, worn out and flabby. Constipation
KlHwi^SSsSdP^^! IP- is the curse of old "age,- causes bile and
KjS|2»iSWl ®ffr3 acid poisons to remain in the blood, making
H/Tlrfe^ I «^\iflft) \W 0 *^c s^in e^ow and wrinkled, the eyes
*^ess¥ 1 flfiP^ bleary arid causing the " bones to ache "
//// \WF /^^^^W'^K/ /V^ Keep the bowels strong, healthy and regular
•if 'w^/fil ~^^f ''MFy^ - and olc* age loses all its terrors and weak"
\U'^^V^^(C'liiv/i^ vffilll nesses* No reason why grandpa and
K^^^WL^W-^^Wf/Y grandma shouldn't have bright eyes, and
«^^^/^^H^/i^^^ mmuil/ c*ear ' ruc^y sk*n anc* *cc* *ive*y anc* active >
sSfty Pfe/1 tUwMi^- & they will only keep their bowels open and l
'3Sf j^l^^^ lfW>^ vigorous with CASCAREtS CANDY
!?^^ Vx-JPi CATHARTIC, the greatest bowel tonic
wl / / \^^' ever icard °^ Try t^l6"l to-day—a 50c
V /*^mf^§S^^ "*i/^ ij box—a whole month's treatment— find
JJlj TfS^=^rtl ' that the tortures of constipated old age are
PREVENTED BY .
V^ LIVER TONIC • ;^^ttg&o^.
all druggists!^^l'^^™ lii> <l jJH^n^l^"*s^^ SOLD IN BULK
AIIRT 1 all bowel troubles, appendicitis, bll- AllinillTPPffl X° r?^. riT lVac£§L-
Pj IP L iou»ne«, bad breath, bad blood, wind FIB 111 D A SJTt Lli m SiS Wti
Illlnr on the .tomach, bloated bowel., foul IllSMflHnl ITI 8! ™ YIV .Dillon boie. a.
UUIIk mouth, headache, indigestion, pimples, UUfilinil I &-*-&* *Xar. J-e«ier than any
pains after eating,.liver trouble, sallow complexion similar medicine la the world. This i« »i«oiate proof or
and dizziness. When your bowels don't move regu- great merit, and our best testimonial, we iare raiißa na
larly you are setting sick. Constipation kills more win sell CASCARJET9 absointeir gnar ant.ved i? T *?hln?S
: people than all other diseases together. It is a money reminded. todaj^^T^S?E,»? |£d fir y«*^Sr*
starter for the chronic ailments and lone years of r^"SS*^VSiCoSrafiS^^«^iiaASdsse
suffering that come afterwards. No matter what X«SS«BS?e«*ty bo 2 ton. lJ^mS ,^rThe dr.nUt firom
alls you* start taking OASCAKBTS to-day, for you whom yon purclSied It, and («t;oar m.ineybact for both
will never get ■well and be well all the time until boxes. Take our advice-no matter what »»'?•« ~,?" d ""
you put your bowels right. Take our advice; start day. HealthwmqnicUyfolw»Bd jowwWW«»«J«»
BUT FEW CATTLE IN
Hog Supply Small With Prices 5c
Higher.
CATTLE PRICES ARE FIRM TO-DAY
Receipt* of Sheep Are .Small and the
Prlceit Remain In
changed.
South St. Paul, Minn., May 30.—Receipts to
day, 75. cattle, 65 calves, 750 hogs, 17 sheep.
CATTLE—The receipts were very small.
Prices held firm. Sales:
Butcher Cows and Heifers— I '.:v',;r.iV.>> ;
No. Ay. Price. || No. A y. Price.
1 720 4.00 || 1 ...640 $3.85 \
1 .:...... 640 3.15 ii 1 ........ 860 2.75
1 ..;..... 820 2.25 HI ........ 790 2.25
Milkers and Springers-
One cow for $37; one cow for $31.' r.J~f';'•
'Stockers and Feeders —. >v;".v...
No. Ay. Price. II No. , Ay. Price.
