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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, June 12, 1901, Image 13

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1901-06-12/ed-1/seq-13/

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__ -WEDNESDAY EYEOT^G, JUSTE 12, 1901,
WHEAT SOLD LOWER AGAIN, JULY TO 67!/k
The Market Remains Demoralized
and There Is Not Enough Sup-
port to Hold It.
GOOD CASH WHEAT DEMAND HERE
New York: Wai Firmer—Gen
New* .of a Continued Bear
1 - Market. .;
Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, June
■—Ajlot* lßr l°w point was scored to-day in
Wheat. July sellin* to 87* c and September
to 66*<g66%c.
When the market opened there -were signs
of returning confidence, and it looked at
start as if yesterdays break had cheeked
the decline and marked low point for the
present. There was some short covering
and enough buying support to sell July to
«S*c. Chicago was firm and a general tone
of confidence ruled for the moment. As
coon, however, as this early support was
spent, the market fell back iuto weakness,
the bears began to pound it and sharp de
cline followed.
: More rain fell ever the northwest, cover
ing- the Dakotas, Nebraska and lowa. There
."were light rains in Kentucky and Missouri.
The government weekly crop bulletin says
winter wheat ia improved in the lower Mis
souri valley.' An unusually fine crop is .be
ing harvested in California. From portions
of the Ohio valley and Michigan there are
less favorable reports. According to advices
from Odessa, there is an improvement noted
in the general condition in Russia. The first
Liverpool cables . showed that market %d
lower. Paris was very strong, coming l%(£r
l*o higher. At the close Liverpool was
[email protected]%d higher.
Primary receipts were 559,000 bu. against
649,000 bu last year; shipments, 388,000 bu, '
against 157,000 bu. Clearances, wheat and
flour, 381,000 bu; corn. 293,000 bu. Minneapo
lis received 257 cars and Duluth 30, against
269 and 215 last year. ' •
July corn opened easier at 37>>2C and heid
quiet around this figure.
The market closed weak, July at 67V4c, Sep
tember, 66«4c, Chicago. July closed 70&@70%e
-New lork was relatively strong, holding
firmer all through and losing only %c clos
ing July at 77c. '<■; ;■'
The demand for cash wheat was very ac
tive and the market was cleaned up on all
grades in a surprisingly short time. No 1
northern sold In the main at lc over July
and selections brought l%c over. There was
good demand for the grade to arrive with
sales at 69c. No. 2 northern held very firm
over a range of 66%' to 67c. No. 3 wheat
brought 63 to 66* c. Low grades were firmer :
all around. Rejected sold at [email protected] No
grade ranged from 56c for poor to 63c for the
best lots. <
THE FLOUR MARKET
Steady and Firm at the Lower
Price Riinge.
The market is firm and fairly active at the
'ower prices made yesterday. Foreign de
°l?u uU iight- Tbe holding-off tendency is
sun sbown, and buyers are inclined to wait
until the wheat market becomes more settled
before placing orders beyond immediate re
quirements. Stocks in general are light ai.d
m.llers are hopeful for the future First
patents are quoted [email protected]; second'patents
|i.60G3.70; first clears. $2.65<§2.75; second
oJ e!V\ ? 2S^.:u. Shipments were light at
THE CASH TRADE
Flax Firm aml Active—Corn Active-
Oats Firm.
FLAX—There was good demand for flax
at prices about In line with the top figures of
yesterday. The choice rejected continues
selling very close to No. 1 seed. Selections
of rejected brought $1.67. Ordinary sold at
5L65&1.68. There is not much low grade
coining. The very poor, sour no grade that
comes is taken by local crushers at prices
low. according to quality. Good no grade
sells 3t" $1.50(^1.62, but the very poor stuff I
goes at from $1.25 down. Shippers are bid
ders for No. lor choice rejected. Ten ears '
were shipped. Minneapolis received 8 cars, \
against 1 last year. Duluth received none. !
Chicago had 9 cars.
Closing prices were: Minneapolis, cash,
$1.68; September, $1.26%. Duluth' cash, $1.66;
to arrive, $1.66; September, $1.28%; October,
$1.27.
TORN—The market was active but on easy
raiige except for choice lots, which sold well
ud. No. 3 sold at [email protected]%c. No. 3 yellow is
quoted 3S%<§3S%c. No. 4 corn sold a L Jo'^c.
Receipts, 8 cars.
OATS—The general market was firm and
the average was higher on to-day's sales
than 011 yesterday's. No. 3 white is quotable
at 27%<§2Sc; No. 3 oats, 26%<Q27%c. Receipts,
15 cars; shipments, 0 cars. "~
FEED AND MEAL—The general mar
ket is quiet and easy. Coarse corn meal and
cracked corn is quoted $15.25; No. 1 feed,
$15.50; No. 2 feed. $1G; No. 3 feed, $16.50;
granulated corn meal in cotton sacks at the
rate of $1.95 per brl.
MILLSTUFFS—The market Is firmer on
flour middlings, and these two grades are
quoted 25c per ton higher. Other grades un
changed and Mm; bran in bulk is quoted at
$11. 11.75; shorts. [email protected]; flour mid
dlings.. $13: red dog in 140-pound sacks,
[email protected]; feed in 200-lb eacks. $1 per ton ad
ditional; In 100- sacks, $1.50 per ton addi
tional. - Shipments, 1,354 tons.
BARLEY—One car of No. 5 barley sold at
28c. The market remains quiet. Quotations
are unchanged. .Malting grades, [email protected]; feed
grades, [email protected] Receipts, 2 cars; shipments,
1 car.
RYE—No. 2 sold at 48c. Choice No. 2 will
bring a little better price. Receipts, 2 cars;
shipments, none. -
HAY— timothy is quoted $12.50; Min
nesota upland, $11; lowa upland, $11; choice
mixed, [email protected]; rye straw, [email protected] Receipts,
58 tons". ~ ' £iT>SK;I
Put* and Calls.
Two o'clock report:
Puts—July wheat, 66% c
Calls—July wheat, 67% c.
Curb —July wheat, 67% c.
Cash Sales Reported To-day.
No. 1 northern, 23 cars $0.69%
No. 1 northern. 1 car 68%
No. 1 northern, S cars 69%
No. 1 northern. 3 cars 69
No. 1 northern, 2.00U bu, to arrive 69
No. 1 northern, 700 bu, to arrive 69
No. 1 northern, 1,000 bu, to arrive 69% I
No. 2 northern. 4 cars 66% !
No. 2 northern, 1 car' 66% ;
No. 2 northern, 1 car 66%;
No. 2 northern. 14 cars 67% |
No. 2 northern. 5 cars 67% i
No. 2 northern, part car 67% j
No. 2 northern. 5 cars 67% -j
No. 2 northern, 10 cars 67%
No; 2 northern. 1 car 67
No. 3 wheat. 8 cars 65
No. 3 wheat. 1 car 63%!
No. 3 wheat, 5 cars 63 I
No. 3 wheat. 2 cars 65% ■
No. 3 wheat. 3 cars 66
No. 3 wheat. 1 car 66%
No. 3 wheat, part car 66
Rejected wheat, 1 car 60
Reiected wheat. 2 cars 58
JCo grade wheat, 2 cars 63
Ko grade wheat, 3 cars 61
No grade wheut, 1 car 65
No grade wheat, 1 car 64
>Co grade wheat, 1 car 57
Js'o grade wheat, 2 cars 56
Jso grade wheat, 3 cars 60
No grade wheat, 1 car 62
No-grade wheat, 1 car 59
No. 3 coin. 1 car 38%
No. 3 corn, 2 cars .38%
No. 4 corn, 1 car .38%
No. 4 corn, 1 car 36%
No. 2 white oats, 1 car 28%
No. 3 white oats. 1 car t .28
Ko. 3 white oats. 1 car 27%
S To. 3 oats. 1 car 27%
Ko. 5 barley. 1 car 38
Reiected flax. 1 car 1.67
Rejected flax. 2 cars 1.66
Rejected flax, part car 1.66
State Gram Inspection.
June 11. ,
Wheat Inspected In—Cars—Great Northern
-No 1 northern, 7; No. 2 northern, 4s; No.
», 87 ' rejected, 6; no grade, 11
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul—No. 1
lorthern, 8; No. 2 northern, 1?; No. i, 15;
rejected, 5; no grade 4.
Minneapolis & St. Louis—No. 1 northern,
12; No. 2 northern. 5; No. 3, 3; no grade, 2.
Soo Line —No. 2 northern, 1: No. 3, 6.
