OCR Interpretation


The Minneapolis journal. (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, August 07, 1901, Image 10

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1901-08-07/ed-1/seq-10/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 10

10
BULL MARLET IN WHEAT; SEPTEMBER UP TO 69& c
Good Support Throughout and a
Two Cent Advance With Only
Slight Reactions.
CLEARANCES HEAVY AT 1,160,000
Much Interest in the Foreign Situa
tion and the tiov't Corn Re
port, Due Auk. 1O-
Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, Aug. 7.
—Wheat had a strong turn to-day and by
noon had gained nearly 2c, September sell
ing to 69ttc and December to 70% c.
The opening was a shade lower at G7%@
67^c, but the market turned strong at once
on good buying, helped to some extent by
predictions of frost to-night for North Da
kota. Southwestern Nebraska had a rain
fall as heavy as any ever recorded, showing
nearly three inches in places. The northwest
1b clear and cool. Light showers fell at
Dodge and Huron and there were some local
sprinkles. Generally speaking, the condi
tions continue very favorable for harvesting.
Liverpool was off %@Mi. Pariß lost %@
%c. Antwerp was unchanged.
The Washington weekly bulletin Bays that
late corn has experienced a general and
decided improvement as a result of cool
weather and raina. Early corn had been in
jured beyond any help. The drought in the
Missouri valley is largely relieved, but there
has been only partial relief east of the Mis
sissippi valley and north of the Ohio. The
oats crop Is generally unsatisfactory. St.
Louis received 156,000 bushels, against 204.000
bushels. Kansas City had 146 cars, against
484.
Sentiment in wheat Is gradually hardening.
Because the September option aold down in.
the neighborhood of 61c at one time, there
has been even to date more or less hesitation
and fear that it might again seek this low
level. Within a week, however, and espe
cially within a few days, this hag been
giving way to a more confident feeling, and
the belief in now more general that the pres
ent price level represents about the legiti
mate value of wheat. The market will have
its variations and natural changes, but in
the situation as it stands to-oay tt is dim
cult to find much thai, argues for weakness.
There are several strengthening factors In
sight. The corn crop damage remains a
leader, aud there is &reat interest In the gov
ernment report, due Aug. 10, that will cover
it fully, and even mere thoroughly than
'.c. former years, according to Secretary Wil
son's statement. It is expected that the fig
ures will be low, and many look for them to
run below the figures of 1891. In that case
the corn damage will remain a strong argu
ment in support of wjieat. Cash \cheat de
mand is good, especially in this market. Mil
lers i re drawing steadily upon terminals and
grinding the wheat. Local elevators are
practically bare and were never in better
shape to handle a crop than this year, and
however heavy the movement of new wheat,
that is just getting under way, they can
take care of everything. Receipts here" con
tinue very light and many opinions have
been expressed to the effect that the north
west is now nearly as well cleaned up as in
the Leiter year. The heavy clearances that
have been a feature of the daily statistics for
ten days, and the continued export inquiry
for cash wheat. Indicate a prospective Eu
ropean shortage. The German damage has
been fully verified. Russian advices are con
flicting, but are generally bad and if con
ditions are even approximately as bad as
reported, it would mean a material lessening
of Russian exports. The first definite sug
gestion as to foreign requirements came
yesterday from Broomhall, who estimates the
total European crop to be 60,000,000 bushel 3
under last year.
To-day' s news indicated a continuance of
the heavy foreign movement. St. Louis
wired that exporting houses were buyers
of September wheat in that market. Clear
ances were again heavy at 1,150,000 bushels
wheat and flour.
Primary receipts show 1,206,000 bushels,
Against 1,207,000 bushels last year, and ship
ments 791,000 DUEhels, against 800,000 bushels.
Minneapolis received 82 cars and Duluth 38,
against 217 and 29 last year.
New York reports 43 loads taken for ex
port. The market eased oft near the close
on profit taking. September closed at 68%@
68% c. December closed at 70%@70i4c. Chi
cago closed September at 71%@71%c.
Trading In wheat to arrive was the feature
of to-day's cash market. No. 1 northern
sold well on this basis, showing a range
of 68*ic to 70c in conformity with the ad
vancing option. Spot No. 1 was in light
supply, as receipts were light all around.
Sales were made at 68% c and 69% c. No. 2
northern Bold up to 68c for new and was
firm around this figure. No. 3 wheat held
around [email protected]%c. Few low grades were on
sale. No grade wheat brought 56®58c.
THE FLOUR MARKET
Prices Advatccd — Good Demand
Prom Every Quarter.
Millers report good active den-.and and ad
ditional business stirred up by the advance in
■wheat. Buyers are coming in from all mar
kets and to-day's sales will show a large
total.
Shipments for the day were 53,031 barrels.
First patents are quoted [email protected]; second
patents. [email protected]; first clears, [email protected]; sec
ond clears, $2.20.
THE CASH TRADE
Flax Selling? to Arrive—Corn Dull —
Oat* Easier.
FLAX—The market showed more activity,
both for spot and for flax to arrive. Re
jected sold at [email protected] New flax. No. 1,
sold at practically the same figures. Flax
to arrive in five days sold at [email protected]%.
Closing prices were: Minneapolis cash, $1.65;
Duluth, cash, $1.66.
Minneapolis received 7 cars, against 1 last
year. Duluth had 1 car.
CORN—The market was quiet and some
what neglected. Receipts were only 4 cars
and there were no shipments. No. 3 ytfllow
is quoted 54% c.
OATS —There was an easier tone to the
market. Prices held fairly well, but there
were concessions on some lots. No. 3 white
is quoted 34%®35c. Receipts, 14 cars; ship
ments, 4 cars.
FEED AND MEAL—The market is firm and
active on all grades. There is good demand.
Coarse corn meal and cracked corn, $19.50®
20; No. 1 feed, [email protected]: No. 2 feed, $20.50
@21; No. 3 feed, [email protected]; granulated corn
meal in cotton sacts, at the rate of $2.25 per
barrel.
MILLSTUFFS — Prices are firm as
quoted, and bran in bulk is quoted
$13.50gi4: bulk shorts, [email protected]: flour mid
dlings, [email protected]; red dog in 140-lb sacks, $17
®17.50; feed in 200-lb sacks, $1 per ton addi
tional; In 100-lb sacks, $1.50 per ton addi
tional. Shipments, 1,894 tons.
RYE—The market was less active. No. 2
Bold at 52% c. New rye to arive sold at 53c.
Receipts, 11 cars; no shipments.
BARLEY—Prices were firm and active. No.
4 sold at 48c and No. 3 from 56c to 58c. Feed
grades are quoted [email protected] and malting grades,
[email protected] Receipts, 2 cars; shipments 7 cars.
HAY—Upland fancy, $12.50; upland choice,
[email protected]; upland No. 1, [email protected]; midland,
[email protected]; medium, [email protected]; timothy, choice
$12.50; No. 1, [email protected]; rye straw, choice,
|[email protected]; wheat and oat straw, $4.50®6.50
Put* and Call*.
Two o'clock report:
Puts, September wheat, 67% c.
Calls, September wheat, [email protected]%c.
Curb, September wheat, 68% c.
Receipt* and Shipments.
Aug. 6.
Received—Wheat, 82 cars, 63,960 bu; corn
8,080 bu; oats, 19,240 bu; barley, 980 bu- rye
8.030 bu; flax, 2,870 bu; flour, 1,338 brls; mill
stuffs, 20 tons; hay, 50 tons; fuel oil 62 890
--fruit, 1,252,476 lbs; merchandise, 2,069,986'1b5;
lumber, 14 cars; barrel stock, 5 cars ma
chinery, 728,060 lbs; coal, 979 tons; wood 15
cords; brick, 122,000; lime 1 car; cement
465 brie; household goods, 20,000 lbs; stone
and marble, 5 cars; dressed meats, 116 000
lbs; butter, 9,000: railroad materials, 7 cars;
sundries, 61 cars; car lots, 474.
