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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, August 30, 1901, Image 14

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1901-08-30/ed-1/seq-14/

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s iEi__**" tyMjj^ i
| lIL JlIEiIl ____ _B_JnE_J7/_'y^r,T^-^4»t T^B
_rlig_g_lilQj
Electric Lighted—Ob- Lear* Arrive
Serration Cars to Port- __„ •_».»« __
.nd, Ore. via Butte. Missoula, * 10:10 * 1 :4-5
Spokane, Seattle, Tacoma..;.. am pm
Pacific Express
Fargo, Jamestown, Boi»- „ _ _ __ _ _ __
man, Helena, Butte, Spokane, * 1 I .1 0 * 7 :05
Seattle, Tacoma, Portland... pm am
Fargo and Leech Lake
- :*.- Local '„ - •
Bt.Cloud,LittleFau»,Brain- * 9 :05 t5: 10
•rd. Walker, Bemidji, Fargo.. am 'n m
Dakota _ Manitoba
Express n
NFergifs Falls, Wahpeton,
Moorhead, Fargo, Crook stem, -«.«»„.«
Grand Forks, Grafton, Win- * 8:40 * 6 'AQ
ni peg „.. pm am
"PULUTH SHORT t-INE"
—' -T.TTT tt-tt ™
+8:15 am DULUTH # „ |W ftm
..0.-ggS SUPERIOR tj^ggg
' : 'Dally. |Ex. Sunday.
TICKET OFFICE— I 9 NICO_- L -b T cK.
MILWAUKEE STATION, UNION STATION,
- Minneapolis. St. Paul.
Office, £00 Xic. Phone, main 860. Union Pepot'.
Leave, |*Dally. fEx.Sun. jSuu. only.; Arrive.
t 9:ooam St. Cloud, Fer. Falls, Fargo" t 6:35pm
t 9:ooam| ..Willmar via St. Cloud... t 6:36pm
• 9:sl_mJFlyer to Mont, and Pac. Co. * 2:oopm
t 9:43 am Willmar, Su F.,Yan.,Su City t s:o2pm
f s:lopm Elk River, Milaca,Sandst'ne t 9:35 am
t 6:lopm |..Wayzata and HutoUinson.. t B;ssam
• 9:o3pm|..Minn. and Dak. Express.. * 7:ooam
• 7:4opm Fargo, Gd. Forks, Winnipeg]* 7:l2am
EASTERN MINNESOTA.
t 9:2oam|...Duluth, West Superior...lt «'oopm
...Duluth, West Superior. „j* 6:loam
Sleeper for 11:60 train ready at 9 p. m.
NORTHERN STEAMSHIP CO. _ SAILINGS.
Steamship Miami leaves Duluth Wednes
days and Saturdays, connecting at Mackinac
Island with steamships North West and North
Land for Milwaukee, Chicago, Detroit, Cleve
land, Buffalo and Pan-American exposition.
LAKE MINNETONKA TRAINS.
Leave Minneapolis—*2 pm, *5:05 pm, t9:IS
am, f6:10 pm, tlO am, a§:2s pm, bl0:40 pm.
Returning, Leave Spring Park—*l:3o pm, *5
pm, +7:25 am, 18:14 am, {9:20 'am, c 9 pm,
610:45-. pm.. a except Saturday; b-Saturday
only; c except Friday and Saturday; d Fri
day and Saturday only.
Milwaukee J^SM
Office, 328_Nic. Phone 122._ Milwaukee Depot.
Leave L | 'Daily. fExceprSunday." | Arrive 7
• 7Chicago.La Crosse,Milw'kee|*lo:sopm
• 3:oopm Chicago.La Crosse,Milw'kee *12:30pm
• 6:2spm|Chicago,La Crosse,Milw'kee * 3:2opm
*7:3flpm Chicago=Pioneer Lifflited*B:2oam
• 3:4spm|Chic'go, Faribault, Dub'que * 9:2oam
t 3:oopin|.Red Wing and Rochester. tl2;3opm
t 7:soam LaCrosse, Dub., Rk. Island +10:50pm
• 7:soam Northfield, Faribo, Kan.Cy. * 6:lspm
t 9:ooam .... Ortonville, Milbank .... + 5:45pm
• 7:3spm|Ortonville, Aberdeen, Fargo * 6;55am
t 6:sopm .Northfield, Faribo, Austin. +11:06 am
t 4:4opm ....Hutchinson, Glencoe + 9:45 am
Trains for Hotel St. Louis, Minnetonka,
leave Milwaukee Station: +6:15 am, *9:30 am,
•1:30 pm, +5 pm, *6 pm, *11:45 pm. Returning,
leave Hotel St. Louis: +7:20 am, +8:20 am,
.9:30 am, tl pm, »4 pm, *6 pm, *10:45 pm.
pRffI^ESTERNIINEI
11—JTc. ST. P.M.atOTRYIi^LJI
Ticket office, 418 Nicollet. Phone 240, main.
+Ex. Sun. Others daily. Leave I Arrive
Badger State Express— > 7:50 10:45
Chi'go.Milw'kee.Madison , am pm
Chicago—Atlantic Express.. 10:40 pm 11:55 am
Chicago—Fast Ma 11......... 6:25 pm 9:00 am
I North-Western Limited—) 7:30 8:15
Chi'go.Milw'kee, Madison j pm am
Wausau.F.duLac.Greenbay 6:25 pm 9:00 am
Duluth. Superior, Ashland. +8:10 am +5:20 pm
Twilight Limited— > 4:00 10:30
Duluth, superior, Ashland j pm pm
SuCity.Omaha,Deadwood.. +7:10 am 3:00 am
Elmore, Algona, DesMoines +7:10 am +8:05 pm
St. James, New Ulm, Tracy 9:30 am 8:05 pm
Omaha Express— ) 0:30 8:05
Sv. City, Omaha, Kan.Clty J am pm
New Ulm, Elmore 4:20 pm 10:35 am
J alrmont, St. James 4:20 pm 10:35 am
Omaha Limited— , 8:00 8:00
Sn.Clty, Omaha. Kan. City f pm am
Chicago Great Western Rk
"The Maple Leaf Route."
