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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, June 27, 1901, Image 10

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1901-06-27/ed-1/seq-10/

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10
SEPTEMBER WHEAT SOLD A SHADE OVER 65c
Higher Cables Gave Encouragement
and Put the Market in
Firmer Tone.
HEAVY RAINS IN ILLINOIS
Generally- Favorable Domestic Con
ditions Are Maintained—
Gossip of the Day.
Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, June
27.—Wheat gained a cent to start the day
on generally firm foreign markets and a
Liverpool advance. September sold up to 65c.
Domestic advices were bearish and the mar
ket responded first to the foreign Influence
and then fell back part way on the continued
favorable crop news.
Springfield, 111., had a very heavy rain,
the total precipitation showing 1.70 inches.
The rain was heavy through all of central
Illinois. Further south and west in the cen
ter of the most active winter wheat harvest
ing the conditions are very favorable. Min
nesota and South Dakota have predictions
for cloudy weather and looal showers. North
Dakota for clean and fair weather to-day.
Cooler weather is predicted for the entire
weat.
The Price Current says crop conditions are
maintained without material changes. Win
ter wheat harvesting and threshing reports
are meeting expectations. The quality is ex
ceptionally high. Corn needs rain in the
southwest. Chicago reported good cash wheat
inquiry and considerable business done for
shipment east and for export. Liverpool
closed %d higher. Antwerp closed un
changed. Paris was up—equal to %c. Buda
pest was 1%0 lower, while Berlin was strong,
closing at a full cent advance.
Primary receipts were DOO.OOO bushels, and
shipments 317,000 bushels, against 438,000
bushels and 9f1,000 bushels last year. Clear
ances—Wheat and flour, 577,000 bushels; corn,
517,000 bushels. Minneapolis received 249
oars and Duluth 82, against 256 and 82 last
year. It is expected that northwest wheat
stooks will decivase about 1,500,000 bushels
for the week.
The market closed firm and active. New
York reported 21 loads for export. Chicago
said the good cash business there was 'help
ing the market and that 350,000 bushels had
been taken. September closed at [email protected];
July closei at 63%@@639ic Chicago closed
September at 67%@67%c.
Cash wheat sold in good part on the basis
of 2o over July for No. 1 northern. There
was an aotive inquiry for No. 1 Northern to
arrive and trades were reported at 65%@
«5%0. Good No. 2 northern sold at over
July and the general run of this grade va*
close to the July figure. No. 8 sold from 580
to Sttfcc, the latter figure for choice. Re
jected brought 54c to 58c, some poor stuff go
ing as low as 52% c. No grade ranged from
62c to 57c.
THE FLOUR MARKET
Good Sales Reported and Prices Are
Held Firm.
Millers report good sales to-day. The for
eign orders were larger and the late strength
in wheat in foreign markets has a tendency
to make buyers more active. Clears are
being taken and also a lew patents. Prices
are very firm as quoted. The domestic
trade continues buying freely.
Shipments for the day were 51,585 brls.
. First patents are quoted [email protected]; second
patents, [email protected]; first clears, [email protected];
second clears, $2.
THE CASH TRADE
Flax Trade Active—Corn Dull—Oats
Firm-Feed Easier.
FLAX—There was an active trade in flax.
Twenty-seven cars were the posted receipts,
but about 42 lots were offered all together.
Some were parts of cars. The market held
very steady, and without especially new de
velopment. No. 1 flax sold at $1.83. Good
rejected brought |[email protected] Poorer lots of
rejected sold at $1.77. No grade, in small
■ack lots, sold at $1.60.
Minneapolis received 27 cars, against none
last year. Duluth had 8 cars.
Closing prices were: Minneapolis—Cash i
$1.84; September, $1.39. Duluth—Cash, $188
--to arrive, $1.88; September, $1.42; October,
$1.36.
CORN—There was not much trade in corn
and the market showed neglect. No. 3 is
quoted 40%@41c. Receipts, 10 cars; ship
ments, none.
OATS—The market was firm and good No
3 sold at 290. Receipts were 19 cars, and
c shipments 4 cars. No 3 white is quoted at
[email protected]; No. 3 oats, 27%@28%e ■
FEED AND —The market is a little
lower. Coarse corn meal and cracked corn
quoted [email protected]; No. 1 feed, [email protected];
- i / c,f d> *16: No- 3 feed ' [email protected];
granulated corn meal in cotton sacks at the
rate of $1.96 per brl
in bulk ls quoted at
$10.50; shorts, $15.50: flour middlings, $12.50
©13: red dog in 140-lb sacks. $15; feed in
200-lb sacks, $1 per ton additional; in 100-lb
,s ™£ 3 * $1-B0 per ton additional. Shipments,
x. (so tons. '
»RY;?7^ e market {s very quiet; No. 2 sold
at 44%@40c. Receipts, none; shipments 2
cars. '
o B^Kt,f Y7" Th. market is Quiet. Quotations
are 30®39c for feed grades and [email protected] for the
malting grades. A part car of No. 5 sold at
u*^?l^ 18 ' 5 cars; shipments. 1 car.
*q^i7 plndfancy ' ?10-50; upland choice,
[email protected]; upland. No. 1, |[email protected]; midland, $8
@9.50; medium. [email protected]; timothy, . choice, $11-
K I??^» yl-No-v1' ?1010-50: rye straw, choice
[email protected]; wheat and oat straw, [email protected] Re
ceipts, 20 tons. .;„■-,» '
Put)* and Calls.
Two O'clock Report-
Puts— September wheat, 74% c.
Calls—September wheat, 75% c
Curb—September wheat, 74%e
Cash Sales Reported To-day.
No. 1 northern, 13 cars $0 65%
No. 1 northern, 700 bu. to arrive- ...„[
No. 1 northern, 5.000 bu. to arrive 65%
No. 1 northern, l car , ' . 65%
No, 1 northern, 2 cars ~..'....'.1 .65%
No. 2 northern, 15 cars _ • ••••••-. * G; >a?
No. 2 northern, 9 car* __ ;.... ***•*• ' 64 7*
No. 2 northern, 1 car .... ■•*••-•»• 'gay
No. 2 northern, 1 car ... " •---••-• • t*
No. 2 northern, 4 cars _... _... ••--—• • 7*
No. 3 wheat, 3 cars ......_.**. 7. 61
No. 3 wheat, 10 cars .: .1.... *. 62
No. 3 wheat, 1 car *"* '59
No. 8 wheat, 4 cars ...... _ -•••••••••- "ciii
Rejected wheat. 3 cars .....,'...""l!*"* B9 •
Rejected wheat. 1 cars ..._..,..~ "" 58
Rejected wheat, 1 car ..."**"" ' "ks
Rejected wheat, 1 car ...!!!"*" "**"* . "5514
No grade wheat, 2 cars ... "HI""" 63
No grade wheat, 2 cars . *"* '58
No grade wheat, 1 car ...'.'.'.'.'.lVV. 57
No grade wheat, 5 cars .. rs^f**"** * 56
No grade wheat, 1 car ....^.\_.H"***" 5314
No grade wheat, 1 car .... HT!!!." "** 59
No. 3 oats, l car "1 27\i
No. 3 oats, 2 cars T" *** 29
No grade oats, part car ,;*-*•'-"' " 2 6
No grade barley, paxt car * *"* '■"«■'
Flax, 12 sacks ... „ **"' ? ,'%
Flax, 13 sacks " ***~ * ,7«
No. 1 flax, 1 car .ZY'.'Zl' 1 83
Rejected flax, half car .... -."".1111 180
Rejected flax, 2 cars .. """""■ 1 sa
Rejected flax, 1 car ;.'.*l;**-**"*"* ******* ir?
Rejected flax, l car . •""* "*"* " 17-
Rejected flax, part car" '.'.'"."JZ '•'■""'" 177 -
Rejected flax, 3 cars .....: *'* & l
Rejected flax, l car ........[. = 1 70
No grade flax, part car ......Z..'.""~ 160 -
Xo grade flax, part car ...\.'.Z'.'\ ieo
No grade flax, 20 sacks 159
No grade flax, 40 sacks'.""?".!! * 1 61
No grade flax, 25 sacks _. *" 160&
State train Inspection.
June 26.