Northern Pacific —No. 2 northern, 2; No. 3.
t; no grade, S.
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha-
No. 1 northern, 11; No. 2 northern, 13; No. 3,
7; no grade, 1.
Chicago Great Western—No. 1 northern, 1.
Total—No. 1 northern. 59; No. 2 northern,
77; No. 3, 58; rejected, 11; no grade, 21.
Other- Grains—Cars—No. 3 winter wheat,
j>; No. 3-yellow corn, 1; No. 3 corn, Jl; No.
4 corn, 1; No. 3 white oats, 1; No. 3 oats, 2;
ma «rade oats. 1; 2 rye, 2; No. 3 rye,
■ RANGE OF WHEAT PRICE IN MINNEAPOLIS I -"-M.
Open. ■•High; Low. To-day. • Yesterday. Year Ago. <«
June..? '...:.-.„;: * .......... $:;:....;... $.67% ' S .67% ..V .$..72 ;v
July.. .68* ;.. .68%, .67* \ : .67% " , .67%@67% * .71% '*
Sept.. ■ .67 ..... .67* ■.66%<3>66. %, .66% ,•; .68%<g>68% r .72*
On Track-—No. 1 hard, 4 70c; No. 1 northern. 68c; No. 2 northern, 65*<g>66c*
. THE DAY'S RESULT
July Wheat. Minneapolis. Chicago. Duluth. St. Louis. New York.
Close to-day.......$ .67* >. $ 70*@70% 1 % .70 % .66% "' ? .77 '
Close yesterday 67%@67% .71* ■ " .70% ' .67* ' .77*
1; No. 4 barley, 2; No. 5 barley, 2; rejected
flax, 12; no. grade flax, 5. - -V
Cars Inspected Out—No. 1 northern wheat,
52; No. 2 northern wheat. 31; No. 3 wheat,
43; rejected wheat, 5; no grade wheat, 14;
No. 2 winter wheat. 6; No. 3 oats, 2;-No. 5
barley, 1. „
Receipt* and Shipment*.
• ••. —„- June 11. •■•,*--V.;'>;,:>/
Received—Wheat, 257 cars, 208,170 bu;' corn,
6,880 bu; oats, 18,000 bu; barley, 1,200 bu; rye,
1.080 bu; flax. 6.540 bu; flour, 150- brls; hay,
5S tons; fruit, 138,063 lbs; merchandise, 1,975,
--572 lbs; lumber, 12 .curs; barrel stock, 2 cars;
machinery, 292.150 lbs; coal, 291 tons; wood,
26 cords; brick, 89,000; lime, 5 cars; cement,
340 brls; ties, 2! cars; stone and Garble, 2
cars: live stock, 2 cars; salt, 1 car; logs, 45
cars; dressed meats, 94,000 lbs; butter, 20,000
lbs; railroad materials, 3 curs; sundries, 33
cars; car lots, 606.. .
Shipped—Wheat," 25 cars, 21,250 bu; corn,
920 bu; oats, 6,850 bu; barley, 630 bu; flax,
7,300 bu; flour, 36,020 brla; millstuffs, 1,354
tons; fuel oil, 24,000 gals; merchandise, 2,294,
--948 lbs; lumber. 89 cars; posts and piling,
1 car; barrel stock; 1 car; machinery, 217,300
lbs; brick, 12,000; . lime, 1 car; cement, 125
brls; household "goods, 69,0000 lbs; railroad
iron, 2 cars; ties, 28 cars; stouc and marble,
4 cars; live stock. 1 car; llnsesd oil 155,920
brls; oil cake. 356,000 lbs; wool, 19.860 lbs;
railroad materials, 5. cars; sundries, 26 cars;
fruit, b0,352 lbs; car lots. 742. ■
Wheat' Movement.
The following are the receipts and ship
ments at the principal primary wheat mar
kets:
Receipts, Shipments,
bu. . bu.
New York 25,650 A 5C.306
Philadelphia .51,604 v 16,800
Baltimore ..'..'.............' 58,247 None
Toledo 20,162 2,659
Detroit ....V......;......... 2,000 • 3,697
St. Louis'...... 21,000 7,000
Boston 4,650 None
Chicago 163,975 7,300
Milwaukee 24,000 3,180
Duluth ;.. 84,039 288,057
Minneapolis 208,170 21,250
Kansas City 38,000 50,400
Wheat Movement by Roads.
?«Vv£'£iv**'i ; . June 11. ■ .• ''.--:'■ -.>,*':;
• Received— Milwaukee, 69; Omaha, 31;
St. Louis. 36; Great Northern, 104; North
ern Pacific, 11; Burlington, 3; Soo, 3.
Shipped—Cars—Milwaukee, 7; Omaha.. 4;
Great Northern, .4;. Northern Pacific, 2; Great
Western, 3; Burlington, 5. ■ V .'•:■■-*,•;
RANGE OF JULY WHEAT
g3o mo wan nan 11/
! ■ v . ■ -, . - ;». .;
i^/r —^——
a U~—. _ ■ :—•
H 4 ■—
jf —ITT?
n~~r —I I I
OTHER GRAIN MARKETS
CHICAGO GRAIN
Wheat Open* Higher, but Slide*
Back Rapidly.
Chicago, June 12.—Steady Liverpool cables
helped wheat at the opening to-day. The
demand was quickly ; satisfied, however, and
I the market rapidly declined. July opened %
@%c higher at ' 71%(<?71%c. declined to 71c,
I rallied to 71% c and then fell to 70,4 c this
j price a disposition to take profits was mani
i fest on the part of the shorts and July
! rallied to 70%@70?ic. Minneapolis and Duluth
j reported 287 cars, against 420 last week and
I 484 a year ago. Local receipts were 72 cars,
, none of contract grade.
July touched 70-/ 4 @70%c, reacted to 70% c,
and closed weak, %@%c lower, at 70%@70%c.
Close: June, 70c; July, 70%@70%e; Septem
ber, [email protected]%c; cash No. 2 'red, 71%@72%c; No.
3 red, [email protected]; No. 2 hard winter 70c; No. 3
hard winter, 69%@70c; No. 1 northern spring,
17%@72%c; No. 2 northern 71%',&72%c;
No. 3 spring, [email protected]%c.
Corn was dull but steady. July opened a
: shade lower on favorable weather at 42%@
42% c, advanced to [email protected]»ic, ard reacted to
the opening figure. Local receipts were 219 I
cars, 3 of contract grade. . . i
July weakened finally on lack of demand to I
1 42Vic. The close was easy, y>c lower, at 42% c
Close: June, 41% c; July 42% c; September
| 43%@43%c; cash No. 2, 41%£f42e; No. 3 41c.
Oats were moderately active and fairly '
! steady. July opened %c higher at 27% c and
j declined to 27%@27%c. Local receipts were
108 cars.
i Close: Jnue, 26% c; July, 27% c; September,
20% c; cash No. 2, [email protected]: No 3, 27%(528c.
The following was the range of prices:
| Wheat- July. Sept
Impelling • 71%@% 68%@C9
! Highest 71% 69%
j Lowest , 70%, 65%@%
Close—. . '- ■■■•,■■■"•
To-day 70%@% [email protected]%
Yesterday ................. 71% • 68%@->4
Year ago J 73%@%
Corn—
Opening 42%@% 43%@%
Highest ;..:... 43% 44.
Lowest 42% 43%
Close— . ,
To-day 42% 43%@%
Yesterday 42% 43%
Year ago 38% .. ..
: Oats— '- ,-V '-'. ■ '■"- ■ . ------
Opening 27% . 26%
Highest 27% 26%@%
Close— ...r 4.
Lowest ; ............... 27%@% ; 25%
To-day .. 27% 25%..
Yesterday V 27% 26%
Year ago .........^....... 22% •.....";.;
Duluth Grain.
■-".'•■- ■ . » i" ■ i. •- -± -■ '■ i~ ■
Duluth, Minn., June 12.—Wheat opened %c
up but the tendency was sharply downward '
and a full cent decline ■ set in, which was >
| partly recovered. July opened at 71c 'sold !
