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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, September 10, 1901, Image 8

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1901-09-10/ed-1/seq-8/

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8
SUOHTLY WEAKER FEELING SHOWN IN WHEAT
Northwestern Receipts Were 1,438
Cars—December Closed Dull
at 67 3-4 C*
TRADE WAITS FOR GOVT. REPORT
Clearance* 803,000 Bu.—BraiUtreeU
World's Vi»lble Increased
by 2.500,000 Bu.

Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, Sept.
10.—Dullness and weakness were tie features
in the early wheat market .and yesterday's %c
gain was loot In the first trades. There was
nothing on which to work for an advance,
end It was difficult to maintain the market,
even on the lower level, after .the first slump.
Fourteen hundred and thirty-eight cars came
Into market In the northwest. Duluth led
the day by far, showing receipts of 1,000 cars,
compared with 300 on this late last year. The
effect of the heavy receipts was lessened by
the fact that Dulutli got the bulk, much of
■which will probably go out again promptly
by lake, making the hedging pressure against
receipts leas than might be supposed by first
glance at the figures.' Liverpool made a poor
response to our advance of yesterday, com-.
ing unchanged to %d higher. Corn was a
shade easier. Primary receipts ran a trifle
■over last year. .Clearances were well up, •
•howing SOJ.OuO bu. The Bradstreet figure? for
the world's visible are for an increase of
2,500,000 bu. About noon there was an im
pression gained .that the government corn re
port this afternoon will be favorable, and,
"while no serious break developed, " there was
a sag "all through. 'Minneapolis December
opened %c off, at 679 ie, and sold to 67& c.
May opened at [email protected], and sold to 70%t£z)
70^e. 'Liverpool closed %@}4d higher. Ant
werp closed unchanged. " Paris closed un
changed to 10 centimes off on both wheat and
four
St. Louis had 95,000 bu, against 171,000 bu
last year, and Kansas City 118 cars, against
191 cars." Total primary receipts were 1,674,
--(00 bu, against 1,293,000 bu last year, and
shipments 778,000 bu, against 805,000 bu. Min
neapolis received 438 car's, against 302 last
year,* and Daluth 1,000, against 300 last >'ear.
The market (showed firmer tone and a part
recovery toward the close. December lost
%c, closing at 675ic May wheat closed at
70 7/BC, and September at 67&@67i4c. Chicago
closed December at 70%@70%c.
Cash demand'was good. The selling basis
showed only slight change from yesterday.
No. 1 "northern-taken nearly all on the early
quiet option showed a tight range around
6SVB®6S«4'c7 Xc-. 2 was a little wider, ranging
from 6jV^@C6c, with sales to arrive at 65% c.
In the No. 3 grade elevators were buyers,
taking it on a range of 64%@65%c. Rejected
and no grade sold from 57»^c to 64% c.
THE FLOUR_MARKET
General Tune (inlet, but Shipments
• Holding Ijt Well.
The market shows no important change and
the general tone is quiet. Sales are confined
principally to small lot domestic buyers.
Some foreigu trade developed this morning,
but nothing of much importance.
Shipments continue to hold well up and for
the day the posted figures show 62,826 bar
rels.
First patents are quoted [email protected]; second
patents, [email protected]; first clears, [email protected];
second clears, $2.20.
THE CASH TRADE
Flax Advanced—Corn Dull—Rye in
Good Demand—Oats Steady.
FLAX—The market jumped oc this morn
ing. The advance was principally on the
rains in the northwest. Receipts here were
aguin light, about half that of last year.
Duluth had a lair run. Local receivers look
on the present as a temporary situation and
expect increased receipts here after the North
Dakota movement has fairly bogun. Mean
while the local oil mills are buyers of all good
lots that are shown here. No. 1 sold at $1.42
@1.43; no grade brought $1.41 for a fairly good
car.
Receipts here, 24 cars, against 41 last year.
Duluth had CO cars.
Closing prices: Minneapolis, cash, $1.44;
September, $1.43; October, $1.38; Duluth, cash,
$1.45; to arrive, $1.45; September $1.45- Oc
tober, $1.41. ■'"" ' - ■: x'-"> '"- '-■■
Flax futures were quiet with about 6,000
bu October traded in at the opening around
$1.38. ' - .. ; .. . .„, !
CORN—The market was dull. Buyers were
bidding 53c for choice No. 3 yellow, ' but
sellers were stubborn and some corn stuck
at the close; No. 3 yellow is quoted 53}&c'and
No. 3 corn 1 at £3c. Receipts; 10 cars; ship
ments, 7 cars. ' .■•••■••••- r-
OATS—No ' important changes were shown
in any grades. ' The market was fairly active.
Closing quotations for No. 3 white were 34c
and No. 3 oats, 33& c. Receipts, 22 cars; ship
ments, 23 cars. - ••' - - •
FEED AND MEAL—The market is a trifle
lower. Coarse com meal and cracked corn.
$20<§2U.50; No. 1 feed, '$20.50021: No 2 feed,
[email protected]; No. 3 feed, [email protected]; granulated
corn meal in cotton sacks at the: rate of $2.25
per brl.
MILLSTUFFS— There is a better demand
lor all grades. Bulk bran quoted [email protected] 50;
-bulk shorts, $13013.50; flour' middlings; $15®
18.60; red dog in 14°- sacks, [email protected];
feed In 200-lb sacks, $1 per ton additional in
300lb sacks, $1.50 per ton additional. Ship
ments, 1,582 tons. •• •■ -
BARLEY—There was an active market at
•unchanged prices. Receipts were' large and
there was an easier tone all through but no
serious declines were noted. No. 4 soli at 50
@o3c. Feed grades are quoted [email protected] malt
ing grades, [email protected] Receipts, 40 cars; ship
ments, 44 cars. •■• • ; wV *••'---"• ' : -^-- -~v:
" RYE—The market was firm with good de
mand. Sales of choice; No. 2 were made ", at
60c, and No. 3 at 49c. Receipts, -1 cars;
shipments, 8 cars. Closing prices of No 2
•v.-as 49»4c. ' ' ■ • - ■■■•■•■
' HAY—Upland, fancy, [email protected]; upland,
choice, [email protected]; upland, No. 1, $8; midland, $5
@i; medium, $5.50; timothy, choice, [email protected]
11; No. 1, $10; rye straw, choice, $4; wheat
and oat straw, [email protected] Receipts, 118 tons
shipments, 70 tens.
Puts and Calls.
Two o'clock report:
Puts—December wheat, [email protected]%c.
Calls—December wheat, 68% c
Curb—December wheat, 67% c.
Cach Salea Reported To-day.