Inspected In-Wheat-Cara.-Great North-
Yern-No. 1 northern. 5; No. 2 northern, 14;
No. d, 5, rejected, 1; no grade 11
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul—No 1
northern, 8; No. 2 northern, 10; No 3' 2
no grade, 5. ' '
Minneapolis & St. Louis-No. 1 northern,
14; No. 2 northern. 8; No. 3, 1; no grade L
Soo Line—No. 2 northern, 2; No 3' 2
rejected, 1. ' '
Northern Pacific—No. 2 northern, 2; No 3
2; no grade, 4.
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha-
No. 7 northern. 7; No. 2 northern. 3; No 3
3; rejected. 2; no grade, 2
J r x<? d~; N?; : X northerQ. 34: No. 2 northern,
39; No. 3, 15; rejected, 4; no grade 23
Other Grains-Cars—No. 3 winter wheat,
1; No. 3 yellow corn, 1; No. 3 corn, 2; No 4
corn, 1; No. 3 white oats, 3; No, 3 oats, 6- no
grade, oats, 3: No. 3 rye, 1; No. 1 flax' 6
rejected flax. 19.
Cars Inspected Out—No. 1 northern wheat,
96: No. 2 northern wheat, 51; No. 3 wheat, 59;
rejected wheat, 1; no grade wheat, 6- No 3
winter wheat, 24; No. 3 yellow corn, 3- No.
! corn. 7; No. S white oats. 1; No. 3 oats, 3-
No. 2 rye, 6< rejected flax, 5.
Receipts and Shipments.
June 26.
ReceiTOd—Wheat, 249 cars; 219,120 bu; corn,
8,700 tm: oats, 24,890 bu; barley, 2,000 bu;
flax. 11.070 bu; flour, 440 brU; mlllttuffa, 50
tons; hay, 20 tons; fuel oil, 28,360 gals; fruit,

RANGE OF WHEAT PRICE IN MINNEAPOLIS
Open. High. Low. To-day. Yesterday. Year Ago.
June.s * I $.63% $ .63*4 * .82*4,
July.. .63*6 .63%<§>64 .68% .63%@63?i .63 @63% .81*4
Sept. .64% .65 @65*4 .64% .64%@65 .64% .82
On Track—No. 1 hard, 67*& c; No. 1 northern, 65*fcc; No. 2 northern, 63% c.
THE DAY'S RESULT
Sept. Wheat Minneapolis. Chicago. Duluth. St. Louis. New Yor
Close to-day $ .64%@65 * .67%@67 *4. I .66% $-65*4 $ .73*4
Close yesterday 64% .66% .66*4 .64 .72%
90,362 lbs; merchandise, 1,745,956 lbs; lumber,
2B cars; barrel stock, 4 cars; machinery, 535,
--900 lbs; coal, 390 tons; wood, 42 corcU; brick,
30,000; lime, 1 car; cement, 345 brls; house
hold goods, 20,000 lbs; ties, 1 car; stone and
marble, 16 cars; salt, 2 cars; logs, 89 cars;
dressed meats, 48,000 lbs; wood, 9,200 lbs;
railroad materials, 3 cars; sundries, 40 cars.
Car lots, 685.
Shipped—Wheat, 36 cars, 31,680 bu; oats,
4,960 bu; barley, 630 bu; rye, 1,340 bu; flax,
1,800 bu; flour, 61,585 brls; millstuffs, 1,786
tons; merchandise, 2,486,620 lbs; lumber, 110
cars; posts and piling, 1 car; barrel stock, 1
car; machinery, 462.350 lbs; coal, 92 tons;
wood. 8 cords, brick, 30,000; cement, 350 brls;
household goods, 26,900 lbs; live stock, 3 cars;
linseed oil, 293,100 gals; oil cake, 679,000 lbs;
dressed meats, 26,110 lbs; railroad materials,
79 care; sundries, 24 cars. Car lots, 913.
Wheat Movement.
The following are the receipts and ship
ments at the principal primary wheat mar
kets:-
Receipts, Shipments,
Bushels. Bushels.
New York 86,450 201,594
Philadelphia 24,953 None
Baltimore 13,241 135,870
Toledo . 2,150 2,400
Detroit 1,000 1,583
St. Louis 41,000 47,000
Boston 70,684 56,872
Chicago 81.528 159,181
Milwaukee 14,250 3,730
Duluth 93,474 None
Minneapolis 219.120 31,680
Kansas City 46,400 71,100
Wheat Movement by Road*.
June 26.
Received—Milwaukee, 43 cars; Omaha. 47;
St Louis, 26; Great Northern, 119; Northern
Pacific, 6; Soo, 9.
Shipped—Milwaukee, 9 cars; Omaha, 3; St.
Louis, 15; Great Northern, 9.
RANGE OF SEPTEMBER WHEAT
q3a yrt3o //So fc&r, '//.<■
&— ~ " ~
U -jr : ■ p*i
yl l ' II 1
OTHER GRAIN^ MARKETS
CHICAGO GRAIN
Better Money In the Wheat Pit, Dae
to improved Cables.
Chicago, June 27.—Improved cables caused
better prices in the wheat pit to-day. Sep
tember opened *4e higher at 67% c, declined to
67}fec, and advanced to 67%@ti7*4c. Leading
shorts covered heavily. July also was in good
demand. Minneapolis and Duluth reported
331 cars, against 329 a week ago and 338 a
year ago. Local receipts were 53 cars, 1 of
contract grade.
September continued upward on a good ex
port demand until 67% c was reached. The
close- was firm, *[email protected]%c higher, at 67%@67*fcc.
Close: June, 67% c; July, 65% c; September,
67%@67*4c; cash No. 2 red, [email protected]*4c; No. 3
red, 66*4 c; No. 2 hard winter, 67c; No. 3 hard
winter, 66*4 c; No. 1 northern spring, 67*4 c;
No. 2 northern spring, 66*<>c; No. 3 spring,
[email protected]
Corn opened featureless. September opened
unchanged at 44% cto 45c, declined to 44*£ c,
and rallied to 44% c. Receipts were 143 cars,
2 of contract grade.
The close was easy, *[email protected]%c lower, at 44% c.
Close: June, 42% c; July, 43*[email protected]*4c; Sep
tember, 44% c; cash No. 2, 43c; No. 3, 42*[email protected]
42*4 c
Oats were inert. September opened a shade
up at 26%@27c, and declined to 26%@26%c.
Receipts wer^e 105 cars.
Close: June, 26% c: July, 26%e; September,
26% c; cash No. 2, 27%@28c: No. 3, 27*4 c.
The following was the range of prices:
Wheat— July. Sept.
Opening „„ 67 67y B @*i
Highest 67*£ 67%
Lowest 66% [email protected]*&
Close-
To-day ~ 67% 67%@y 3
Yesterday 66*[email protected]% 66%
Year ago 80 '
Corn —
Opening 43%@*4 [email protected]%
Highest 43%@*£ 45
Lowest 43 44*4
Close-
To-day 43*[email protected]*4 44%
Yesterday 43% 44%@45
Year ago , 42*4
Oats-
Opening „ 27*4 [email protected]%
Highest 27% 27
Lowest „ 26% 26%
Close —
To-day 26% 26%
Yesterday ».. 27*[email protected]*4 26%@27
Year ago 24%
Duluth Grain.
Duluth, Minn., June 27. —Wheat opened
higher to-day and maintained an advance all
day. There was fair trading. October flax
advanced to $1.39, a gain of 3 cents from
yesterday. September wheat opened *4c up,
at 66% c, declined several times to 66*4 c, ad
vanced as frequently to 66% c, where It closed
with sales. July sold up to 67c and main
tained a fraction higher level than Septem
ber. Receipts—Wheat, 82 cars; corn, 1; oats,
2; rye, 1; flax, 8; total, 94. No shipments.
Close: Oats, 27*4 c; rye, to arrive, 46% c;
September, 46c; flax, cash, $1.88; September,
$1.42; September northwestern, $1.47; Octo
ber, $1.36; wheat, No. 1 hard, cash, 69% c;
September, 69% c; No. 1 northern, cash,
66% c; July and to arrive, 67c; September,
66% c; August, 67c; No. 2 northern, 61% c;
No. S, 57% c.
Liverpool Grain.
Liverpool, June 27. —Close—Wheat, un
changed to *4d higher; July, 5s 6%d; Septem
ber, 5s 6%d; December, 5s 7%d. Corn, %c to
*4d lower; July, 3s ll%d; September, 4s *id.
Chicago Seed and Coarse Grain.
Chicago, June 27. —Flax, cash, northwestern,
$1.88; No. 1, $1.88; September, $1.45; October,
$1.38*4. Rye, July, 47% c; September, 47%e.