2 375 $4.25 || 1 ........ 240 $4.25
1 ;....... 280 4.00 || 3 ........ 440 4.00
8 ........ 821 4.00 1112 ........ 271 3.50
10 ..287 3.50 ||15 ........ 414 3.35'
5 354 3.50 112-.. 370 3.25
2 .•...:..; 355 3.25 || 2 ........ 480 2.75
Feeding Cows and Heifers—
No. Ay. Price. [I No. Ay. Price.
7 ...;...." 315 $3.25 [I 1 :...1... 750 $3.25 :
■5 .324 3.25 || 2 ........ 385 2.60
3........ 463 2.40 II
Feeding Bulls-
No. Ay. Price. [I No. Ay. Price.
1 1,060 $3.25 I|l 900 $3.10
1 ......... 740 3.00 II 1 560 2.85
, Veal Calves—
No. Ay. Price. |( No. Ay. Price.
3 133 $5.00 111 ,•....... 110 $5.00 i
1 120 . 3.00 ||
HOGS —The supply was very small and
prices ruled 5c higher. Sales: .;: Ji
Hogs- •.- ';;>;
No. Ay. Price. 11 No. , Ay. Price.
69 .....;.. 226 $5.75 |44 .......; 298 $5.75
55 223 5.75 ||58 ... 219 5.70
71 .213 5.70 1162 ......;. 260 5.70
77 203 5.70 ||82 217 5.67^4
25 221 5.67%! |40 .;;.....'209 5.67%
68.. - 209 . ■ 6.67%1l 4 .... 307 5.50
Pigs and Culls- ,
No. ••■-■ Ay. Price. 11 No. Ay. -Price.
2 ."....'... 320 $5.30 || 2 335 $5.30
1 :...;:;. 490 5.30 || 1 ......:. 210 5.30
•SHEEP—Receipts were small; prices un
changed. Sales: " ./'> .'-
Sheep-
No. Ay. Price.
2 sheep •.. 105 $4.00
2 sheep .:........' 95 3.25
5 sheep ..' 80 2.00
1 buck .......................i..i 120 2.50
Sioux City Live, Stock.
. Sioux City, lowa, May 30.—Receipts— Hogs,
4.000; cattle, 200. Hogs—A shade higher.
Sales: >
No. Ay. Price.
62 .......>... .. 211 $5.55
66 ..235 5.57 1/™
74 ........................;..;..... 245 5.60
DC 240 5.6214
C 7 .:............ 285 5.65
Cattle— Sales:
No. Ay. Price
11 beeves •; .............. 1,050 $4.75
1C beeves 1,380 5.50
2 canners ...;..... 820 2.50
4 cows ...;..... .....l;020 4.50
6 stock heifers 540 3.25
5 stock heifers 500 3.40
2 bulls 910 2.50
2 bulls 1,020 3.00
4 bulls ...;... .'.. 900 3.40
6 stockers 840 3.50
i stockers 800 4.25
6 yearlings ...................... 550 3.75
8 yearlings ..;....... 590 4.25
6 calves 400 ... 3.50
5 calves 320 4.40
Sheep—ln demand, $3.75@5. .
Chicago Live Stock.
Chicago, May 30.—Cattle, receipts, 8,500;
generally strong to 5c higher; good, to prime
steers, - [email protected]; poor to medium, $4.40@
5.30; stockers and feeders, $3.25@6; cows,
[email protected]; heifers, [email protected]; canners, $2.25@
2.90; bulls, [email protected]; calves, [email protected]; Texas fed
Steers, ; [email protected]; Texas bulls, [email protected].
Hogs, receipts, to-day, 25,000; to-morrow,
24,000; left over, 4,125; opened 5c higher;
closed easy; top, $6.05; mixed and butchers, '■
[email protected]; good to choice heavy, $5.80®6; j
rough heavy, [email protected]; light, [email protected]%; '
bulk of sales, [email protected]. ■■■<•-: -
Sheep, receipts 13,000; strong to shade high- ■
er; good ■ to choice wethers, [email protected]; fair
to choice mixed, [email protected]; western sheep,
[email protected]: Texas sheep, . [email protected]; native
lambs, [email protected]; I western lambs, [email protected].
. Official yesterday: . Receipts—Cattle, 23,355;
hogs, 33,630; sheep, 14,872. Shipments—Cattle,
•4,132; hogs, 5,762; sheep, 2,137.