No. 1 northern, 6 cars $0.68%
No. 1 northern, 20 cars 68%
No. 2 northern, 52 ears 65%
No. 2 northern, 10 cars 66
No. 2 northern, 1 car 65%
No. 2 northern, 2,000 bu, to arrive 65%
No. 2 northern, 5,000 bu, to arrive 65%
No. 2 northern, 1 car 65%
No. 3 wheat, 33 cars t 64%
No. 3 wheat, 23 cars 64%
No. 3 wheat. 1 car, choice 65
No. 3 wheat, 1 car, choice
No. 3 wheat, 9 cars, choice '.si%
No. 3 wheat, 1 car, fancy !65%
No. 3 wheat, 2 cars, soft ', [64
Rejected wheat, 1 car ;;• J63
Rejected wheat, 1 car '. ]63%
Rejected wheat, 1 car „*. !64%
Rejected wheat, part car ;.... [63
Rejected wheat, 3 cars .„. !63%
Rejected wheat, 1 car !!!*!! *61
Rejected wheat, 1 car 6.".!!!! "~ *62%
Rejected wheat, 1 car ..; '62%
No grade wheat, 1 car, bin burnt... .. '57%
Corn, No. 1, 3 cars \[ 53t.*
Oats, 2 cars No. 3 white ." 34%
Oats, 1 car No. 3 white .......'.'.'. '34%
Oats, part car 34
Oats, 1 car No. 3 white ,wheaty """" "33a/
Oats, 2 ears No. 3 white "" '34V
Oats, 4 cars No. 3 white 341/
Oats, 1 car no grade " "335?
No. 2 rye, 1 car .*■"" " 50
No. 4 barley, 1 car !.'!!!!!
No. 4 barley, 2 cars i..I1*IIil" 54
No. 4 barley, 1 car , '*'
No. 4 barley, 1 car \'" '53
No. 4 barley, 8 cars "ruu.
No. 4 barley, 1 car '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.» 52
No. 4 barley, 1 car [ * 4 9
No. 4 barley, 1 car
No. 3 barley, 1 car
No. 5 barley, 1 car "!".!!^ *48
No. 4 barley, 1 oar vru.
No. 3 barley, 1 car '..'.'.'.'.'.'". %
No. 1 flax, 1 car ill"" 142
No. 1 flax, 2 cars " i' 4 o
Flax, 200 sacks 142
Flax, 1 car, no grade '.'...'. \.i\
State Grain Inapection.
Sept. 8.
Inspected In—Wheat—Cars—Great North
ern—No. 1 northern, 25; No. 2 northern, 88;
No. 3, 72; rejected, 27; no grade, 15.
Chicago. Milwaukee & St. Paul—No. 1
northern, 22; No. 2 northern, 76; No. 3 75
--rejected, 52; no grade, S.
Minneapolis & St Louis—No. 1 northern,
16; No. 2 northern, 9; No. 3, 16; rejected, 6;
no grade, 8.
Northern Pacific—No. 2 northern, 1; No. 8,
t cars.
Soo Line—No. 1 northern, 2; No. 2 north
ern, 33; No. 8, 10; rejected, 9.
Chicago, SU Paul. MUiuaeaj>olis & Omaha-
RANGE OF WHEAT PRICE IN MINNEAPOLIS
• . Close Close Close
Open. High. Low.. To-day. Yesterday. Year Ago.
May.. .70%@71 $ .70%@71 % .70%@70% % .70% ? .71% ?':7..'..•*.....
Sept.. .67% .67% .67 V .67%@67% .67% - / .74% ' ;"'
Dec. .67% .67% * .67% .67% .68 .75%@76%
THE DAY'S RESUL.T
Dec. Wheat Minneapolis. Chicago. Duluth. St. Louis. New York.
Close to-day $ .67% | .70%@70% $ .68% $ .71%@71% $ .76Vi
Close yesterday 68 .71 .68% .72 @72% .76%
CLOSING CASH PRICES
On Track —No. 1 hard, 70c; No. 1 northern, 68c; No. 2 northern, 65% c.
No. 1 flax, $1.44; No. 3 yellow corn, 53% c.
No. 3 white oats, 34c, No. 2 rye, 49% c.
Barley, 47c to 57c.
No. 1 northern, 8; No. 2 northern, 73; No. 3,
76; rejected, 9; no grade, 2.
Totals—No. 1 northern, 73; No. 2 northern,
280; No. 3, 251; rejected, 103; no grade, 23.
Other Grains—No. 3 yellow corn, 3 cars;
No. 3 white corn, 1; No. 3 corn, 6; No. 3
white oats, 35; No. 3 oats, 41; no grade oats,
3; No. 2 rye, 18; No. 3 rye, 4; No. 3 barley,
23; No. 4 barley, 68; No. 5 barley, 10; no
grade barley, 1; No. 1 flax, 33; rejected flax,
3; no grade flax, 1.
Cars Inspected Out—No. 1 northern wheat,
35; No. 2 northern wheat, 52; No. 3 wheat,
39; rejected wheat, 5; no grade wheat, 9;
No. 3 white oats, 14; No. 3 oats, 7; No. 3
harley, 3; No. 4 barley, 4; No. 2 rye, 1;
No. .3 rye, 1.
Receipts and Shipment*.
Sept. 9.
Received—Wheat, 438 cars, 372,300 bu; corn,
8,400 bu; oats, 30,360 bu; barley, 40,000 bu;
rye, 3,000 bu; flax, 17,040 bu; flour, 1,115 brls;
hay, 70 tons; fruit, 671,903 lbs; merchandise,
2,949,138 lbs; lumber, 28 cars; machinery,
338,325 lbs; coal, 1,399 tons; wood, 77 cords;
brick, 51,000; lime, 2 cars; cement, 1,525 brls;
household goods, 2,770 lbs; stone and marble,
1 car; live stock, 1 car; dressed meats, 130,404
lbs; railroad materials, 9 cars; sundries, 38
cars; car lots, 1,188.
Shipped—Wheat, 67 cars, 62,310 bu; corn,
5,880 bu; oats, 31,740 bu; barley, 44,000 bu;
rye, 7,920 bu; flax, 850 bu; flour, 62,826 brls;
millstuffs, 1,582 tons; fruit, 109,000 lbs; mer
chandise, 2,346,620 lbs; lumber, 94 cars; posts
and piling, 3 cars; barrle stock, 1 car; ma
chinery, 373,650 Ibe; coal, 20 tons; brick,
7,000; lime, 1 car; cement, 240 brls; ties, 22
cars; stone and marble, 1 car; live stock, 1
car; linseed oil, 50U gals; oil cake, 100,000
lbs; railroad materials, 11 cars; sundries, 31
cars; car lots. 1,020.
Wheat Movement.
Sept. 10.
The following are the recipts and ship
ments at the principal primary wheat mar
kets :
Receipts. Shipments.
Bushels. Bushels.
New York 67,450 228,684
Philadelphia 75,679 53,430
Baltimore 150,866 246,000
Toledo 63,62 a 1,000
Detroit 28,693 1,790
St. Louis 98,000 221.000
Boston 8,678 None
Chicago .....340,375 145,099
Milwaukee 57,000 18,140
Duluth 618,000 198,981
Minneapolis 372,300 62,210
Kansa3 City 94,000 115,200
Wheat Movement by Roads.
Received—Cars—Milwaukee, 116; Omaha, 45;
St. Louis, 50; Great Northern, 152; Soo, 50;
Northern Pacific, 25.