I down to 69c; and later back to 70c. - It was !
i very . weak. September sold first at ! 6S%c,
I which was Vie up. r It sold oft to 67;ic and '
• back" to 68% c. July, lost a cent as compared |
i with September for the:. session. July .. closed I
I at 70c, sales, and September at «S^c; one:%c |
i off the other %c higher than yesterday. "Flax
1 was a cent higher. September selling at $1.28,
October at $1.26. Cash sales included '38 cars |
No. 1 and' No. 2 northern: Receipts, wheat, j
30 cars; corn, 10; rye, 10; total, 41 cars; I
■ shipments, wheat, ./. 288,857 bu ; ;. corn, 49.291. j
I Close: Oats, 27% c: rye, ar-rive, 4S%c; Septem- ■
j ber, 48c; flax, cash, $1.66; September, $1.28%• i
! September, northwest, $1.29%"; October $1.29
--' No. I.hard, .cash, 72% c; September, 69% c:
No. 1. cash, C<9%c: September, CB%e; July
70c; No. 2 northern, G4%c: No. 3, Co?4c.
Liverpool Grain. ■,•■/..
Liverpool, June Close: Wheat, steady
unchanged to %d higher; spot, 5s ll%d!&-63 '
%d; July, 5s 9%d; September, 5s 9%d. Corn, i
steady, unchanged to %d lower; July, 3s !
10% d; September, 3s ll^id.
Milwaukee Grain.
Milwaukee,' June 12.— Flour— lower
I Wheat—Steadier; No. 1 northern, [email protected]%c;
No. 2 northern, [email protected]%c; July, [email protected]%c. Rye
1— Steady; No. i, 51%@52e. Barley— Steady
No. 2, 56.:; sample, [email protected] Oats—Quiet; No.
2, 25%@29c. ;--:-tj"
, St. Louis Grain.
St. Louis, June 12.—Close: Wheat—Lower;
No. 2 red, cash, t>S%c; July, 66% c; September,
66%e; No. 2. hard, [email protected]%c. * Corn—Lower;
No. 2, cash, 40% c; July, 40%@40%c; Septem- 1
ber, 41% c. - Lower; No. 2, cash, 28% c;
July, 27% c; September, • 25% c; No. 2 white,
I Pl%c. Lead—Strong; $4.32%@4.35. ' Spelter—
Firm; $3.82%. .
Chicago Seed and Coarse Grain. .
Chicago, June 12.—Flax, "cash northwest,
1 $1.70; No. 1, $1.70; September, $1.251 October,
: $1.26. Rye, July, O»S%c; , September, 48% c. '
Barley, cash. [email protected] Timothy, . September,
$3.70. Clover, cash, $9.50.
''--.- Kansas City Grain.
Kansas City, June 12.—Close— July,
64% c; .September, 63% c; cash No. 2 hard,
67%@68c; No. .2 . red,, [email protected]%c.. Corn July,
39% c; September, 40% c; cash No. 2 mixed,
39%@40%c; No. 2 white,' 41c. Oats, No. 2
white, 29% c. v-- ' ">.• .. ■ S
■ •"'" ' : ■ '" - ,'
i Clearances: Wheat ..and flour, 381,000 bu;
corn, 293,000; oats, 62.000.
TfiE MINNEAPOLIS JOUKNAE,
GENERAL PRODUCE
The MlnneuMollN Market.
Wednesday, June 12.
The butter market is steady at unchanged
quotations. Demand is not quite so sharp as
during the past few days and there is a
slightly easier tendency on anything not
strictly first class.
Eggs are easy at lO&e for candled stock and
10c case count. • . .
Veal is quoted lower this morning fancy at
[email protected]
BUTTER—Extra creameries, per lb, 18c;
firsts, per lb, 16c, attends, per lb, [email protected]^ic;
Imitations, firsts, per lb, 14c; seconds, per
lb, 12c; dairies, extras 16c; firsts, 12V4®
■13c; seconds, lb, lie; packing stock, fresh,
12Vfec; stale packing stock,, per lb, 6©7 c;
grease, lb. [email protected]; tested butter fat, in separa
tor crtam. I.e.
EGGS—Strictly fresh, candled stock, doz,
lOVsc; case count, .10c; dirty, fresa, 6%@7c;
checks, [email protected]^£c.
CHEESE—Twins or flats, fancy, new, 10c;
twins or flats, choice, new, lb, B#9c; twins
! or flats, fair to good, lb, [email protected]; brick No. 1,
lb, 12c; brick. No. 2 per lb, lOf&llc; brick.
No. 3, lb, bitlc; limburger No." 1, per lb,
13Vic; limburger, No. 2, B^®9Vic; primost,
I No. 1, per lb, 8c; No. 2, per lb 6c; Young
America, fane;-, lb, 11 Vie; choice per lb,
--10c; pultost, per lb, 9®loc; Swiss No. 1,
[email protected]; block Swiss, No. 1, 14c- block
Swiss, No. 2, lb, [email protected]
LIVE POULTRY—Turkeys, mixed coops,
7c; chickens, hens, [email protected]>c; yearlings, [email protected];
old roosters, per lb, sc; broilers, per lb, 20c:
] ducks, white, 7c; colored, tic; geese 5c
DRESSED MEATS—VeaI, tancy, 100 to 125
! lbs, [email protected]; fair to good, lb, 8c; . thin or
I overweight, [email protected]^c; mutton, fancy, country
! dressed, 7c; thin or overweight, [email protected]; lambs,
| fancy, 8c; thin or bruised, lb, 6c; milk lambs,
j fancy, 10V£@llc; choice, B(§9c; hogs accord-
I ing to weight, 5%@6>4c.
FlSH—Pike, per lb, [email protected]; crappiea, per lb,
|3Vi(g4c; pickerel, drawn, [email protected]^c; pickerel,
! round, sc; sunflsh, perch, etc., [email protected]; bull
i heads, skinned, [email protected]; turtles, lb. 2®3c
} buffalo, 2<&3c.
POTATOES—Burbanks, car lots bu 75c-
Rurals, 70c; Ohios, [email protected]; mixed white)
[email protected]; mixed red, 60c; small lots sell at
5c to 10c per bu higher than these figures
BEANS—Fancy navy, bu, $2.25; choice, per
bu, $2; medium, hand-picked, per bu $2
brown, fair to good, [email protected]
DRIED PEAS—Fancy yellow, [email protected] per
bu; medium, [email protected]$l; green, fancy, [email protected]
--green, medium, 90c<g$l;- marrowfat, per bu,
APRICOTS—Four-basket crates, [email protected] 50
CHERRIES—24-qt cage, [email protected]:50; Califor
nia cherries, per 10-lb box, $1.75.
PEACHES—Missouri stock, per six-basket
crate. [email protected]; Alexanders, per box, $1.25
PLUMS—Clyman, 4-basket crate, [email protected]
ORANGES—California navels, 80s [email protected]
California navels. 965, $3<g)3.25; California'
navels. 1265, $3.25; California navels 150s
$3®3.25; California navels, 1765, [email protected]; Cali
fornia seedlings, all sizes, [email protected]; Califor
nie tangerines, half box, $2; Mediterranean
sweets, $3.50: St. Michaels, $3; grace fruit
80s to 965. $2.25.
LEMONS—Messicas. 300s or 3605, fancy, $4
choice, $3.50; California fancy,, as to size'
$3.50: choice. $3.25. '
PINEAPPLES—Per doz. as to si*e, $1.75®2
STRAWBERRIES-Case, '24 qts SI 7509 •
per 16-qt case, [email protected] ' '
GOOSEBERRIES—Per 24-qt case, $1.76
BANANAS—Fancy, large buncD.es. $2 50
--medium bunches, • [email protected]; small bunches
$1.50<51.75. '
HONEY—New, fancy, white, 1-lb sections,
19c; choice white, [email protected]; amber, [email protected];
golden rod, [email protected]; extracted white' 10®lie'
buckwheat. [email protected]; extracted amber [email protected] '
VEGETABLES-Asparagus, doz. [email protected];
beans, wax, bu crate, [email protected]; beans, string
2-3-bu crate, [email protected]; beets, bu, 45c; beets
new, doz bunched, [email protected]; cabbage, south
ern, crates, about 150 lbs, [email protected]; cabbage.
California, per hundredweight, $1.75; car
rots, new, doz bunches, 40c; cauliflower,
doz, $1; celery, Florida, per doz, [email protected]$l'
celery, California, 90c«a$l; cucumbers home
grown, doz, [email protected]; egg plant, doz, $1.7502
--lettuce, per doz, 20c; lettuce, head, per aoz'
40c; mint, per doz, 40c; onions, doz bunches,'
[email protected]; onions, Spanish, bu crate, [email protected] 25'•
onions, southern, per bu box, $] ■ Ber
muda onions, crate, [email protected]; parsley, doz,
30c; parsnips, bu, 50c: . potatoes, new, bu
[email protected]; peas, green, bu, $1.50; pie plant lb'
I®lVsc; radishes, long, doz* Dunehes 20c
radishes, round, doz bunches, [email protected]20c- ruta
bagas, bu, 30c; salsify (oyster plant) per
doz, 3oc; spinach, bu, 35c; turnips, new doz
bunches,. [email protected]; tomatoes, Illinois stock
6-basket crates, $3.25; Florida stock $3®4
--watercress, per doz, 35c. '
, New York Produce.