City Ticket Office, sth & Nicollet, Minneapolis.
Depot: Washington & ioth Aye. S,
tEx. Sund ? y. Others Dally, LeOVe jfc | flfflyg fjjjjj
Kenyon, Dodge Center, 7:40 am 10:35 pm
Oelwein, Dubuque, Free- 7:35 pm 8:25 am
port, Chicago and East.. 10:45 pm 1:25 pm
Cedar Falls,Waterloo.Mar- 10:00 am 8:00 pm
■halltown, Dcs Moines, 7:35 pm 8:25 am
St. Joseph, Kansas City. 10:45 pm 1:25 pm
Cannon Falls and Red 7:40 ami 10:35 pm
Wing t 5:30 pm +10:25 am
Northfield, Faribault, Wa- |7:4oam t_o:3s pm
terville, Mankato 5:30 pm 10:25 am
Mantorville Local 5:30 pin] 10:25 am
Minneapolis & St. Louis R. R.
Offlce.Nic. House. Phone 225. St. Louis Depot
tEx.Sunday. Others Dally.|~Leav"er~fA"rrive7
Watertown & Storm Lake] "
Express „.(+ 9:20 am t 5:21 pm
Omaha, Dcs Moines, Kan-]
sas City, Mason City and
Marshalltown + 9:35 am f 6:50 pm
Estherville Local 5:36 pm 9:40 am
fit.Louis & Chic'go Llmit'dl 7:35 pm 8:05 am
Omaha and Dcs Moines]
Limited ....; j B:3s'pm 7:25 am
Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sam. Sts. Maris
Office, 119 Guaranty Building. Telephone 134 L
Depot, 3d and Washington Ayes S.
Leave. | 'Daily. +Except~Sunday. | Arrive.
• 6:4opm Pacific Coast Points."]* 9:loam
• ...AUantlo. Coast Points... 9:3oam
Depot sth and Washington Ayes. N. '
- t 9:4oam I Dakota Express + 4:2opm
T8:15ar0|.... Rhlnelander Local .... + 5:45pm
Burlinclon Route .Office^ 414 Nicollet Aye.
PUI-lUgII»UIVUUIC. tph one 543, Union Depot
Leave for I Terminal Points. .. . | Ar. from
~1 :80am ! Chicago — Except Sunday. I:2opm
7:Boam 1 St. Louis—Except Sunday
7:2opm; Chic, and St. Louis—Daily. 6:25_n
WISCONSIN CENTRAL RAILWAY CO.
Office, 230 Nicollet. Phone 1936. Union Depot
Leave. ] All Trains Dally. [Arrive.
7:25 ami., Chicago and Milwaukee.. 8:50 am
7:05 pm;..Chicago and Milwaukee../ 5:35 pm
SUBSTITUTION
The _____) of the Day.
See you get Carter's,
Ask for Carter's,.
Insist and demand
CMS Mttte Liver
Fills.
The only perfect
Liver PilL
Take no other. ,
Even if
Solicited to do so.
Beware of imitations
of Same Color
Wrappers,
RED-
X BARBERS' SUPPLIES
lV=^_fcy AND CUTLBRY.
cHGd Shears, Razors and Olppere
£$&af R. H. WEGENER,
—BUS ___ tttfiOLLET AVENUE.
P^^_ ■W^*P^P^*»_— • mmwrnaram—wmmmr
' M--I-«TT-.-—t_-hMTri--nn-i • - >,*__■___
FALL OPENING SAM OF
SCHOOLSHOES
New Shapes, New Toes, New Fashions In
all kinds of Footwear for Grown Up
People as well as for the Children.
MM || I 1 ffi I 239 Nicollet
Knoblauch s Arcade «£%
Fall Novelties for tho Ladies 500 pairs Misses' Black Kid and 600 pairs Boys' and Youths' Satin
—•An elegant imported enamel Lace Calf Button and Lace, (gS\ $sa • Calf Lace School _m A
Boot, with full extension, heavy also Tan Lace and _H_ mm / g»k Shoes, worth $1 25 Ik _9 _R_
rope stitch sole. _^ A- mm agaL Button; worth to $1.25; ■•%■■■ Sizes 12 to 5. ,«__l__P
Allthe style of ||« "J iWiWm sizes 12 to 2. Sale price. Xiv *§_? f_J Sale price <-WWW
_V y'" wl W W Misses' Extension Sole _®kMSk Boys' Steel Shod Satin Calf School
How Imperial Boots— Extra heavy Vici Kid Lace _\_M a?a\ Shoes. Worth **}*, M g& &&
fine Vici Kid Lace Boots.with heavy and Button,worth $1.29. ~fl»«l" $1.75. Sizes __& _\ ™38 _\M
extension soles, either patent leather Sale price... Www %M to 5. • il_ 8 H^H
orkidtips.eqnal^ "1 gfafffa Mis£es - Kangaroo Calf £& && Sale price WIlVw
to any $4 boot (jp mM || Misses' Kangaroo Calf _*_ &_
in the world. _J«U || II School Shoes, lace and fQf|n_«_ v..,.. *._»_. 10, „ uv. . dv
Our price. pair.. Wfjf _\ *$§ %$ button, worth $1.25. *-*! P J outJ i Steel Shod School Shoes'
Very Swoll-Our^elegant Vici Sale price,,... ..,.,VVV Worth _l°_o #1 AA
■_ — ■ — _r_ j «j_ « ■ M Ui Lxl OltOU'i mrHyM 'mm F_ —— ftt H_ arm
Kid Lace Boots, either heavy or g ale v , tt*. 0 Jf%m
light soles, new j^ jOk wm 4pK Misses' Fine Box Calf Lace, ex- pr ; ce fl&lli 9 n ___'^
fall shapes, all P■■ tension soles, fair _^ J _%__. W____i^
the style and "a §__ B jjjl fffij stitch, Sale ]_ ■ **■ m\ Br°^ b' extra solid ?chool Shoes.
