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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, August 21, 1901, Image 9

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WEDNESDAY EVESmSTG, AUGUST 2t 1901.
MUNYON-ISMS
A Machinist might as well try to run his
Biaohlnery without oil. as for an employer to
•xpect the best results from his employes
whom he never gives a vacation. Rest to the
body i* like oil to the machinery.—MUNYON.
Every human being is entitled to a vaca
tion, and the Employer will show good busi
ness judgment by seeing that his employes
have a few days" outing. The Summer
months are apt to produce Dyspepsia and
Indigestion, and nervous prostration gener-'
ally follows To every person who suffers
with any stomach trouble, I most urgently
advise the use of Munyon's Dyspepsia Cure.
This Remedy is a wonderful tonic, not only
to the stomach, but to the whole nervous
system. It makes good, rich blood; it
strengthens the heart's action; it makes old
stomachs feel like new; it insures a good
night's sleep; it relieves constipation; It en
ables one to eat all he likes, what he likes
and when he likes. My D. D. &. C. Tablets
should be In every home and grip-sack. I
have never known a cage of Cholera Morbus,
Diarrhoea, or any bowel trouble that these
tablets would not cure Inside of one hour.
Relief Is immediate. I guarantee that my
Rheumatism Cure will cure nea.rly every
form of Rheumatism in a few hours. Those
suffering with Kidney Complaint can employ
no physician who will cure them so quickly
as a 25-cent vial of Munyon's Kidney Cure.
These are strong statements, but every one
true. Nothing Is more important to health
than to keep the pores of the skin in a
healthy condition. Munyon's Witch Hazel
Soap Is a skin food and vitalUer. It gives
a youthful glow to the complexion, cures all
ekin eruptions and makes the skin soft as
velvet.
No matter what your disease Is, or how
many doctors have failed to cure you. write
Munyon doctors. It will cost you nothing,
and may save you much money and suffering.
Munyon's Remedies at all Druggists. 25c
MOTON'SJroaAway and 26tn St., New Yorfc
"WALKING AGAINST TIME.
Waterloo, lowa, Aug. 21.—Fred Coubert of
New York left this city to-day on foot for
San Francisco under contract to cover 2,000
miles in seventy days for a purse of $5,000.
He is a muscular fellow and looks able to
do all he says he has and can.
Board and Room Only $7 Per Week
For the rest of the season at Lake Park
Hotel. Frequent trains on Minneapolis &
St. Louis railroad.
EXPORT
OIL &
PipeLineCo
OF BEAUHONT.
Pfesidsnt, Hon. CHARLES A. TOWNE
Of N«w York City and Beaumont, Texas.
Beaumont, Texas, Aug. 16.
WALTER Q. HUDSON & CO.,
342 Bxchmmg* Bldg., Bottom.
Oil struck top of derrick at twelve
fifteen; turned off at once. Will send
photograph horizontal gusher soon and
of perpendicular when weather permits.
Expert opinion says no bigger or better
well on Spindle Top, at least seventy
thousand barrels a day. Mill place on
pipe line as soon as possible.
CHARLES A. TOWNE.
NEXT SATURDAY
AUG. 24,
is positively the
LAST DAY
In which to secure stock in this
company
AT 75c A SHARE,
as no stock will be sold after that day
at less than par, §1.00 per share.
This company has more than fulfilled its
promises to stockholders and our own antici
pations. All our calculations of its profits
have been based on a 10,000-barrel well,
which would pay the company a million dol
lars in one year, or 60 per cent on its entire
capitalisation. Let the reader figure for him
self or herself the actual profit from this
magnificent well of 70,000-barrel flow.
Having struck oil in its first Spindle Top
veil, the company is now proceeding to the
construction of an immense storage reeer-
Tolr for the ell. The usual size of oil tanks
in the Taxas fields Is 37,500 barrels; this does
not giro such capacity as the Export Com
pany requires, and its reservoir will be made
aot less than 500,000 barrels. In marketing
the product, it is essential to have on hand
• largo reserve of oil, and the company hav
ing already an assured market, must provide
tor suoh reserve at once.
It will also proceed at an early day to drill
additional wells on Spindle Top, and prob
ably on ita Dyke and Johnson lands. The
company having been successful in securing
to its stockholders ALL. the profits from
It* well on Spindle Top, where outside par
ties offered to guarantee a gusher for a
share in the profits, will do its own
drilling: on these other two tracts where
•lmllar guarantees were offered. The com
pany has also closed the arrangement here
tofore referred to as pending, by which a
cash market for 7,000 barrels daily of its
product is assured.
The ooznpany having secured the right of
way for Its pipe lines to Fort Arthur and Sa
bine Pass, the construction of these lines
will begin at the earliest possible date, thus
enabling it to load vessels direct for the ex
yort trade.
This company does not meed to
"gruarantee" a arusher; It has one.
Until Aug. 24, we offer a limited issue of
the Export Oil & Pipe Line Company's
•lock at
75c PER SNARE
par value $1.00, full paid and non-assessable.
Comparing the company's present condition
and prospects with those of other successful
Texas oil companies, we see no reason why
Jjs shares should not bring 10 times par.
No subscriptions at 75c accepted after Aug.
M. Orders by mail must bear date and
postmark: not later than Aug. 24 to secure
allotment.
implications should be sent either to the
wmpany at £*aumont, Texas, or to Its fiscal
agents as below, with check or draft pay
able to the order of
SANFORD MAKEEVER,
84 Adams Street, Chicago, 111.,
General Agent for Minnesota, .v
BASEBALL
LOSE TWO IN A DAY
Beall's Men Make a Frightful Be-
ginning on Final Trip.
'TWAS WITH THE JOE-JOES, TOO
It Wasn't a Walk-Away for the
Missouri Players, but
Then—.