Shipped—Wheat, 68 cars, 57,420 bu; oats,
5,160 bu; barley. 6,510 bu; flax, 680 bu; flour
53,031 brls; millstufls, 1,894 tons; fruit, 200 000
lbs; merchandise, 2,468,510 lbs; lumber, 100
oars; machinery, 628,896 lbs; coal, 27 tons
brick, 8.000; cement, 225 brls; household
goods, 61,000 lbs; ties, 29 cars; stone and
marble, 3 cars; linseed oil, 46,600 brls; oil
cake, 441,560 lbs; butter, 22,008 lbs; railroad
materials, 6 cars; sundries, 27 can; car
lott, »n.
Cash Sale* Reported To-day.
No. 1 northern, 1 car to arrive,.^...^.so.6l>-
No. 1 northern, 4 cars ............. ..^..,.69
No 1 northern, 6,000 bu, to arrive.—... .68%
No' 1 northern, 8 cars".. ;..^.......;.... .68%
]{« rnorttMO) 1 car now •,~~..«^... 7 .69 .•
RANGE OF WHEAT PRICE IN MINNEAPOLIS
Open. High. Low. To-day. Yesterday. Year Ago.
Aug..* $ $ $.68% $ .67% $.75
Sept.. .67%@67% .69% .67% .68%@68% .67%@67% .74%@74'
Dec. .69% .70% .69% .70%@70i4 .69 .76
On track—No. 1 hard, 71% c; No. 1 northern, 60% c; No. 2 northern, 68% c.
THE DAY'S RESULT
Sept. Wheat Minneapolis. Chicago. Duluth. St. Louis. New Yorl
Close to-day $ .68%@68% $ .71%@71}i $ .70% $ .69% $ .76%
Close yesterday... .67 1 / &@67% .70 @70% .69*4 .68^4 .75%
No. 1 northern, 1,000 bu new, to arrive. .70
No. 1 northern, 1,000 bu, to arrive 70
No. 1 northern, 1 car 6!Hg
No. 1 northern, 1,000 bu, to arrive 69:
No. 1 northern, 16,000 bu, to arrive. 70 !
No. 2 northern, 1 car new .68^4
No. 2 northern, 6 cars .: 68 il
No. 2 northern, 1 car .88*4 |
No. 2 northern, 5 cars .... .67%
No. 2 northern, 3 cars new 68
No. 3 wheat, 1 car new 661 /*
No. 3 wheat, 1 car 66&
No. 3 wheat, 1 car 66
No. 3 wheat, 5 cars, elevator ............ 65Vi
No grade wheat, 1 car .68
No grade wheat, 1 car 56
No grade oats, 2 cars 33^
No. 3 oats, 1 car 34V^
Rejected flax, part car 1.67
Rejected, flax,. part car 1.65
No. 1 flax, 1 car new 1.65 '
No. 1 flax, 2 cars 1.67
No. 1 flax, 2,000 bu, to arrive five days.. 1.63
No. 1 flax, 2 cars, to arrive five days... 1.63%
No. 1 flax, 1,000 bu, to arrive 1.63
Rye, 1 car ..,...:....:. 53
State Grain Inspection.
■V^l><. ■'■-■l Aug. 6.
Inspected In—Wheat—Cars—Great Northern
—No. 1 northern, 1; No. 2 northern, 9; No.
3, 4; rejected, 3; no grade, 9.
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul—No. 1
northern," 5; No. 2 northern, 4; No. 3, 3; re
jected; 2. \
Minneapolis & St. Louis—No. 1 northern,
5; No. 2 northern, 8. /- ; • -
Soo Line —No. 3, 2. .
Northern Pacific — 2 northern, 1.
- Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha-
No. 1 northern, 5; No. 2 northern, 6; No. 8,
5; rejected, 2; no grade,-4.
Total—No. 1 northern, 16; No. 2 northern,
23; No. 3, 14; rejected, 7; no grade, 13.
' Other Grains — No. 2 winter wheat, 7 cars;
No. 3 winter wheat, 2; No. 3 yellow corn, 10;
No. 3 white corn, 1; No. 3 corn, 7; No. 4
corn, 8; No. 3 white oats, 7; No. 3 oats, 12;
no grade oats, 1; No. 2 rye, 5; No. 3 rye, 2;
No. 3 barley, 5; No. 4 barley, 2; No. 6 bar
ley, 2; No. 1 flax, 1; rejected flax, 2; no
grade flax, 1.
Cars Inspected Out—No. 1 northern wheat,
148; No. 2 northern wheat, 77; No. 3 wheat,
23; rejected wheat, 1; no grade wheat, 26;
No. 3 corn, 8; No. 4 corn, 1; No. 3 white
oats, 20; No. 3 oats, 16; no grade oats, 5;
No. 2 rye, 4; no grade flax, 7. >
Wheat Movement by' Roads.
Received—Cars— 26; Omaha, 19;
St. Louis, 18; Great Northern, 14; Northern
Pacific, 1; Burlington, 4.
'ShippedCars—Milwaukee, 14; Omaha, 15;
St. Louis, 13; Great Northern, 2; Great.West
ern, 12; Burlington, 10.
RANGE] OF SEPTEMBER WHEAT
<&) /OSo fl&o /330 M
'*- '■■'• .- ' ' ;
y_—f/MT
?U „_ I L
k ~W7 "
d TZ
&— /
% 1 ...''. : L
W—fczfcH—
OTHER GRAIN^ MARKETS
CHICAGO GRAIN
Eaiiy Cable* Cause a Lower Opening;
in Wheat.
Chicago, Aug. 7.—September wheat opened
lower, at 70c to 69% c, under the Influence of
easy cables. The corn strength started shorts
to covering, however, and the price waa run
•up to 70%e during the first hour! Local re
ceipts were 233 cars, 61 contract grade. North
western receipts were 120 cars, against 177
last week and 246 a year ago.
Predictions of frost in the northwest and
heavy seaboard clearances added strength to
the market. September advanced to 71% c
and closed strong and [email protected]%c over yesterday,
at 71%@71%c.
Close: August, 70*4 c; September, 71%®
71% c; October, 72% c; December, 73% c; May,
76% c. Cash: No. 2 red, 70%@71%c; No. 3
red, [email protected]; No. 2 hard winter, [email protected]; No.
8 winter, 69%@70%c; No. 1 northern spring,
[email protected]; No. 2 northern spring, [email protected]; No. 3
spring, [email protected]%c.
There was a fair general demand for corn,
due partly to light receipts. September opened
%c iower to %c higher, at 56%@56%c, and ad
vanced to 57% c. Receipts were 80 cars.
Corn closed firm and %c higher, at 57%e.
Close: August, 56% c; September, 57% c;
October, 68%®58%c; May, 60% c. Cash; No.
2, 57c; No. 3, [email protected]%c.
Oats were quiet but steady with corn. Sep
tember opened %c down, at 34% c, under local
liquidation, but soon steadied and rallied to
34%e. Receipts were 220 cars.
Close: August, 34% c; September, 34% c; Oc
tober, 35%®35%c; May, 37% c. Cash: No. 2,
[email protected]%c; No. 3, 35c.
The following waa the range of prices:
Wheat— Sept. Dec.
Opening [email protected]% 72®72%
Highest 71% 73%
Lowest 69% 72
Close—
To-day 71%®%. 73%
Yesterday [email protected]% 72%®%
Year ago 75%
Corn—
Opening 56%@% 57%®%
Highest ................. 67%@% 69%@%
Lowest 66% 57%
Close —
To-day .................... 57% 58%®%
Yesterday 56% 57%
Year ago 37%
!■ Oats- ..?."';.-■■ ' ■•:?;-■,-;
I Opening .........:.. 34% .;: 35%
Highest 35% 36
Lowest ....34% 35% •
Close— ; -;' "■■ >
To-day 34% 35%@%
Yesterday 34%
Year ago 21%
». ,-'-.- . Sew York Grain.