New York, June 12.—Butter, receipts 12 -
492 pkgs; steady; creamery, lo^igy.c;' fac
tory, [email protected]%c. Cheese, receipts, 5,709 pkgs
irregular; fancy large colored, 8%©8% c:
fancy laree white, B%c; fancy small colored'
9c; fancy small white, 9c. Eggs, receipts,
17,854 pkgs; dull and weak; western candled
and selected, 12%@13c; western urgiaded 10
@12c. Sugar, raw, steady; fair refining 3%c
--centrifugal, 96 test, 4c; molasses sugar' 3%c:
refined, steady; crushed, 6.05 - powdered'
5.65 c; granulated, 5 55c. Coffee, quiet ■ No 7
Rio, 6c.
Chicago Produce.
Chicago, June 12.—Butter—Steady; cream
eries. [email protected]%c; dairies, [email protected]%c. Cheese-
Steady; twins, [email protected]%c; Young Americas lOVaC-
Cheddars, B%<&9c; daisies, b%@loc. Eggs-
Weak: loss off, cases returned, lo^c Iced
Poultry—Chickens, [email protected]; turkeys, [email protected]
Hide, Pelts, Tallow and Wool.
Andersch Bros., Minneapolis, say The hide
market is very active and the weakness of
six to ten days ago has given way to better
conditions. All classes of hides and skins are
salable at quotations, excepting light branded
nicies and long-haired kip skins. Present
receipts show a marked improvement in
quality and the short-haired season has
started. Dry hides are scarce and are want
ed. G. S. horse hides are in demand at firm
prices.
Receipts of domestic pelta are light, but in
place thereof short shorn shearlings.are arriv
ing. It is yet too early to expect much ship
ping activity in dry pelts /lorn territorial
wool growers. Owing to the dullness in wool
ana to the fact that the fleece woool season
is at its height, pullers are showing little in
terest at this time.
The tallow market rules quiet and a shade
lower. Continued declines abroad have
largely counteracted the good effect of the
previous export trade, and it is now reported
that foreign consumers are being supplied
largely with Australian tallow at lower prices.
Local receipts are light, but there appears to
be a fair supply in the hands of local buyers.
Wool receipts are heavy, although the late
rains have retarded shearing somewhat. As
compared with last year, quality shows <x
slight improvement. Prices are low and the
general outlook for the future depends upon
the ability of manufacturers to obtain orders
for finished goods and thus create new de
mand tor raw material. It would seem to us
that woois are alVpost low enough, but there
is considerable South- American wool being
sold at low prices, and our American quarter
and coarse wools suffer in consequence.
X0.1.N0.2.
Green salted heavy steer hides ay s ~t^
Green salted heavy cow hides 7Vi t>Vi
Green salted light hides 7>4 6%
Green salted heavy cow and steer
hides, branded 7 6
Green salted bull and oxen 6% 5%
Green salted veal calf. Bto 15 lbs. ..10% 9
Green salted veal kip, 15 to 25 1b5.... 8^ 7
Green salted long-haired or runner
kiD 7% 6
Green salted deacons, each 45 35
Green cattle hides and skins, ltiil^ per
oound less than above quotations.
Green salted horse or mule hides,
large $3.00 2.25
Green salted horse or mule hides,
medium 2.50 1.75
Green salted horse or mule hides,
small 1.50 1.00
Dry flint Montana butcher hides. .12%@14V6
Dry flint Minnesota, Dakota uiid
Wisconsin hides 11 9
Dry Hint calf skins 16 12
Dry flint kip skins 14 11
Green salted pelts, large, each [email protected]
Green salted pelts, medium, each .. .suw .70
Green salted pelts, small, each 20® 43
Dry flint territorial pelts, butcher.. 10 (&10V4
Dry flint territorial pelts, murrain.. [email protected] 91^
Dry flint territorial shearlings 6 @ 8 "
Tallow, in cakes 5
Tallow, in barrels 4% 3s/
Grease, white 4 v ?>
Grease, dark 314
Wool, medium, unwashed 14 <f?n\±
Wool, fine medium, unwashed 12 tali '
Wool, coarse, unwashed Ij; .^[^
Wool, fine, unwashed 9 jgu
Wool, broken fleeces, unwashed .11 @12>U|
Wool, seedy, burry, unwashed 10 @12
Bright Wisconsin and s.nnlar grades, i&2c
higher than above quotations. ,
STOCKS UP A BIT
Influenced by Rumors of Peace Pre
vailing in London.
BUSINESS CONTRACTED.HOWEVER
St. Paul and Amalgamated Copper
Among the Stock* That t
. • Advance. ' , ' l
. New York, June 12.—Rumors of peace In
South Africa again caused higher prices in
London to-day aud was an influence here at
the opening. Missouri Pacific and Pennsyl
vania were features, 5,000 shares of the for
mer selling at 122 ft to 123, compared with
121 last night and 3,000 shares of the latter
selling at 151% to 151%, compared with 151
last night. Amalgamated Copper, St. Paul,
Grande stocks rose IV4 for the common and
Denver & Rio Grande preferred were up
about a point.
Spasmodic advances In various parts of the
list did not enliven the general trading,
business contracting greatly. Missouri fell
to 122, but rallied to 123 ft. Denver & Rio
Grande stocks rose IV4 for the commong and
1% for the preferred. Sugar broke- to %
under yesterday's close, got back to above
parity and took the down grade again. Ameri
can car common rose 1%, preferred 1%, Rock
Island 2ft, Pacific Coast second preferred 2,
Colorado Fuel lft and Baltimore a point.
On the other hand Tennessee Coal and the
Linseed issues were [email protected] points off. Penn
sylvania continue! upward, touching a level
lft above last night en the reported acquisi
tion of the Pennsylvania Steel company, and
Erie common and Reading first preferred
made good gains. Lead advanced IK and
the preferred 4, while Amalgamated Copper
lost about 2. At 11 o'clock speculation was
feverish and prices were moving irregularly.
Pennsylvania assumed the leadership of
the market and on the absorption of thou
sands of shares the stock worked up to 153 ft.
The buoyancy of this property was without
a beneficial effect on the other active stocks,
moderate offerings causing tharp relapses in
Alchison, Louisville, Missouri Pacific, Union
Pacific, Southern Pacific and United States
Steel. There were substantial gains in borne
minor railroads and specialties and the gen
eral market felt mere acutely than of late
the absence of inside support. The traction
stocks moved up a point or more before noon
and American Cotton Oil suddenly jumped
2%, Denver & Rio Grande preferred gained
2ft and Colorado Fuel 3ft altogether.
Colorado Fuel touched 115 at the last hour
I and fell back to 106%. The drop of prices
elsewhere - was seemingly from inanition, as
there was no urgent pressure to sell and
business was in a semistagnant condition.
American Snuff fell 3 below the last sale and
there were sharp gains in some obscure In
dustrial stocks. Minneapolis '&; St. Louis
dropped 2, due to a disappointment over the
unchanged dividend. The closing was In
tensely dull and heavy. - v '
Bonds were dulKsnd irregular.
Stock quotations reported for The Journal
by Watson & Co., Chamber of Commerce,
Minneapolis: ; • -*' ...'■■ t
Closing prices are bid. ■ ■
I .-. .■■■■ ■ ■' . ' | | —Close—
Salesf Stocks— | Hi- | Lo- I Bid. 1 Bid.
j', . '-:- j est. | est. |Ju.l2|Ju. 11
8,100 Am. Cot. Oil ... 30% 27% 29% 27%"
100 do pr 89% 89% '
17,200 Am. Car........ 32% 31% 32% 30% i
2,700 do pr 86% 85% 86% 85 I
Am. Ice .; ' 35% 35%
'' do pr 71% 71% 71% 72
700 Am. : Linseed ..25 23 22% 23
do- pr 53 52 52 62%
26,000 Am. Sugar .... 141% 140 140% 140% I
do pr \ 121 | 120%
Am. Smelting .. 58% 57 58% 57% I
do pr ....... 100% | 100 .99% 99%:
10,600! Am. Tobacco 140%! 139% 139% 140%
| do pr 1 ...... 147 ......