wear of $_.m boots, IV __m _UU $1.75. Sale JS TO Bo >TS' estra solid School Shoes.
per pa.r only W■■■ W W Wl■ li W Nailed soles. M_m _f~
For Gentlemen—The best on " Kangaroo Calf. - fflgi i g£T
earth. Gent's tine enamel or patent Child's Fine Box Calf &_ /sg_ Worth 82.00. ~ Jfe. ■ If mm
leather lace, *_> _Vk SB g_. Lace and Button.worth fl Qa_ Sale price 10P9-ff%_r
new fall styles, »■■ _ !lS gl Sale Price %y% to n•- • • WJ. 9so Youths' solid serviceable School
r.ry r 9Jr anf,iv; l_9 _U_ _. 11l IJ Sale Price W Wlf " Youths' solid serviceable School
per pair, only.. f(p 9^l »& .ww shoes. Soles filled with iron. Worth
Extra Woo-Velour calf, Good- Child's Calf and Kid ££ £& H;ll\ 9 , n9 . A| Pfl
year welt, full extension sole, heavy School Shoes, sizes B>_ fiT K| _1_ Sizes 12 to 2 «v I H__ ||
stitch; just the *J± HA to 11, worth 98c, HB__lC • mm 9 «11
properthing ©^1 Sale price WW pnce
for fall wear; j|| JS ?» |
per pair, only.. Child's Kid Button, g-a J& Little Gents' Satin ma 0%
Half Price Sale-Meat, Tan Shoes. sizes 6 _to 8, kid tips, ESB gm Calf School Shoes. §0- IB Jfe
Tan Shoes worth $3.00 for $1.60 worth (DC. bbIS H Sizes 10 to 13.
Tan shoes worth $3.50 for $1.75 Sale price \_W _^ |L_f Sale price. BR_f I_IBJI
Tan Shoes worth $-.00 for $2.00 F A?, : -\ mmw —mw mar .*■" * '-'."■' '***'**& —*W
CARRIE IS COMING
A Way Mr-. Nation Has of Getting
"Ads."
There Is terror in one of the railroad
general offices of St. Paul, all owing to a
letter from Carrie Nation of window
smashing fame.
In the letter Mrs. Nation says she Is
coming to St. Paul to spend a few days
with the -advertising agent, right away.
She also wants a little advertising for her
paper, the Smasher's Mail. She will prob
ably get the ad, with a check for the
amount, for the advertising agent does
not want to run the risk of a personal
call from the editor. The letter follows:
Dear Brother—l send you to-day a package
of my papers. Could you not send me an ad
vertisement for the Smasher's Mail? I ex
pect to be with you to stay several days the
11l IV * DOUBLE BARBEL BREECH'LOADING $15 SHOT GUN FOR $7.7?.
___» I __—.___« * Kewßrf;RPhr.on,iHni-Shnft»iin» <E/i At Net. The new
—mmm m _^^_WWS_SaHn__senH BBMniodelSpenoerKepeatirigShotGuns, $16.47 Net.Our
_____H___Br_Sß_SK IHI Famous *5-°° ™_ Shot Take Down 2a Caliber Rifles
_«S-I __6____Bi for 82.97 Net. Winchester and V. M. C. Loaded
_B_ EB-"*^^^ '■!__. WBBIBI **" "' II •I 7 per 100. Nitro Powder Loaded Shells,
___■ mfW^ SSS-BAT PUNS AND AMMUNITION at wholesale prices to everybody.
_BWBy' PFT eUAT PUNS AND AMMUNITION at-sholesale prices to everybody.
msijfi*^ *£■*_ 1 9IIV ■ ■ Our Gun Catalogue containing 98 pages, size -kxiatf Inches, will
my be sent postage paid on receipt of three cents to any one returning this ad and mentioning this
paper. We can save you big iollars on guns. Write at once. We sell more sporting good than any OTHER
HOUSE IN THE WORLD. Tents, Hunting Coats, Hats, Caps, Belts, Boots, Shell Boxes, Dog Whips, Col
lars. Biscuits. Tents and Baseßall Goods and Fishing tackle, all in our 9J^xl2>., 96 page Freb Gun Catalogue.
T. M. ROBERTS' SUPPLY HOUSE, 717-721 NICOLLET AYE. MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.
■1 I ' i * i i .iii, „ • ■ *- -
8 PROGRESS. BRILLIANCY $
I . THE GREAT --MINNESOTA I
Q Midway Between St. Paul and Minneapolis. 85
8 J_RSP _ib__ BMHifrm _?___■ if__l __^ _RBF 2
ICA A AAA S PREgsiuiS I
S vnrUiUUU «ho pubs.s |
£& Comprehensive Exhibits—Sensational Racing ®
Sk New and Wonderful Special Attractions— 3*
i A Comprehensive Exhibits—Sensational Racing A
New and Wonderful Special Attractions— X
A Notional Display ol Live Slock 1
0 Increased Display of Agricultural, Dairy, Horticultural, Mineral, 0
feW ±orestry, Apiarian and Mechanical Products; Women's Work, Fine Ck
. X Arts, Etc.—Twentieth Century Conditions Substantially Illustrated. JC
_9_ T-l--_-lAP-k I)i_AC AI/AE- Vice-President of the United States, will 7_
*_. IIIVVUV- V KVII.C«C-l open the Fair on nonday, September 2, fefs
£jk and will deliver an address. •-»
J_ ' X. N,9»»t: Running Races by Electric Lights, Many Special X
bA Attractions, Martial Music, and Pain's Brilliant Spectacular Pvro- «
£L technic Exhibition, Zjfc
I The lost nop of Pompeii 1
§ MONDAY ftooscvcli and Labor Dag 8
I TUESDAY Minneapolis Dag. .T7^ |
3 WEDNESDAY _______g*ji Dag 8
J THURSDAY »vcsioeK.DalrgDag |
I FRIDAY a Paul Day. ....... I
I SATURDAY Twin CllgDay..;..] §
8 THE HOLIDAY WEEK OP THE YEAS Jg
1 Han Rotes on oil Railways §
X E.W. RANDALL, S©c,y_ JOHN COOPER, Pres. Ii
£ ADVANCEMENT . PROFICIENCY^
latter part of August, maybe before If you
provide me with a booth. I will not be able
to lecture until then. I have been invite
several times by Mr. Been to come, which I
will be more than delighted to do. Remem
ber the adv. Your loving defender,-'
Carrie Nation.