New York, Aug. 7.—Flour—Receipts, 18,306
brls; sales, 3,450 pkgs; state and western mar
ket ruled firm and more active; winter
straights, [email protected] Wheat—Receipts, 236,
--550 bu; sales, 3,000,000 bu; developed activity
and a good advance on heavy, covering, large
clearances and frost rumors; September,
75 [email protected] l-16c; October, 75%®76%c; Decem
ber, 77%®78i4c; May. 80%@81%c. Rye-
Quiet; state, [email protected], c. i. f., New York car
lots; No. 2 western, 60c, f. o. b., afloat. Corn
—Receipts, 11,000 bu.. Bales, 245,000 bu; was
active and higher on the wheat advance and
covering; September, 60%@61%c; December,
61%@62%c.', Oats—Receipts, 76,400 bu; was
firm with corn; track white, state, [email protected];
track white, western, 40®49c.
Close—Wheat,'September, 76% c; December,
78% c. Corn, September, 60% c; December, 62c.
Dalnth Grain. !
Duluth, Minn., Aug. 7.—Wheat was very
firm to-day and higher. It sold • fairly well
for near futures and on the advance, but May
held yesterday's price. September opened %c
oft at 69% c, and at once started up. With a
few breaks it went to 70% c, but then weak
ened toward the close and closed at 70% c bid.
December held lc premium. Cash wheat was
dull. October flax fluctuated between $1.51
and $1.52, with considerable manifestation of
interest. —Wheat, 38 cars; corn, 1;
oats, 3. Shipments—Wheat, 74,942 bu. Close:
Oats, 35c; rye, to arrive, 54>4c; futures, 64c;
corn, 55c; flax, cash, $1.65; September, $1.5?;
September northwestern, $1.58; October, $1.52;
No. 1 hard, cash, 73% c; September, 71% c; No.
1 northern, cash, 70% c; to arrive, 70% c; Sep
tember, 70% c; October, August, 70% c;
December, 71% c; to arrive, new, 70% c; No. 2
northern, 65% c; No. 3, 61% c.
Milwaukee Grain.
Milwaukee, Wis., Aug. 7.—Steady.
Wheat—Higher; close. No. ' 1 northern, ;. 72®
72%0; No. 2 northern, 70%@71J4c; September,
71% c. : Rye—Steady; No. 1, 68V£@56%c. Bar
ley—Steadyi No. 2, 62c; sample, [email protected]
Oats—Steady; No. 2 white, 39% c. Corn—Sep
tember, 67>4c. '
Kama* City Grain.
Kansas City, Aug. 7.—Close: Wheat—Sep
tember, 66% c; December, 68% c; cash. No 2
hard, [email protected]>67c; : No. 2 s red, 1 68%0. " • Corn—Sep
k temb«r, SSVs#5S%c; December,; SSV&o; • cash,
THE MINNEAPOLIS JOUKNAH
No. 2, mixed, [email protected]&c; No. 2 white, 69c.
Oats—No. 2 whi c, 39'-ifc:4oc.
Liverpool Grain.
Liverpool, Aug. 7.—Wheat--Spot No. 2 red
western winter, oe 8d; No. 1 northern spring,
steady, op S^fed; No. 1 California, dull, 6s;
futures 6teady; September, 5s 8d; December,
5b 9%d. Corn—Spot firm; American mixed,
new, 4s B%d; American mixed, old, no stock;
futures steady; September, 4s 8d; October,
4s B%d; November, nominal.
Chicago Seed and Coarse Grains.
Chicago, Aug. 7.—Flax—Cash northwestern,
$1.63; No. 1, $1.61; September, $1.56; October,
$1.61 &. Rye—September, 56V4c; December,
58c. Barley—Cash, [email protected] Timothy—Sep
tember, J5.30; October, $6.15. Clover—Octo
ber, ?10.30.
St. Louis Grain.
St. Louis, Aug. 7.—Close: Wheat—Higher;
No. 2 red, cash, 69% c; September, 69% c; De
cember, 72& c; No. 2 hard, higher, [email protected]:C.
Corn—Higher; No. 2, cash. 58& c; September,
58% c; December, 59% c; May, 61%.c. Oats-
Higher; No. 2, cash, 36c; September, 36c;
May, 39% c; No. 2 white, [email protected] Lead-
Firm; [email protected] Spelter—Dull; $3.80.
GENERAL PRODUCE
The Minneapolis Market.
Wednesday, Aug. 7.
The egg and butter markets are steady,
without Important changes in either line.
Egg receipts, continue showing considerable
loss off although not quite so heavy as form
erly. The quality of butter receipts show
Blight improvements.
BUTTER—Extra creameries, lb, [email protected]^c;
firsts, per lb, 17% c; seconds, per lb,
14% c; imitation, firsts, per lb, 14c; seconds,
per lb, 12^c; dairies, extras, per. lb, 18c;
firsts, 16c; seconds, per lb, 13c; packing stock,
per lb l^fH3c; stale stock, per lb, 6V6c;
grease, lb, 3<&sc; tested butter fat, in sepa
rator cream, 20c.
■ EGGS—Strictly fresh, cases included, loss
off, per dozen, 13c; dirties, fresh, doz, 7c;
checks, fresh, 7c. -
CHEESE—Twins or flats, fancy, new, lb,
10c; twins or flats, choice, new, [email protected];
heated, s^@6c; brick. No. 1, per lb, 12%o;
brick. No. 2, per lb, [email protected]; brick, No. 3,
per lb, 6c; limburger, No. 1, per lb, 12V2C;
limburger, No. 2, per lb, 8y 2 @9%c; primost,
No. 1, per lb, 8c; No. 2, per lb. 6c; Young
America, fancy, per lb, lOV&c; choice, per lb,
9»/4c; pultost, per lb, [email protected]; block Swiss, No.
1, ll(&)12c; block Swiss, No. 2, B%@9c. • • ..-
LIVE POULTRY— mixed coops,
7%c; chickens, hens, B%c; roosters, lb, sc;
springs, 1% to 2 lbs, 12c; ducks, old, [email protected];.
spring, white, 10c; colored, [email protected]; geese, &c.
DRESSED MEATS—VeaI, fancy, lb, 7^c;
fair to goad, 6%?; thin, small or overweight
sc; mutton, fancy, 7c; milk lambs, pelts oft,
[email protected]&c; :-iog3, CU'&"6?4-
FlSH—Pike, per lb, 6c; crapples, per lb, sc;
pickerel, drawn, per lb, 4c; pickerel, round,
[email protected]%c; sunflsh, perch, etc., [email protected]; buffalo, 3c;
bullheads. 3%c.
POTATOES— per bu, $1.
BEANS—Fancy navy, bu, $2.75; choice, per
bu, $2.50; medium, hand-picked per bu, $2.35
@2.40; brown, fair to good, $1.75; brown,
fancy, $2.25. ■'. -- -X*:
DRIED PEAS—Fancy yellow, [email protected] per
bu; medium, [email protected]$l; green, fancy, [email protected];
green, medium, [email protected]; marrowfat, per bu,
?2. ■ ■• ■• . ■ .
APRICOTS—Four-basket crates, [email protected]
APPLES—Per brl, [email protected]
CHERRIES—I6-qt case, $2; California, per
10-lb box. $1.75.
PEACHES—California stock, per box, $1;
free stones, southern stock, 4-basket crate,
$1; clings, 4-basket crate, [email protected]$l.
PLUMS—Four-basket crate, $1.25.