Barley, cash, [email protected] Timothy, August, $4.40;
September, $4.50. Clover, cash, $9.50.
Kansas City Grain.
Kansas City, June 27.—Wheat, July, 60% c;
September, 61*6 c; December, 62*£ c; cash, No.
2 hard, 63*[email protected]; No. 2 red, 64c. Corn, July,
41% c; September, 42% c; cash, No. 2 mixed,
42*[email protected]*4c; No. 2 white, 43c. Oats, No. 2
white, 30*[email protected]
St. Louis Grain.
St Louis, June 27.—Close: Wheat, high«r;
No. 2, cash, 66c; July, 64% c; September,
65% c; December, 67*4 c; No. 2 hard, 64*[email protected]
Corn, lower; No. 2, cash, 42*4 c; July, 41% c;
September, 43% c. Oats, firm; No. 2, cash,
290; July, 27*[email protected]%0; September, 26%@26%c;
No. 2 white, 31*ic. Lead, steady; [email protected]
Spelter, steady; $3.52*4.
Milwaukee Grain.
Milwaukee, June 27.—Flour—Steady. Wheat
—Higher; close, No. 1 northern, 68*[email protected];
No. 2 northern, [email protected]>67c; July, 6i%c; Septem
ber, 67% c. Rye—Higher; No. 1, 48*4 c Bar
ley—Dull; No. 2, 54*[email protected]; sample, [email protected]*4c
Oats—Steady; No. 2 white, [email protected]*4c
FRENCH WHEAT
France Will Probably Have to Im
port a Largre Amount.
New York, June 27.—A special from Paris
says that from the latest figures obtainable,
Secretary Green, of the American Chamber
of Commerce there, has prepared an interest
ing report on the grain crop of France. He
says the situation to-day is quite different
from that of last year, when the crop was
also short. There was then a considerable
surplus and the stock in hand is consider
ably less than at the same period in 1900. In
1900 the French area under cultivation in
wheat was 18,649,549 acres, while the returns
this year show 16,698,145 acres—an increase
of 148,596 acres, or nearly 1 per cent.
The crop came through the first part of
the winter in very good condition, but the
severe cold weather of February and March
and the very backward spring season caused
considerable damage. Present indications are
that the wheat crop for France this year will
amount to 304,000.000 bushels, as compared
with 309,380,000 in 3900. The annual consump
tion of wheat in France }s about 340,000.000
bushels, and France will thus have to Import
at least 36,000,000 bushels to make good the
deficit.
THE MIJNJNEAPOLIS JOUKNAJL.
STOCKS SINK A BIT
This Is in Sympathy With Lower
Quotations in London.
EFFECT OF THE BANK SUSPENSION
Announcement Turin* the Market
Weak, Under Liquidation
All Around.
New York, June 27.—The cable brought low
er quotations for Americans from London this
morning, said to be due to further liquida
tion for Berlin account. Opening prices here
sagged in sympathy. Metropolitan Street
Railway fell 2 points. Otherwise declines
were fractional. The only notable gains were
in lowa Central of a point and Chicago, In
dianapolis & Louisville preferred of 1%.
Trading was on a small scale.
Some further recessions were made in
prices of railroad stocks, but the maximum
was only % per cent in St. Paul and Kansas
& Texas preferred. Buying of usually dor- j
mant stocks then became a feature, causing j
a rise of 3 points in lowa Central preferred, '
2 in Lackawanna and Pullman and a point in j
National Biscuit, Chicago Terminal Transfer
issues and Wisconsin Central. Prominent
blocks then began to improve, St. Paul rally
ing 1% from the lowest. The local tractions
rose 1 to 1%. Union Pacific got up to yes
terday's close. . The announcement that the
Seventh National bank had closed its doors j
"turned the market suddenly weak under |
liquidation all around. St. Paul dropped 2%
and Manhattan, Sugar and Missouri Pacific
over 2 points. Many other stocks quickly
lost a point, i'^-iii^'-S-
Supporting orders were rushed into the
market and large sums of call money were
loaned at 6 per cent, causing a rebound in
prices of a point in many stocks. The re
covery was in Manhattan, Missouri - Pacific,
Sugar and St. Paul. Business became dull
Again and the tone rather feverish, some of
the principal stocks getting back to the low
est. American Linseed preferred dropped 3*4.
The selling was renewed all around the
room after midday, and the whole list . fell
below the previous low point. The calling of
loans threw securities on the market, forced
the loan rate up to 15 per cent, and the bears
1 joined in the selling. The severest sufferers
were recent speculative favorites. Manhat
; tan made an extreme decline of 4, Chicago &
Eastern Illinois 4%, St. Paul, Union Pacific,
\ Texas Pacific, lowa Central preferred, Rock
Island and Sugar between 3 and 4, and the
New York public utilities- Smelting, Ameri
can Tobacco, Atchison, Twfn City, People's
Gas, Tennessee Coal and Amalgamated Cop
per 2 to . 2%. When ' the bears covered they
rallied prices in some of the leaders from 1
to 2 points and the trading again stagnated.
Uneasiness aroused by the bank suspen
sion and the stiffness of call money rates de?
terred active buying in the market. Busi
ness practivally ceased on the floor between
1 and 2 o'clock, the ticker registering trans
actions only at long intervals.
There was, if anything, more disposition to
buy than sell. The leading stocks fell off
slightly from the level reached on the rally.
There was a steady recuperation in the mar- j
ket on a small volume of business after 2
o'clock under the leadership of Missouri Pa- j
cific and Manhattan, which rose a fraction
over last night, as did a number of other
prominent stocks. The declines were re-1
duced to small fractions except in a few
cases. American Linseed rose 2 points over
last night. Consolidated Gas and American
Smelting preferred also rose sharply over
last night. The closing was very dull but
firm at the rally. -...;.. 1, .=
Bonds were quiet and irregular.
Stock quotations reported far The . Journal
by Watson & Co., Chamber of. Commerce,
Minneapolis, Minn. . . .
■ Closing prices are bid. ■■
' j 1 —Close—"
Sales Stocks— * [ HI- Lo- ] Bid. | Bid.
I | eat, est. |Ju.27[Ju.26
[Adams Express. I I I 195 1 , 1
400 Am. Cot. 0i1... 31 *4| '30% 31 31%
do pr 89 89
3,300 Am. Car 32 30% 31% 31%
400 do pr 87% 86%. 87% 87%
Am. Ice 34% 33*£ 33% 34%
do pr '..... 71 71
900 Am. Linseed ... 24% 23 23 22
do pr ..,. 50*4 51
Am. Malting ... .:. 7*£ 7*£
15,900 Am. Sugar 145% 142 144 144*4
•do pr ...... 120% 120 120 119
Am, Smelting .. 58% 56 57% 58
do pr ...... 104 101% 104 102
Am. Tobacco .. 135*4 134% 135 136
12,900 Amal. Cop .... 122% 120 121% 121%;
1,300 Anacon. Cop ... 48% 47% 47% 48 •
13,800 At, Top. &S. F 8«% 84% 85% 86%
7,200 do pr ...... 104% 106 106% 106%
800 Bait & Ohio.. 107»4 106 106% 106%
I do pr 94% 94%
10,300 Brook. Rap. Tr 82% 80% 81% I 81%
Brook. Un. Gas ..-. 215 216
Brunswick Co 10% ......'