Two games were fought for at St. Joe
yesterday between the millers and the
Missouri saints, and, although, the millers
had confidently expected to take both, they
got neither. After the disastrous tour
of the Joe-Joes in Colorado, where they
could not win anything, even the sympathy
of the mountaineers, it was supposed that
any team of ball tcssers would wade right
through them .Possibly it was. due to
over confidence that the millers were I
routed.
The millers outbatted their hosts about '
two to one in the first game. Whitridge
twirling in his usual good form but hav
ing unreliable support. The score was all
but ti?d in the eighth inning, but Whit
ridge was retired at the plate*after two
ruus had come in. The score:
FIRST GAME.
Mpls. rhp c St. Joseph, rhp c
Belden 1f... o 3 0 0 Flood 2b.... 1 0 2 0
MeCredle rf 0 0 2 0 Hall 3b 0 0 10
Congalfn cf 1 0 4 0 Hulswiu ss 1 0 2 0
Brashear 2b 1 1 1 1 Schrall If.. 0 1 2 0
Law lb 0 1 9 0 Doom c 1 1 1 0
Rahe a 5.... 0 2 2 1 Davis 1b.... 1 113 0
Cockm'n 3b 1 2 0 0 Honey'n cf. 0 0 3 1
McCon'll c. 0 0 6 1 McKib'n rf 0 1 2 0
Whitridge p 0 1 0 0 McDonald p 0 1 1 0
Totals ...3 10 24 3| Totals ...4 627 1
St. Joseph 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 •—4
Minneapolis 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 o—3
Earned runs, St. Joseph 2, Minneapolis 2;
base on balls, by McDonald 2, by Whitridge 6;
struck out, by Whitridge 5; sacrifice hits.
Flood, Hall, McCredie; stolen bases, Huls
wiu, Davis, McKibben, Cockman; double
play, McDonald to Davis; wild pitch, Whit
ridge. Time, 1:50. Umpire, Figgemeier. At
tendance 2,500.
Captain Wadsworth essayed to pitch the
second game but after he had issued
passes to Davis and McKibbin, and Flood j
had brought them home with a four-bag- ;
ger in the second semester, the captain j
turned over the command to Ferguson, \
who was all right, only the damage had j
already been done. The score:
SECOND GAME.
Mpls. rhp c St. Joseph, rhp c
Belden 1f... 0 0 0 0 Flood 2b.... 12 10
McCredie rf 0 1 1 0 Hall 3b 0 2 1 0
Congalfn cf 1 1 0 0 Hulswitt ss 0 1 1 0
Brashear 2b 1 1 3 0 Schrall 1f... 0 1 1 0
Law lb 0 1 8 0 Doom c 0 0 3 0
Robe S3 0 15 0 Davis 1b....l 2 8 1
Cockman 3b 0 0 0 1 Honey'n cf..l 2 9 0
McConnell c 0 0 6 A) MeKib'n rf 1 0 3 0
Wadsw'th p 0 0 0 0 McFad'n p. 0 0 0 0
Ferguson pOllO
Totals ... 4 10 27 1
Totals ... 2 6 24 1
St. Joseph 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 •—4
Minneapolis 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 o—2
Earned runs, St. Joseph 2, Minneapolis 2;
two-base hits, Davis, Rone; home run, Flood;
struck out, by McFadden 3, by Wadswortn- 1,
by Ferguson 4; base on balls, by Wadsworth
2, by McFadden 1; sacrifice hits, Hulswitt,
Honeyman; stolen bases, Honeyman 2, Mc-
Kibben, Brashear, Congalton; passed ball,
McConnell; innings pitched, by Wadsworth
2, by Ferguson 6. Time, 1:20. Umpire, Fig
gemeier.
Chech and Gibson, the two collegians,
worked against each other at Kansas City
yesterday and Gibson had somewhat the
best of the match, as he likewise pitched
the best game. The score:
FIRST GAME.
K. C. rhp c St. Paul, r hp c
Ketchem If 0 1 4 0 Shannon rf 1 1 1 0
Hartman 2b 0 0 2 0 Dillard cf.. 0 1 1 0
Beville rf.. 0 0 0 0 Ryan If ... 0 0 2 0
Robins'n 3b 1 1 1 2 Brain 3b ..0 0 2*l
Brashear lb 0 0 8 0 Kelly lb ..0 0 5 0
Messitt c... 1 1 6 0 Schafer 2b. 0 0 3 1
Lewee ss .. 1 1 2 0 Huggins ss. 0 0 1 0
Wolfe cf .. 0 0 2 0 Wilson c... 0 0 8 0
Gibson p.. 0 1 2 0 Chech p.. 0 0 1 1
Totals .. 3 527 2 Totals .. 1 224 3
Kansas City 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 o—3
St. Paul 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o—l
Earned runs, Kansas City 3, St. Paul 1;
two-base hit, Ketchem; three-base hits, Mes
sitt, Dillard; sacrifice hit, Brashear; stolen
base, Eewee; bases on balls, off Gibson 1,
off Chech 1; struck out, by Gibson 6, by
Chech 7; hit by pitched ball, Ryan; wild
pitch, Gibson; double plays, Wilson to Scha
fer, Robinson to Brashear; left on bases,
Kansas City 1, St. Paul 2; time of game, 1:35;
umpire, Tyndal.
The second meet was as poor a one as
the other was good. The cowboys lost by
piling up a stack of errors. The score:
SECOND GAME.