ORANGES—Late Valencias, $5.25; grape
fruit, 80s to 965, $2.50. •
LEMONS—Messinas, 320s or 360 a, fancy $7;
choice, $6.50; California- fancy. &a to size,
$6.60; choice, $6. '■ r •
PINEAPPLES— as to size, [email protected]
2-25. _ ..: ' . ■
GOOSEBERRIES—I6-qt case, $1.75.
BLACKBERRIES—I6-qt case, $2®2 50
BLUEBERRIES—I6-qt case, $2 25
RASPBERRIES—Red, per 24-qt case, $2.25
@2.50; black, 24-qt case. [email protected]
CURRANTS—I6-qt case, [email protected]
WATERMELONS—Per doz, [email protected] me
dium, $3.
GRAPES—Ives. per basket. [email protected] four
basket crates, California, $1.75.
PEARS—CaIif ore ia, Bartlett, per box $2 50
CANTALOUPS-Per bu crate, [email protected]:
1-3-bu crate, $1.25. ♦*«**.«>,
BANANAS—Fancy, large bunches, [email protected]
2.50; medium bunches, $2; small bunches,
$1.75.
HONEY—New, fancy white, 1-lb sections
15c; choice white, [email protected]; amber, [email protected]
golden rod, [email protected]; extracted white, [email protected]'
buckwheat, [email protected]; extracted amber, [email protected]
VEGETABLES—Asparagus, per doz, 86c;
beans, wax, bu crate, $2.40; beans string
bu crate, $1.60; beets, bu, 50c; beets, new.
per doz bunches, 15c; cabbage, home-grown,
large crate, $3.50; carrots, doz bunches, 15c;
cauliflower, per dozen, 60c; celery, per doz.
25c; cucumbers, home grown, per doz, [email protected]
30c; lettuce, per doz, [email protected]; lettuce, head
per doz, [email protected]; mint, doz, [email protected]; onions,
doz bunches, 15c; onions, southern, bu boxj
$1; Spanish ionions, bu crate, $2.75; parsley'
doz, 20<@25c; parsnips, per bu, [email protected] peas'
green, per bu, $1.25; pie plant, per Ib, [email protected]%o;
radishes, round, per doz bunches, 15®25c'
rutabagas, bu, 60c; salsify (oyster plant)'
per doz, 30c; spinach, bu, 40c; turnips, new'
doz Winches, [email protected]; per bu, 40c; tomatoes'
home-grown, per bu, $5; Illinois, 4-basket
crates, $1®1.25; watercress, per doz, 30c.
New York Prodnce.
New York, Aug. 7.—Butter—Receipts, 5,548
pkgs; steady; state dairy, [email protected]; creamery,
[email protected]%c; western, June factory, [email protected]%c
--imitation creamery, [email protected]%c. Cheese—Re
ceipts, 2,358 pkgs; quiet; fancy large, colored
9%c; fancy large, white, 9%c; fancy small!
colored, 9%c; fancy small, white, 9%@9%c
Eggs—Receipts, 8,270 pkgs; firm; state and
Pennsylvania, [email protected]; western candled 12®
16% c; western, uncandled, B®l4c. Beef quiet
Pork easy. Lard dull; prime western steam!
$8.90.
Chicago Produce.
Chicago, Aug. 7.—Butter—Steady; creamer
ies, 14%@20c; dairies, [email protected]%c. Cheese-
Steady; twins, 9%@10c; Young Americas 10U
@10% c; daisies, 10%@10%c. Eggs—Firm- loss
off, cases returned, [email protected]%c. Iced Poultry-
Steady; chickens, [email protected]%c; turkeys, [email protected]
PROVISIONS
Chicago Provision*.
Chicago, Aug. 7.—Provisions were easy on
liberal hog receipts.- September pork opened
[email protected]%c lower, at [email protected]%; September
lard 2%c down, at $8.60, and September ribs
a shade higher, at $7.82%. Close- Pork-
August $13.72%; September, $13.82%- Octo
ber, $13.92%; January, [email protected]%. Lard-
August, $8.55; September $8.57%; October,
$8.62%@8.65; December, $8.60; January $8 62%
Ribs—August, $7.67%; September $7 77%- Oc
tober, $7.82%@7.83; January, $7 67%
Hide*, Pelt*, Tallow and "Wool.
• /'" ■ '■■-'•''l-.-- No. 1.N0.2.
Green salted heavy steer hides..!... 9 ■8 |
Green salted heavy cow hides...... 7% «ai
Green salted light hides .: 7^ g%
Green salted heavy cow and steer
hides, branded "....;.. 7% 6%
Green salted bull and oxen ......... 7 6 '
Green salted veal calf, Bto 15 lbs 10% 9
Green salted veal kip, 15 to 25 lbs.. 8% 7
Green salted long-haired or runner
kip •........% .'.:.;......:...-..... 7% gi/
Green salted deac&ns, each 50 40
Green cattle hides and skins, [email protected]%c ncr
lb less than above quotations.
Green salted horse or mule hides,
large ••••■••• ..: $3.00 2.25
Green salted horse or mule hides,
medium 2.50 175
Green salted horse or mule hides,
small 1.60 1.00
Dry flint Montana butcher hides 12%®14V4
Dry flint Minnesota, Dakota and
Wisconsin hides v 9
Dry flint calf skins ig 12
Dry fine kip skins 14 v
Green salted pelts, large, each [email protected]
Green salted pelts, medium, each.. [email protected] 70
Green salted pelts, small, each 20® 45
Dry flint territorial pelts, butcher..lo @12i4
Dry flint territorial pelts, murrain B%(u> a^
Dry flint territorial shearlings 6 & 7
Tallow, in , cakes ...............;,.... 4% 4->
Tallow, In barrels ................... 4% " 3%
Grease, white 4 -■ '3^
Grease/ dark .....3% 2 x/4
Wool, medium, unwashed 12%@13%
Wool, fine, medium, unwashed ....11 @12V&
Wool, coarse, unwashed 11 @12%
Wool, fine, unwashed 9 @io
Wool, broken fleeces, unwashed 11 @12
Wool, seedy, buddy, unwashed 10 @11
Bright Wisconsin and similar grades, [email protected]
higher than above quotations.
STOCKS ARE SLEEPY
Trading Semistagnant, But the
Tone Temporarily Firmer.
STRIKE ORDER INFLUENCE SLIGHT
United States Steel Loses but Little
—Industrials, Except Sugar,
Neglected.
New York, Aug. 7.—The issuance of the
general strike order by the Amalgamated As
sociation was without much effect on the
prices of the United States Steel stocks, the
common and preferred losing only % each on
sales of 6,000 and 5,000 shares respectively.
The general market was slightly mixed, but
changes either way were not Important out
glde of Rock Island, which opened off 1%,
but recovered 1% on the next transaction.
Trading became semi-stagnant, but the tone
was firmer for a time and active stocks mado
small gains. Sugar was marked up 2 points,
against the shorts, but other Industrials were
neglected. Offerings of the United States
Steel Issues were well taken during the first
half hour and their opening losses were wiped
out. They dropped to the lowest again when
Sugar, St. Paul, Manhattan, New York Cen
tral and Union Pacific were depressed a point
each.
Reports of dissatisfaction among mine
workers caused some selling of the coal roads
and Reading declined 1 and Delaware &
Hudson 1%. Laekawanna slumped 7% on one
transaction. Qeneral Electric fell 3%. The
market otherwise showed a hardening ten
dency, the earlier low point influenced pur
chases for both accounts and gome good re
coveries were made. St. Lawrence & Adiron
dack advanced 3%. United States Steel com
mon got back to 40, the highest, again, but
the preferred hugged 89. the lowest, closely.