200 Can. Southern.. ' 68% 68% 68 j 68 '
1,300 Can. Pacific .. 104% 102% 103% 104%
1,300 Ches. & Ohio.. 48% 47% 47% 48%
C. & E. 111... 126 127 . i
do pr 130 130
100 do pr ...... 78% 78% 78% | 78
Chi., Bur. & Q. 196% 196% 196% i 196%
3,300 Chi. Gr. West.. 24% 23% 24% 24%
1,300 Chi. & Alton.. 45% 44 44% 45%
' 100 do pr A ....| 82% 83%
do pr B ...... 52 | 52
do deb 90% I 90%
■' Chi., Ind. & L. 37 35% 36 | 36%
VVv" do pr I 72% I 73
1,8001 C.,C.,C. & St. L . 87% 86% 86% 86%
I do pr i 116 I 116
Chi. Term ..... 23% 23% 23 | 22%
I do pr 45% 44 45 | 44
Ccl., H. C. &I. 23% 21% 23% 22%
Col. uFel & I'n| 113% 110% 111% 111
do pr I I 136 1.....V
1,900 Col. Southern . 14% 14% 14*41 14%
do Ist pr 1 •. 51 1 50%
\\ do 2d pr .... 22*41 22%j 22*41 22%
,8001Consol. Gas .... 221% 218 | 220 ■. j 220
Con. Tobacco .| 68 I 67%| 67%) 67%
700 do pr ...... 118%' 118% 117%| 11S%;
1,100 Del. & Hudson. 169% 164 166 | 165
■300 Del. Lack & W. 237% 235 ; 235 | 235%
200 Den. & Rio Gr. 49 • 48% 49 | 50 .
1001 do pr 98% 98 '98% 99
|Dcs M. & Ft. D 40% 39% 39% 41%
Du., S. S. &At ! 11%| 11%
I do pr 20% 20 I 19%
16,200 Erie ............ 42% 40%| 41%1 42
3,400 do Ist pr ... 71% 70 70% | 70%
do 2d pr 56 j 56%
Evans & Ter. H .....*. ...... 55 | 55
do pr /.... 88 I 88
400 Gen. Electric .....260 j 260
100 Glucose ....,.,. 60 59 59 | 69%
do pr „... 1 185 ! 185%
'do pr ; 1 1 100 I 100%
, Great Nor. pr..| j .: 185 | 185%
200 Hocking Valley 64% 54% 54%! 54% 1
1001 do pr I 78% 78 78 | 78%:
2,600 Illinois Central. 149 | 147% 148% | 148% !
lowa Central .. 41% 40 -40 | 40%:
do pr ....... 81% 78 80% | 77%
Inter. Paper ... ...... ...... 22% 22%
do pr 77 77%
La Clede Gas .. 85" 85
- do pr ..................... 99 98
Lake Shore .. 235
Lake E. & W. ...... ...... 57 59
do pr ....'..... 120 120
Long Island .....74 ...;..
10,900 Louis. & Nash.! 109% 107% 108% 109
600 M., St. P. & Soo 26 | 25 25% 26;
do pr ....... 73 i 71% 71 r 71%
21,500 Manhattan ..... 125%; 121% 123% 124%
3,900 Met. St. Ry.... 174% 172% 173% 174%
500|Minn. & St. L. 107 105 107 : 106
do pr ......:... 113% 114
11,000 Missouri Pac .. 120% 118 120% 119%
600 M., K. & T.... 30 29% 30 , 29%
900 do pr 62% 61% 62% 62%
(Mexican. Cent... 28% 27% 28 28%
iMex. Nat 11 10% 10% .11,'
900 Nat. Biscuit ... 44 43% 44 44 ,
do pr ..« 101 101
500 Nat. Lead , 22% _22 22% 22%
i do pr ....... 90 90 >
,-• Nat. Salt ....... ...... ...... 43% 43%
i do pr .....— ...... ...... 75% 76-v
600 N.J. Central.. 166% 165% 165 161 •
3,500 Norfolk & West 51% '50 ; 51% ' 51%
North Am. Co ...... | ...... 101% 102
' 400 Northwestern .. 200 199 197 200
4,200 N. Y. Central.. .158% 166% 168' ...;.".
N.Y..C. & St.L. 37% 34% 36% 35%
do Ist pr ............... 108 I 108 ,
. do. 24 pr .... 77 73 \ 76% 73%
N.Y..N.H. & H ...... ..:..'. 216 , :V.T;t
6,500 Ontario ■ & W... 36% 35% 36 36%
- Paper Bag .... 16% 15% 15% 16%
do pr ........ ...... ...... 72% "73
100 Pressed Steel 43% 44
,100 do pr .:.;.., 85% 85% 85 85 ;
- ■■>-..v Pacific Coast .. i.'..V. ...... 68 68
900 Pacific Mail .:.. ...... 41 42%
14,600 Perm. R. R.... 160% 149 v 150% 150%
,7,500 People's Gas ... 118 116% 117% 117%
•700. Pullman .. 212 210-209 209
3,300 Reading ........ , 45% ,43% 45% 45
3,000 .do Ist pr... 78% s 77% 78%1 .78%'
. 5.000 do 2dpr.... 55% : 54% i, 55% 55%
3,100 Repub. Steel .. .' 21% 20% 21% 21%
700 do pr ...... 75% 74% -75 75 '
3,800 Rock I Island... 167 164 166 166%
■ St. L. & San F : 51% ',49% , 60% 51%
• • do Ist pr... ...... ...... --85% 85 +
do 2d pr:... 73 72% 73% 73%
. 400 St.; L. & S W 33 ' 31% 33 33%
800 do pr ..'.... 68 6P.% 67% 68%
22,600 St. Paul 174% 170% 172% 173%
, do pr ...... ...... :,.... 188, 188
v St. Joe & Gr. Is • • ••• • .••• • 14% 14%
• Stand. R. &Tw 6% 6% .6% 6%
23,200 Southern Pac .. 59 57% 58% 59%
12,900 Southern Ry .. .32% 31% 32% 32%
1,200 do pr ....'... -86% 85% .86% 86%
5,800 Term. Coal & I 67% 65 66% 67%
5,400 Texas & Pac. 45 ,41% 43% 44%
Tol.,St. L. & W .....; ...... 21% 21%
"• I do pr ...... ............ 35% 35%
Twin City R. T...... ...:.. 02% 93%
42,600 Union Pacific . 110% 107% 108% 110%
5004 do pr ....... 90% ' 90% 90% 90%
. |U. S. Express 88 j..
. U. S. Leather .. 13% 13% 13% 13%
• | do pr ........ 78% 78% 78% | 78%
: U. S. Rubber... 21% 21 |. 21 | 21
I do pr'...:... | 60%| 61
31,900 U. 8. Steel .... 48% 47% . 48%| 48%
16,500 do pr 99 97% 98% 98%
1.700 Wabash ........ 22% 22 | 22% | 22%
3,100 do pr ........43 41% 42% 43%
100 Wells-Far. Ex. ...... ...... | 150 | 150
2.000 Western Union. 93% 92%| 92%| . 92%
• 800 Wheel. &L. E. 20% 20 | 20% | 20%
100 do Ist pr ... 55%| 54% | -55. | 56
100 do 2d pr 32 | 32%
4,600 Wisconsin Cent 25% 24 24% 24
700 do pr ■:...... 48 47 47% 47%
Total sales, 662,500. ■ ~
MONEY REPORTS.
New York Money. .
New York, June 27.—Money on call unset
tled at 6 to 11 per cent; prime mercantile
paper, 3%©4% per cent; sterling exchange, j
fairly steady, with actual business in bank- |
ers' bills at $4.87y>@4.87% for demand and at |
$4.86%&4.85% for 60 days; posted rates, $4.86 :
■and $4.88%; commercial bills, $4.84%@4.85%.
Silver certificates nominally at 60c; bar sil-
I ver,-. 59% c; Mexican dollars, 47% c. Govern
i ment bonds steady; refunding' 2s, registered i
j 107, coupon 107%; 3s, registered and coupon,
108%; r.ew 4s, registered and coupon, 139;
old 4s, registered 112%, coupon 113%; os, reg
istered and coupon, 108%. -• ■■',-'.
Minneapolis Money.
MINNEAPOLIS — Bank clearings, $1,525,
--449.89; for the week, $9,039,959.48; correspond
■ ing week, $12,412,870.60. New York exchange,
selling rate, 50c premium; buying rate, par.
Chicago exchange, selling rate, 25c premium;
buying rate, 25c discount. London sixty-day
sight documentary, $4.85%.
. ST. Clearings to-day, $734,474.92.
Chicago Money.
* Chicago, . June 27.—Bank clearings, $24,187,
--919; balances, $1,845,805; posted exchange. $4.86
@4.88%; New York exchange, 30c premium.
London Consols.
London, June 27.—Consols for money and
the account 93 3-16. ,
GENERAL_PRODUCE
The Minneapolis Market.
Thursday, June 27.
The produce markets are very active this
morning, following the partial suspension of
business yesterday. There are no important
changes in the leading lines. Butter is fairly
active. Eggs hold steady at current figures.
Quality of receipts continues very poor.
Veal and poultry are steady.
BUTTER—Extra creameries, per lb, 17% c;
firsts, lb, 15y 2 @l6c; , seconds, 1b,[email protected]%c;
imitations, firsts, per Id, 14c; seconds, per
lb, [email protected]%c; dairies, extras, lb, 16c; firsts,
12% c; seconds, lb, lie; packing stock, fresh,
12% c; stale packing stock, per lb, 6%c; :
grease, lb, [email protected]; tested butter fat. In separa
tor cream, 17c.