K. C. rh pc St. Paul, r hp c
Ketchem If 0 1 1 1 Shannon If. 1 0 2 0
Hartm'n 2b 1 2 6 2 Dillard cf.. 2 1 2 0
Bevllle rf.. 0 1 0 0 Cogan rf .. 1 2 1 0
Robins'n 3b 1 0 0 0 Brain 3b .. 2 2 0 0
Brashear lb 2 116 0 Kelly lb .. 2 118 0
Messitt c... 1 0 1 1 Schafer 2b. 0 1 1 1
Lewee ss .. 1 1 2 1 Huggins ss. 2 2 1 0
Wolfe cf .. 1 1 1 1 Wilson c .. 0 2 2 0
Weimer p.. 2 2 0 0 Cook p... 0 2 0 0
Totals ..9 9 27 6 Totals ..10 13 27 1
Kansas City 0 60120000—9
St. Paul 3 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 2—lo
Earned runs, Kansas City 4, St. Paul 6;
two-base hits, Beville, Dillard; thre«-base
hit, Hartman: stolen base, Wilson; sacrifice
hits, Ketchem, Messitt, Cogan, Huggins,
Kelly; double play, Lewee to Hartman to
Brashear; bases on balls, off Weimer 3, off
Cook 4; struck out, by Cook 2; hit by pitched
ball, by Weimer 1, by Cook 2; time of game,
1:40; umpire, Tyndal; attendance, 1,600.
Den/er took two •• un. s from the Dcs
Moines midgets yesterday. The grizzlies
had to work in the first game, but the
second was surrendered by the midgets
without a fight.
FIRST GAME.
Denver. rhp c Dcs M. rap c
Preston .rf 1 1 0 0 McQuade If 0 1 0 0
McHale cf.. 1 1 3 0 Thiel cf ... 0 1 2 0
Mohler 2b.. 2 1 1 0 Warner rf. 0 1 0 0
Everitt lb.. 1 3 12 0 Hines 2b .. 0 0 5 0
Jones If ... 0 0 1 0 Werden lb. 2 1 7 0
Dundon 3b. 0 2 2 1 O'Leary ss. 1 2 0 0
Radcliffe ss 1 1 1 1 Callahan 3b 0 1 0 0
Sullivan c. 0 0 6 0 Kleinow c. 0 1 8 0
Eyler p... 0 0 1 0 Glade p... 1 1 1 l
Totals .. 6927 2 Totals ..49 23»~1
•Everitt out; hit by batted ball.
Denver 0 0 0 1 0 3 1 1 o—6
Dcs Moines 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 I— l
Two-base hits, McHale, Mohler, Everitt,
Glade; bases on balls, off Glade 5; struck
out, by Glade 7, by Eyler 5; wild pitches,
Glade 2; time of game, 1:40; umpire Eb
right.
SECOND GAME.
Denver. rh pc Dcs M. rh pc
Preston rf. 2 0 2 0 McQuade If 0 2 1 2
McHale cf. 2 1 1 0 Thiel cf ... 0 0 3 0
Mohler 2b.. 2 2 5 0 Warner rf.. 0 1 0 0
Deleha'y lb 0 0 0 1 Hlnes 2b .. 0 1 0 1
Everitt lb.. 0 16 0 Werden lb. 0 0 5 0
C. Jones If 1 2 0 0 O'Leary ss. 0 1 1 l
Dundon 3b. 1 2 1 0 Callahan 3b 1 1 4 0
Radcliffe ss 1 1 0 0 Kleinow c. 0 0 2 0
Sullivan c. 00 3 0 Bubser p.. 00 0 0
Jones p...2200
Totals .. 1 6 16* 4
Totals ..11 11 18 1
•Game called on account of darkness after
one man was out, at end of the sixth.
Denver 4 0 0 2 5 0-^-11
Dcs Moines 0 1 0 0 0 0— 1
Three-base hits, McHale, Mohler; bases on
balls, off Jones 1; off Bubser 2; struck out
by Jones 3; hit by pitched ball, Preston 2
Werden 1; double play, Dundon to Mohler
to Everitt; time of game, 55 minutes; um
pire, Ebright.
Making more hits than the "Willie
boys" and fewer errors, the kidnappers
had no trouble in making off with all
honors in part one of the double header
at Colorado Springs. Seven double plays
made it a memorable contest. The
score:
FIRST GAME.
Omaha. rh pc Col. Spgs. rh pc
Genins cf .. 0 3 1 0 Bandelin rf. 0 2 3 0
Fleming If.. 112 0 Hulen ss ... 1 8 2 3
Stewart 2b.. 1 1 9-0 Hemphill cf 0 0 3 0
Calhoun lb. 1 2 9 2 Holland lb.. 1 1 7 2
Letcher rf.. 1 2 1 1 O'Con'ell 3b 1 1 4 0
M'A'd'ws 3b a 0 1 0 Hernon 1f... 1 0 2 0
Toman ss .. 1 1 2 0 Ream 2b ... l 1 5 0
Gonding c... 2 1 2 1 Donohue c. 0 0 1 0
Coons p... 1 1 0 0 McNeeley p. 1 2 0 1
Totals .. 81227 4 Totals .."«"» 27 ~6
Omaha 1 00500010—8
Colorado Springs .„0 30010200— C
Earned runs, Omaha. 4, Colorado Springs 1;
THE MINNEAPOLIS JOURNAL.
stolen bases, Herron, O'Connell: two-base
hits, Hulen, Toman, Gondlng, Calhoun, Gen
ins; three-base hits, O'ConneH, . Stewart,
Fleming; double plays, Fleming to Calhoun,
McAndrews to.". Stewart to Calhbun, ■ Toman
to Stewart to Calhoun, O'Connell to Ream to
Holland, Bandelln to O'Connell, O'Connell to
Holland; bases on balls, off Coons 6, off Mo-
Neeley 1; hit by pitched bal... Me Andrews,
Holland 2, O'Connell; base on errors, Omaha
6, Colorado Springs 1; left on bases, Omaha
5, Colorado Springs 6; umpire, Carruthera;
time, 1:35. ... ■■'<-.?. .. -•' ■ -.;■■■ .. ' ■. ; .v-.