A rise to 53% in Southern Pacific and a re
turn to the highest by St. Paul and Atchi
son Infused additional firmness to the rail
roads. United States Steel reached 40% and
the preferred 89%. The latter soon met
•enough stock to lower it %. Lake Erie &
"Western advanced 2% and the preferred 4
points.
While the general volume of business was
small there was a good demand for special
stocks, notably Atchison and St. Paul, whicn
sold 1% and 1% respectively above yester
day's close. Union Pacific was also carried
sharply upwards, touching 95%, as compared
with 93%, the early lowest. St. Lawrence
and Adirondack increased its gain to 6%.
United States Steel, common and preferred,
were taken in moderate amounts and Bold
at 40% and 90 respectively.
Lake Erie & Western, common and pre
ferred, made sensational rises of 8 and 10
points respectively. lowa Central, common
and preferred, were also 2%@4% higher.
Other stocks declined on realizing, led by
St. Paul and Missouri Pacific, which lost
a point each. The United States Steel
stocks were relatively better sustained than
other leaders and after a trivial setback ral
lied again. The market in the final dealings
was almost at a standstill, but there was
some improvement in prices again and the
closing was firm.
Bonds were dull and irregular.
Stock quotations reported for The Journal
by Watson & Co., Chamber of Commerce,
Minneapolis, Minn.
Closing prices are bid.
I „ -i- . —Close-
Sales Stocks— I Hi- | Lo- 1 Bid. I Bid.
| .-■■-■;- I eat. | eat. |Ag. 7]Ag. 6
- Am. Cot. Oil. I | 33% 33%
do pr....i... ............ 90 I 90
--1,000 Am. Car........ . 28% ■ 27% ' 28% - 28
100 do pr 82 | 81% 82% 82:
Am. 1ce......... 31% | 31% 31% 31%
I do- pr | ...... | 67% 67
Am. Linseed j 23% 22
I do pr... j 1 60% ' 61%
Am. Malting... ...... ...... 6% I■> 6%
| do pr | | ..;;. 27 , | 27
8,200 Am. Sugar 133% I 131 132%! 131 %
- Am. Smelting.. 51% 61 61% 51%
. | do pr ...... 100% 99% 99% 100
Am. Tobacco ............ 130 | 130%
j do ■■pr/:: .......:.... 140 | 140
1,400.Ama1. Cop ..... | 111%| 110% 111% 110%
600jAnacon. Cop...| 43% 42% 42% 43
18,400 At., Top, & S.F. 72% 70% 72 . 70%
3,500| do ", pr........ 94% 93% 94 93%
200|Ba.lt. & Ohio.. . 94% 94% 94% :95
. . | do ,pr,I.J 92 92
5,200|8r0k. Rap. Tr. 74 72% 73% 73
Brook. Un. Gas. ...... ...... 214 j 214
. Brunswick Co.. ...... 9% ......
Can. Southern .'..:.. 66% . 66%
600iCanadlan Pac. 107% 107% 107% 107%
2,ooo|Ches. & Ohio.. 44 | 43% 43% 43%
. C. & (E. 11l 1 120 120
■■"■'■ Chi. & Alton.. 36% 36% 36% 36%
. I do pr......'.. ...... ! ...... 75% 76
900 Chi. Gr. West. 22 21 21% 21%
200 do pr A ..........; 81% 81%
do pr B .... 46%1 46 46% 44%
Chi., Ind. & L. 33 32% 32 32%
do pr 68 - 68
200 C.,C.,C. & St.L. 89 88% 88% 89 :
j do pr : '... 115 115 ■■
Chi. Term ..... 18% 17% 18% 18 .
do pr 37 37
•■ " Col. H. C. & 1 ...... 18 18
Col. Fuel & I. 92 90 90% 91%
, do pr ....... 123 123
300 Col. Southern .. 12% 12% 12% 12%
, do Ist pr ... 49% 49%
. ' do 2d pr 21 21
200Consol. Gas .............. 218 218%
300 Con. Tobacco .. 65% 65 65 65%
: - do pr ....... ;.'.... .'...:. 115 115
. i 400 ©el. & Hudson. 168% 157 158% 157%
300 Del., L. & W. 220% 220 220 220
100 Den. & Rio Gr ..:.... 40% 41
' 300 do pr 88% 88% 88% 88%
. Dcs M. & Ft. D ..."..,. 33 33
do pr ...... 120 115
9,900 Erie .....36 35% 35% 35%
600 do Ist pr ... 64 63% 63% .63%
:. do 2d pr .... 47% 48
Ev. & Terre H. 51 51
do pr ....... ...... 86 ......
800 Gen. Electric .. 247% 246% 247 248
1,100 Glucose 56 54%
do pr ....... 104 106
r. Great Nor., pr ...... ...... 174 173%
Hocking Valley 50 .49%
do pr 73% 73%
200 Illinois Central. 144 143% 143% 142%
lowa Central .. 39% 37 39 35
do pr ....... 76% 71 75% 72
100 Inter. Paper .. .:.... ...... ■" 20% 20%
" 100 Intef. Paper .. 74% 75
K.C.& South. 18. 18
- do pr ...:....... | 38% 38
LaCledeGas 87 85
do pr .....::. 100 100
Lake E. & W.. 58% 53% 58 | 52
500 do pr ....... 128 120 | 126 | 115
1,500 Louis. & Nash. 100%! 99%| 100% | 100
. 800 M., St. P. & Soo 25% 24% 24% 23%
do pr ...... 71% 69%
3,700 Manhattan ...;. 116 114% 115% | 115
1,000 Met. St. Ry .. 164 163 | 163%| 183
■ 200 Minn. & St. L. 107 106%| 106 i linj
• : do pr ...... 115 114 | 115 114
■ 2,900 Mlsouri Pac .. 96% 94% 95% 95%
. 300 M., K. & T.... 25% 25%
200 do pr ... 52 51% .51% 62
Mobile & Ohio. .:.......... 81% 81%
. Mexican Cent . 23% 23 22% .'22%
Mex. Nat ; 9% 9 9 9
- 300 Nat. Biscuit .. 41% 41 41 , 41%
do pr I | 102 - 100
2,400 Nat. Lead .... 19% 19 | 19% 19%
500 do pr .."..... 86 85
, •■■>■■<■ Nat. Salt .; ..:.. ...... 39 40
..-"-- " do pr ....■.;. ...... ..".... 75% 75%
' N. J. Central . 158 j 158
3,000 Norfolk & West 51 50 50% 50%
North Am: Co ;.-... | ..... 97 | 97
Northwestern ■.....:.■....... 190 | 189
.- N.Y. Air Brake ...... ...... 135 | 135
400 N. Y. Central.. 151% 149% 151% 150%
2,600 N.Y..C. ■& St.L. 39% 38% 39% 38%
- V do Ist pr ... ...V.. ...... 105 105
do 21 pr .... .; 78 -74
Omaha ;.... ... ...... .:.... 125 126
do pr ......".....".....;.. 185 185
3,300 Ontario & -W... 32% 31% 32% 31%
■;i ;fe. Paper Bag .... .1.... ...... 14% 14
' do pr ........■......::... 70% 70%
t::-_, Pressed Steel .. 42% 41% 42% 41%
:'-i-. do pr ....... 84% 83 84 82%
300 Pacific Mall ..'. ...... .... 38 38
7,600 Perm. R. R.... 143 141% 142% 142%
P.,C.,C. & St.L. ;. 73% 73
'.':■' do pr ............:. 102 102
800 People's Gas ■'.. 113% 113 113% 112%
Peoria & E J ..;... 22 22
" Pullman :....... ....r. .....: 204 204'
8,000 Reading ........ 40 39 39% 39%
1,100 do Ist pr ... 76% 76% 76% 76
.do 2d pr .... 50% 50% 50% 50%
" 400|Repub. Steel .. 19% 18% 19 18%
600 do pr Y...T.. 73% •73 - 73% 73
1,100 Rock Island .. 138% 136 137% 137 V
! St. L. & San F. 39% 38 38% 37%
do Ist pr ... :.;... .':.... 76 76
-: • I do 2d pr .... 67% 66% * 66% - 66%
200 St. L. & S. W. ............ 27% 27
do pr'...,... [ ....;. ...... 59 59%
11,300 St. Paul' | 157% 155% 156% 155%
■' - do pr ...... | ...... ...... 182% ......