EGGS— count, 9%c; dirty, fresh, 6c;
checks, 6c.
CHEESE—Twins or flats, fancy, new, 9%@
10c; twins or flats, choice, new, [email protected]; twins
or flats, fair to good, lb, [email protected]; brick, No. 1,
lb, 12c; brick, No. 2, per lb, [email protected]; brick,
No. 3, lb, . [email protected]; limburger, No. 1, per lb,
13% c; limburger, ' No. 2, 8%@9%c; primosr.,
No. 1, per lb, 8c;. No. 2, per ib, 5%c; Young
America, fancy vlb, ll%c;. choice, per ib,
10c; pultost, per lb, ,9®loc; - Swiss, Ne. l,
13%@14c; block Swiss, No. 1, 13% c; block.
Swiss, No. 2, ,lb/[email protected] , ;
■ LIVE POULTRY—Turkeys, mixed coops,
7%c; . chickens, hens, [email protected]%c; yearlings, [email protected];
old roosters, lb, sc; broilers, per lb, 16% c;
peepers, doz, [email protected]; ducks, white, 6%@7c;
colored, 6c; spring ducks, [email protected]; geese, sc.
DRESSED MEATS—VeaI, iancy, 100 to 125
lbs, [email protected]%c; fair to good, [email protected]%c; thin or
overweight, sc; mutton, fancy, i country
dressed, 7c; thin or overweight, lb, [email protected];
lambs, fancy, thin or bruised, 5%@6c; milk
lambs, fancy, [email protected]; choice, B©9c; hogs,
according to weight, 5%@7c.
FlSH—Pike, per lb, 6c; crappies, per lb,
4c; pickerel, drawn, per lb, sc; pickerel,
round, 4%@5c; sunfish, perch, etc., [email protected];
bullheads, skinned, 3%@4c; buffalo, [email protected]
POTATOES—Burbanks, car lots, bu; 75c;
Rurals, per bu, 75c; mixed white, bu, 50
@55c; mixed red, [email protected]; small lots sell at
[email protected] per bushel higher than these figures.
BEANS—Fancy navy, bu, $2.35; choice, per
bu, $2.10; medium, hand-picked, per bu, $2;
brown, fair to. godo, $2. ..
DRIED PEAS—Fancy yellow, [email protected] per
bu; medium, [email protected]$l; green, fancy, [email protected];
green, medium, [email protected]$l; marrowfat,- per bu,
$2. -. • ; :■'-'■ . ■ :- ■
APRICOTS—F%our-basket crates, [email protected]
CHERRIES—24-qt case. [email protected]; Califor
niac herries, per.lO-lb box, [email protected]; Illi
nois sour cherries, $1.25.
PEACHES—Missouri stock, per six-basket
crate, $2; Alexanders, box, [email protected]
- PLUMS—Clyman, 4-basket crate, [email protected]
ORANGES—California navels, 80s, $4; Cali
fornia navels, 965, $4; Calif navels, 1265,
$3.75; California navels, 150s, [email protected];
California navels, 1765, [email protected]; Cali
fornia seedlings, all sizes, $3.25; Califor
nia tangerines, half box, $2; Mediterranean
sweets, $3.75; St. Michaels, $4.25; grape fruit, '
80s to 965, [email protected] • -
LEMONS—Messinas, 300s or 3605, fancy, $4
@4.25; choice, $4; California fancy, as to size,
[email protected]; choice, $3.50. - : - : - \
PINEAPPLES—Doz, as to size, [email protected] ;
STRAWBERRIES—Cases, 24 qts, [email protected];
home grown stock, 24-qt cases, [email protected] '
GOOSEBERRIES— 24-qt ease, [email protected] i
BLUEBERRIES—I6-quart ease, $2.25.
1 BLACK RASPBERRIES—I2-qt case, [email protected]
1.75; red raspberries, 24-qt case, [email protected]
WATERMELON—FIorida stock, per 100, $30
CANTALOUPE — Florida stock, per craw,
[email protected] . . • .
BANANAS—Fancy, large bunches, $2.50;
medium bunches, [email protected]; small bunches
[email protected];75. . -V
HONEY—New fancy, white, 1-lb sections,
19c; choice white, [email protected]; amber. [email protected];
golden rod, [email protected]; extracted white, . [email protected];
buckwheat, [email protected]; extracted amber,
VEGETABLES—Asparagus- . doz, [email protected];
beans, wax, bu crate, $1.75; beans, string,
2-3-bu crate, $1.25; beets, bu, 50c; beets, new,
doz bunches, ■ 35c; ■ cabbage. southern,
about 160 lbs, $2.75; carrots, doz bunches,
40c; cauliflower, per doz. $i; celery, Florida,
doz, [email protected]; celery, California, 60c; cucum
bers, home grown, doz, [email protected]; . egg plant,
doz, [email protected]: lettuce, doz [email protected]; lettuce, head
doz, 20c; mint, per doz, . 35c; - onions, doz, i
bunches, [email protected]; onions, southern, bu box,sl; j
Bermuda onions, crate, [email protected]; parsley,do*
30c; parsnips, bu, 50c; ■ potatoes, new, bu,
$I.lo® 1.25; peas, green, $1.25; pie plant, per
lb, [email protected]%c; radishes, long, doz bunches, 15c;
radishes, round, doz bunches, [email protected]; ruta
bagas, bu, 30c; salsify (oyster paint), per
doz, 35c; spinach, bu, 30c; .turnips, new, doz
bunches, [email protected]; tomatoes, home grown, 5-lb
basket, [email protected]; watercress, p«r doz, 35c.
New York Produce.
260 I New York. June 27.—Butter—Receipts, 8,226
69V* pkgs; steady; - creamery, [email protected]^c; factory,
18oVa I [email protected] Cheese—Receipts, 10,125 pkgs; un
-100% settled; fancy large, colored; 9^@9%c; fancy
185% i large, white, 9%c; fancy small, colored, 9%&)
j»*%- 9%e; fancy small, white, [email protected] . Eggs—
TBVi : Receipts, 9,520 pkgs; firmer; western candled,
145f1/i Lia^e; western uncandled, [email protected] Sugar—
4°% j Raw, firm; fair, refining, 3 9-16 c; centrifugal
"Vfe 1 S6-test, 4. 7-32 c; molasses sugar, 3 5-18 c; re
22Vs ; fined, firm; crushed, 6c; powdered," 6.60 c;
77!4 i granulated, 6.50 c. Coffee—Steady; No ;7
83 j Rio, 6 l-16c.; „.':..
98 : ';;— :—:—- ki "
Chicago Produce.
Chicago, June 27.—Butter steady; creamer
ies, 14^@19c; dairies, [email protected] Cheese,
steady; twins, [email protected]%c; young Americas, 9%<g>
10c; Cheddars, [email protected]; daisies, 9^c. Eggs,
steady; losa off, cases returned, 10%@ll%c!
Iced poultry, steady; turkeys, 6<f?Sc; chickens
[email protected]%c.
MISCELLANEOUS
Xmv York Cotton.
New York, June 27.—Cotton opened firm and
unchanged to 6 points higher, and immedi
ately advanced to a level of &@l3 points over
yesterday's closing, on general buying. So
far as the Texas rains were concerned, private
telegrams declared the precipitation was very
light and entirely local Liverpool cables
stated that Manchester spinners were in the
midst of a large export and domestic trade.
Spot closed quiet; middling uplands, B%c;
middling gulf, 9Hc; sales, 27f> bales. Futures
closed steady; June, 8.61 c; July, 8.61 c; August,
7.82 c; September, 7.46 c; October, 7.40 c; No
vember, 7.37 c; December, 7.40 c; January,
7.43 c: February, 7.43 c; March, 7.46 c.
SPRING LAMBS UP
They Are Quoted ioc to 15c Higher
To-day.
HOGS ARE A SHADE HIGHER
Cattle Receipts Are Small With
Prices UuUiiK Steady With
Yesterday's.
South St. Paul, Minn., June 27.—Receipts
to-day were 200 cattle, 100 calves, 600 hogs
and 100 sheep.
The following table shows the receipts from
Jan. 1, 1901, to date, as compared with the
same period a year ago:
Year. Cattle.Calves.Hoßs.Sheep.Horses.Cars.