Shipped—Cars—Milwaukee, 21; Omaha, 41;
Wisconsin Central, 1; Great Northern, •3;
Chicago Great Western.' 1. '/
RANGE DECEMBER WHEAT
Wo a^ ifa rt&~ ll£L
to —LJ—-_.
%i wf- J .-— — 1 T*
ht LJ| — r^^ rl ~—\
OTHER GRAIN MARKETS
CHICAGO GRAIN
Moderate Demand, but Absence of
Special Features.
Chicago, Sept. 10.—Cables to-day were in
different on wheat and the opening here was
steady, with a fair volume of business early. .
There was a moderate outside demand, but I
the market lacked any special features. De
cember opened *£@%c lower, at 70%@70%c,
but, under commission house selling in an
ticipation of the showing of the government
report, caused a decline to 70y 2 c and weak
ness prevailed during the first half of the
session. " Minneapolis and Duluth reported
receipts of 1,438 cars. Local receipts were
269 cars, with seven cars contract. '
Dullness continued throughout the entire
session' and prices held steady. December
closed *[email protected]%c lower, at 70%#70%c.
Close: September, 68%@68%c; October,
69y 8 c; December, 70%@70%c; - May, 74% c.
Cash: No. 2 red, [email protected]&c; No. 3 red, 68%@
70% c; No. 2 northern spring, 68i4(3)69i4; No.
3 spring, [email protected]}4c.
Corn opened a shade easier and trading
was * mostly for local account, although,' on
the whole, rather light; ' Later, commission
houses became free sellers and the market
showed considerable weakness. ■ December
opened [email protected]&c lower, at 57%@57%c, and, after
touching 57%@67%c shortly after the open
ing, declined to 67% c, where the market held
steady. Receipts were 409 cars, with 31 of
contract grade.
Toward the close corn firmed up a little,
but' trading was light. December closed
lower,. at 57% c.
Close: September, 55% c; October, [email protected]%c;
December, 67% c; May, 59% c. Cash: No. 2,
55%@57c; No. 3. [email protected]^c
Oats opened quiet; prices unchanged. Trad
ing was confined almost entirely to scalpers
and there was but little of that nature. De
cember opened a shade higher, at 35^c, and,
in sympathy with corn, declined to 34%@35c.
Receipts were 241 cars.
Close: September, 39% c; December, 35c;
May, 3714 c. Cash: No. 2, [email protected]; No. 3. 34c.
' The following was the range of prices: "" i
Wheat— Sept. "Dec. May.
Opening 65% 70%@% [email protected]%
Highest 68%@& 70% ■ 74%
Lowest 68% 7016 74
Close- " "'
To-day 68%@# 70%@?i 74%
Yesterday ■..'....: GB%'-' ; 71 - - 74>,[email protected]%
"Year" ago ......; 74%@% ........ :::.;...
Corn — ~ ........
Opening ..r. 55%@% 57%@% 59%@%
Highest 55%- - 67%<g>% 59%
Lowest ............ 55 57 59
" Close-
To-day 55% 57% 59%
Yesterday ....... 55% 57% 69%<5%
Year ago ......i 40% ;..:.... "...".....
Oats— •
Opening 33% 35% 37%@%
Highest „. 33& 35% 37% ■
Lowest .;.:......„ 33% ' 34% 37%
"' Close- " ■ * • - . ' '. * ■ • •
To-day 33% 35 37%
Yesterday '..:..:. 33% [email protected]% 37%<g%
Year "ago ....... 21%. : ..:.."...' ::r.:■::';
Duluth Grain.
Duluth, Minn., Sept. Wheat was -weak
and flax strong. December wheat opened %c
off at 68% c, sold up to %c and by noon was
i off to %c. September sold at from 68% cto
! 68% c, and closed at %c sales. There was the
customary large business in cash and to ar
rive wheat. Flax advanced, September . from
the close yesterday of $1.42% to $1.44; October
from $1.39 to $1.41%. Later they reacted.
There was fairly large business. Receipts-
Wheat, 1,000 cars; corn, 7; oats, 23; rye, 21;
barley, 68; flax, v 60; total, 1,179. Shipments
wheat, 198,981 bushels; flax, 93,857. -
! Close —Oats, 35% c; rye, 51c; corn, 55% c;
flax, cash. $1.45; track,sl,4s%; to arrive, $1.45;
September,' $1.45; October, $1.41; November,
$1.39; No. 1 hard, cash and September, 71c;
No. 1 northern, cash and to arrive and Sept
ember, 68% c; October, 68% c; December, 68% c;
May, 72% c; No. 2 northern, 66c; No. 8, 64% c;
barley, unchanged. •
New York; Grain.
New York, Sept. 10.—Flcur, receipts, 27,363
brls; saies, 4,700 pkgs; state and western,
quiet and barely steady. Wheat, receipts 47,
--950 bu; sales, 745,000 bu; dull; easy this morn
ing because of lower rabies, realizing and
heavy northwestern receipts; September, 74%
@74 13-16 c; October, 74 [email protected]%c; December,
76 [email protected]%c; May, 79%@79%c. Rye, dull;
state, [email protected] c. i. f. New York car lots; No. 2
western, 60% cf. o. b. afloat. Corn, receipts,
52,000 bu; sales, 65,000; weakened also under
bearish cables, higher northwest temperature
and unloading; September, 61% c; October
61% c; December, [email protected]%c. Oats, receipts,
96,000 bu; Inactive and easier; track white
38%@47c.
Close: Wheat—September, 74% c; Decem
her, 76% c; May, 79% c. Corn—September
61% c; December, 61% c; May, 62% c.
So. 2 Hard Winter.
New York, Sept. 10.— M a meeting of the
grain trade held In the produce exchange it
was decided that No. 2 hard winter wheat on
and after June 1, 1902, shall constitute a good
delivery on an equal footing with other con
tract grades of wheat. The grade represents
a large proportion of the winter wheat crop
grown ia the southwest. Its introduction as
THE MINNEAPOLIS JOUENAL.
a contract grade, it is said, will militate
against "corners," as it gives so much more
wheat to deliver. A special committee of the
trade, appointed some time ago recommended
that this % grade be made deliverable at a dis
count of 2c a bu, but a strong minority among
its members declare that it was owing co their
work that the vote declared the contract
grade was due.
Liverpool Grain.
Liverpool, Sept. 10 —Wheat—Spot No. 2
red western, quiet, 5s 5%d; No. 1 northern
spring, quiet, 5s 7&d; No. 1 California, Auiet,
5s HVfed; futures, quiet; September, 5s 6%d;
December, 6s 8d! —Spoi, steady; Amer
ican mixed, new, 5s B^d; futures, quiet; Sep
tember, 4s lid; October, 4s, 10% d; November,
4s 10'*d.
Chicago Seed and Coarse Gruin*.
Chicago, Sept. 10.—Flax—Cash, northwest
and No. 1, $1.46; No. 1 southwest, $1.44; Sep
tember, $1.44; October, $1.41. Rye—Septem
ber, 53c; December, 54% c. Barley—Cash, 52
©60c. Timothy—September, |5.30; October,
$5.15. Clover—October, $8.50.