8,200 Amal. Cop 123 121% 121% 121%
600|Anacon. Cop ... 49 48% 48% 48% i
12,200 At., Top. & S.F. 87% 86 86% 86% I
i 2,200 <do pr 103% 102% 102% 102%
2,400 Bait. & 0hi0... 109% 109 109% 108
' 400 do pr ... 96% 96 96 96
19,300 Brook: Rap. Tr. :* 82 79% 81% 79%
Brook. Un. Gas 215 215
Can. Southern . ... 68% 68
700 Canadian Pac .. 104% 104% 104 105
600 Ches. . & Ohio.. 49% >■■ 49% 49% 49%
100 Chi. & Alton ...""46% 46 46% 46%
Ido pr_.. 82 81% 81% 81
„.|^!-. Bur. & Q. 193%; 196% 196% 196%
2,oOO|Chi. Gr. West. 24 I 23% 23% 23%
I do pr A .... ......... 1... 82% 82
I _„d. °p r, Bo - ---! 50 49% 50% 49
Chi., Ind. & L. . 39% 38% 38% 38%
I do pr ....... "... 73 73
• aw.CC.C. & St.L I 85% 84%
i do pr 115 115
Chi. Term ..... .23 22% 22% 22%
. do pr ........ ....... 43% 43%
C01.,H. C. & I. 24% 23% 24% .. ....
J Col. ■ Fuel &I. 115 99% 107% 99%
i do pr ...:....,.....:...•. 135 133"
Col.: Southern .. 15% 15% 15% 15%
do ; Ist pr ... 51 51%
| do 2d pr .... 23% 23 22% 23 T
;Consol. Gae '■•- 222 I 219% 222 219%
9,000: Con. Tobacco .: 69% 68% | 68% 69%
8001 do pr ....... 123 122 %i 122 123%
| 100; Del. & Hudson I 167 167 "
■- - jiDel., L. & W. ............ 235 233
! 2,4Oo|Den. & Rio Gr. 52% 52 62% 51%
20,500; do :pr .. j 101% . 100 101 99%
IDes M. & Ft. D. 40 39% 39 38V.
}Dv,, S. S. & At| 11%' 11% 11%....."
I do pr ... 19% ......
13,300 Erie..........,".. 43% 43% 43% 43%
600; do Ist pr ... 70% 70% 70 70%
| do 2d pr 55% 56
JEv. & Tern? H. 57 57
| do pr | 88-88
--700: Gen. Electric .. 248% 248 247 r 245
lOO.Glucose ....-..■.. ...... j .....: I 57 '57
! do pr .! I | 100 100
= [Great Nor. pr..| 186 [ 185% | 186% | 185%
Hocking Valley. !..„ | 53% 53/-.
do pr .......].. 77% 76%
I lowa Central ..| 36%| 35% 35% 35%
I do. Pr ...j 66 j 65. 65 65
1001 Inter. Paper ..|......|......j 22 22
I do pr | ......| 78 78%
IK. C. & South.l ......|...... • 21 21
. I do pr | 43% 44%
I Lake Shore ....1 220
ILake E. ; & W..1 58 59
I do pr 1 |...... 120 120
I Long Island ...| ...j...... 70 70
600] Louis. & Nash | 109% | 108% | 109% 105
M. f St. P. & Soo| ...21% 21
■ I, do pr .......I | 59% 59%
2,1001 Manhattan ...J 122 | 119 | 121% 116%
6.600|Met.: St. Ry ..I 173% 170% i 173 170%
600|Minn. & St. L. 96 j94 j 94 95%
I do pr i | | 113%......
32.000iMissouri Pac .| 123% i 122 | 122% 121%
1.0001 M., K. & T.....1 31%I ■ 31 | -31% 31
.8001 do: .pr'. ! 64%] 64 I: 64 64%
• IMbbile & 0hi0.1......| I 81 81
■ I Mexican Cent .1 28% | 2S ' j 28% 27%
|Mex."Nat. ...... i 11% 11% 11 11%
300] Nat. Biscuit „| 45% 45% 45 45%
I do pr-;....:.|. ! | 101 | 101 .
12.6001 Nat. Lead ....:| 25% 23%|:24% I 23%
1.9001 do .pp.. ! 93 | 88 | 92% 87
;-- I Nat. Salt ...... I 45 | 44% | 44% 44%
,| do pr .......I 77% 74%1 77 76%
' IN. J. Central .|. 160 160
800! Norfolk & West! 54 53% 53% 53%
I do pr •.....*;!.. |." 89 89
I North Am. C0T.:'...:.....-I 92 91
Nor. Pac, pr..l .:....! 98%! ......
-: Northwestern .. '. 195 - | 195 Gj
400 N." Y. Central. 155% 155% 155 j 155%
N.Y..C. & St.L ...:. 32 i *32.
■ ■• do Ist pr... .......*..-...• 108 108
■-/ do ■2d pr.... 66, 67%
N.Y..N.H. & Hi ............ | 214% 214 -
3,300 Ontario & W.. 38 | 37% ' 37% 37%
! • *-' Paper Bag j 15%! 14
■ do pr ...::: 71% 71%
1,900 Pressed Steel .. 45% 44% 44% | 44
700: do -pr ...... 86% 86 86% 55%
Pacific Coast .. .;: . 6*5 ■ j 66
do Ist pr... ....:....... | 95 j 95
- do -2d pr.... 72 71 j 71% 70 •
j Pacific Mail ...: .:. | 41 ! 41%
97,000 Perm. R. R.... 153% Jsiy s 150% 150%
900 People's Gas .. 116 i 115% 115%| 115% I
Pullman ........ ...... | ...... | 208%| 208% i
7.200 Reading ........ 45:?4' 45% 45% 45 j
3,100 do lst'pr... 78% 78 73% 78% |
. 900 ! do- 2d pr.... ' 55% 55 55% 55%
7,900 Repub. Steel .. 21 19% 21 19 I
4,600 do pr ...... 77 75% 76% 75%
j 100 Rock Island .:../......... 166% 165 I
' ' St. L. & San F ' 47% 46% |
1 do Ist pr ...... 86 I 86% I
;i ,j' do 2d pr....l 73% 72% 73 | 72 1
2,40(1 St. L. & S. W 36 35% 35% 35% j
1,000! do. Pr .:.:.. 70 I 69% I 69 | 69- !■
! 3,700 St. Paul ....... 167% 166 " 166- 166%:
I ■ ] do pr ■.;:...': ::..;. :..;.*. 187 187 '
I ..•:'." St. Joe & Gr. I. 14% . 14% 14% • 14 -
|: .-* 'Stand. R. &Tw 8%! 7% 7V. .7.
1 17,100 Southern Pac '.. 60% :59 .19%! 59%
' 1. 700 Southern Ry .. 33% 33% 33% 33% !
•.. "600 L do' pr ...'.'..": ! 87% 8.7 87 86%
! 13,400 Term. Coal &I. 64% 59 62% 59 j
; 7.6OC,rexas & Pac : ... 48% 47% 48 48%'
1 'Twin City R. T. 89 | 88% ! 88% - 88% I
j . Tin Can ..." j...... 26% I '27' j
1' do pr .....'.. ...... 1 .".'.".:. 75% 76 1
i 16,200 Union Pacific' .. 10S%l 107 107% 107% '•
■ 1,300 do pr/":.-..... : 90% 90 89% 90- ';
jt-'-'*■ U. S. Expre55.;..."............ 90 90 ;
■ 800 U. S , Leather. | 14 I 13% 13% 13% i
8001 do pr •:..':...1 SO | 79%| SO j 79% I
■ - IU. S. Rubber ..|....■..!.......|;:20% . 20%'
.■:.|:-4o ;pr ::.....!...:.. | ...:..; 62% 62% !
36,100iU. S. Steel..;.l 49%! , 48%! 48% 49%.
.6.500! do pr .....V. I 95%; 98%( 98% 98%
l.SOOlWabash ........ I V 24%! 23% 24 24 '
■■. 1 do ". Pr .;..:.. 1., 44%) • 43% ■ 43% 43% I
900! Western Union.| N 94%! 94 -1 : 94% 93% i
■ 3001 Whe«l; • •»> *4 1 19% i \ 19%| 19% 20% <
I do Ist pr ...| | 65 64ft
I do 2d pr I 1...... 33 33
900! Wisconsin Centl 23% 23 23% 23%
l__do pr .......| | 145 45%
' Total sales. 684.800.
MONEY REPORTS
New York Money.