1901 ....62,705 23,815 288,594 77,724 6.998 6,881
1900 ....51,736 25,150 254,504 108,636 15,017 6,862
Dec 1,335 30,912 8,019 ....
1nc....11,969 34,090 19
The fo>' /wing table shows the receipts for
June to «ate, as compared with the same pe
riod a year ago:
Year. Cattle.Calves.Hogs.Sheep.Horses.Cars.
1901 7,701 2,638 36,939 2,924 3,202 960
1900 9,809 4,025 35,234 7,970 5,657 1,153
Dec .... 2,108 1,387 3,246 2,455 193
Inc 1,705
Receipts:
Date. Cattle. Calves. Hogs. Sheep. Cars
June 20 .... 339 90 1,730 44 50
June 21 59 24 748 8 26
June 22 41 42 1226 65 21
June 24 226 52 1,299 13 45
June 25 1,099 416 2,*42 579 8G
June 26 737 145 1,952 225 58
Estimated receipts by cars to-day of the
railroads centering at these yards: Chicago,
Milwaukee & St. Paul, 6; Chicago, St. Paul,
Minneapolis & Omaha, 5; Great Northern, 3;
Northern Pacific, 5; total, 19.
Disposition of stock June 26:
Firm. Cattle. Hogs. Sheep.
Swift & Co 242 1,958 76
Elliot & Co.. Duluth.. 6
! Estate of I. Staples .. 1 ....
i Slimmer & Thomas 89 .... ...
•Peter Evans 31 ....
j Hankey Bros 57 ....
J.B.Fitzgerald 36 ....
Louis Hertz 5 ....
R. N. Katz 6
J. R. King 6
King Bros 2 .... 16
Leo Gottfried .... 65
Country buyers 330 .... 89
Totals 812 1,958 246
CATTLE—Receipts in the local yards were
very small. Supplies at ©jutside markeU
were light; with prices generally ruling
steady. Prices here on all kinds of killing
cattle ruled steady with yesterday, but about
25 cents under the best time early last week.
Stockers and feeders moved very slow, and
especially kinds that did not possess quality.
Good-quality little stock steers and heifers
sold fully steady; common to fair kinds were
very slow at prices [email protected] lower. Sales:
Butcher Cows and Heifers—
No. Ay. Price.ilNo. Ay. Price.
1 980 $4.00 || 1 970 $3.35
■ 1 1,200 3.25 I 2 1,010 3.50
2 1.075 3.50 1 970 3.25
1 1,040 3.00 3 1,023 2.65
2 .... 920 2.60 | 2 955 2.25
3 906 2.00 || 9 793 2.10
1 730 1.75 || 1 960 1.76
Milkers and Springers—
Two cows and two calves for $66; one cow
and one calf for $40; one cow and one calf for
$38; one cow and one calf for $36.50.
Stockers. and Feeders—
No. Ay. Price.||No. Ay. Price.
3 876 $3.85 |10 459 $3.80
8 418 3.65 | 1 620 3.75
1 440 3.75 || 2 520 3.70
4 510 3.50 || 4 355 2.50
Feeding Cows and Heifers—
No. Ay. Price. | j No. Ay. Price.
5 392 $3.00 i| 1 840 $2.50
1 910 2.50 | 6 421 2.45
1 770 2.40 |
Feeding Bulls—
No. Ay. Price.ilNo. Ay. Price.
2 1,045 $2.70 || 1 760 $2.40
1 510 2.25 ij a 424 3.00
Veal Calves-
No. Ay. Price.||No. Ay. Price.
1 150 $5.25 || 2 45 $5.25
2 145 5.00 || 1 180 5.00
13 121 4.35' |;10 148 4.35
HOGS—The marketing of hogs in sight to
day shows an increase of 5,000 over last
Thursday and about 16,000 over a year ago to
day. The supply here was very small, with
early bids ruling strong to a shade higher,
i with cases possibly 5c up. Aside from one
! load at $6 and one load at $6.05. offerings
were not very desirable and sold largely at
$5.90. Rough packers sold at $5.55.
Hogs—
No. Ay. Price.MNo. Ay. Price.
59 243 $6.05 ||7C 215 $6.02%
10 176 6.00 [61 253 5.97%
40 212 5.97%]]£4 242 5.95
54 270 5.95 |48 228 595
12 330 5.90 10 229 5.90
55 231 5.90 22 194 5.85
54 241 5.85 j 5 207 5.80
Pigs and Culls-
No. Ay. Price.ilNo. Ay. Price.
9 362 $5.55 11 2 285 $5.55
2 360 5.55 H 1 510 5.35
1 boar 190 5.30
SHEEP—Receipts were very small and con
sisted of only fair quality spring iambs and
ewes. Spring lambs are quoted 10c to 15c
higher at $5.25 for choice ones, while both fat
ewes and wethers are quoted steady. Spring
lambs are in very strong demand and are
now fully 75c higher than three weeks ago.
No. Ay. Price.
2 spring lambs , 65 $5.15
5 spring lambs 56 4.80
5 spring lambs 60 5.00
5 ewes — v 108 3.50
3 stock lambs 46 3.25
2 bucks 120 2.25
On the market: W. Round, Isanti; F. W.
Richter, Ellsworth, Wis.; J. Rise, Fertile;
L. Rausch, Howard Lake; G. Gardner, Ham
mond, Wis.; C. H. Richards, Stewart; M.
J. Malonophy, Bonalr, Iowa; J. S. Green,
Welch & Redwing, A. McQuodale, OUvia.
Sioux City Live Stock.
Sioux City, lowa, June 27.—Receipts—Hogs
3,700; cattle, 400. Hogs—Shade lower. Sales
i No- Ay. Price.
62 210 $5.80
72 235 5.82%
69 245 5.85 '
70 250 2.87%
66 260 5.90
67 315 6.95
I Cattle—Steady. Sales:
Ay. Price.
23 beeves 1,149 $4.90
17 beeves 1,275 7.57
2 canners 920 2.50
6 cows 1,250 4!20
6 stock heifers 440 2.75
5 stock heifers 400 300
2 bulls 910 2.50
2 bulls 900 2.75
12 bulls 1,050 3.00
8 stockers 840 3.50
10 stockers 800 4.00
5 yearlings 550 350
6 yearlings 490 4.00
3 calves 330 3.75
4 calves ..-. 320 4.00
Sheep—ln demand, [email protected]
Chicago Live Stock.
Chicago, June 27.—Cattle, receipts, 8,600, in
cluding 400 Texans; steady to slow; butch
ers" stock slow; good to prime steers, $5.40®
6.40; poor to medium, [email protected]; stockers and
i feeders, [email protected]; cows, $2.7i>@4.85; heifers
I [email protected]; canners, [email protected]; bulls, $2.90©4 60:
j calves, [email protected]; Texas fed steers, $4 25®
6.40; Texas bulls, [email protected]
Hogs, receipts, to-day, 22,000; to-morrow
18,0000; left over, 3,125; averaged steady top'
$6.25; mixed and butchers, [email protected]%; good
to choice heavy, [email protected]; rough heavy $6 85
©5.95; light, [email protected]; bulk of sales, $6®6 15
Sheep, receipts, 13,000; sheep about steady
clipped lambs strong; others steady to slow'
good to choice wethers, [email protected]; fair to
choice mixed, $3.80<g:4; western sheep $4®
4.25; yearlings, [email protected]; native lambs, $4®
6.16; western lambs, [email protected]
Official yesterday: Receipts—Cattle 20 507
--hogs, 30,256; sheep, 20,298. Shipments—Cattle'
2,874; hogs, 5,912; sheep, 120.
Kansas City Live Stock.
Kansas City, June 27.—Cattle, receipts 6,000;
10c to 15c lower; native steers, [email protected]
Texans, $4.25<g0.20; native cows and heifers!
[email protected]; stockers and feeders, $3.50®5 75
--calves, [email protected] W '
Hogs, receipts, 18,000; steady; bulk of sales,
[email protected]; heavy, [email protected]; mixed, [email protected] 05
--light, $5.7«@6; yorkers, |[email protected]; pigs, $5.50
@5.65.
Sheep, receipts, 3,500; strong; muttons. $3.50
@4.75; lambs, [email protected]; Texans, [email protected]
St. Louis Live Stock.