St. Louis. Live Stock.
St. Louis, May 30.—Cattle, receipts, 1,500;
steady to higher; steers, [email protected];: stockers
and feeders, ■. [email protected];, cows and heifers, $2
(g5.15; Texans, [email protected]. *'■■-
Hogs, receipts, 6,000; 6c higher; pigs, $5.
@5.80; packers,: [email protected]; butchers, $5.85i@;6.
■-> Sheep, receipts, 3,500; steady; muttons,
[email protected];»1amb5,. [email protected]. ;
. Kansas City Live Stock.
• Kansas' City, May 30.—Cattle, receipts 4,000;
TTTTrRSBAY E¥ENIM. MAY :30, 1901.
6has. E. Lewis tocis
*Co- Bolls,
1, 2 and 3 Chamber of
Commerce, Minneapolis. P ()tt (111
GRAIN, PROVISIONS.
New York Correspondents,
Clark, Dodge & Co.
Chicago i Bartlett, Frazier & Co.
Correspondents, ( J. P. Harris.
Dally Price Current mailed free on ap
plication: ; „ _.; ..; ___ ...:.
ESTABLISHED 1834. ' , .
LT.SOWLE&SINS
nrntart \m I Grains, Provisions, .
firOKers ll £ Stocks and Bonds.
Chicago ' and New York Correspondents.
Long Distance Telephone, 634 Main. :
21 CHAMBER gOF COMMERCE.
Texas steers, [email protected]: cows, [email protected];
stockers and feeders, $3.75@5.
Hogs, receipts, 15,000; s@7^c higher: bulk
of sales, [email protected]; heavy, [email protected]; mixed,
[email protected]; light, [email protected].
Sheep, receipts, 2,500; steady; muttons, $3.75
@4.90; lambs, [email protected].
PLAIN CLOTHES MEN
; Kx-Depnty Sheriffs Placed on the
! Detective Force.
Former Deputy Sheriffs Schutta,
Brundage and De Laittpe have been as
signed to duty on the detective staff at
police headquarters, the order to take ef
fect June 1. This addition of these men
will: make a formidable array of "plain
clothes" men at police headquarters.
Much speculation is rife as to whether
the appointment of the men to the "plain
clothes" staff means the dropping of for
mer sleuths or whether the "missing
ones" next month will be taken from
some other branch of the service. The
assignment of the new men to the de
tective force has caused no small amount
of uneasiness among the "fly bobs" who
fear they will either be dropped to make
room for the new appointees or be rele
gated to the ranks of patrolmen.
Mayor Ames will announce his decision
June I.T '^.
INSPECTION' REPORTS. |
Captain W. W. Price, in charge of tne an
nual inspection and muster of the state
troops, will complete his work on Saturday.
The report will be given out by Adjutant
General Llbbey Monday or Tuesday. General
Llbbey says no statement has been given out
in regard to the result of the inspections.
The reported result assigning first. place Jto
Company P was not authorized by. the depart
ment. Captain Price's report concerning the
First regiment was sent to General Libbey in
a sealed, envelop and has not yet been opened.
M. BORA* & CO.,
The Oldest Firm of
Bankers and Brokers
IX THE NORTHWEST
Hat* removed from their old quarters
on Jackson Street to the ■
&ermaaia Life Building, Car. 4th
and Minnesota St., «K. Paul, Minn.
THOMAS A Go
Graii Commission ail Stock Merc
, Write for our dally market letter, which we
mall FREE on application.
Members Minneapolis Chamber of Com
merce. Telephone—Main 18&7-J.
5 CHAMBER OF OOMMERSE.
Tfo^RD§TwooD a & ca\
\ STOCKS. BONDS.CRAIM. PROVISIONS, \
\ urupeoc /BOABD OF TRADE CHICAGO. V
\MEMBERS \cham9Ehcf commerce mpls. \
\312 GUARANTY LOAM BLCG MINNEAPOLIS. \
\6 CHAMBER CF COMMERCE HINHEAPOUS.\
WOODWARD & CO.