Omaha wanted the second game also,
but the "Willie boys" protested and final
ly In the eleventh round had their way.
The score: .. .:. .
SECOND GAME. " ' ;
Col. Spgs. rh pc Omaha. rh. p,e
Bandelin rf. 0 1 1 1 Genins:cf .. 0 1 f 3 0
Hulen ss... 0 11 1 Stewart 2b.. 0 '0." 5 1
Hemphill ss 0 1 0 0 Fleming If.. 12 4 0-
Gaston lb .. 12 8 0 Calhoun lb. 0 2 12 1
Holland cf.. 1 1,1 1 Letcher rf.. 0 2 1 1
O'Con'ell 3b 0 1 3 1 M'A'd'ws 3b 0 . 0 2 0
Hernon If. 0 16 0 Toman es .. 1*,2;3 0
Ream 2b ... 1 2 2 1 Buckley p.. 0 0 0 0 I
Donahue c. 0 1 11 0 Alloway p.. 0 0 0 0
Parvin p... 0100 . ' ; . ——*— —
■_■_ Totals .. 2 8 30* 3
Totals .. 3 12 83 6 ... ..'..; ;';
Omaha ....... 1 0 0 0 6. 1 0 0 0 0 o—2
Col. Springs -.0 100000010 I—3
•None out when winning run was made.
Earned runs, Colorado Springs 2; stolen
bases, Letcher, Hernon;" two-base hits, Flem- ]
ing 2, Toman, Calhoun, Letcher, Ream, Gas
ton, Holland; double play, Toman to Stewart '
to Calhoun; struck out, by Parvin 8; bases on '
balls, off Parvin 1; first base on errors, Colo- i
rado Springs 2, Omaha 4; left on bases, Colo
rado Springs 8; Omaha 11; umpire, Carruth
ers; time. 2:05. ' .
How They Stand. •' :■'"■''
Played Won. v Lost. Pet.
Kansas City 99 63 ->Z6<- : .836
St. Joseph ...a? ■■.>- 63 44 ;: .516
St. Paul 99 .63 46 .535 1
Minneapolis 94 47- 47 ... .500 i
Omaha 96 46 50 .479
Colorado Springs 93 41 62 .442
Denver .... 93 .41. 52 : .142 1
Dcs Moines 95 ; 39 66 •; .411
Where They Play. t - .';
Minneapolis at Kansas City.
St. Paul at St. Joseph. '
Omaha at Denver. -"..v.
Dcs Moines at Colorado Springs. iV- jv;
NATIONAL LEAGUE, r
v For ten innings the giants and beaneaters
battled and not a run was scored. ; In the
eleventh, Will* grew weary and the giants j
ended the remarkable game by making three
runs. The score: ;•*••-*?■>;
_ . -" ■■' '■','• * X H E
Boston .. 0 0000000000—0 6 3
New York .. 0 00000000 0 3—3 8 1
Batteries—Kittridge and Willis; Warner and
Taylor. ' ' •
For four innings yesterday, Murphy amused
himself with the pirates, but in the next five
they made a score of hits and fourteen runs.
The score: . • ■•••.
n.w v "r'H E
Pittsburg .. .........0 0005 512 I—l 421 3
St. Louis 0 20000000—2 6-"'4
Batteries— and Chesbro; Schriver
Murphy and Wicker. '• x
Brooklyn pulled up on the Phillies yester
day by defeating them twice. -• Both contests
were close and interesting. The scores:
First Game . ;.-,;.■ R rHE
Brooklyn .. 3000 010 0 o—4 8 1
Philadelphia 0 0010000 o—l 4 0
Batteries—McGuire, Farrell and Donovan;
McFarland and Townsend. . . , ; ■
Second Game— ' • R HE
Brooklyn 110 000 10 o—3 11 0
Philadelphia 0 0000100 I—2 11 0
Batteries— and Hughes; Douglass
and Donahue.
Rain prevented the Cincinnati-Chicago
game. . .. • '•',..,;.....■■
National Standings.
• Played. Won. ' Lost; Pet.
Pittsburg .. 93 '■■ 57 36 ' ■'■ .613
Philadelphia 99 67 4 42.. .576
Brooklyn.... 100 56 . 44 .560
St. Louis 102 56 46 .549
Boston 98 47 51 .480
Cincinnati .. ..;... 95 ' 40 55 .421
New York 93 ... . 39 '- 54 .419
Chicago ... ......102 39 63;, .352
. To-day's Games. „ ■■ :':,
Pittsburg at St. Louis. ; '.
Chicago at Cincinnati (two games),
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Umpire Connolly bad a guard of honor
again yesterday and the blue coats were busy
keeping the excited populace off his back. The j
tigers batted out a victory, but the crowd j
said that it was Connolly who decided the
game. The score: ' ; V ' ." - - a
:■ . . ■■■-. ■ .:.-«=•■:''.. wRvH-vH
Baltimore.. ..... 10 0100 0 0 o—2 7-1
Detroit .. 3000 00 0 2 o—s 10 -1
Batteries—Bresnehan, Howell and McGin
nity; McAllister and Si ever. ■ •
In one hour and . twenty minutes the Bos
ton Americans had the brewers whitewashed
from end to end in a workmanlike style. The
score:
R H E
Boston „- 0303 00 0 0 •—6 9 0
Milwaukee .. 000 00 0 000—0 1 2
Batteries —Criger and Young; Donahue,
Hawley and Sparks. ...