St. Louis, June 27.—Cattle, receipts, 2,700;
steady to strong; native steers, [email protected];
stockers and feeders, [email protected]; cows and
heifers, [email protected]; Texans, [email protected]
Hogs, receipts, 6,500; strong to shade high-
M. DOBAM & CO.,
Th« Oldest Firm of
Bankers and Broker*
IN THE NORTHWEST.
• Have remoTed from their old quarters
, ■ on Jackson Street to the •
tiormania Life Batldias, Cor. 4th
and Miuiaeots St* IK. Faml. Mian.
THUKSDAY EVENING, JUJSE 27, 1901.
or; pigs, [email protected]; packers, [email protected]; butch
ers, [email protected]%.
Sheep, receipts 4,500; 10c lower; native mut
tons, [email protected]; lambs, [email protected]
FOUNDRY IRON TRADE
Markets Are Rather Quiet and Still
Balancing.
CONSUMPTION IS STILL HEAVY
Confidence Felt That It "Will Con
tinue Up to the Top Notch
Till Winter.
New York, June 27.—The Iron Age says:
So far as the foundry iron trade is con
cerned the markets have been rather quiet,
and are otiil balancing. Cincinnati, which
Is the chief distributing point for southern
iron, is rather weak. In the east the pur
chases of basic pig by the leading steel
interest, both lor western and New England
delivery, are having their effect. Among
these sales is one lot of 6,000 tons. In Pitts
burg some larger outside steel companies
have taken round blocks of Bessemer pig.
Apparently, however, it is only for prompt
shipment that this iron is wanted.
Consumption continues on a large scale,
and there are those who feel confident that
It is bound to continue up to the top notch
well into the winter months. In many lines,
as in steel rails, and in railroad equipment
generally, this is abundantly assured by the
orders on the books. In structural material,
in which there was a lull in new orders, there
is more doing. Some very good contracts
have just been placed, among them one lot of
10,000 tons for improvements at the Pueblo
works of the Colorado Fuel and Iron com
pany. The same is true of the shipyards on
the lakes, which have just booked additional
tonnage.
The labor situation is being given less con
sideration. The end of the machinists' strike
is in sight, so that that consuming branch will
soon be restored to its normal condition It
is not believed that there is serious danger
over the moulders' demands, while the con
ferences between the Amalgamated associa
tion and the Union rolling mills are likely to
lead to an early adjustment. The flood in
West Virginia will not delay coke shipments
from that important district for more than
two weeks at the utmost.
Some uneasiness has been caused by the |
reports from England that steel billets and ;
wire rods were again being offered from thi3
side. This was construed as an intimation
that powerful interests had evidence that
there is danger of consumption here falling
off later on. We understand, however, that !
the management of the United States Steel
corporation has decided to change the policy
pursued by constituent companies in the
past of selling abroad only when relief was
desired. It is understood that henceforth the
leading American makers will at all times
keep in touch with the foreign markets
through sales, even though they be small
only.
Hides, Pelts, Tallow and Wool.
N0.1.N0.2.
Green salted heavy steer hides 8% 7%
Green salted heavy cow hides 7%
Green salted light hides . "Vi 6%
Green salted heavy cow and steer
hides, branded 7 6
Green salted bull and oxen 7 6
Green salted veal calf, 8 to 15 1b5..10% 9
Green salted veal kip, 15 to 25 lbs BV4 7
Green salted long-haired or runner
kip 7% 6
Green salted deacons, each 50 40
Green cattle hides and skins, IQ-lVi per
pound less than above quotations.
Green salted horse or mule hides,
large $3.00 2.25
Green salted horse or mule hides,
medium 2.50 1.75
Green salted horse or mule hides,
small 1.50 1.00
Dry flint Montana butcher hides.. [email protected]»4
Dry flint Minnesota, Dakota and
Wisconsin hides 11 9
Dry flint calfskins 16 12
Dry flint kip skins 14 11
Green saited pelts, large, each 75<81.00
Green salted pelts, medium, each .. .50® .70
Green salted pelts, small, each [email protected] .45
Dry flint territorial fpelts, butcher.lo @10*4
Dry flint territorial pelts, murrain.. B^@ 9^
Dry flint territorial shearlings 6 @ 8
Tallow, in cakes 4% 4
Tallow, in barrels 4% 3^
Grease, white 4 3%
Grease, dark 3% 'iy^,
Wool, medium, unwashed 13%@14
Wool, fine medium, unwashed 12 @13V4
Wool, coarse, unwashed 12 @13
Wool, fine, unwashed 9 @--
Wool, broken fleeces, unwashed 11 @12
Wool, seedy, burry, unwashed 10 @11
Bright Wisconsin and similar grades, [email protected]
higher than above quotations.
SPECTTLATIVE GOSSIP
Winnipeg reports weather excessively hot;
heavy thunder storms, accompanied by del
uges 0 frain and hail. Serious damage report
ed from several localities.
Chicago to I. G. Andrews & Co.: Kansas
City wires: "President of the Kansas Grain
Growers' Association is on the floor this
morning. He says with perfect weather con
ditions from now on the state cannot possibly
raise over 60 per cent of a crop of corn."
Clearances: Wheat and flour, 577,000 bu;
corn, 517,000; oats, 59,000.
Price Current: Crop conditions maintained
without material change. Winter wheat har
vest and threshing reports are exceeding ex
pectations. Quality exceptionally high. Corn
needing rain in southwest. Packing hogs,
480,000, against 435,000 last year.
INVESTMENT GOSSIP
Soo Line, third week, increase, $2,419; from
July 1, decrease, $631,121.
Ontario & Western reports for May: Net
earnings, increase, $45,970; from July 1, net
earnings, decrease, .$41,904.
Chesapeake & Ohio, third week June, in
crease, $250; from July 1, increase, $1,912,423.
The governors of the Stock Exchange, at
their meeting yesterday, decided not to close
the exchange July 5 and 6.
Atchison report for May shows net Increase
after taxes and rentals of $253,761.
Monon earnings for second week June. In
crease $5,139; from July 1, decrease $19,820.
The Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St.
Louis railway. May report net earnings in
crease $27,571; surplus increases $31,582; from
July 1, net earnings decrease $17,746; surplus
decrease $48,866.
Verhoeff, from Milmlne: London dull and
lower. Lord Salisbury's speech on South
African affairs caused a chill. Stock specula
tion market will be narrowed to a profes
sional one. Our people recommend the long
side on all declines.
New York to Watson & Co.: The disquiet
ing rumors which have been in circulation
regarding alleged embarrassment of another
house besides Marquand & Co., which have
caused a good deal of frightened selling the
past hour, are absolutely without foundation.
The rumors probably grew out of the house;,
which assisted to tide over the bank Tuesday
and yesterday. The market has been pretty
well cleaned up of a lot of weak, scattered
long interest and stop orders. Liquidation
has also been heavy by pools. The result of
this and the calling of loans which has been
going on all the morning will re reflected on
a heavy decrease in loans in Saturday's bank
statement, which we think will, with the
large interior remittances, produce a consid
erable increase in surplus.
Public Baths Agitation.
Special to The Journal.
Winona, Minn., June 27.—The heated spell
has revived agitation for public baths here,
similar to the institution at St. Paul, which,
was unanimously indorsed by the Winona
aldermen on their visit there last fall. It
will be too late to get the baths this year,
but it is hoped to have them by another
season.—Some anxiety has been felt lest the
prolonged heated spell would have a bad
effect on Bishop Cotter, now in the hospital
at Rochester. A message says the bishop
does not seem to mind the heat, and that he
Is doing nicely and gaining strength every
day.—Mary Luxa, who was recently sent to
the poor farm from Winona, has become in
sane.
,;-< > .\'. ' ■' . '■ === nfAUZBTO) 1879 ■: —-———..' ;
WOODWARD & 00.
m»^i* GRAIN COMMISSION **—
iV MU3Kffnra oUam» and Mllwauke*. Orders tut future dellrenr exeoatad la •& aarkflU.,
eiias; E. Lewis Ms _
fi Co- . Bonds,
1, 2 and 3 Chamber of ,
Commerce, Minneapolis. Pnttflll
GRAIN, PROVISIONS.
New York Correspondents,
Clark, Dodge & Co.
Chicago * < Bartlett, Frailer AC*.
Correspondents, < J. F. Harris.
. Dally Price Current mailed free on ap
plication.
L T. SOWLE & SONS
STOCKS, BONDS, GRAIN
AND PROVISIONS.
21 Chamber of Commerce, Minneapolis.
Members i Chicago Board of Trade and
MemDerM M . pTg Chamber of commerce.