For the G. A. H. . Encampment at
• Cleveland
In September very low rates will be in
effect from Chicago via the Lake Shore &
Michigan Southern railway. No other
line affords equal service. Morning, after
noon and evening trains at convenient
hours. G. A. R. folder sent on applica
tion of F. M. Byron, G. W. A., Chicago, or
W. B. Hutter, N. W. P. A., 120 Endicott
Arcade, St. Paul, Minn.
The farm value of the potato crop last
year was $90,800,000.
THE MINNEAPOLIS JOURNAL.
'MCKINLEY'S MASCOTS
The Famous Canton, Ohio,* Band in
Minneapolis,
The Grand Army band of Canton, Ohio,
President McKinley's famous "mascot
band," is spending the day in Minneapolis
while enroute home from the Elks' carni
val at Tacoma. The "mascot band" is one
of the most famous musical.organizations
in the country composed entirely of resi
dents ' of Canton, Ohio, the home town
Of President McKinley. It was organized
In '66 and has visited every section of the
United States and portions of Canada.
John Stuerhoff, one of the charter mem
bers, is with the band on this trip. He
is hale and hearty at seventy years and
has demonstrated that he can better stand
the fatigue of the march than many of
the younger members.
The first engagement of the band out
side of Ohio was at the dedication of a
soldiers' monument* at Pittsburg. The
band played at the centennial in '76, and
has played at every convention at which '
President McKinley was .nominated with
the exception of one congressional conven
tion in the eighties, where McKinley
failed. :r It is on this record * that it re
ceives the name of "mascot band." •
The older members of the organizations
have been intimate friends of the presi
dent for years. George Nauman who
joined the band in '69 has been an ardent
supporter of the president ever since he
began bis public career.
W.LDOBGL4S
*__• SHOE &-.'__
FOR MORffHAN A QUARTER OF A CENTURY
The reputation of W. L. Douglas $3.50
shoes for style, comfort and wear has
exoelled all other makes sold for $3.50.
This excellent reputation has been won by
merit alone. W. L. Douglas shoes have to
give better satisfaction than other $3.50
shoes because his reputation fer the best
$3.50 shoes must be maintained. The
standard has always been placed so high
that the wearer receives more value for
his money in the "W. L. Douglas *3.50 ahoes
than he can get elsewhere.
W. L. Douglas sells more $3.50 shoes than
any other two manufacturers in the world.
s:^. w,; ; *',;|^S v-_^:t; vf «.//•"'Vfe
W. L. Douglas $3.60 shoos are
made of the same high grade leather a .
used In $5.00 and $8.00 shoes, and
are lust as good In every way.
Sold by 63 Douglas stores in American
cities selling direct from factory to wearer
at one profit; and shoe dealers everywhere.
• Insist upon having W. _. Douglas shoes
with name and price stamped on bottom. '
Mow to Order by Mail. W. L. Douglas shoes
are not sola In your town, send order direct to factory.
Shoes sent anywhere for $3.76. My custom depart
_;:&---'-w u-i j'*3i mentwill make yon a pair that will
1..'-'-S^a*t^giii_ equal $5 and $6 custom, made shoe*
\^^Mmo*^——\ In style, fit and wear. Take meas-
IRij „ '-'£??_ nrements of foot as shown is
i # **> "'■'••"•!_ model; state style desired: size
IsW* «_■ °* 7**3»_ -nd width. usually worn: I
P^__^^_*___.''"^^__ medium or toe-heavy.;
j F&Mz®%&ka^l"V"&3*^ medjnm or light soles.
■ Jt*£l_l^-.ffi2r *'•'_;-_£!*_. lii—trated catalog
"ftWra*s . • *_TO-to* '
Fast Color EyeletedpffiS- » . ■
and Kodlte Always Black. Hooka deed.
MINNEAPOLIS: 405 NICOLLET AYE.
**____ ■ : ■ ■ ____ ■ ' "'_ ___.
STORAGE
Household goods a specialty. Un
equaled facilities ' and lowest rates.
, :\. Packing by experienced men. :. * "■"-_
Boyd Transfer & Fuel Co., 46 SoTWriSL
. Telephone Main 656— both exchanges.
|^i|ThesS dapVuie. arei superior
1J? J 8*'"'" of Copaiba,,^---. :'"i
\__\ J CURE iN 48 KOURS\ouDn
_9i the same diseases with-^*—
ou* Inconvenience: ':..''■
—m%^^ mm _____iy_aU drutgitU. . ?
JOLTS MR. CORSER
Judge Noyes Has His Opinion of the
; Gold-Hunting Silverite.
"TRUTHFUL AS HE IS HONEST"
Says Corner la a Type of the Nome
Men Sent Oat to Malign
the Court.