A timely bunching of hits in the first in
ning decided the game at Philadelphia yes
terday in favor of the spiders. The score: i i
* ■ > R-; H 'E'
Philadelphia 10 000 010 I—3 12 2
Cleveland 40010 10 0 I—7 14 3
Batteries— and Bernhard; Wood and
McNeil. / ' "
Although the senators outbatted the white
box, they did not hit so far out. The sox
made five three-baggers, a homer, a double
and two singles, : and this variety of sticki
work seemed more effective than the big
bunch of the senators. * The score: > i
""" * "* ' ■ ' ' .- - • .. - ' ' R". H E
Washington .. .....1 bOIO 010 o—3 12 2
Chicago .. 4000 03 0 2 o—9 -9 1
Batteries—Clarke and Patten; Sullivan and
Griffith. • •:■■;•■. '■■■.•:■. ■■•■■ :.■•...:'
American Standings.
Played. Won. Lost Pet.
Chicago .. 100 61 -• 39 .610
Boston .. 99 59 /40 .696
Baltimore 96 - 54 42 .602
Detroit ..." 100 63 " ' 47 .530
Philadelphia .. ....99 50 v 49 * .506
Cleveland ..;..... 96 42 54 ; .438
Washington .. ...'.96 40 66 : .417
Milwaukee ........102 *.;<■; 35 ;\67 ' .343
• To-day '■ Schedule. .
Milwaukee at Boston. . J,
Chicago at Washington. ; : • ,- ■.
Detroit at Baltimore. ; r. .; - -
; Cleveland at Philadelphia. „ ■, ..
AMATEURS' COLUMN
lowa'* Tournament. '. .
• lowa Falls, Aug. 21.—Webster City's base
ball team won the pennant in the two days'
baseball tournament which closed yesterday,
defeating Manson's team by a score of 11 to
7. Man son tied the score in the eighth In
ning. With the bases full in the ninth. Town
batted a home run, giving Webster City the
game. •,.,••* '■• • •'- -;-•■. •■;■■■■•:
Northwestern. " ..:.
Specials to The Journal., ■; \. .*>.,:
Waseca, Minn., j Aug. 21.— . baseball
game at Flandreau, S. D., yesterday resulted:
Waseca, 10; Flandreau Indians, 8; eleven in
nings. ■ '-.-■■> ■'?'-'
Elroy, Wis., Aug. 21.—The Elroy s fair
opened yesterday. . The championship ball
game between Cashton and Elroy was won. by
Elroy, by a score of 3 to 4. Batteries—
Elroy, White and Bear, of Minneapolis;
Cashton, Fox and Coe. ' • ... ,- *
- Northfleld, Minn., Aug. 21.—The Watertown
Superbas defeated the Reaches, of Wadena,
in a thirteen inning game, Iby the score of.
2to 0. In the thirteenth inning, with one
out, Maas, of the Superbas, walked, and
Stover, a Minneapolis boy, hit for fourt bases.
Stover was badly injured in the Reaches'
half of the thirteenth, and was obliged to
return home, while the team' went to Albert
Lea. - .■,'.■■ '■-- : > ...",- :,■ -. ■• ;
Wykoff, Minn., Aug. 21.—Lanesboro : and
Winnebago City. crossed bats here Monday,
and the game resulted in a victory for Lanes
boro by a score of 13 to '9.. The batteries
were: Wisebecher and Peterson Rau and
Haight. ,: ;■ : r..^. '.--■•■'■'■■ ■"; : - ';.", ■..\- ;■■
-Willmar, Aug. 21.— Willmar Juniors de
feated the Glenwood ball team here Monday
afternoon in a game that would have done
I credit to older teams. It was an excellent
exhibition. and a fast game. Time, 1 hour and
10 minutes. | Score, 4 to L Batteries—Will
mar, Glarum and Sather; * Glenwood," Abra
hamson and Wollan. ,
;■ Locals. ■ ; .---i- •■■ .' x
The Boston Candy company team defeated
the Boeheim Sons by a score of 34 to 4. The
winners • wish a game - with -the ' Minneapolis
/Dry Goods company club. Address F. Suk
ritz, 1430 Madison street NE. - >*\ ■■' - ■
The Lyndales would like to arrange a game
with any team In the city or state averag
ing 16 or 17 years, the Oak Hills or the Glen
wood Kids preferred. ' All those wishing
games, address M.. 1., 616 Seventh avenue N.
The G. A. Bingenhelmer team would like
to meet any 16-year-old team in the city for
games Sept. 1 and 2, the R., F. & H. club
preferred. ■■;. Address G. A. Bingenheimer, 642
Sixth avenue N. •,-..'. ,;_,.,
The R., F. & H. team would like to arrange
a ■ game for Sunday, Sept 1, >or Labor Day,
with ;■ any 16-year-old team «In'; the • city or
state, Le Sueurs, Minneßotas. or , Glen wood
1 MINNEAPOLIS DRY GOODS CO.
WHILE SUMMER LINGERS
Continued heat makes Summer goods still necessary. That's your advantage.
But we must have room for Fall goods. That's our disadvantage. Between
the two you find the best bargains.
BDsicry. ggi^asl ««,_« gmm .^ ~ < - in wane Goods
ufaeturers' .seconds, with double *&&£s&*% Iff iLSIIQ© €*£aWf«3a?ffS 36 and 40-inch Curtain Swisses,
s!ffin^3 X£ihfif«^ As a "startw" for the Fall trade ' ™ enounce the purchase S^M^iT
1 pair ................'10C of nearly 900 pairs of Lace Curtains at about 50c on the dollar. 15c and 18c yd.; Psale yd ./.. 83C
Children's Cotton Hose; 2-thread, You may have them at the same ratio. They are beautiful new ! A sale of fine India Linen, im
fast colors,-seamless, with 4f\ goods, in Scotch Net and Brussels ■ effects. Such bargains al- : ported from England.