Milwaukee Grain.
Milwaukee.^Sept. 10.—Flour steady. Wheat
lower; close, No. 1 northern, 69^@70c; No. 2
northern, 67%@68%c; December, r.o%c. Rye
steady; No. 1, 54c. Barley dull; No. 2 60e;
sample, [email protected]%c. Oata steady; No. 2 white,
37c. Corn —December, 57% c.
St. Louis Grain.
St. Louis, Sept. 10.—Close— Wheat—Lower;
No. 2 red cash, 69% c; September, 6*% c; De
cember, 71% c; May, 75% c; No. 2 hard, 68%@
68% c. Corn—Lower; No. 2 cash, 57c; Sep
tember, 57c; December, 58?£c;'" May, ' 60% c.;
Oats— No. 2 cash, [email protected]&c; September,
36% c; December, 37c; May, ' 39% c; No. 2
white, [email protected]%c. Lead—' $4.27&@4.35.
Spelter—Quiet $3.85: ' J<VV;
Kansas City rain.
Kansas City, Sept. 10.—Close.—Sep-;
tember, 64c; December, 6(j%@66%c; May,
70%@1Q%c;" cash No. 2 hard, ' to}i<S;6s&c; No.
2 red, 67V£@68c. September, 5Se; De
cember, 6ic; May, sy%c; cash No. 3mixed,
57%@58%c; No. 2 white, 58Vfec. Oats—No. 2
while, [email protected]%c. '■
* GENERAL PRODUCE
The Minneapolis Market.
Tuesday, Sept. 10.
: THE LEADERS. :
'':':■?. Extra creamery butter, 19^@20c; : S
: extra dairy, 17%@18c." Strictly iresh :
: eggs, loss off, doz, 13% c. Live hens, :
; per lb, &c; spring chickens, i)%c; :
: turkeys, per lb, ivic. Fancy veal, :
: per lb, 6Vi©iC. Fancy country •: ,
: dressed mution, 6c. New potatoes, : j
.: per bu, ' [email protected]; tomatoes, ' per bu, :
: [email protected]?i.2s.' • ■' ' : J
BUTTER—Extra creameries, lb, 19 [email protected];
firsts, lb, 17y 2 ®lßc; seconds, [email protected]%c; imita
tions, firsts, lb, 14c; seconds, per lb, 12% c;
dairies, extras, lb, 17%@18c; firsts, lb, 16c;
seconds, per lb, 12%e; butter fat in separator
cream, Babcock test, 20c, delivered Minne
apolis; ladles, firsts, 15® 16c; seconds, per lb,
12^c; packing stock, lb, 12% c; stale stock,
per lb, 6V£c; grease, lb, 3(goc.
EGGS—Strictly fresh, cases Included, loss
off, per doz, ISftc; dirties, fresh, doz, 6&@7c;
checks, fresn, 6Vj:@7c
CHEESE—Twins or flats, fancy, new, lb,
lie; twins or flats, choice, new, !
per lb, [email protected]; fair to good, 6M>@6c;
brick. No. 1, per lb, 12& c; brick, No. 2,
per lb, 9%c; No. 3, per lb, 6c; limburger.
No. 1, per lb, 12^c; limburger No. 2, per
lb, S&St^c; primost, No. 18, sweet, lb, 6^c;
common, 3c; pultost, [email protected]; Young Amer
ica, fancy, 12^; choice, per lb, 9&c; block
Swiss, No. 1, 13&@14c; block Swiss, No. 2,
[email protected]; No. 1, round, 13%@14c; No. 2 round,
By s @9c.
LIVE POULTRY—Turkeys, mixed coops,
per lb, 7%c; chickens, hens, 8c; roosters,
sc; springs, per lb, 9%c; ducks, old, lb, 6c;
springs, [email protected]; geese, sc.
DRESSED MEATS—VeaI, fancy, per lb,
6%@7c; fair to good, lb, 0c; thin, small or
overweight, per lb, sc; mutton, fancy, coun
try dressed, 6c, thin or overweight, per lb,
[email protected]; milk lambs, pelts off, fancy, [email protected];
choice, [email protected]^e; hogs, [email protected]%c.
FlSH—Pike, per lb, 7c; crappies, lb, [email protected];
pickerel, drawn, per lb, [email protected]; pickerel, round,
[email protected]%c; sunfifih, perch, etc., [email protected]; buffalo,
[email protected]; bullheads, [email protected]
POTATOES —New, per bu, straight carlota,
[email protected]; mixed car-lots, bu, 70c; small lots,
sacked, [email protected]
SWEET POTATOES—Jerseys, per brl, '■
$5.50; Virginias, per brl, $4.
BEANS—Fancy navy, per bu, $3.25; choice,
bu, [email protected]&; medium, hand-picked, per bu,
[email protected]; brown, fair to good, bu, $1.75;
brown, fancy, $2.25.
DRIED PEAS—Fancy yellow, [email protected] per
bu; medium, $1; green, fancy, $1.25; green,
medium, $1; marrowfat, per bu, $2.
APPLES—Duchess, per brl, $4; Wealthies,
brl, $4; other varieties, [email protected]; crab apples,
common, bu, $1; per brl, [email protected]; fancy,
per bu, $1.25(31.50; poor stock, per bu, 25
@75c.
PEACHES—California stock, fancy, $1;
free stones, southern stock, 4-basket crate,
[email protected]; boxes, 80c.
PLUMS—Four-basket crate, $1; plums, 16
--quart case, 65c; small, per bu, [email protected]
ORANGES—Late Valencias, [email protected]; grape
fruit, 80s to 965, $2.50.
LEMONS—Messinas, 320s or 3605, fancy,
$4.25; choice, $4; California, fancy, as to size,
$4.25; choice, $4.
PINEAPPLES—Fancy new stock, doz, as
to size, $3.50®4.
WATERMELONS—Per dozen, [email protected]; me
dium, [email protected]
GRAPES—Ives. per basket, 20c; Moore's
Early, basket, 20c: Concords, basket, 20c; 4
basket crate California muscat, [email protected];
Tokay, [email protected]
PEARS—California Bartlett, box, [email protected];
Hardy, $2-^2.26.
CANTELOUP—Bu crate, [email protected]
BANANAS—Fancy, large bunches, $2.50®
2.75; medium bunches, [email protected]; small bunches,
$1.50.
HONEY—New, fancy white. 1-lb sections,
14c; choice white, [email protected]; amber, [email protected];
golden rod, 11^4c; extracted white, [email protected];
buckwheat, [email protected]; extracted amber, [email protected]
VEGETABLES—Wax beana, bu, [email protected];
beans, string, bu, [email protected]; beets, bu, 45c; cab
bage, home-grown, large, crate, $1.75; carrots,
bu, [email protected]; cauliflower, doz. [email protected]$l; celery,
per doz, [email protected]; cucumbers, home-grown, bu,
[email protected]; egg plant, per doz, $1; lettuce,'doz,
2Oo; lettuce, head, doz, 35c; milt, per doz,
[email protected]; onions, doz bunches, 15c; onions,
southern, bu box, [email protected]; Spanish bu
crate, $2.50; parsley, doz, [email protected]; rutabagas,
bu, 40c; spinach, bu, 40c: squash, per doz,
[email protected]; turnips, per bu, 40c; tomatoes home
grown, per bu, [email protected]; watercress doz
30c.