_..&.. Corser, of Minneapolis, who has
recently returned from Nome and who is
now on his way home, has given out a
statement to the Seattle papers in which
he says that Judge Arthur H. Noyes, who
is vow in this city on his way to aWsh
ington to meet the charges made against
him, is generally regarded In the Alaskan
city as a man unworthy of respect or con
fidence. In effect, Mr. Corser said that
the reputable population of Nome consider
the judge venal and corrupt to the last de
gree. HBmH
Judge Noyes, when seen this morning,
was decidedly caustic in his comments
upon Mr. Corser's criticisms of himself.
Said be: HBSP__PH
"In answer to the published statements
Of Mr. Corser I desire only to say that I
believe he is as truthful as he is honest;
and furthermore that he is of the exact
class and type of men at Nome, and who
have come out there, or been sent out,
for the express purpose of maligning and
slandering the court. That's all I care to
say about the matter."
Regarding the story telegraphed from
the coast to the effect that a petition was
on its way to Washington, signed by fifty
two members of the Nome bar and de
manding his removal, Judge Noyes said
that his friends at Nome had offered to get
up a petition in his behalf before he left
there, but that he had refused because he
did not think such a document would be
necessary.
"Of course," said he, "there are a lot of
broken-down, worthless attorneys out
there who are sore at me, probably be
cause I decided some case against them.
You can imagine just what sort of legal
talent a mining town such as Nome would
naturally, attract. We have some good,
reputable lawyers out there; and we have
many who have probably left their homes
for reasons that they would not like to
have made public. Some of them are no
better than drunkards. I should consider
it a misfortune to have the good opinion
of such men. I'd like to see that petition.
I'm curious about the names on it. I
don't believe there are fifty-two of them,
though." 7v : *.
BOVINES OF NOTE
The State Fair Shorthorn Show
Will Break All Records.
SALES WILL ATTRACT BUYERS
Northwestern Stock Farmers Have
Taken Up With the Shorthorn
and Have the Price.
The exhibit of shorthorn cattle at the
state fair this year will be the largest
and best ever shown in this country.
Usually the shorthorns number abou. 100,
but this year the entries will not fall far
short of 300. The increase Is due to two
causes: First, the increasing popularity
of the breed, and second, because of the
public sale of shorthorns which is to be
held Tuesday morning, and which is a
novelty in state fairs. This sale is at'
tracting much attention among breeders,
and as the farmers of the northwest are
unusually prosperous this year, excellent
results are anticipated. This sale will
be held under the auspices of the National
Shorthorn Breeders' association, which
has its headquarters at Springfield, 111. .
H. F. Brown this morning said that
North Dakota alone needed all the
Shorthorns that could be bought in this
country, „ and added that the farmers of
that state were buying heavily. Mr.
Brown himself will not exhibit this year,
although he will offer several cattle at
the sale. His herd has been a prominent
feature of the Shorthorn exhibits for the
past two decades, and he determined not
to enter it this year only because the
breeders' association, of which he is a
member, decided that if his herd was not
entered other entries would probabl.' be
more numerous, as breeders generally
have learned to fear the results of a com
petition ; with the Brown cattle and do
not like to make entries against them.
Some Bis Herds Entered.
The truth of this seems to be shown in
the increased number of Shorthorns which'
will be ehown here this year. Of the
herds which will attend Robbins & Sons of
Indiana, will send ten; George Harding &
Son, of Waukesha, will enter fifteen; N. P.
Clarke, of Minnesota, will have fifteen;
G. M. Casey, of Missouri, will probably
have two herds; and George Bothwell of
Nettleton, Mo., and W. A. Bowland, of
Michigan, will also have entries. In ad
dition to these the best of the animals ex
hibited at the lowa state fair, which
opened to-day at Dcs Moines, will be
shipped here to enter the competition.
The prizes for Shorthorns this year will
aggregate $4,000, of which $2,000 Is con
tributed by the Shorthorn Breeders' asso
icatlon, and $2,000 by the state agricultu
ral society. ' In addition, several special
premiums will be offered by private par
ties. This is the largest premium list of
fered anywhere in the country, and is re
sponsible in a large measure for the ex
cellence of the exhibits. During the last
few years the Minnesota state fair has of
fered the best exhibit of shorthorns shown
anywhere in' the world, and this year the
best previous effort will be outdone.
Other Breeds to Be Shown.
In addition to the Shorthorns there will
be shown, among the beef breeds, Here
fords, Angus, Polled Durhams and Red
Polls, and among the dairy breeds, Jer- i
seys, Guernseys, Holstsins, Swill Devons
and Dutch-belted breeds. Altogether about
650 cattle will be shown, while in pre
vious- years the number has run from 250
to 300. The increase is entirely in the
beef breeds, in which 500 cattle are ex- j
pected to be entered. The dairy breeds'
will show about the same number as J
usual, from 100 to 150.. .
New barns have been erected on the fair ]
grounds to house the increased number of I
cattle, and a new judging tent will be J
used, with a seating capacity for 1,000 J
persons. The cattle parade will be made j
more a feature than usual; and breeders
throughout the country are looking for
ward to the fair as the biggest event of
Its kind ever held.
; Do not suffer from sick headache a mo
ment longer. It Is not necessary. Car
ter's 5 Little Liver Pills will cure you. v
Dose, one little pill. Small price. Small
dose. Small pill. BHSai
Elk -fountain, Wyoming:.
This mountain is 1,100 fet high, and be
tween Laramie and Rawlins, for 117 miles,
it is constantly in sight. This is one of
the historical ranges of the west, over
which roamed at , one time great herds of
Elk, from which the mountain was nanud.
Other famous landmarks are also' seen
all - along this line. E. L. Lomax, G. P.
and T. A., Omaha, Neb.
Buffalo via "The _H.wa_lcee."