Phones: K. W.6J4M., T. C. C 34.
PROVISIONS
Chicago Provlaiun*.
Chicago, June 27.—Provisions were dull but
steady. September pork opened a shade lower
at |14.82V£ and sold up sc. September lard
opened o c down at 18.7U, and advanced to
Jo-^'/i, and September ribs unchanged at
' J&.lo. Close: Pork, June, $14.60; July, $14.60;
I September, $14.80. Lard, June, $8.62%; July.
;$8.6.i%; September, $8.70; October, $8.67%; No
vember, $8.97%; December, $8.22%; January
$8.07%@8.10. Ribs, June, $8; July, $8; Sep
tember, $8.12%; October, $8.02%.
Peoria YVHLkj .
Peoria, June 27.— Whisky on the basis of
$1.27 for finished goods.
Cans Lake's Fourth.
Special to The Journal.
Cass Lake, Minn., June 27.—Ine commutes
in charge of the Fourth of July celebration
has about completed all arrangements, and
tne indications are that Cass Lake will have
one »of the beat celebrations in the north
west. The running team of the Bemidji fire
department, which won the championship of
tne northern Minnesota firemen's tournament
association at BemldJl last week will be here,
and give several exhibitions. The Bemidji
band one of the best in the north half of
™* -I ' i* 11. 1 also P artlciPate, and the Be
midji baseball team will cross bats with the
local club. There will also be a band of
Pembina Indians, numbering over 200 who
will join the- Chippewa Indians in dances an.i
equestrian exhibitions. A long program of
athletic sports and games has been arranged.
SHIPPING NEWS
OF THE LAKES.
Detroit—Up: Madagascar, S:3O last night-
Oglebay, 9:10; John Spry. 9:20; Argonaut
?A s?i pneer Chattanooga, 10:20. Zenith City,
10:10; Tacoma, 12.40; Iron Cniel, consorts 1*
Thomas Wilson. 1:30; Annie Laura, barge!
2jtO; Wallace, Ashland, *:' Black and whai—
back, 3:30; Walter Scranton, 3:00; Maytham
6; Bradley, consorts, 6:30; Louisiana, 6-50-
Roman, Whitworth, 7; Glasgow, Abyssinia)
7:30; Buffalo, Helena, Yukon. 10; Alcona
Alta, 11.
Sault Ste. Marie—Up: Fairbairn, wbaleback
10:30 last night; Neilson, midnight; Morse
Cadillac, 7 a. m.; Shaw, Wilson, Norton'
Cumberland, 8:30; Adams, Mohegan Mingoe
9; North Star, 9:30; Tecumsch, 10:30; Nyanza
Charles Eddy, Manola, Russell, 11:30. Down-
Mariposa, whaleback. 1C last night; Penob
scot, 11; Matoa, Nasmith, 1:30 a. m.; Maine
Brainerd, Toledo, Hoag. Buckout, 3.40; Colby'
Superior City, Mala, 4:20; Miami (passenger),
4; Van Hise, Sevona, 5:20; Kennebec 7-30-
Hill (steel). Outhwalte, Leaffleld, Burlum 9:
Amaranth, Italia, 10; Coralia, Thomas, Con
tinental, Holland, 10:40; Stone and oil tank,
Chicago—One shipper who had a cargo he
wanted to load by to-morrow night nad con
siderable difficulty in finding a boat. This
gave the appearance of a better demand but
vesselmen claimed it was an illusion, for,
when that one cargo was taken, there was
not much else in sight. Rates hung at 1%
cents.
Au —The remains of another victim
of the Baltimore disaster came ashore live
miles above Oscoda to-day. The body will
be brought here for identification.
Detroit—The steamer Madagascar is
aground in Lake St. Clair. The wrecker
Saglnaw went to her assistance this morning
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.— Hanna Mar
ina, 12:30 p. m.; Mataafa, Bryn Mawr, Oliver
2; Alberta, 3; Joliet and whaleback, Gilbert,
Kearsarge, 4; Gracian, 7:20; Northern Light.
Waldo, 8; Norwalk. Viking, Vinland United
Empire, 8:20. Down: ■ Presque Isle Car
negie, noon; Murphy, Maritana, Kaliyuga,
Robert Rhodes, Ford, 1:30 p. m.; Wetmore,
Brunette, King, 2:30; Manitoba, Whitney. Fai
con. 3; D. C. Whitney, 4; Business, 4:40;
Reynolds, Fronterac, 6; John Eddy, Penning
ton, 6:30; Senator. 7:30.
Detroit — Up:- Wawatam and whaleback.
John Mitchell. 11; Wolvin, 12:30 p. m.;
Wolf, Linden, Wall, 12:40; Lafayette 2;
Masaba, Malta, 3; C. W. Chamberlain. Scran
ton, 3:40. Down: Amazonas, 9:10 last night;
Livingstone, America, Tyrone, 2:15 a. m.;
Corona, Carrlngton, 2:30; Pathfinder, Saga
more, "4; Castle, Edenborn and whaleback.
5:30; Sheldon, Rhodes. 6; Oades,. 10:30; Pope,
11; Reis, 11:50; Mars, Lake Shore, 1 p. m.;
Cormorant, NorrJs, 2; Case, Troy, 4; Andaste,
4:30; German, 4:40; Victory, 5:15; Angelina,
6:30.
Marquette—Cleared: Frontenae. Buffalo;
Business. Ashtabula; Colby. Cleveland.
Cleveland —The steamer George W. Peavey,
the second of the big fleet of carriers now
being built at the yards of the American
Shipbuilding company for the Peavey syndi
cate, was launched at Lorair. this afternoon.
The new boat will be ready for service in
about six weeks. ■•. Ay. ■<:-
Buffalo—Cleared: Coal—Ketchum, Au Sable.
Lorain—Cleared: Light—Castalla, Mar
quette.
Conneaut— Cartagena, Du
luth. Light— Rees, Admiral. Duluth.
Cleveland—Cleared: Light—Hattie, Duluth.
Chicago—Two or three charters for oats
covered the day's business in the grain trade.
The boats reported were the Ravemcraig to
Midland and the Topeka for Buffalo.
Cleveland —There is no improvement In the
dock situation and business -will drag along
at the present rates for some time. Early In
the month the June ore movement was pre
dicted r.t 4.000.000 tons, but these figures will
not be reached, on account of the time con
sumed by the fleets in unloading. Vessel
men are getting tired of having their boats
tied up at the ore docks and they are taking
Lake Michigan coal a little mere freely.
Buffalo —A cut in the Green Bay rate from
-40 to 35 cents is the only change in the coal
market. A dull month for July Is predicted.
Charters: Stafford. South Lake Linden, 35;
Neshoto. West Superior, 35.
Erie—Cleared: Coal— Glasgow, Duluth.
Toledo—Departed: Coal—Helena, Helvetia,
Yukon, Duluth: Linden, Hall. Hough ton.
Light—John Hutchlnson, Ashland, Duluth.
Duluth-SupfHor— Nicholas. North
Wave. Mahonlne, Avon, Queen City. Ed
Kelley. Huron City, Bay City. Depart^:
M^Williams, Pawnee and consorts, Ashland,
light: K'rby, Hartnell. .Italia. Bsnpor, Gll
ohrist, Kennebec. Oceanica Page. Quito. Lake
Erie, ore: Arizona and consorts. B'rckhead,
Burton. ZHlah. Minch. Madden and consorts,
Cleveland. Lake Erie, lumber.
THOMAS & Co
Grain Commission ail StocK Brokers. 1
Write for oar d*Uy market letter, which we H
mall FREE on application. ■ . §3
Members Minneapolis Chamber of Com- B
meroe. Telephone— Main IRB7-J, |l
8 CHAMBER OF OOMMERBE. g
Watson & Co
Brokora In Qraln,Pi*ovMon&,
Stooka and Bonds,
member* H. ¥. Stock Exchange
Chicago Correspoodatite *«*w»rtz ul) *
Private wire ChicaKO Ptivrr Tort. 906 Mala
33 Ohambor of Oontmoroo*
[email protected] BONDS. CBAIN. FROVISIPNS,\
\ v tmiWATK WIWB ■ ■£: ci \
aMEMBERS I eh amber of commerce mpls v \
\312 CUIRAKTY LOAN BLDC MINNEAPOLIS. \
\8 CHAMBER OP COMMERCE MIWHEjftPQLIifeA

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