New York Produce.
New York, Sept. 10. —Butter— Receipts, 10,
--905 pkgs; State dairy, [email protected]%c; creamery,
15%@20%c; June packed, factory, [email protected]%c.
Cheese—Receipts, 12,531 pkgs; unsettled;
fancy large, colored, 9c; fancy large, white,
9c; fancy small, colored, 9%c; fancy small,
white, $Uc. Eggs—Receipts, 10,905 pkgs
steady; state and Pennsylvania [email protected]; wes
tern, candled, [email protected]; western, uncandled
[email protected]
Chicago Produce.
Chicago, Sept. 10.—Butter, steady; cream
eries, 14<gl9c; dairies, [email protected] Cheese steady
twins, 9%@10c; Young Americas, [email protected]%c
--daisies, 10% c. Eggs, steady; loss off 14%@
15c. Iced poultry, unchanged; turkeys, [email protected]
chickens, including springs, B%@llc.
PROVISIONS
ChicHgo Provision*.
Chicago, Sept. 10.—There was a fair trade
in provisions early and prices were a shade
firmer with considerable demand for lard and
ribs. January pork opened 7Uc higher at
$15.92%; lard 2%c higher at $9.?2%, and ribs
were 2% higher at $8.20.
Close: Pork, September, $14.70; October
514.50; January, $15.80; May $16.95. Lard'
September, $9.42%; October, $9.42%; Novem
ber, $9.35; December and May, $9.20- Janu
ary, $9.17%. Ribs September, $8.65; October
$8,67%; January, $8.15.
New York Provision*. •
New York, Sept. 10.—Beef, firm; pork, firm;
lard, quiet; prime western steam, $9.72%. ' ;
Clearances: Wheat and flour, 803 000 bu
corn, 87,000; oats, i«,ot». *
ACTIVE, FEYEBLESS
This Describes Wall Street Trading
To-day.
STOCKS SHOW GAINS AT OPENING
General Tendency Is Upward, Some
Hiuh Figures Being;
Reached.
New York, Sept. 10.—Opening quotations far
stocks showed prices maintained, and In a
majority of cases small fractional gains were
recorded. There were few exceptions among
the important stocks, which showed frac
tional losses. The market was active but
not feverish.
The uncertainty of the money outlook in
duced tome selling of stocks. A fall of 1%
in Brodklyn Transit led to realizing elsewhere,
especially *n Atchison, St. Paul and Union
Pacific. Business then became quieter, but
when large buying orders appeared for St.
Paul, that stock was pushed up from 162%
to 165%, and the entire market became active
and strong. Amalgamated Copper rose 2 and
Smelting, Hocking Valley and Cleveland,
Columbus, Cincinnati & St. Louis from 2 to
3 points. The quotations for United States
2 per cent and the 4 per cents of 1925 were
advanced a half per cent on call. St. Paul
and Amalgamated reacted a point and then
the advance was checked.
Buying was renewed and the advance re
sumed under the leadership of southwesterns,
which showed a gain of over 3 points. High
figures were reached by Union Pacific, Atchi
son, Erie and St. Paul. The latter stock did
not hold well, the large advance since Satur
day inviting frequent realizing. The Vander
■bilt group was prominent and strong. Cleve
land, Columbus, Cincinnati & St. Louis led
this division with a gain of 4. Some other
inactive stocks were notably higher, St. Paul
preferred, for instance, rising 5 points. Be
fore noon St. Paul fell back 1% and other
leaders about a poirt.
The market rallied on the announcement of
a proposition of the secretary of the treasury
for the release of government funds. St.
Paul rose a point above any previous price
of the day and other leaders recovered to the
best on light transactions.
Prices were not maintained at the best,
profit-taking causing a material and dropping
market. St. Paul, Atchison and the Pacific
I yielded about a point and Amalgamated Cop
per 2. American Linseed preferred advanced
4 points but soon lost the improvement. Ev
ansville & Terre Haute rose 5% over last
night.
United States Steel stocks w«re pushed up
1% for the common and 1% for the preferred
with sympathetic effect on the general list.
Colorado Fuel and American Car preferred
rose 3 each and Tennessee Coal 1%. The ear
lier market leaders rose again to the top fig
ures. lowa Central gained 3% and Kansas &
Texas preferred 2%. This advance met heavy
offerings which carried prices back sharply,
St. Paul declined 2%. The market was sup
ported again and steadied, but closed heayy.
Bonds were firm.
Stock quotations reported for The Journal
by Watson & Co., Chamber of Commerce,
Minneapolis.
Closing figures are bid.
~i~~ | —Close—
Sales Stocks— Hi- | Lo- | Bid. | Bid.
| est. | est. jSeplO|Scp.3
Adams Express | I 175 175
Am. Express 1 190 185
200 Am. Cot. 0i1... 32 | 31% 31% 31
do pr 90%j 90 |90 90%
MOO^m. Car 29%| 29%| 29%| 29%
100, do pr 87 8T.% 86 I 85%
|Am. Ice i 31 30% 30% 30%
I do pr I t>6 66
800 ; Am. Linseed ..( 21 20 19% 19%
i do pr | 54 50 49% 49%
|Am. Malting ,-.| 7% 7% 7 ......