Visit the Exposition and travel via the
C, M. & St. :P. railway to and from Chi
c;^lSTOWl9Bi3Hß_B^_fv '■.-.
Lowest ■ rates on excursion tickets food
'tor ten days, fifteen days, and until
Oct.* 9Lrr- *.*::.'
Apply at "The Milwaukee" offices or
write 13. T. * Conley, Assistant Genera!
Passenger * Agent, St. Paul, , for the • Mil
waukee's Pan-American folder, one of the
beat exposition guides yet published.
Wff-Illf IT TiTlll 111 i—i II l*IIM» ■ I ■_ ■
FRIDAY EVENING. AUGUST 30, 1901.
Minnesota Considered a
r_ _•_ • i n jj i _"• ■
Political Battle Ground
Minnesota is receiving a great deal of
attention from the political writers just
now on account of the visits of such
distinguished presidential possibilities
as Senator Fairbanks of Indiana, and
Vice President Roosevelt. The Washing
ton correspondent of the Cincinnati-Corn
mercial-Tribuue, writing last Sunday eve
ning, gives his paper a column of gossip
anent the North Star State as ."a battle
ground early in the game," and holds that
both Fairbanks and Roosevelt are mak
ing a sort of test case of this state to
see just bow they stand in the west and
among western politicians.
This article was written on the.day'of
Robert G. Evans' death and the corres
pondent, with great delicacy, however,
points out the 111 effects which this sudden
death would probably have on Fairbanks'
chances in Minnesota. For he holds that
Evans was doing bis best to promote the
cause of his friend Fairbanks in this
state. Of this phase of the situation the
writer comments:
District Attorney Evans, who died to-day,
and the senior Indiana senator were old
friends, a boyhood attachment having hei>!
good through the years. Mr., Evans was
probably the meet popular republican in Min
nesota. He was a candidate to succeed Sena
tor Davis, and the honorable defeat which he
sustained added to rather than detracted from
his popularity.
He was. heart and soul for Fairbanks for
president in 1904. He was endeavoring to line
up his friends for the Hocsier statesman.
While Senator Fairbanks may not be consld
'Twas "on His Conscience"
To the officials at the Milwaukee passen
ger station, Dowlelsm possesses at last
one redeeming feature. One of its disci
ples has written the railroad functionaries
a letter, explaining a slight personal de
parture from the narrow path and making
reparation therefor. This course, the
writer avers, is in accordance with the
teachings of Dowie, and in obedience to
his rule to "restore to everyone, anything
we have kept back."
This Is the letter:
WANT ADS ON PAGES 14 and 15
BIRTHS AND DEATHS
. Births.
Mrs. Louis Dinsmore, 518 W 32d st. .twin boys
Mrs. William Gagnon, 1223 E 22d St....boy
Mrs. C. G. Johnson, 2433 23d ay S, boy
Mrs. Fred Pratt, 620 6th ay S boy
Mrs. Thomas O'Grady, 35 Royalston' ay..boy
Mrs, Jesse Brown, 415 7th ay S boy
Mrs. Sam Welch, 24 12th st N boy
Mrs, A. H. McNulty, 302 11th st S girl
Mrs. Frederick O. Olsen, 1403 4th st N....g1rl
Mrs. Thomas Kelley, Buo Washington ay
SE .......:..... girl
Mrs. Solomon J. Cyr, 323 Monroe st NE....boy
Mrs. Wallace R. Clarke, 601 9th st S girl
Mrs. Walter C. Hall, 1109 13th ay SE boy
Mrs. George L. Davis, 74 Bedford ay SE..girl
Mrs. Bernard Clinton, 425 Washington
ay S boy
Mrs. Page Robinson, 1700 Portland ay....girl!
Mrs. Charles A. Burnham, 3009 Cedar ay..boy
Mrs. William G. Simons, 115 12th st S..boy
Mrs. Jacob Goldstein, 407 6th ay S boy
Deaths.
Charles H. Williams, St. Barnabas hospital,
35 years.
Marriage License...
Charles Loftus and Stella Spencer.
John Anderson and Hannah Christensen.
Horace F. Curtis and May H. Warner.
Nels Leberg and Alma Person. -..- ;
— * • ,
Building Permits.
The Charles Malmstedt Co., 829 Nicollet,
interior alterations $4,000
I. H. Edmonds, agent, 2641 Pleasant
avenue; dwelling 2,500
Louis A. Mansel, 3006 Glrard avenue N;
dwelling 2,000
F. H. Cobb, 2112-14 Fourth ay S; re
pairs 1,000
Siegfried Johnson, 1902 Pierce street
NE; dwelling „ 1,000
1 AG-NTS WANTED
WANTED—AI SOLICITORS, MALE OR FK
male, reference; none but responsible rus
tlers; money for the right parties. Address
Room 56, St. James Hotel. *
WANTED—RELIABLE PARTY TO REPRE
SENT US IN EACH TOWN OF 1,000 OR
OVER, WITHIN 200 MILES, AND SELL DI
RECT TO CONSUMER; $15 TO $25 GUARAN
TEED EARNED WEEKLY.
JAVA COFFEE CO.,
IMPORTERS TEAS AND COFFEES,
> 58 SEVENTH ST S.
WANTED—SO FIRST-CLASS "BOOK AGENTS
for the state and city. Call 70 Syndicate blk^
OUR SUBSCRIPTION AGENTS ON COM
mission clear from $15 to $30 weekly above- all
expenses; groat premiums; easy work; we
want agent 3 for country fairs in Minnesota
and adjoining states and for soliciting farm
ers In small towns; steady work all fall;
references required. Northwestern Agricult
urist, 1237 Guaranty building.
2 ANNOUNCEMENTS
DO THE SPIRITS RETURN? ARE YOU
! interested iv the question, If a man die shall
jhe live again? Mrs. Dr. Edwards of Chicago,
I the noted exponent of spiritualism, will lec
ture and give tests Sunday at 3 and 8 p. m.