New York, June 12.—Money on call steady
at 3 per cent; prime mercantile paper, 3%@
4ft per cent; sterling exchange steady, with
actual business In bankers' bills at $4.BBV4<g>
4.88% for demand, and at $4.85M>@4.85% for
60 days; posted rates, [email protected] and $4.89;
commercial bills, $4.84%@4.85%; silver certif
icates, nominally at 60c; bar silver, 59% c;
Mexican dollars, 47ftc;' government bonds,
steady; refunding 2s, reg., 106%; coup., 107%;
3a, reg. and coup., 109; new 4s, reg. and
coup., 139; old 4s, reg., 112; coup., 113 ft; ss,
reg. and coup., 10S%.
Minneapolis Money.
MINNEAPOLIS—Bank clearings, $2,031.
--906.66; New York exchange, selling rate 40c
premium, buying rate par; Chicago exchange,
selling rate 40c premium, buying rate par.
London 60-day sight documentary, $4.85.
ST. PAUL—Clearings, $737,355.34.
Chicago Money. *
Chicago, June 12.—Clearings, $25,726,295;
balances. $1,574,503; posted exchange, 4.S>[email protected]
4.89; New York exchange, 5c premium.
London Consols. ,
London, June 12.—Consols for money, 93%;
for the account, 93 11-16.
pliovisioNs
Chicago Provisions.
Chicago, June 12.—Better prices for hogs
induced an improvement of provisions. July
pork opened 12ftc up, at $14.90, and declined
sc. July -lard opened 5c higher, at $8.60.
July ribs were not quoted. Close: Pork-
June, $14.85; July, $14.85; September, $15.02 ft.
Lard—June, $8.52 ft; July, [email protected]; Sep
tember, [email protected]; October, $8.62 ft; No
vember, $8.30; December, $8.30; January,
$8.30; year, $8.17 ft. Ribs-^June, $8.07 ft; July,
$8.07 ft; September, [email protected] t
MISCELLANEOUS
New York Cotton.
New York. June 12.—Cotton opened un
changed to three points lower, but immedi
ately turned strong on a scare of near-month
shorts and brisk demand for outside account:
July rose to 8.28 c, the highest price in weeks.
August advanced to 7.68 c, while steady. The
new crop months advanced but little, the
trade being bearish owing to very favorable
weather news and continued improvement
in the tenor of crop reports. Later, proflt
taking sent July off to 8.21 c, August to 7.61 c,
and October to 7.17 c.
Futures closed steady; June, 8.22e; July,
8.25 c: August, 7.69 c; September, 7.26 c; Octo
ber. 7.20 c; November, 7.16 c; December, 7.18 c;
January, 7.21 c; February, 7.21 c; March, 7.24 c.
Peorla Whisky.
Peoria, June 12.—Whisky—On the basis of
?1.27 for finished goods.
SHIPPING NEWS
OF THE LAKES.
Detroit — Up: Roby, Chisholm, 8:40 last
night; Wallula. 8:50; Henry Hougbton, 9;
Republic, 9:10; Paliki, Barium, 9:30; Lehigb,
9:50; Eelwyn Eddy, 10:40; Blanchard, Coralia,
11; Rust, Griffin, 10:10; Penobscot, 12:10; Au
rora, Majestic, 1:30 a. m.; Lincoln, barge,
1:50; Senator, 2:30; Murph, 3; Harper, 3:40;
Faxton, Monguagon, 6; Nyanza, 6:15; North
ern Light, 6:30; Centurion, 7; Gates, 8:20:
Ira Owen, 8:30; Topeka, 8:50; Argonaut 9;
Van Hi?e, 10; Forest City, 10:50.
Sault Ste. Marie—Whaleback, 133, was re
leased yesterday afternoon. It takes a six
inch pump to keep the water down. The
damages have not been located by the divers.
Whaleback, 202, has been patched and will
clear to-day.
Sault Ste. Marie—Up: Ford, 11 last night;
Brake. Ralston, la. m.; Northern Wave, 2;
Queen City, 8; Birckhead, Our Son, Burton,
8:30; Matoa. 9; Pease, Planet, 9:40.
Down: J. D. Marshall, 1:20 a. m.; Wil
liam Palmer, Moore, Mashaba, 9; Manola,
Frontenac. Choctaw, 10:30.
Chicago—The lines are taking most of the
erain offered on the basis of l%c for corn.
Full cargoes are difficult to get, but rates
have not been shaded. In fact, there is not
much use of shading rates, for the grain is
not on the market to go forward.
Detroit—The steamer H. C. Frick went
aeround at Ballard's reef this morning and
the wreckers Saginaw and Wales are working
on her. Her cargo of iron ore will have to
be lightered.
Chicago—Two or three charters were made
on the basis of 1% cents on corn to Lake
Erie, but were not reported. There is no
sign of an Improvement in the volume of
business this month.
Cleveland—The supply of coal and ore ton
nage is about equal to the demand, and the
feeling is steady, with no question of a change
in rates. • At some ports coal is coming for
ward a little slow and vessels have to wait
for cargoes. Ore shippers have reason to
fefl satisfied with reports, showing 1,700,000
tons moved up to June 1, as against esti
mates of a little more than a million tons
made by some vessel owners, but they are
taking all vessels that are offered on con
tracts similar to those made at the opening
of navigation.
Buffalo—Coal business picked up a little to
day, and several charters were closed. There
is no change in rates. Charters reported
were: Fleetwood, Moravia, Duluth, 35 cents-
Danforth, Erin, Owen Sound.
Cleveland—The steamer A. A. Parker,
which was in collision with the steamer
Curry D. in the Detroit river, was placed in
dry dock here to-day. The Parker is badly
damaged, and it will take about ten days
for repairs.
Ashland, Wis.—Arrived: Panther, Massa
■soit, Nestor, Kewanee, Bourke, Sagamore,
Pathfinder. Cleared—Coal: Iron Age, Two
Harbors. Lumber: Exile, White and Friant
Crosswaithe.
Green Bay, Wis.—The longshoremen's
strike has been settled for a duration of a
week, both sides making concessions.
Buffalo—The steamship North Land left to
night for Chicago on her first trip on the
new rule of the Great Northern steamers
She will reach Chicago Friday, and that aft
ernoon will take an excursion to Waukegan
under the auspices of the Chicago Press
club. The Miami, which has come to the
lakes from Florida, will meet the North Land
at Mackinac island on her way down the
lakes from Chicago.
Kingston, Ont.—News was received here
to-day that the steamer Myless is ashore
at Depot Harbor in Georgian bay The
steamer has on a cargo of grain for Richard
son & Sons of this city, shipped from Lake
Superior. It Is said to be badly damaged
Captain T. Donnelly has gone to the scene
of the wreck. The Myless was in command
of Captain J. Dix.
Toledo, Ohio—Departed—Coal: Wallula Gil
christ, Harper, Duluth.
Erie, Pa.—Cleared-Light: Rappahannock,
Parker, Duluth.
Duluth-Superior—Arrived: Trevor Victory
Hutehinson, Rensselaer, Saturn, 'Neptune'
North Star, Schuylkill, Ward, Butters Staf
ford, Bielmau, Venezuela, Superior City
Departed: Manola, Carrington, Thomas
Wilson, Princeton, Liberty, Stephenson La
Fayette, Poe, N. A. Smith, Oceanica, walter
Scranton, Manda, Pasadena, Lake Erie ore-
Williams, Venice, Two Harbors, light; Avon'
Auburn, Reynolds, Buffalo, flour; Rosemount'
Melrose, Selkirk, Kingston, grain; Holland',
Lake Erie, lumber.
Marquette—Arrived: Quayle. Cleared:
Moore, Presque Isle, Ashtabula; Frontenac
Cleveland.
Port Arthur—Cleared: John Hill Mar
quette.
Ashtabula—Cleared: Light, Samuel Mitchell,
Duluth.
Lorain—Cleared: Light, Williams Du
luth.
Conneaut—Cleared: Rails, Paliki Soo.
Light, Bulgaria, Norton, Duluth.
Cleveland—Cleared: Drake, Algeria Du
luth.
Buffalo —Cleared: Coal, Minneapolis, Glad
stone; Madagascar, Duluth; light Pontiac
Duluth.
Detroit, Mich.—Up: Whitney (steel), 12-15
p. m., Gilchrist (wood), 1 p. m.; Em
bury, King, 2:40; Turner and barges 3- Ma
riska and whaleback, 3:20; Hayward 3-40-
Mary Boyce, 4:40; Zi'lah and consorts' Mad
den and consorts, 5; Northern Queen, 5-40;
Hickock and consort, 7.