I do pr I | | 27
2,300; Am. Sugar ... 132% | 131 132 131
|Am. Smelting .. 49%j 47% 45% 47%
I do pr 100%| 99% 100 99
j Am. Tobacco 133 1/-! 133
I do pr 145 "| 145
36,300) Amal. Cop .... 116 114 114%| 114
2,loo|Anacon. Cop .. 47 I 45V" : 45%
24,600: At., Top &S. F 77%| 75% 7S%j 76%
4,200! do pr 96% 96%| 96W 96%
1,400 Bait. & 0hi0... 102 101 101%1 101
100 do pr 92 92
9,900,8r00k. Rap. Tr 69 67% SB% 68
jßrook. Un. Gas 210 210
l,6oo|Can. Pacific 111% u\u
2,400 Ches. & Ohio.. 46% 45% 46 45%
C. & E. 11l 127 126
1,000 Chi. & Alton.. 39 38% 38% 37%
1,000 do pr 78% 78 77 77
2,500 Chi. Gr. West.. 24% 23% 24% 23%
do pr A j 86 84
do pr B 48% 49%
Chi., Ind. &h. 41 40 | 40% 39%
do pr 74% 74 74% 72%
2,900 C.,C.,C. & StL. 95 82 94% 90%
do pr 119
Col., H. C. & I 18% 18 18
Chi. Term .... 21% 21% 21% 21
do pr 41% 40% 41 40%
Col. Fuel & In 100 97% 99 97%
do pr | 123 120
1,400 Col. Southern . 14% 14 | 14% 14
do Ist pf ... 56% 55 | 55% 55
do 2d pr .... 25% 24%| 25% 24%
2,700 Consol. Gas ... 222 220%| 220% 220%
Con. Tobacco 66% 66%
do pr 117 117
700 Del. & Hudson. 165 164 164% 164
300 Del., Lack & W 224 223 j 223 221
,900|Den. & Rio Gr.. 47% 46%; 47% 46
1,100 do pr 95% 94%] 94%| 94
Du., S. S. &At 12% 11% 12%| 11%
do pr 20% 19% 20% 19%
37,400 Erie 43% 42% 42% 42%
2,100 do lat pr ... 71 70% 70% 70
do 2d pr 58 57 57% 57%
Evans 4 Ter H. 66% 62 64%
do pr 1 79
300 Gen. Electric .. 264%j 262 264% 262
1,700 Great Nor. pr.. 185 183% 184% 182
Hocking Valley 53% 51% 53%
do pr 75% 74 75%
900 Illinois Central. 147 j 145 146%| 144%
lowa Central . 39% 37 39 36
do pr 72% 72 72% 71
400 Inter. Paper ... 25% 24% 25% 24
do pr 81% 79% 80% 79%
K. C. & South 19% 19%
do pr 42 42%
Laclede Gas 90
do pr 100
E. & W 62 62
do pr 123 123
5,400 Louis. & Nash. 104 103 103% 103%
400 M. St. P. & Soo 26 25% 25% 25
do pr 70% 70%
4,500 Manhattan ... 117% 116 117 116 V.
Met. St. Ry. .. 165% 165 165% 164 "
200 Minn. & St. L 107 107 106% 106
do pr 115 115%
4,200;M0. Pac 104 102% 103% 102%
900 M. K. & T 29% 29 29% 29%
2,400 do pr 57% 55 56% 54%
Mobile & Ohio 83% 83%
Mexican Cent... 25 24% 25 24%
Mcx: Nat 14% 14 • 14 14%
100 Nat. Biscuit I 43% 43%
do pr 101 101
Nat. Lead 20 19%
do pr . 86 88
Nat. Salt 41 40% 40% 39%
do pr 76 76
N. J. Central 163% 160
Norfolk & West 55% 54% 55 54%
North Am. Co. 97% 95% 96% 95%
• North. Pac. Pr | 97% 95%
800 North-Western 197 194 196% 191
1,700 N. Y. Central.. 154% 152% 153 152%
1,800 N.Y.Chi. & St.L 41% 39% 40 39%
do Ist 110 110
do 2d 79% 78
Omaha 135
do pr 175
s,6oojOntario & W... 34% 34% 34% 84%
iPaper Bag 16% 16%
do pr 74% 74 73% 74
300 Pressed Steel... 42 41% 41 41%
do pr 82 81% 81% 81%
Pacific Coast... 84
do lfit pr S2
do 2d pr 68
2,900 Pacific Mail.... 43% 41% 43% 41%
11,600 Perm. B. R 144% 143% 144% 143%
P..CC. & St.L 70%
I do pr 100
5,300 People's Gas... 112 110 111 no%
Peoria & K. 31
9,900 Reading 42% 41% 42% 42%
1,800 do Ist pr.... 76% 76 76% 76
24.00 do 2d pr.... 53% 53% 53% 53%
2,100 Repub. Steel... 18% 18 18% 18
800| do pr 72 71% 71% 71%
400 Rock Island.... 143% 142% 142' 142
St. L. & San F 45% 44%
do 2d pr.... 68% 68 68% 68%
300 St. L. &S. W.. 29% 29 29% 29
200 do pr 62 61% 62 62
45,50015t. Paul 166%| 162% 164% 165
SOOi do pr 190 188% 188 186
■St. Joe & Gr. Is 1 12
I do Ist pr... 67 66 «6%
' do 2d pr I I 26%
Stand. R. &Tw 5 | 4% 4%
44.800 Southern Pac .'. 59 1 56%) 56% 56%
10.800! Southern Ry .. 32% 32 | 32Hl 32
1,500| do pr 88%j 87%| 87%| 87%
4,300 Term. Coal & I 65H1 63% i 64% l 63%
3,soo:Texas & Pac. 43% I 43 | 43 42%
lOOJThird Aye. Ry 121 | 120 i2O | 121
Tol., St. L & W! 20 20
do pr „ 33 33
200 Twin City R. T 103 102% 102% 101%
I do pr 164
28,7001 Union Pacific... 99.% 97*4 98% 97%
6CO! do pr 88%! 88% 88% $8
U. S. Express I { 95 | 95
U. S. Leather.. 13% 12% 13 12%
do pr 83% 81 82 81%
U. S. Rubber I 17% 18
do pr |. I 55% 55
TUESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 10, 1901.
35.100 U. S. Steel .... 45% 43% 44% 431,4
14,400 do pr ""."....Y. 95% 93% 94% 93%
1.800 Wabash ........ 22% 21% 22% 21%
5,100 do pr ."..'..■.. .40% 39% 39% 39%
- Wells-Fargo Ex ...'..., ...\7. 160 160 ]
800 Western Union. 92% *92 ' 92%' * 91%:
■ Wheel. & L.' E ...... 18% 18%
.200 do Ist pr ".'..■............ 49 49%
■•■■." do 2d pr ..",... 28 26
• 600 Wisconsin Cent ;22 :! ( 21% 21% 21%'
_100| _J*°__ pr •_!.• •■-, ' .43% , 43% fr 43 42 i
Total Bale's, 793,5067 •"'. •■■■;-<■■■—-•-. '
New . York. Bonds.