d™, k£^s and soles pr.IVU ways rare,rare especially so at the opening of a season 35c quality, sale, yard .. 21c
Men's Hose of pure Egyptian cot- -J - ' _ w vpomugui a tseusoa. j, sc quality, sale, yard.......... 180
ton, in fast colors, with spliced heels ,!,.>». i A_, _ . - ■• • ■ ■■■■■■! ——"—————" White Pique, special value, worth
and toes. Regular 18c a 1 a Lot I—Pair Lot 2—Pair Lot 3—Pair Lot 4—Pair 20c and 25c, at 15c 4 O**
1 goods, special ..........;;. I&2G *%**-'- Sfc-jSt^S **^ ***& *****. and.............'.-...;.,.;.: 13fC
SliSipl^; 38c »' 98c $1.98 $2.98 summer underwear
heels and toes, never sold at less than I ■' I I Ladies' Cotton Vests, 'Richelieu
U¥ c a paA£ Thursday 3I A H p ■ ribbed, low necked and sleeveless;
pairs for 25c, 1 pair...... IVb 60-inoh Tapestry, in rich Rope Curtains, for doors of some with wing sleeves. "j^
The best value yet offered—Ladies' patterns and colorings for full siza O* M <ffe«* These 12^c garments now at i C
black Cotton Hose, made of combed *Z., J ftW i «un £' lull size, SI 9 Q Ladies' Combination Suits,inecru,
yarn, with spliced soles, |AI A merly sold at §LoU /Sf* each Sff ■a&a %V Jersey ribbed, handsomely trimmed!
heels and toes, pair...... I^2C yard, now at.........a WW ■•■ _ 4 . . - low neck, no sleeves, knee length-
Ladies' Fancy Hose, a large as- ' Window Shades 3xfi feet Cretonne and Satine, m sold usually at 50c per QQ.
sortment of the kind that has sold in ot "^ j f ' d,v ?' handsome Oriental 4B A suit; now at........ O5fC
this season at ISc pair, 12 2 © m standard colors, all ready T, a ttern«» p^d IOC Men's fancy balbriggan shirt* and
closing out price. ....... I ZiO to hang, 4A A patterns, per yara .... «w drawers; sizes are broken but the
sale ftlilnflepni^ii^ parh |C illi^i^lliP goods are perfect; excellent value at
Af IlflUlfWniielfcie «^V Extension Curtain Rods, 50c each; now offered «Q«
OUIC If I Ulill U 11111511115 couch Covers, fringed on made of polished brass., will at....... ............... OOC
.. Corset Covers, the kind that we all sides, in two desirable extend 30 to 54 inches, ffc^ L9CC DCHHPtlll^ilf
have sold at 19c and 25c. .We have lines at «9 7K o 7U I 7K n^ s9C »-«vv l/vpui IIIIVIII
only sizes 32, 38, 40 and 42.^*11^ *«"», at $Z. 75 and $3.75. each .................y.W Lace Bindings, Galloons and In
To close, each .. ..... D&i2u ' 111111 — ■ ———i—————. sertions, for dress trimmings, in
Drawers, well ! made, in * various '' '" " ' ' ' ; ; ' straight, serpentine and wave ef
styles and patterns, with cambric «i^ ' ' ' iects, colors, white, cream, ecru
flounce, tucked and wide AC** ■■■■■■ -■ ■ -^ mmmm—~ and black. Per &9
hemstitched. Extra at.... AO C §&£}***** m&£;rm SMmmmm, C* #~-— yad "Cr-'A Bcto<J*fii
Ladies' Chemise, plain in style but «© Wf 9110110 SRiPtS erv "S'erdons In^nn^ , EEobroid;
of nrst-class materials and a Qa ' , ' "^ «!, ft i^J li on,V n- 1 °Pen deSllf^ °
workmanship, each ....... & G Selected with reference to quality, style and beauty, then Pe?vard ' x lnch Wlde- ISC
Night Gowns, well made, with priced within the reach of all. r>^ Torchon' Laces" and'inaertioTm
yoke of pretty tucking and insertion, . ' v,„ 1 t^t^Jt Sa ™
and cambric ruffles on neck and Walking Skirts, made of heavy golf cheviot, in dark mixed ular prices are 5c and St* o*'
Jfeves, full lengths, all SOo brown anddark gray> with flarin *flounoe' CAn yard Special .■ — •••••So
SIZeSV- EaCh ."•yy heavily stitched, each.... ) ...9&®»!HI Hail(i^|>l>il^fC
NOIiOIIS Dress Shields, light in Walking Skirts, in Oxford gray, navy blue and dark tan, ■""""tvl UTOia
iIVIIVIIO weight, lined with fine with nine rows of stitching around bottom, <&£» £**% »>, L*d}» B' ■ Inifciai Handkerchiefs, of
nainsook, sizes 3 and 4; good value „„-s„„+ iin- „ x ' i¥^K^ illl sheer linen, hand embroid- »fl**
at 18c a pair. +tkg* Perfect-fitting, each iPVaW ered, > 2 dozen for 99C
Our price I Iff* i Walking Skirts, regular tailor made perfect in style and fit Men's Hemstitched Linen , Hand
"Favorite" Hair Pin Cabinets, con- deep flaring flounce with 12 rows of stitching; colors, Pan-Ameri- 6*?™"? inch uhem «ade
SS^Sa"^^^ QB^ Z and T ? °rd gTi ight mif ed bror and nay %7 ifitf) XricVeach 0 81.. eaCh: 250
Thursday. .. ...3© blue- This is our leader in value; each .... V«iOU UmhpAlla R»l>H2llnC
■J. O. King's Spool Cotton, a soft * ' ■ iJlflOPCIia yQI!IS
finish machine thread; in black and ——^—————————~————_—.._„ ———————« Ladies' 26-inch BlacK Union Taf
white only, warranted 200 »^ ni«»k /»AAi«n ■■ -■ '-v » feta Umbrella, with English Para
y ....,..^..ZO lr ards.per.po, WSStI Gooas Hardware Department JSdS^'svJuisrwS?