«««. GRAIN COMMISSION «*•*»
'f * WLINCHES— Chloura aod Milwaukee.' Orders lut future delivery executed In all markets,
American Linseed Company
■ New> York, MiV 20. 193 L
To the Stockholders of the ; „
AMERICAN LINSBEpCdriPANY:
The Board of Directors are pleased to report
to the Stockholders that after mature consider*
ation and deliberation a most desirable arrange
ment has been effected for an exchange of the
stock of the AMERICAN LINS-EED COfIPANY
for the stock of the UNION 4 LEAD AND OIL,
COMPANY.
The capital stock of the Unaori Lead and Oil
Company, Including that necessary to acquire all
the capital stock of the American Linseed Com
pany on the tarms hereinafter mentioned, to ha
Seventeen[Million Dollars ($11,000,000), said:
stock being all of one class Common Capital
Stock, one hundred and seventy thousand (170,
--000) shares, of One Hundred Dollars ($100) each.
The stock of the American Linseed Company
shall be deposited udder the agreement—
of which are on lite with the depositaries here
inafter mentioned—to be exchanged for the
■took of the Union Lead and Oil Company on
the following basis or terms:
Each share of "the Preferred Stock of
the American Unseed Company shall
receive Forty-eight Dollars (S4B) in th«
stock of the Union Lead and Oil Com
,- pany. r^VC -■ .. - - •■'■
Each share of the Common Stock of *
the American Linseed Company shall
receive Eighteen Dollars ($18) In th«
stock of th« Union Lead and Oil Com
pany. "■■•" ..;.;. ■:''.■
The Union Lead and Oil Company reserve*
the right to refuse to make such exchange un
less there is deposited for such exchange two
thirds {%) of each class of stock of the Ameri
can Linseed Company.
The holders of large amounts of the stock of
the American Linseed Company have already
signified their approval of the arrangement,
and your Board of Directors urge the prompt
acceptance thereof by the balance of the stock
holders.
Certificates of stock, duly and regularly as
signed *nd endorsed In blank, duly witnessed,
with proper venue Stamp's attached for
transfer, should be deposited with the
NEW YORK SECURITY AND TRUST COM
PANY. NO, 46 WALL STREBT. NEW
YORK CITY, or the ILLINOIS TRUST AND
SAVINGS BANK, CITY OP CHICAGO, upon
deposit of which transferable receipts will be
Issued, exchangeable for the stock of the Union
Lead and Oil Company upon the consummation
of the arrangement. -
DEPOSITS MUST BE HADE ON OR BE
FORE THE STH DAY OP JUNE, 1901, after
which date no deposits will be received exoept
In the discretion of the Board of Directors of .
the Union Lead and Oil Company and on such.
terms as they may prescribe.
By authority of the Board of Directors,
GUY Q. .MAJOR. President.
' New York, May au.MOi.
To the Stockholders of the
AJIERICAN LINSEED COrtPANY:
The undersigned stockholders of the AMERI
CAN LINSEED COHPANY, having carefully coa
sidered the proposed arrangement between the
stockholders of the American Linseed Company
and the Union Lead and Oil Company, have de
cided to exchange our stock as per said arrange
ment for the stock of the Union Lead and Oil
Company. . .. . ... -
We believe that the consummation of th«
proposed arrangement will decrease expenses
and lower the cost of manufacture, resulting la
larger net earnings applicable to dividends.
Inasmuch as the Union Lead . and Oil . Com
pany have reserved the right to refuse to make
such exchange unless two-thirds | (%) of each
class of stock of the American : Linseed \ Com
pany is deposited, we urge the prompt deposit
of your stock. Faithfully yours,
, GLY O. MAJOR.
FRANK H. RAY,
WILLIAM P. ORR,
", AUGUSTUS N. BODY.
JOHN L. SEVERANCBV
GOMER E. mQHLBY,
" GBORUB Q. rtETZQB^
JOHN W. HIRST, •. , -.
ROBERT H. ADAMS.
JOHN W. DANIELS.-'
Watson & Co
Brokers in Grain, Provisions*
Siooks and Bonds,
members H. ¥. Stock Exchange
Chicago Correspondent* -Sofewartz. Dupee&Co.
Private wire CWea«o SrSew Kerb. Tel. 908 Mala
33 Chamber of Oommm»i*o.
BSTABiISKBO 1879

xml | txt