New York, Sept. 10.— -
United States refunding 2b, registered...'.lo7% =
United States refunding 2s, c0up0n....108%'
United States 3s, reg................ 108%
United States 3s, coup 108%
United States new 4s, registered ........ 137%
United States new ,4s, coupon 137%
United States old 4s, reg■;:..'.'............112
United States old 4s, c0up....... 113
United . States ss, reg ...................107%
United States ss, coup V.......... 107%
Atchlnson, general 4s :..: 103%
j Atchison -adjustment 4s (bid) *.V.."."....."96
i Baltimore &" Ohio 4s .103%
> Baltimore & Ohio 3%s ........V.V...V..V95%
Baltimore & Ohio Cony. 4s Vv...../..;...105%
Canada Southern seconds (bid)... 107 «
Central of Georgia 5s 7;....."......:.......106%
.Central of Georgia first mc ..V...V...V.... 81%
Chesapeake & Ohio 4%s ..........104% '
! .Chicago & Alton 3%s . v... 84%
1 Chicago; Burlington & Quiney new 45.... 96%
I Chi., Mil. & St. Paul gen 4s (bid)........ 110
I .Chicago & North-Western consol 7s .....140
j Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific 4s (bid).. 106
! C, C, C. & St. Louis gen. 4s (bid) ..... 03
; Chicago Terminal 4s ...'....." - 94%
1 Colorado & Southern 4s ...'.......-.. ' 87%
(Deliver & Rio Grande 4s (bid) .............101%
Erie prior lien 4s ;...."..... ....... 97%
Erie general 4s J..7...V.'.7.Y.....'.......... 88
Ft. Worth & Denver City Ist .....]...'. *103%
Hocking Valley 4%s (bid) ' 106 :
Louisville & Nashville unified 45."..:..;. 101% '
Mexican Central 4s (bid)... ....".......'.. 85 • |
• Mexican Central Ist lnc 33%
I Minnesota «■ St. Louis 4s ...V..:..V.™V.103%
j Missouri, Kansas & Texas 4s (bid) .. .V 98%
■Missouri, Kansas & Texas 2ds 81%
New' York " Central lsts (bid) ..'......... 104%
New , York Central gen. 3%s (0ffd)......109%
New Jersey Central gen. 5s 133
Northern Pacific 4s „ ■...."..'.104%
Northern Pacific 3s ...'.-....'...'.".■...'.'.■..... 72
Norfolk & Western consol 4s ....: 102%
Reading General '4s "I:.:.. ......:.... 9514
St. Louis & Iron Mountain Consol 5s ' '
(bid) ......... v . 115
St. Louis & San Francis* 4s (bid) ....'. 95
St. Louis' & Southwestern lsts' ......... 97%
St. Louis & Southwestern 2ds (bid) 76%
. San Antonio & Arkansas Pass 4a 86 .
I Southern Pacific 4s "'.".'.'....'.::'....'..'.:...'. 91% ;
'■ Southern Railway 5s 116%
■ Texas & Pacific lsts (bid) 113
; Toledo, St. Louis & Western'4s (bid).... 84
I Union Pacific' 4s .;..:.....:;„:;.. 105
: Union Pacific Cony 4s .:..'.........106%
Wabash lsts (bid) .". us%
Wabash 2ds (bid) 110
Wabash Deb B ....62%
■West Shore 4s .V......V..V..:.............113%
1 Wheeling % Lake Erie 4s 91%
Wisconsin Central '..."..■...■ 88%.
LONDON FINANCIAL
Consols and Quotations of American
Securities. .y*
London, Sept. 10.—Consols for money,
9315-16: consols for account," 94. "
Anaconda, 9%; Atchison, 79; Atchison pre
ferred, 99%; Baltimore & Ohio, 105; Canadian 1
Pacific. 117; Chesapeake & Ohio, 47%; Chi-
I cago Great Western, 24%; Chicago, Milwaukee
l& St. Paul. 170; Denver &'Rio Grande, 48% •
Denver & Rio Grande preferred, 98; Erie
44%; Erie first preferred, 72%; Erie second
; preferred, 59%; Illinois Central, 148%; Louis
ville & Nashville,"lo6; Missouri, Kansas &
Texas, 30%; Missouri, Kansas & Texas pre
ferred, 56%; New York Central, 156%; Nor
| folk & Western, 56%; Norfolk & Western pre- j
erred, 90; Northern Pacific preferred, 100;
Ontario & Western, 35%; Pennsylvania, 74;
Reading, 21%; Reading first preferred, 39%,
Reading . second preferred, 27%';' Southern
Railway, 33%; Southern Railway preferred,
89%; Southern Pacific. 59%; Union Pacific, !
101%; Union Pacific preferred, 90; United
States Steel, 45%; " United States Steel i.re- ,
erred, 96%; }> abash; 22%; Wabash preferred,
41%;." Spanish tours, 70%. ' "" '
Bar silver, steady, 26 15-16 d per ounce; Rand
! mines, 41%; money, 1%@1% per cent. The
1 rate of discount" in the open market for short
bills is 2%@2% per cent; for three months'
bills, 2 [email protected]% per cent.
MONEY "REPORTS
New York: Money.
New York, Sept. —Close.—Money on call
firm at 3©5% per cent; last loan, 3 per ce*t;
ruling' rate, 5 per cent; prime mercantile
paper, [email protected]% per cent; sterling exchange
steadier, with actual business in bankers'
bills at $4.85%@4.85% for demand and at
$4.82% for sixty days; posted rates, $4.53%@
, 4.84 and $4.86%; commercial bills, 4.82%@
4.82%; bar silver, 58%; Mexican dollars, 45%;
government"' bonds, strong; " state bonds,
weak; railroad bonds, firm. ■ i,
Minneapolis Money. =—-
MINNEAPOLIS — Bank clearings, $2,341,- '
928.63; New York exchange, selling rate, 30c
: discount; buying rate, 80c discount; : Chicago
exchange, selling rate, par; buying rate, 50c
discount; London" sixty-day sight documen
tary, 14.82.
' ST. PAUL—Clearings, $894,669.32; year ago,
$642,716.38. " "■..■ : : -
Chicago Money.
Chicago, Sept. 10.—Clearings, $24,154,194;
balances, $2,785,249; posted exchange, $4.84%
@4.87; New York exchange, 10c discount. r
- Berlin Money.
Berlin, Sept. lo.—Exchange on London, 20 ;
marks 43 pfgs for checks; discount rates,
short bills, 2 per cent; three months' bills, 2%
per cent. ;;''■ ■ - ■■ ■;.- '■• :r. - •
i ■ , ' Paris Prices.
Paris, Sept. " Three per cent rentes, lOlf i
77c"" for act . ' Exchange on London, j
25f 21% c for c'u. .3. Spanish fours, 71.72%. •
Gold Premium*.
London, Sept. 10.—Gold premiums are 1
; quoted at Buenos " Ayres to-day at 131.10;
Madrid, 40.22; Lisbon, 38.50. j
Bank Clearings.
Boston, Sept. 10.—Bank clearings, $28,783,
--134; balances, $1,512,213.
New York. Sept. io.— Bank clearings, $309,
--590,476; balances, $13,073,027.
Philadelphia Money.
Philadelphia, Sept. 10.—Clearings, $16,234,
--226; balances, $2,064,714. Money, [email protected]%.
Baltimore Money.
Baltimore, Sept. 10.—Clearings, $4,108,225;
balances, $478,709. Money, 4%@5 per cent.
MISCELLANEOUS
New York Cotton.
New York, Sept. 10.—Cotton opened easy
in tone, [email protected] points lower, following unex
pected weakness in the Liverpool markets
and reports that offerings of spot cotton in
the south were plentiful at concessions of
[email protected]%c. Immediately after the call, the
local market gave signs of doing better on
covering by shorts. Trade was fairly active
in the first hour. Around 7.64 c for January,
the more conservative bears withdrew from
the market. The noon hour found the mar
ket in a listless, heavy condition, with prices
, but a point or so up from the bottom and
• net lower by [email protected] points. Sentiment was
not favorable to a reaction, inasmuch as
there was very little backing in sight from
the outside. Spot closed quiet and steady, ;
i%c deline. Middling uplands, B%c; mld
: dling gulf, B%c. Sales, 992 bales.