St. Joe & Gr. Is .1......:... 11 11
' do Ist pr.:. ............ ~63 63
; do 2dpr.:.. ...... ...... 23 • 24 %•
n Stand. R. &Tw G% - 6% 6% 6%
14,500 Southern Pac .. 63% 52 53% E2%
2,900 Southern Ry ... 28% 28 i 28% 28 :
"200 do ■pr ..,..■; 83% : 83%' 83% 83,
- 500|Tenn. Coal &It .59 58% 59 58%
i 1,200 Texas & Pac.'. 38% • 37% 38% 37%
Third Aye. Ry ;..... .;.... 120 120
- -T. St.L. S. W ...... ....:. 20% 20
do pr .:'.'... 33% 32%
,-• Twin City R. T ...... :..... 93% 93%
25,500 Union' Pacific.'.. 95% 93% 9g% 94%
: »00i do :-pr, ..;... 87% 87% 87% / 87%
; :. U.; S. Leather.. 13% 12% 13% ; 12%
: J do ,pr ■;;..-...-. " *0% ' 79 • 1 :80% - 79%
U. S. Rubber ....I 1714 17%'
.v. do ■■•■-■ pr ...... .■;.;.: ■• " " 55 55
?««S U£ S. --Ste«»">.. 40% ; 39% 40% 39%
?'TXX« do' pr ••••.. 90 '89; ,89% 89%
1,400 Wabash ;...,... '0% 20% 20% 20%
of^T^V pr —• 88% 37% 38% 87%
2,500 Western Union 90% 90 90 90%
. - 100 Wheel* L. E....* ....1. 17% 37%
100 do ! Ist pr.;. .........;. 48 49
do 2d pr.;.. 29 28% 28% 29
Wisconsin Cent 20 19% 20 19 1
do pr..;.',.-.),,;,; [ 38 .....7
Total sales, 302.100. "
LONDON FINANCIAL
Consols and Quotation* of Ameri
t can Securities.
■ London, Aug. 7.—Consols for money, 93 6-16;
consols for the account, "93 7-16.
Anaconda, 8%; Canadian Pacific, 109%; St.
Paul, 159%; Louisville, 102%; Illinois Central,
146; New York Central, 153; Northern Pacific
preferred, 99; Southern Pacific, 53%; United
States Steel, 41; United States Steel pre
ferred, 91%; Atchison, 72%; Atchison pre
ferred, 96%; Baltimore & Ohio, 97%; Chesa
peake & Ohio, 45; Chicago Great Western,
20%; Denver & Rio Grande, 41%; Denver &
Rio Grande preferred, 92; Erie, 36%; Erie
first preferred, 1 65%; Erie second preferred,
60; Missouri, Kansas & Texas, 26; Southern
preferred. 64%; Norfolk & Western, 51%; Nor- 1
folk & Western preferred, 90%; Ontario &
Western, 32%; Reading, 20%; Reading first
preferred, 39; Reading second preferred, 26;
Southern Railway, 28%; Southern Railway
preferred, 85; Union Pacific, »o; Union Pa
cific preferred, 89%; Wabash, 21; Wabash pre
ferred, 38%; Spanish 4s, 69%; Rand Mines, 41.
The amount of bullion taken into the
Bank of England on balance to-day was
£103,000. ■
Bar silver, quiet, at 26 15-16 d per ounce.
Money, 1%@2 per cent. Rate of discount
in the open market I for short bills, 2%@2%
per cent; three months' bills, [email protected] 9-16 per
cent. ..v ■
Bar silver closed firm at 27d per ounce.
MONEY REPORTS
New York Money.
New- York, Aug. 7.—Money on call closed
steady, at [email protected]% per cent; last loan, 2% per
cent; prime mercantile paper, 4%@5 per cent;
sterling exchange strong, with actual busi
ness in bankers' bills at [email protected]% for de
mand and at [email protected]% for sixty days;
posted rates, $4.86% and $4.88%@4.89; com
mercial bills, $4.84%@4.85; bar silver, 58% c;
Mexican dollars, 46c; government bonds
steady; state bonds, inactive; railroad bonds.
Irregular.
;. v Minneapolis Money.
• MINNEAPOLIS— clearings, $1,604,
--495.99; New York exchange, selling rate, 60c
premium; buying rate, par; Chicago ex
change, selling rate, 50c premium buying
rate, - par;, London 60-day sight documentary,
?4.54%. . v
ST. PAUL—Clearings to-day, $912,120.56. ;
. ' Paris Prices.
Paris, Aug. • 7.—Three ■ per cent rentes, 101
francs 22% centimes for the account. Ex
change on London, 25 francs 20 centimes for
checks. Spanish 4s, 70.20.
. Berlin Money.
Berlin, Aug. 7.—Exchange : on London_2o
marks 43 pfennigs for checks. Discount
rates: Short bills, 2 per cent; three months'
bills, 2% per cent.
'■;': Chicago Money.
Chicago, Aug. 7.—Clearings, $23,832,906; bal
ances, $1,875,730; posted exchange, $4.86®
4.88%; New York exchange, 20c discount.
Gold Premiums.
London, Aug. 7. —Gold premiums are quoted
as follows: Buenos Aires, 134.90; Madrid,
39.85; Lisbon, 38.50. >
Clearances: Wheat and flour, 1,150,000 bu 1
corn, 91,000; oats, 18,000.
THE CATTLE MART
Heavy Supplies East and South
With Prices Lower.
BUT THEY HOLD STEADY HERE
Liberal Supply of Hoff« Elsewhere—
Receipt* Here Are Still
Small.
South St. Paul, Aug. 7.—Receipt* to-day
were 300 cattle, 100 calves, 900 hogs and 400
sheep.
The following table shows the receipts from
Jan. 1, 1901, to date, as compared with the
came period a year ago:
Year. Cattle.Calves.Hogs.Sheep.Horses.Cars.
1901 .....69,213 26,379 326,365 88,797 10,769 7,928
1900 67,148 28,343 296,646 130,300 19,308 8,322
•Dec 1,964 41,503 8,539 G94
Inc 2,065 29,719
The following table shows the receipts for
the month of August to date, as compared
with the same period a year ago:
Year. Cattle.Caives.Hogs.Sheep.Horses.Cars.
1901 ..... 690 193 3,763 1,584 106 103
1900 2,612 321 2,388 6,856 289 181
Dec 1,922 128 6,272 183 18
Inc 1,375
Receipts:
Date. Cattle. Calves. Hogs. Sheep. Cars.
July 31 .... 91 17 1,631 292 44
Aug. 1 145 12 519 469 12
Aug. 2 95 57 868 98 17
Aug. 3 9 .. 483 10 8
-Aug. 5 171 1 900 477 27
Aug. 6 232 103 993 595 28
Estimated receipts by cars to-day of the
railroads centering at these yards: Chicago
Great Western, 6; Chicago, Milwaukee & St.
Paul, 5; Minneapolis & St. Louis, 3; Chicago,
St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha, 5; Great
Northern, 2; Chicago, Burlington & Qulncy,
1; Wisconsin Central, 1; Soo, 6; Northern Pa
cific. 2: total. 31.
Disposition of stock Aug. 6:
Firm. Cattle. Hogs. Sheep.