■'■■-■■ ■■■■■-< • - . ..-•-■..- . main floor. . Jelly Tumblers, tin covers, regu- cess, trimmed or plain naturals; with
rAP^PfC 2)1 Lawns, Dimities and lar 25c dozen; for, •fi©/f% case and tassel. 4*4 rtß
summer corsets at Batistes, sale, yard 50 dozen ...... 18c E\ Bandtassel:8 andtassel: $1.26
34 DPll*^ These Corsets '.-.• .. " '.' •- :-. , n " *' '■;« Bound pan sieves, just the thing 1 |T[ . ... 1
/A ■ ■ ■*'*' were delivered - A bargain lot at 10c—Consisting for making jelly; regular 4 A-.. i^AlAnAil Cilbr lUioloffo
sV&ethatwe marked them at °* *>«* Dimities Fine French 15c, f0r...;.:;...'.. .*.... 1110 tOIOPCd SllK WOISIS.
50c instead of 75c, the regular Batistes, in black and white, linen . Asbestos Stove Mats, only, O^ Special Prices for « Special Purpose.
price. Frankly, it looks now like -gjw «!??S also medium SS o eaCh ' '3 O The goods are the last of our
a needless sacrifice, but the deed ,™S* values l 0 -oc> saie ' 1 IB® Hardwood preserving 4g\ _ line of 87.50 Silk Waists. We still
is done. So long as they last 7 " ••*"' »w spoons; regular 15c, f0r.... lUv show a variety of styles and pat
they're yours at the reduced at cotton counter. (.Basement.) Hardwood Clothes Pins; j_:> terns, in all colors and sizes. The
price. They are made of im- .-'• A Denim Sale—36-inch wide best dozen..... .............; lG special price is $2 less than the
ported white net, with-straight quality made always 13c. 44 _ hi n/*Ah hm«i» old price. The Special Purpose is
front and low bust, trimmed with Sale yard M® All U/Jl^il llmi^B^ to make room for new goods now
lace at top and bottom, .extra ' W- v **--••••_••• •••• » »y nil nwu fTUIOId on the way. It's a simple story
stayed at waistline with Kart^k 36-inch Unbleached Clean Cotton, - Now divided into three lots for the and the moral is obvious Any
wide strip of drilling; eass M© >c quality, limit 20 yards. «1 A flual sale— :: of these $7.50 mE C ilk
1 ■'■■- ' ' ■ -<y- -' Sale, yard *§-2C Lot 1,69 c Lot 2,98 c Lot 3, $1.98 waists now at.... jjlOiuU
Kids preferred. For games, address L.
Heck, 610 Fifth street N.
George Hemperly has two broken ribs and
Will Evans a damaged face. They played
with C. N. Dickey's Colts, in the great game
at Lake Park, last Saturday, and got in the
way of Leslie Ogden's speedy slants. Leslie
threw so hard he dislocated his shoulder. It
was a great game, however.
WISCONSIN
HUDSON—James Sanders, who settled in
St. Croix valley la 184S, died yesterday, aged
82 years.
MENOMONIE—Rev. James W. White, pas
tor of the First Congregational church, has
tendered his resignation.
OSCEOLA—Some excitement has existed
since one of Frank Entwer's boys found a
clam with fifteen small pearls in it.
SHELL LAKE—EarI Teban, a young brake
man in the employ of the Chicago, St. Paul,
Minneapolis & Omaha, was run over and in
stantly killed.
EAU CLAlßE—Attorneys representing per
sons interested in the Keeley cure claims
will seek a writ of mandamus to compel the
commissioners to pay the claims.
PRAIRIE DU CHIEN—M. Gronert was
found dead at the residence of M. Menges. He
was watching the residence nights during the
absence of the family. Death resulted from
heart failure.
ASHLAND—Dr. Harrison, a member of the
board of health, accompanied by Sheriff Lien,
of Bay field county, left for Leonard, in Bay
field county, with the avowed purpose of
closing the camp on account of smallpox.
Three men from the camp have come to
Ashland with smallpox.
WEST SUPERIOR—The program for the
forty-seventh annual session of* the west
Wisconsin conference of the Methodist Epis
copal church has been prepared. The con
ference will be held In this city for six days,
commencing Sept. 11. The presiding bishop
will be Bishop Earl Cranston, of Portland.
SOUTH DAKOTA
DELL RAPIDS—Grain yields are somewhat
varied, but the grade is considered good.
Wheat yields range from 10 to 22 bushels to
the acre; oats run as high as 40 and barley
a* high as 35.
PIERRE—The state board of review, on
protest from the Illinois Central Railroad
company, reduced the assessment of its lines
from $5,500 to 15,000 per mile. The protest
of the Adams. Express company brought no
relief.
NORTH DAKOTA
DEVILS LAKE—Marvin Nichol pleaded
guilty to assault with a deadly weapon and
Judge Cowan sentenced him to two years
and a half in the penitentiary. Nichol was
charged with" assault on William H. Reid.
OFFICIAL ROUTE
KNIGHTS TEMPLARS
LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY
The Grand Commandery of the state of
Minnesota and also Mounted Commandery
No. 7, and Darius Commandery No. 7 of
Minneapolis, Bayard No. 11 of Stillwater,
Duluth No.. 18 of Duluth and Malta No. 25
of Preston, Minn., and their friends will
leave Minneapolis about noon Sunday, Aug.
25th, on a solid special train of handsome
sleepers and dining cars via the Wiscon
sin Central railway, and Pennsylvania
Lines arriving in Louisville Monday noon.
Train will run Jhrough without change.
For full particulars, rates and berth
reservations call #n or address V. C. Rus
sell, C. P. & T, A., 230 Nicollet Aye.,
Minneapolis, or Herman Brown, C. P. &
T. A., 373 Robert St., St. Paul, Minn.
' $24.30 to Buffalo and Return—
■"•: , .; !« '- Days' Limit. y " ■'• ■,~ •
Go to the Pan-American exposition -!via
the best route and avoid any waiting or
depot • transfer in Chicago.'?: Call ;at "■ Mm- >
neapolis & St. Louis office, No. ; 1 Wash
ington avenue S for full particulars. , W.