1 at A. O. U. W. hall, 19 7th st S, assisted by j
; prominent mediums. All are welcome. Read- ,
| ings daily at, residence. 6 13th st S, near j
Hennepin ay. Independent slate writing. Me
diums developed. -
4 SUMMER RESORTS
LAKE MINNETONKA-LARGE LIST COT
j tages, lots and acres on and near Minne
tonka, within easy access Minneapolis and
St. Paul. Jaeger & Torelle. 310 Bank of
Commerce. .- . - .
«,——w—^——_—_— emmemem __——■———_■-_
5 BUSINESS PERSONALS
SWITCHES, SWITCHES, SWITCHES.
90 cents aud up. Send for price list. Feeiy
| & Crocker. 515 Nicollet ay.
Q BUSINESS CHANCES
j YOU CAN MAKE SPLENDID PROFITS BY
! judicious, systematic operations on the wheat
' market; $20 will margin 1.000 bushels i cents.
I Send for our free book, "Facts and Figures,"
explaining option trading. The Osboru Grain
Co., 813 to 815 Phoenix building, Minneapolis.
Members Chamber of Commerce.
; HOW TO MAKE MONEY. 7*
Our new book, just issued, tells you how to
make from $5 to $20 per day with a small
Investment in grain or stocks. Your name
on a postal card will bring it free. Write
to-day. - ■ .
THE COE COMMISSION COMPANY,
Bank of Commerce Building,
Minneapolis. Minn. .
THE SAVINGS FUND CO., 110 TEMPLE
Court, pays 4 and 5 per cent on deposit; capl
tal, $350,000; surplus, $30.000.
GET YOUR FURNACE REPAIRED NOW;
don't wait until you want to start a fire; re
pairs for all furnaces. Great Western Stove
Repair Co. Tel. 161. 312 Hennepin ay. ■
BAKERY, HOTEL AND RESTAURANT,
taking , 250 loaves bread daily, 45 regular
boarders and good - transient trade; price,
$5,000 for building, stock/furniture and fix
tures; best of reason for selling. . Address
Lundgren & Hulberg, Winthrop, Minn. •*: .;
FOR SALE—HOTEL IN GROWING TOWN
for $1,200; no competition; terms reasonable.
Address Mrs. Jane Roberts, Plerpont.S.'D.
PHYSICIAN DESIRES-A LOCATION IN
Minnesota or South Dakota. 2089, Journal.
A GOOD BUSINESS "OPPORTUNITYF~~LE
gitimate, pleasant, honorable; , pays good in
come and Increasing rapidly; business else
where forces sale; small capital needed. Ad
dress 1842, Journal. -
WANTED—EXPERIENCED DRESSMAKER
as partner,' at once. Address Box . 367, - St.
James, Minn. . '
FOR UNFURNISHED HOTEL AND
boarding-house, average 120 regular ■■ boarders,
besides transient trade; good barn and ice
house. All buildings in first-class repair. H.
J^(^a*ffee,_A.menia,_N._D.
FOR SALE-FIRST-CLASS DRESSMAKING;
everything in readiness for, work; going; out
of ; business. -; Apply at 81 Syndicate . or j par;
ticulars. ':-:'^__B__H_BHB9_B_l
ered as starting his campaign, It is obvious
that Mr. Evans was using his visit to get tbe
senator personally acquainted with them.
Despite his accident, it is reported here that
he wa.3 able to meet many of the prominent
workers. Later he spent a few days at Alex
andria, Minn., the hoir.f» of Senator Nelson.
The death of Mr. Evans <v annot but be oonei'l
ered unfortunate for the interests of Senator
Fairbanks. ,
Taking un Roosevelt's T visit, the cor*
respondent has this to say:
Right on the heels of Senator Fairbanks
comes Vice President Roosevelt. He accjbpts
a public invitation, but he will have a politi
cal presentation Just the same. National
Committeeman Shevlin will "give Mr. Roose
velt a dinner next Monday evening, at which
time a number of the right sort will break
bread with the rough rider candidate, Mr.
Shevlin and District Attorney Evans were not
political friends. When Evans was a candi
date, Shevlin boasted that .he would defeat
him. He went out of his way to oppose Ev
ans, and there has been a decided soreness
on the- part of Evar.e' friends ever since.
These facts are the basis of a good fight.
Roosevelt is to depend upon Shevlin to organ
ise things for him. Shevlin is ambitious, ha.
a barrel of money, which he is willing to
spend, Is robust and awkward, but will 'go a
long way if he gets started.
The letter concludes with a refer
ence to the possibilities of Governor Shaw
of lowa in Minnesota, the Intimation
being that the lowa politicians would like
to capture this state for their candidate.
Zion City. 111., Aug. Chicago, Milwau
kee & St. Paul Railway Company, Minneapo
lis—Messrs.: I inclose you 25 cents in stamps
in payment of a half ticket between Lak_
Minnetonka and Minneapolis, which the con
ductor did not collect and which I sold.
• We are taught by Dr. Dowie of the Chris
tian Catholic church to restore to every one
anything we have kept back, and for this
reason I restore to you this money. Yours
truly,
Foss P. 0.. 111. —J. C. Atkinson.
g__BUSJNJiS^HAN^ES___
Continued.
WANTED—THREE PLATE GLASS FLOOR
showcases, in good condition; must be cheap
for cash. Address T. J. Long, 6th Ay Hotel.
Washington and Sixth. -A ■::--;A
IMPLEMENT BUSINESS FOR SALE;
western central Minnesota; good town, no
opposition; will sell nt a bargain on account
sickness. Address Lock Box C, Audubon,
Minn. -
FOR SALE— STOCK AND FIXTURES OF
light grocery and confectionery at 25 per cent
less than Inventory value. Must _>c sold im
mediately. 3349 Nicollet _-.