Swift & Co 151 936 337
Elliot & Co., Duhith 34
W. B. McCormick ... Co
Hankey Bros 28
King Bros 3 ... 133
J. R. King 18
Leo Gottfried 7
R. N. Katz 7
J. H. Wooolpy 1
Louis Hertz 4
J. B. Fitzgerald 2
W. D. Bronson 7
J. T. McMillan 70
Haas Bros 28
Weirs ™ •••
Country buyers 27 1
Total 271 1,115 629
CATTLE—-To-day's receipts were only fair.
Supplies both east and south were very lib
eral with prices generally quoted 10c to 15c
lower. The demand here was so strong for
anything in the killing line that prices held ,
steady. Veals ruled about 25c higher.
There were a few loads of stockers and ;
feeders received but they were no very desir
able cattle and were hard to move.
Butcher Cows and Heifers-
No Ay. Price. I No. Ay. Price.
1 1,190 $4.25 4 1,150 |3.25
1 1,080 3.25 1 1,050 3.00
3 1,046 2.50 1 1.360 3.10
2 1,120 3.85 2 1,005 2.10
1 . ...1170 2.10 3 986 2.10
1 920 1.50 | 1 980 3.25
Grass Cows—
No. Ay. Price. No. Ay. Price.
12 1,161 $3.50 6 1,158 $8.75
11 1,139 3.75 4 095 3.00
1 1,200 3.75
Beef and Butcher Seers—
No. Ay. Price. |No. Ay. Price.
3 1,026 $4.40 6 1,010 $4.25
2 905 3.25 4 920 3.25
2 815 3.00 2 S9O 3.00
Grass Steers—
4 1,375 $4.75 |16 1,060 $4.00
2 1,105 3.75 | 6 1.225 3.75
Stockers and Feeders-
No. Ay. Price. No. Ay. Price.
2 ... 845 $3.00 1 710 $3.00
2 285 2.75 1 800 2.75
2 735 2.60 ||
Feeding Cows and Helters—
No. Ay. Price. |No. Ay. Price.
1 620 $2.75 2 425 $2.40
1 910 2.40 4 605 2.40
1 850 2.00
HOGS—The supply in sight to-day was very
liberal again and prices generally ruled low
er. Receipts here were less than the actual
wants of the trade, but in sympathy with
sharp declines elsewhere bids here ruled
[email protected] off right from the start. Quality
averaged only fair, with the bulk selling
from $5.65 to $5.75 and a top at $5.80. Com
mon, rough packers sold at $5.45. Sales:
Hogs—
No. Ay. Price. No. Ay. Price.
24 180 $5.90 31 239 $5.80
56 251 5.80 46 222 5.80
29 238 5.80 63 224 5.75
58 285 5.70 51 237 5.70
11 263 5.65 60 v . 292 5.65
58 243 6.65 36 /. 258 5.65
72 248 5.65 32 281 5.60
36 264 5.60 |
Common Rough Packers-
No. Ay. Price. | No. Ay. Price.
12 333 $5.60 6 390 $5.45
* 292 5.45 8 403 5.45
3 410 5.45
Stags—
2 b - q - 470 $5.00 | f 410 $5.00
No. Ay. Price. | No. Ay. Price.
1 370 $3.60 j|l 280 $." >b
SHEEP—Receipts here were fair. Liberal
supplies east caused weaker prices at all
outside market. The demand here was good,
WEDNESDAY EVENING, AUGUST 7, 19U1.
with no quotable change from yesterday's
strong tone. Sales: .
Sheep-
No. Ay. Price.
■29 spring lambs 73 $4.80
11 spring lambs 63 4.75
19 spring lambs 68 4.50
44 spring lambs 68 4.40
15 spring lambs 66 4.25
2 sheep 110 3.40
3 sheep > 113 3.25
2 sheep 130 3.25
23 feeders 57 2.50
3 bucks 166 2.25
On the market: E. Mark Live Stock com
pany, Princeton; Schneider Brothers, Alma,
Wis.; M. Kinsella, Mlllvllle: J. S. Green,
Welch; Heaney Brothers, Goodhue; Kinney
Mercantile company, Colfax, Wis.; J. H. M.,
Hersey, Wis.; Frantz & Wilkins, Spring Val
ley; L. A. Dodge, Truman; Dunham & Car
penter; Commercial Bank, Dawson; Frank
Hipp, Arlington; Aug. Wittsack, Waconia;
E. M. Prouty, Velva, N. D.; T. W. Baker &
Co., Kenaal, N. D.; Fred George, Ransom,
N. D.; Mblm & Donaldson, Morristown; W.
H. Helberg, Nestrand; W. S. Burke, Rice
ville, Iowa; Jerry Cashman, lowther, Iowa;
S. C. King, Kansas City, Mo.
Sioux City Live Stock.
Sioux City, lowa, Aug. 7.—Receipts—Hogs,
2,700; cattle/ 800. Hogs, [email protected] lower. Sales:
No. •?;'<us; Ay. Price.
fi2 215 $5.60
65 ..;,...... 240 5.62%
II " 250 5.65
63 266 5.67%
64 .........„.........;....;....... 250 5.70
57^.... ..:.-...-....-.'.-. 270 5.75
Cattle— Weak. Sales:
No- Ay. Price.
17 beeves ..;....1,150 $4.75
39 beeves .....1.236 40
18 westerns .;...;..... .....1,242 . 3.50
37 westerns .........;...;........U,200 ' 3.95
2 canners :...... 880 2.50
4 cows •• ....;..... 1,020 3.40
2 stock heifers 560 2.50
4 stock heifers 600 2.75
6 stockers .„ ...850 ~ 2.90
5 stockers 910 3.40
Sheep—ln demand, [email protected] >
Chicago Live Stock.
Chicago, Aug. 7.—Cattle—Receipts, 28,000,
including 375 Texans; best steady; others 15c
lower; good to prime steers, [email protected]; poor
i» <«m, edlum > [email protected]; stockers and feeders,
[email protected]; cows, [email protected]; heifers, [email protected];
manners, [email protected]; bulls, [email protected]; calves,
[email protected]; Texas fed steers, [email protected] 50
04 Hogs—Receipts to-day, 33,000; to-morrow,
24,000; left over, 4,812; [email protected] lower; mixed
and butchers, [email protected]; good to choice
heavy, [email protected]; rough heavy, [email protected];
5°90 light< *[email protected]°; bulk of Bales- *[email protected]
Sheep—Receipts, 20,000; strong; lambs glow,
10c lower; good to choice wethers, [email protected];
fair to choice mixed, [email protected]; western sheep,
[email protected]/o; yearlings, [email protected]; native lambs, $[email protected]
o.la; western lambs, [email protected]
Official yesterday: Receipts—Cattle, 5,746;
nogs, 17,682; sheep, 9,478. Shipments—Cattle,
o,080: hogs, 2,825; sheep 3 548
Kansas City Live Stock.
Kansas City, Aug. 7.—Cattle—Receipts,
13,000; steady to [email protected] lower; native sTcSrs
[email protected]; Texan3, [email protected]; cows and heif
ers, [email protected]; stockers and feeders, [email protected]
Hogs—Receipts, 15,000; 5c lower; bulk of
sales, [email protected]; heavy, [email protected]; packers, $5.75
@6; mixed, [email protected]; yorkers, [email protected]; pigs,
[email protected]
Sheep—Receipts, 1,500; steady; muttons, $3
@3.75; lambs, [email protected]
St. Louis Live Stoclc.
St. Louis, Aug. 7.—Cattle—Receipts, 4,500;
steady; native steers, |[email protected]; stockers and
feeders, [email protected]; cows and heifers, [email protected]
Texans, [email protected]
Hogs—Receipts, 7,000; 10c lower; pigs, $5.75
@5.85; packers, [email protected]; butchers, [email protected]
6.10.
Sheep—Receipts, 2,500; steady; native sheep,
[email protected]; lambs, $4.25<g>5.