Down: Gratwick, Antrim. 9:10 last night;
Japan, 9:30; Tecumseh, Marengo, 10:20; St.
Louis and consorts, 11; Spencer, Hoyt Louis-I
iana, 12:2J) a. m.; Bartlett and whaleback,
12:40; Vulcan, 1; Elfinmere, 2:30; Pawnee
and barges, 3; Rosedale, Birckhead, Sligo,
Hreck, 4; Gogebie, Biwabik, 5:20; Vanderbilt,
7:20; Emoery Owen, Australia, 8; Pridgeon,
9:20; Iron Duke, Case, Concord, Ketchum,
10:30; Northern King, 11:40; Volunteer, Geor
ger, Moonlight, 12:30 p. m.; Delaware, 1:20;
Watt and whaleback X. Mahoning, 3; Waldo,
3:30; Wilhelm and consorts, John Mitchell 5-
Griffin, 6; C. W. Chamberlain, 6:15; Shaw,' 7;
Sacramento, Granada, 7:50.
M. DOBA\ & CO.,
C The Oldest Firm of
Bankers and Brokers
IN THE SOUTHWEST.
Have renfored from their old quarters
' ; . v'.V.;.9. Jackson Street to the
«ermwiia Life Building, Cor. 4th
and Minnesota St.. St. Paul, Sinn.
COW PRICES LOWER
Large Receipts East Knock Off a
Dime.
A STRONG HOG DEMAND ON
Bid* Prom the Start Rule 5 Centi
Hticker—Sheep Market
Slow.
South , St. Paul, Mian., June 12.—Receipts
to-day were 300 cattle, 100 calves, 1,600 hogs
and 100 sheep. '■;'•' r - - - .
The following table shows the receipts from
Jan. 1, 1901, to date, as compared with the
same period a year ago: ■ ■ :. ; ': '
7£S F' Ca"l eCalves-Hogß.Sheep.Horses.Car3.
iom 57,823 288 266,019 75,739 3,818 6,243
44,345 22,302 233,474 102,647 13,952 6,197
£,"•.'• ; ••;• ■■x 14 ....... 26,908 10,314 ....
1n c ......13,478 ..... 32,545 ...... ..... 46
The following table shows the receipts for
the month of June to date, as compared with
tne same period a year ago
Year. - Cattle.Calves.Hogs. Sheep.Horses.Cars.
1901 ...... 2,819 1,111. 14,364 1,939 22 322
1900 ...... 2,418 1,177 14,204 1,181 4,592 4Si
Dec ........... 66 ...... ...... 4,570 166
Inc. ..... 401 ..... « 160 ' 578 .........
Receipts: .
Date. . Cattle. Calves. Hogs. Sheep. Cars.
June.s 456 167 1,783 331 43
June 6 ..... 134 34 " 922 99 17
June 7 ..... 133 . • 76 1,538 118 2)
June 8 ..... 56/ 30 1,318 28 21
June 10 ....175 53 893 153 21
Juno -11 .... 755 -331 2,387 494 64
Estimated receipts by cars to-day of the
railroads centering at these yards: Chicago
Great Western, 2; Chicago, Milwaukee & St.
Paul, 5; Minneapolis & St. Louis, 8; Chicago,.
St. Paul, Minneapolis &:Omaha, 6; Great
Northern, 3;• Chicago, Burlington & Quincy,
1; boo, 3; Northern Pacific, 8. Total, 36.
Disposition of stock June 11:
o F}/ m L 1 :■■ ■• ■■■■■■'''': Cattle. • Hogs. Sheep.
Swift & Co 245 2,225 206
Estate of I. Staples ...... 24 . ;*" 102
W. E. McCormiek ........ .... 51
■Slimmer & Thomas ...... 41 .....
Peter Evans 13 ....'
J. E. Bolton ';.";i. ;...,...'. ..' *...; -26
Hankey Bros 99
J. B. Fitzgerald' ........ 22
R. N..Katz". 7. "■"
Louis Hertz .............. 6 .» *.'
Leo • Gottfried . 1
J. T. McMillan ............ 104
Weirs ...;.,. .79
Country buyers ..........484 .... 61
:Totals .... 942 2,408 446
CATTLE—The local supply was fair for
Wednesday, but was not large enough to meet
the demand from buyers of beef cattle. Re
ceipts east were very large and t prices were
generally quoted a dime lower. The strong
demand here warranted a full steady market.
The stocker and feeder trade did not dis
play very much activity, although good to
choice stock heifers would have sold strong
to 10c higher and good to choice stock steers
would have sold 10c to 15c higher than last
week had they been on sale.
- Butcher . Cows and Heifers— .' .-:,
No. ■' Ay. Price. 11 No. Ay. Price.
2 ......... 850 $3.80 1 ......... 670 $3.75'
11. 977 3.60 1 ......... 710 2.35
2......... 735 2.50 4 840 2.15
2 ..........1,080 2.90 6 „....*... 876 2.65
1 ......... 580 V 2.65 1 ......... 970 2.50
1 ..-810 2.00 1 ...;..... 750 1.50
Beef and Butcher Steers-
No. . Ay. Price. 11 No. Ay. Price.
5 1,118 $4.85 1 .........1,060 $4.25
1 ...... a.. 800 4.00 -
. Milkers and Springers—
2 cows and 1 calf for $65; 1 cow and 1 calf
for $24; 1 cow and 1 calf for $35; 1 cow for $35.
Stackers and Feeders— . ; .
No. Ay. Price. No. Ay. Price.
14 ........... 529 $3.75 8 484 $3.25
8 465 2.75 3 396 2.60
2 ■••••••••• 370 2.25 2. ..445 2.15
Feeding Cows and Heifers-
No. Ay. Price. 11 No. Ay. Price. !
1 550 $3.00 1 ......... 790 $3.00
1 ......... 620 3.00 2 ......... 625 2.75
1 . 720 2.50
' Feeding Bulls- " ' - •
No. . Ay. Price. I No. ' Ay. Price.
2 640 $3.00 1 ...; 1,150 $3.00
1 650 2.75 1 ......... 400 2.60
1 .........1,110 2.50
Veal Calves- '
No. . r Ay Price. No. ' At Price.
4 ......... 160 $5.25 1 130 ..„.
,3 •■•••..•. 133 6.00 II 1 ......;.. 140 5.00
HOGS—Receipts at the leading markets to- !
day were only fairly moderate. The number i
of sales , here was fair. The demand was
very strong and right from the start bids
ruled j about 5c higher. Traders lined up
early....with ; the. result that the movement to
j the scales Was very brisk. I Quality was not
very desirable, with the best on sale selling
from $5.92% to $5.95, and mixed grades from
$5.85 to $5.90. Roughs sold at $5.45. One
load of ■ choice mediums topped the market at
id. ; Sales: / '
; Hogs—
No. Ay. Price. 11 No. Ay. Price.
i 66 ........256 $6.00 1125 188 $5.95
1 20 192 5.95 1182 ........ 200 5.95
18 ..252 5.95 167 213 5.92%
!54 194 5.90 |70 203 5.90
119 :....:.. 267 6.90 ||48 212 5.87%
i2l ..: 279 ■ 5.87%||10 ....... 172 5.87%
25 -240 5.85 || -
Pigs and Culls- ■ "i:■■■■*
No. Ay. Prlce.||No. Ay. Price.
-4 ........ 280 $5.45 || 2 300 $5.45
1 ........ 340 5.45 || 1 470 5.15
1 400 5.15 ||v- .
SHEEP—There were a few received fresh
on sale. Conditions east still looked serious,
with the result. that .the market here was
very slow. Sales: '
Sheep— -.
No. -•! ••'. "4*:U_- Ay. Price.
14 spring lambs 56 $4.50
24 spring lambs 60 4.50
32 spring lambs 60 4.50
16 sheep 11l 3.25
10 sheep 93 3.25
56 feeders 53 3.00
1 buck ....: 150 2.50
2 ewes ....... ..135 2.25
2 bucks v.J 135 .2.25
On the market: L. S., Perham; T. J.
Mathieson. Little Falls; C. P. T., Jr., Man
dan. N. D.; N. Morrill, Battle Lake; J. O.
Billings, J. H. Manning, Fergus Falls; T. H.