PRINTING plant, doing $2,000 monthly. "~
HOTEL, fine, modern; clearing $300 monthly.
BOARDING house; large, modern; large tran
sient. mjsima.
Conf., cigar, $200. 1100 Lumber Exchange.
FOR SALE—HOTEL FURNITURE AND
fixtures; house has 28 rooms and good busi
ness; excellent reasons for selling; lease of
house can also be obtained on reasonable
terms; good location. Address D. W. Harris,
Arlington Hotel, Fargo, N. P.
SOME FINE OPENINGS FOR SALE; HALF
interest in one of the be.t paying country
general stores; new stock, invoice $7,000 •
$3,000 and $4,000 country general stocks, well
located, for 50 cents on wholesale prices; also
half or whole interest in a paying grocery
business. George B. Pant, 807 Phoenix bldg.
7^_BUSINESS SPECIALS
SUTI2RI_U^HJ_*HAI-C >M^^
manently removed by electricity, Miss Hol
lister, 77-78 Syndicate block. Pioneer stand of
the northwest. . Exclusive specialist
ft v MCYtijg
G REAT^RED U C T io^THT^pla^E^oTTllGH
and medium grade bicycles; Tigers, $25 up;
Harvard & Snell, $17.50: second-hand wheels.
$3, $5, $7 and $9. Good value. Haynes Cycle
Co.. 627 Ist ay S. - ■
9SS2£X^IHSSSil EDICINES
%•%- ».»VWV %*WV%,VW WWW VWv
<• TOILET goods, perfumes, drugs and •>
& family medicines; highest quality and •;•
•> absolute purity guaranteed; mail orders «J.
«fr solicited; send for printed matter. Hot- •>
•> flln's drug score, 101 Wash, ay S, Mpls. •*•
»www* ♦X mX*B» -x~x»«> <~;~x»»X" m 5»
~~~~~—**" ' _ II ———»— ————-
10 BOARD AND ROOMS
BOARD and room offered in private family
at Minnetonka Beach, Lake Minn. "64. Jour.
FRONT ROOMS, SINGLE OR EN-SUITE";
board; modern house; desirable location:
walking • distance. 124 E 16th it, corner
Stevens ay. ■ -
■ i H _—_____■—„^»_———__—, ______^—
]_! BOARD OFFERED
TWO NICELY FURNISHED CORNER
rooms for four people; steam heat, modern.
Table board. 1321 sth ay 8. _^
12 BOARD WANTED
WANTED—BY GENTLEMAN. WIFE AND
two grown sons, two pleasant furnished
rooms, with board, In vicinity of public
; library, to Dec. 1; afterward, if satisfied.
; father and one son will remain all winter;
state_ location and terms. 1806, Journal.
WANTED—ON OR NEAR LOWRY HILL,
two furnished room., with board for a lady.
Address 2028, Journal.
ROOMS AND BOARD FOR husband and
wife, with three children, ages from 3 to 8
years, to Dec. 1, in Garfield school district
Address 2161, Journal. .*
13113~™-2-^^
YOUNG, FRESH, RED DURHAM COW;
three choice Jersey springers, cheap; or ex
change. Jersey bull for service. 306 Cth st S.
14-^^^^SX2lAH£_^_^^.
MRS. MANEWELL GIVES READINGS daily.
9 to 5 p. m. 620*. Nicollet, room 14.
MME. CLAYMONT, . wonderful clairvoyant
and magnetic healer. 1028 Hennepin ay.
LADIES" HAVING TROUBLES TO CALL OR
write Dr. Bly, 27 4th st S. New book, 25c.
I^™IHS!S§SS2SS2Z~
LADIES' TAILORING AND DRESSMAK
ing done at reasonable prices. Moffett, 1716
Hawthorn ay.
TAI LOR" MADE SUITS AT' A BARGAIN" FOR
a few days. L. Shea, 81 - Sykes block.
1 6_2XSS_2j^SSLSH^2S?_
THE MINNEAPOLIS WORKS,
A. > HORNUNG, PROP. FRENCH DRY
CLEANING. OLDEST, LARGEST AND BEST
EQUIPPED DRY CLEANING ESTABLISH
MENT IN THE NW, OFFICE, 342 NIC.
TEL. 610; AND 52- NIC. TEL. 3156-J-1
TWIN CITY DYE WORKS - PRACTICAL
dyers and French dry cleaners; out-of-town
orders solicited; prices moderate. 420 Nicol
let. Telephone 1576,
iii ————■—■■M^wy
17 HAIR DRESSING PARLORS
ou_rs£6Tc^nuTY'poTd^^ SEE
out $1 switches; worth $2.50. Shampooing,
25c. Face massage, 35c. •" "*TT*TjTT||_^|__f
MME. DE LEO, 495 Syndicate Arcade.
—————^—«—_——————» I I —_—__—Wj»M
12 FINANCIAL 7
WE HAVE A BLOCK OF EASTERN MONEY
to loan at 5 per cent on choice residence
property. Thorpe Bros.,- Andrut bldg.
MONEY TO LOAN AT LOWEST RATESTNO
delay. Thayer _ Gale, 21S N. Y. Life bldg.
LOANS from $100 upwards; city propertjTpre
ferred; no delay. J. B. Tabour. 410 Ist ay 3.
MONEY TO LOAN; EASY-TERMS; LOW
rates. David P. Jones _t Co., Oneida building.
AT LOWEST RATES—MONEY.TO LOANTrT
D. Cone _ Co.. 517 Guaranty Loan building.
MORTGAGE LOANS—Rates low; any > sums;
no delay; see us sure. Gale & Co., N. Y. Life.
$100,000 TO LOAN ON CITY - AND F"ARM
property; low interest. Barnes 8r05.,104 S 4S_.

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