MISCELLANEOUS
Sew York Cotton.
New York, Aug. 7.—Cotton opened weak
and 8 to 12 points lower, under a small
avalanche of long cotton and urgent bear
pressure, brought out by an Irresistible com
bination of unfavorable influences. There
were feverish rallies from time to time in the
morning, but the market at no time gave
evidence of recuperative powers. The dom
inating bear factor was weakness abroad.
Receipts at the ports and in interior towns
were not much larger than normal and gave
promise of increasing. August sold off to
(.01c, October to 7.07 c and January to 7.14 c,
after which there was a rally of 3 to 4 points
on profit-taking. Later, the market again
eased off until the resumption of the liquidat
ing movement. Spot closed quiet; middling
uplands, 8c; middling gulf, B%c. Sales 460
bales.
Sn^tr and Coffee.
New York, Aug. 7.—Sugar—Raw quiet; fair
refining, 3 9-16 c; centrifugal, 96 test, 4 3-32 c;
molasses sugar, 3 5-16 c; refined quiet;
crushed, 5.85 c; powdered, 5.45 c; granulated,
5.35 c. Coffee steady; No. 7 Rio, 5 5-Bc, nom
inal. Molasses quiet. Coffee futures opened
steady at unchanged prices. News from the
European and Brazilian markets furnished
little for the local trade to work on. While
bearish factors had a tendency to create a
weak undertone here, they failed to promote
bear aggressiveness, and values did not vary
from the opening basis up to mid-day, at
which hour the market was dull at net un
changed prices. Total sales to the hour were
21,750 bags, of which 600 bags changed hands
on the call. Sales included September at
4.85 c; March, [email protected], and May, 5.45 c. Spot
dull and easy at 5%a for Rio. Santos firm.
Midway Horse Market.
Minnesota Transfer, St. Paul. Minn., Aug.
Barrett & Zimmerman report some out-of
town buyers were on hand and a few from
local quarters. Buyers went pretty actively
after the good, heavy horses; but, as on the
former days of this week, the common small
j kinds were slow. Prices held without change
I on the good grades of all classes, but showed
a downward tendency on common horses
Values: ' :
Drafters, extra [email protected]
Drafters, choice [email protected]
Farm mares, extra [email protected]
Farm mares, choice ...... [email protected]
Farm mares, common to g00d........ 60® 65
Mules [email protected]
Peoria Whisky.
Pe'oria, 111., Aug. 7.—Whisky, $1.29.
Barlett to Lewis: Our advices indicate that
the movement-of winter wheat throughout
the entire winter wheat belt from first hands
is rapidly falling off, and we look for much
lighter receipts in the near future. The de
mand is strong and we believe will continue.
M. BORAX & CO.,
The Oldest Firm of
Bankers and Brokers
IS THE SOUTH WENT.
Have removed from thetr old quarters
on Jackson Street to the
tiermania Life Building, Cor. 4th
and Minnesota St.. »t. Paul. Minn.
Vermilye&Co
BANKERS,
NASSAU AND PINE STS., NEW YORK
18 CONGRESS STREET, BOSTON.
Government Bonds of all issues bought, sold
or taken in. exchange for other securities.
Quotations furnished by wire at our expense
List of current offerings of Municipal
Railroad and other Investment Se
curities furnished upon application.
Afcouott Of Banks, Bankers,
and Individual* Solicited.
VedwardsT wood 1 STcaX
\MQUERS /board £F Trade Chicago, V
\MEMBENS UHAMUERCf COMMERCE Mpfe. \
WAY-JOHNSON-LEE CO.
£i%fiS,.Qratn Commission. SZESL
.— — ; -. '' = ESTABLISHED 1879 ■ '. == -,
WOODWARD & CO.
"»"■ GRAIN COMMISSION »*"»
>1i BBAKCHS3— Chicago and Milwaukee Olden for future deliTery executed In a" ■ -.
MINNESOTA
LOAN & TRUST 10.
Miv\EAf»Liß, mini.
Capital 1...... $500,000.00
Guaranty Fund $100,000.00
■'" ■■■
Interest 2%ast
Allowed on Ola* °-
Deposits. CtP.tSSL
Legal Depository Wjt¥»2V
for Court and W2^ gjj^iu
Trust Fund 5........ C*rtifUrt<
INVESTMENTS—ExceIIent First Mort
gages and Municipal Bonds for sale.
TRUSTS—AII classes of Trusts care
fully administered.
HAFKTT I>*P«»IT VAULT*.
Gfias E. Lewis Ms _
*Co< Bonds,
1, 2 and 3 Chamber of
Commerce, Minneapolis. Pnttnil
GRAIN, PROVISIONS.
New York Correspondents,
Clark, Dodge &. Co.
Chicago i Bartlett, Frmzier A Co.
Correspondents, I J. P. Harris.
Daily Price Current mailed free on ap
plication.
J. F. WHALLON. GEO. C. BAGLEY.
GEO. P. CASE. CHAS. M. CASE.
Whalion, cases Co.
STOCKS, GRAiN, PROVISIONS,
t New York Stock Exchange
MEMBERS- Chicago Board of Trade.
' Mpls. Chamber Commerce
Private Wli-m to Mmw York and Chi. ago
18 Chamber of Commerce.
UP TOWN OFFICE.
L.T.SOWLE&SONS
204 ANDRUS BUILDING.
STOCKS, BONDS, GRAINS
AND PROVISIONS.
Members Chicago Board of Trade and Min
neapolis Chamber of Commerce.
Telephones, N. W. 420. T. C. 420.
NOW OPEN FOR BUSINESS. .
All the latest news from growing crops, also
Wall Street gossip. Private wires to all lead
ing markets. -. -
Main Office, 21 Chamber of Com'roe.
EXPORT
OIL &
Pipe Line Co.
OF BEAUMONT.
WELL NOW DOWN OVER 600 FEET, WITH
10-INCH CASINO.
CLOSE OF OFFERING
AT 60c, AUB. 10.
The amount of stock allotted for sale at 60c
having been nearly subscribed, the offering at
this price will be closed as above, and the
price will
ADVANCE TO
75c P£R SHARE.
Send subscriptions either to the company at
Beaumont, Texas, or to its Fiscal Agents as
below. Mail applications for stock at 60
cents must bear date AND POSTMARK not
later than Aug. 10; those by wire must reach
our offices by the close of business, 6 p. m.,
on that day.
The right to reduce or decline any sub
scription is expres&ly reserved.
All applications will be stamped with the
exact time of receipt, and allotments made
accordingly, until only 5,000 shares remain.
In order to give all a fair and equal chance
to secure an interest in this company, these
5,0.00 shares are reserved to be allotted pro rata
among applicants whose orders arrire too late to se
cure the full number of shares desired.
Make checks, drafts and money orderc pay
able to the order of.
Sanford Makeever,
84 Adams Street, Chicage, 111.
General Agent for Minnesota.
WILLIAM OALRYHPLE
Grail Commission Merchant
Consignment solicited; receiving a spe
cialty. Money advanced to farmers, ship
pers and elevator companies. Member
Duluth Board of Trade, Minneapolis
Chamber of Commerce. Office, 601 Board
of Trade, Duluth; 30 Chamber of Com
merce, Minneapolis.
THOMAS & Oo
Grain Commission anil Stoclc Broiers.
Write for our dally market letter, which we
mall FREE on application.
Members Minneapolis Chamber of Com
merce. Telephone—Main 1597-J.
S CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.
Watson & Co
Brokers In Grain, Provisions,
Stocks and Bonds,
Members N. Y. Stock Exchange
Chicago Correspondents—Schwartz, Dupee&Co.
Private wire Chicago & New York. Tel. 906 Main
35 Chamber of Oontmeroo.

xml | txt