Sparrow, Royalton; W. H. Helberg, Nestrand;
Brlnggold Brothers, Mantorville; C. Huber,
[ Alma. Wis. ; Johnson, Peterson & Co., Hec
i tor: Giere & P., Montevideo; W. W. Reeves,
! Milbank, S. D.; Cosgrove company, Le Sueur;
W. Bergman, Butterfield; Anderson Brothers,
> Evans: E. L. Starr, Tracy; Lerschen Broth
! ers. Ghent; G. W. Dodge, Lewlsville; Schuldt
& Walther. Owatonna.
Sioux City Live Stock.
Sioux City, lowa, June 12.—Receipts, 2,200
hogs, 500 cattle.
Hogs—sc higher. Sales:
No. Ay. Price.
62 210 $5.77%
65 , *. 260 5.30
72 245 5.82%
67 266 5.85
65 260 5.87%
66 270 5.90
Cattle—About steady. Sales:
No. Ay. Price.
33 beeves 1,207 5.40
19 beeves 1,196 5.50
2 canners 1,087 2.50
4 cows 1,050 3.75
6 stock heifers 550 3.00
5 stock heifers 600 3.50
2 bulls 900 2.50
2 bulls 1,020 3.00
2 bulls 1,050 3.40
6 stockers 340 3.50
5 stockers 760 4.40
10 yearlings 650 3.75
5 yearlings „. 650 4.50
6 calves 300 4.25
6 calves 350 4.50
Sheep—ln demand; [email protected]
Cliicu-Ko Live Stock.
Chicago, June 12.—Cattle, receipts, 21,000;
choice, 3teady: others weak; top, $6.30; good
to prime steers, [email protected]; poor to medium,
[email protected]; stockers and feeders, [email protected];
cows, [email protected]; heifers, [email protected]; canners,
[email protected]; bulls, [email protected]; calves, [email protected];
Texas fed steers, [email protected]; Texas bulls, $2.75
@3.85.
Hogs, receipts, to-day, 26,000; to-morrow,
25,000; left over, 4,025; opened 5c higher, clos
ing easier; top, $6.25. Mixed and butchers,
$0.90&6.15; good to choice heavy, [email protected];
rough heavy, $5*[email protected]; light, [email protected];
bulk of sales, [email protected]
Sheep, receipts, 15,000; steady; good to
choice wethers, [email protected]; fair to choice
mixed, $3.60!fr4: western sheep, [email protected];
yearlings, [email protected]; native lambs, [email protected];
western lambs, [email protected].
Official yesterday: Receipts—Cattle, 3,988;
hogs, 17,843; sheep, 3,932. Shipments—Cattle,
3,009; hogs, 2,178; sheep, 771.
Kansas City Live Stock.
Kansas City. June 12.—Cattle—Receipts,
8.000; steady to weak; native steers, $5.10®
5.95: Texans; [email protected]; cows and heifers,
[email protected]: tsockers and feeders, [email protected]
Hogs—Receipt*, 20,000; steady to 5c higher;
bulk of sales, [email protected]; heavy, [email protected];
5 ESTABUSSXO 1«79 =
WOODWARD & CO.
Mm^ous GRAIN COMMISSION «—
' BSHHOHES^-Cbieaio and Milwaukee. or4*ta U*i future Aattt«cr executed ta an aoEkCl»>'
MINNESOTA
-LOAN & TRUST 10.
: ■■; Misj,EAr»i.is , Kin. £;• * ••'.'•
; Capital....... $500,000.00
Guaranty Fund. $(00,000.00
Interest 2%k&
Allowed on *}I<*• o.: : \
Deposits. fcl^aSL
Legal Depository ■■OLotft.
for Court «d O2*> JJftS**
Trust Fund 5........ '■■. . ■...■,■ „: .■;
INVESTMENTS—ExceIIent First Mart- .
gages and Municipal Bonds orsala
TRUSTS— classes of ' Trusts cm*
, fully administered. ; ..■'-•*.'%
HAF BTY DEPOSIT VAfCTDm. 1
Bhas. E. Lewis MS)
&Co - ; Bends,
1, 2 and 3 Chamber of
Commerce, Minneapolis. Pnttf)]]
GRAIN/ PROVISIONS.
New York Correspondents, -\.:.^
Clark, Dodge & Co. "/'- H';i
Chicago < Bartlott, Prazlor del*,
correspondent*, 1 J. P. Harris.
Daily Price Current mailed free on »|v»
ESTABLISHED 18*1.
LT.SOWLE&SBNS
Brokers IB ' Sralnß> Provision*,
Chicago and New York Correspondents.
Long Distance Telephone, 634 Main.
21 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.
Vermilye&Co
BANKERS,
NASSAU AND PINE STS., NEW YORK
IS CONGRESS STREET, BOSTON.
Government Bonds of all issues bought, sold
or taken in exchange for other securities.
Quotations furnished by wire at our expense
List of current offerings of Municipal
Railroad and other investment Se
eurlties furnished upon application.
Accounts of Banks, Bankers,
and Individuals Solicited,
packers, [email protected]; mixed, [email protected]; yorkers,
[email protected]; pigs, [email protected]
Sheep—Receipts, 4,500; steady to shade low*
er; muttons, [email protected]; lambs, [email protected]
St. Louis Live Stock.
• St. Louis. June 12.—Cattle—Receipts, 4,500;
shade lower: native steers, [email protected]; stock
era and feeders, [email protected]; cows and heifers $2
(Ba.10; Texans, [email protected]
Hogs—Receipts, 6,500; 5c higher; pigs, 15.55
@5.95; packers, [email protected]; butchers, [email protected]
Sheep—Receipts, 1,500; steady; native mut«
tons, [email protected]; lambs, [email protected]
FLICKERTAITsTATE CROPS
Wheat Is Stooling- Well ana the
Moisture Is Ample.
Special to The Journal.
Bismarck, N. D., June 12.—At the close of
the preceding week, heavy well distributed
showers set in over the entire state, and con
tinued at intervals during the past week;
about two inches of rain on an average fall
ing during that time, which revived all vege
tation that had been suffering more or less
severely for the previous month, and gave
the ground a thorough soaking. In the
northern, and in fact, in most of the cen
tral portions of the state, there was a fall
of snow, which soon melted and went into
the ground. The rains and snow were fol
lowed on the 7th by a killing frost in nearly
all parts of the state, so severe that it froze
most of the corn, potatoes and gardens down,
but did little or no damage to grain, except
some early sown flax which was up.
All grain, as a rule, looks very good, and
is now growing rapidly. The rains were fol
lowed by cool weather, with light winds,
quid the most of the moisture that fell was
absorbed by the ground. Wheat is stoollng
very well, and in several parts of the state
where it was being crowded out by weeds,
and especially the Russian thistle, they hav
ing been killed by frost, a clear fieid for
grain remains.
Cut worms are doing some damage in the
northwestern part of tbe state, and grass
hoppers ari also making their appearance la
the Red and Missouri river valleys.
What flax snd other late grain bad not
been sown, but was waiting for rain, is now
being put in the ground as rapidly as pos
sible, the condition of which for early ger
mination of seed could rot be better.
A Correction.
To the Editor of the The Journal.
In the issue of Monday, The Journal
says: "Jones estimates the wheat yield o£
Minnesota at 80.0C0.000 bu, and of North Da
kota at 70.000.000 bu." I tiave made no esti
mate of yield in these states. The figures
quoted were simply given as a basis of yield
in 'a total of 660,000,000 bu for the country.
They are liberal figures, and they may be
realized. They were used, however, only as
a basis and not as an estimate.
-H. V. Jones.
Minneapolis, June 12, 1901.
L. T. Sowle & Sons say: The cash demand
is much better to-day, and prices for old
wheat are on an export basis. Bears and
short sellers having pounded the distant fu
tures to a standstill, are nof endeavoring to
break the July figures and their efforts show
some success. A sharp rally. ia . likely If
shorts and cash buyers compete for July
wheat.
THOMAS & Go
Grain Gfliiissiei! and Stock Brokers.
Write for oar dally market totter, wUoh ire
mail FBEE on application. .
llembers Minneapolis Chamber of Com
merce. Telephone—Main L897-J.
5 CHAMBER OF OOHMERSE.
Watson Co
Brokers In Groin P Ps*ovision&),
:\ '■■■ Stocks mod Bonds,
Members N* Y. Stock Exchange
Chicago Correspond -Sefcw&rtL, Dopeo&Oo.
Private wire Chicago g?Xeyr Tort. Tol. 806 Main
35 OMana/bOf of OounmM*oom
\ EOWARDS7 wddcT^caX
TIMBERS {ißMp®»kca^s.\
-\8 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE HiHtfeAPOLfe.)
IS

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