L. Hathaway,: city ; ticket agent. '-. ■■".-: ■'■'■
MINNESOTA
PINE ClTY—Frank Svejda, a farmer at
Willow River, took a teaspoonful of some
unlabeled medicine to relieve pain and died
In a short time.
ST. CLOUD—Superintendent Frank Ran
dall, of the state reformatory, entertained
a notable gathering. It too the form of a
picnic given in honor of D. E. Myers, the
Summer
.;■ The torrid heat of Summer is almost unbearable under the most favorable conditions,
even when the blood is healthy and the skin doing its allotted work properly, and the sweat
glands open and pouring out an adequate supply of perspiration to keep the body at an even
temperature, but, unfortunately, there are many who must endure not only the suffocating,
debilitating heat, but in addition the unspeakable tortures of some burning and itching skin
disease. The acid poison in the blood that causes Eczema, Tetter and other diseases of this
type seem warmed into life and renewed activity by the Summer's heat. The action of these
acids upon the blood soon destroys all of its life-preserving qualities, and it becomes hardly
more than water. The skin, instead of receiving a supply of pure and cooling blood, is
blistered and burned by the fiery fluids that are carried to the surface, and the pores are soon
so swollen and inflamed that perspiration is checked, and the whole body feels like
an overheated furnace. Night and day, almost without intermission, the burning and
itching continues. No sleep or rest for the tired body. At last the nerves grow weak and
the constitution breaks down under the terrible strain. The almost distracted sufferer finds
some solace in scratching, and temporary relief from bathing and the application of soothing
Tho doctors said i had Pustular lotions and salves, but the ; n j —
Eczema, which was confined mostly to liquid lire that Seems to be .8. S. 8. for a cose of Eozema of 17
my face and hands. Crusts would form turning within and without, years standing whioh had almost
and scale off, leaving the places in- burning Within and Without, JEELd my body. Itook tn ?11
flamed and raw. I was tormented for an( slowly consuming the BeTen 1". »»<* »ow there is not
five years and used many different r"~ .Wl> wiumumig uic a spot on m# x quit th- mediciM
applications without relief. A short body, IS not * Quenched by i* November, sinoe whioh time I
time after beginningl 8. S. S.I noticed ,-i •" „ ; - -,- ■ J have never seen the slightest evi
a arreat improvement, and a few bottles these temporary remedies; denoe of a return of the disease I
cured me entirely. My skin is now as +h lost Tirnr»PTfiVc -miicjt "hf» cannot too highly reoommend your
clear and smooth as anybody's. ;: . l-Llc -"Jot properties IHUSL De medicine for Eczema ' •■ "■• '
(Signed) E.E.KBLJ.Y restored to the blood, and ■■,««««•«... p.Noa^oLK,
-■•--■ TTrbana, O. .... ... - «'.,,£, 1017 Hackberry St., Ottumwa, la.
:• only persistent and faithful
constitutional treatment can do this. A trial of S. S. S. will soon convince you of its
wonderful curative qualities and its virtue as a remedy for all skin affections, no matter in
what form the disease appears, whether as sores, pimples, watery blisters or the dry and
scaly kind. At this season, when the blood and skin are endeavoring to throw off the
poison, is a much more favorable time to treatment and help nature to do the work.
5..5.5., being a purely vegetable remedy, is best suited for this purpose; it neutralizes the
acids, purifies and cools the blood, and leaves no vestige of the poison to re-ferment and bring
/on a fresh outbreak of the disease. There is no Arsenic, Potash or other harmful ingredient
'^jjjF-^. '- guiiniiiiiiiini^ 'inS.S. S. It is a safe^and pleasant purifier and tonic that
jfj^es^jl fff&xß'iSi v^^^S completely and permanently eradicates all impurities from
■ t^^^^ '-\^^^L^^ :\-^■^B*r* c system» an<^ ma^es a lasting cure of blood and skin
S^^"^^ doubles. It is diseases are not incurable, as some doctors
f#"^3 f^^3 completely and permanently eradicates all impurities from
I I the system, and makes a lasting cure of blood and skin
troubles. Skin diseases are not incurable, as some doctors
*^^J*dr *b<!^-!!lr 5Z?^"l!lr X you are a sufferer from Eczema, Tetter, Acne,
''.^f^JT'yJ/? i-l^:'' ilfue^.';/ Psoriasis, Salt Rheum or other skin disease, write to our
physicians about your case and receive advice and special directions from them without ; any
cost to you whatever, and our free book on blood and skin diseases will be a valuable aid to
you, also, while treating yourself ; SWIFT SPECIFIC CO., Atlanta, Ca.
first superintendent of the reformatory, who
is now a resident of California.
DULUTH—Burton H. Bt lllnger, the alleged
thief and forger, who has been puzzling
physicians and county officers fr ten days
by a case of real or feigned insanity, was
brought out of his fit last night by hypno
tism, imposed by D. H. Day, a dentist.
WINONA—The gradual falling of the Mis
sissippi river is said to have caused the erec
tion of temporary rafting works at Beef slough
where the logs brought down the Cbippeva
river used to be rafted before the Wisconsin
taxation laws caused the opening of the West
Newton, on the Minnesota side.
AUSTIN—The state convention of the
Christian church will be held at Austin next
week. The Ministerial Association will
have the following program: Monday even
ing, address by T. J. Dow; Tuesday morning,
address by E. A. Orr; address by J. M. Elam.
Tuesday afternoon, the missionary society
will begin its program.
Acne, Tetter
Eczema
Salt Rheum
Psoriasis
Nettle Rash
S

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