I Futures closed steady; September, 7.61 c;
October, 7.62 c; November, 7.62 c; December,
7.65 c; January and February, 7.6<3c; March
and April, 7.68 c; May, 7.70 c.
Peoria WhUky.
Peoria, 111., Sept. 10.—Whisky, $1.80.
Toledo Grain.
Toledo, Ohio, Sept. 10.—Wheat, No. 2, cash
and September, 71% c; December, 73% c; May;
77c. Corn, quiet; September, 67c; December,
57% c; May, 59c. Oats, September, 35% c; De
cember,' 36% c. Rye, 62% c.. Clover seed, prime
and' October. $5.17%. December, $5.22%. ""'"
SPECULATIVE gossip
Weare to L. T. Sowle—Twenty years ago
President Garfleld ] fell at the hands of an
assassin. . That marked the culmination of
the great bull market of i 1879 to 1881. Tre
mendous declines followed. Garfleld lingered
until September, but the trend of the market
was" downward for months. In the "spring
of 1882, the big men "worked up another bull
campaign in order to get rid of their stocks
bought' at panic prices and -quotations were
put up nearly as high as in the spring of 1881.
There followed two or three years of de
clining values. There is this difference in the
situation.' In 1881 the public had the load.
At 1 the present time stocks are for the most
part in strong hands which is a virtual assur
ance that there will be no panic and that in
due course we shall get another big bull mar
ket *"?■;' '-" ~"~y - :.' ■■""""" ■■' • ~'~ ~
' World's vlsable of wheat, according to Daily
Trade Bulletin Sept. 1, 146,030,000 bu; Aug.
1. 138,201,000 1 bu; Bept. 1, 1900, 169.431,000 bu.
New York to . Watson—lt Is reported this
morning that < arrangements are being made
I for the importation of a round amount of
gold from both London ' and Paris this week
I and i that i the secretary of the treasury will
j not draw further" deposits from here on In
ternal revenue collections. . "
I Chicago ;to Lewis: ■ Large receipts In north-
I west : and - disappointing cables causa of the
I easier feeling in "wheat. "
GOOD SNAPPY TONE
To the South St. Paul Cattle
Market.
A SMALL SUPPLY OF SHEEP
Early Hoc Quotation* Bast Are Low
' ; er, ' but Unchanged
Here.
I South St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 10.—Receipts
; to-day were about 400 cattle, ' 100 calves, 1,200
hogs and 200 sheep.
The following table shows the receipts from
Jan. l, 1901, to date, as compared with the
same period a year ago:.
Year. Cattle. Cnlves.Hogs.Sheep.Horses.Cars.
1901.... 85,465 28,146 352,843 106,028 12,274 9,129
1900. . .. 91,842 31,165 316,826 199,355 21,852 10,079
Dec... 6,377 3,019 ..:.... 93,327 9,678 950
lnc ...... 36,017 ....................
The following table shows the receipts for
the month of September to date, as compared
with the same period a year ago:
Year. Cattle.Calves.Hogs.Sheep.Horses.Cars.
1801 5,884 ' 379 6,131 7,752 166 372
1900...... 7,440 589 4,600 16,687 784 498
Dec 1,556 210 ..... 8,835 618 126
Inc... 1,631 ../... ... ...
Receipts:
Date. "".. Cattle. Calves. Hogs. Sheep. Cars.
Sept. 3 .... 943 139 . 2,020 627 73
Sept. 4 .... 431 < 18 1,737 1,731 54
.Sept. 5 .... 183 8 512 313 17
Sept. 6 .... 102 10 699- 298 38
Sept. 7 .... 112 .... 302 72 10
Sept. 9 ....1,688 16 402 3,728 100
i Estimated receipts by cars to-day of the
railroads centering at these yards: Chicago,
Great Western, 1; Chicago. Milwaukee & St.
Paul, 10; Minneapolis & St. Louis, 1; Chi
cago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaho, 3;
Great Northern, 12; Chicago, Burlington &
Quincy, 3; Soo, 6; Northern Pacific, 4.
Total. 42. .
Disposition of stock, Sept. 9:
o Firm. '„ ' ' Cattle. Hogg. Sheep.
Swift &Co 180 400 ' 425
Elliot &Co ...... .... 9 ... 200
Slimmer & Thomas .... 2 ... ...
Hankey Brothers ....... 237 ... ... :
W. E. Bronson ......;•.. 1 ... ...
! J. B. Fitzgerald ........ 15
Leo Gottfried ... 26
Country buyers .......... 129 2 ... :
Totals 573 402 651
CATTLE— The . cattle ; supply here to-day
was only fair for Tuesday. The bulk con
sisted of grass westerns and, while quotations
from the " east showed a very slew market,
conditions here warranted a good snappy tone
to the trade at " prices ' fully steady. Veals
were scarce and prices generally ruled strong.
There was very little business done in the
stacker and feeder division. The supply was
very small. " """ ' *y ■ - •
Feeding Cows and Heifers-
No. - Ay. Price. 11 No. Ay. Price.
4 402 $2.50 If 2"■". 355 $2.50
1 700 2.00 I . \
Feeding Bulls-
No. Ay. Price. ||N.o. ■ At. Price.
1 1,010 $2.35 Ifi ........1,130 $2.35
3 880 2.10 I 2 1,015 2.10
I Western Range Cattle— .
1 Steers-
No. Ay. Price.l No. Ay. Price.
16 1,148 $4.35 12 1,154 $4.35
15 • 1,178 4.35 10 ........1,170 4.35
8 1,030 4.00 114 ........1,095 4.00
Cows—
29 1,003 3.45 | '27 1,027 45
i 8 1,020 3.30 II 4 1,017 3.30
1 ........1,040 3.00
Bull- ; "
1 •••■ 1,080 2.60
Feeders—
4 ■ ; &70 3.00
1 Stockers and Feeders-
No. Ay. Price. I I No. Ay. Price.
I 3 1,026 $3.35 I 1 1.20 $3.35
3 ........ 866 3.00 1 900 3.25
1 1,250 3.00 |l 1 990 2.85
1 1,020 2.60 ! 4 910 1.76
2 860 1.75 I
Beef and Butcher Steers—
No. Ay. Price. No. ' Ay. Price.
2 1,245 $4.50 I 1 1,500 $4.50
10 ........1,019; 3.65 I 6 .1,060 3.65
*4 .' 945 3.50 I] ■• '-'''"■'
Milkers and Springers—
3 cows and 2 calves for ?105.
1 cow and 1 calf for $20.
5 cows for $152.50.
1 cow for $36.
1 1 cow for $18.
! Stockers and Feeders-
No. Ay. Price. I j No. Ay. Price.
; 6 ........1,109 $4.00 i! 1 S7O $3.50
! 2 1,010 • 3.00 2 855 2.90
15 251 2.85 10 454 2.60
1 230 2.50 1 210 2.00
Veal Calves—
No. Ay. Price. 11 No. Ay. Price.
1 120 $5.00 |1 140 $4.75
1 180 4.50 II 220 4.00
HOGS—Receipts of hogs at leading market
points "to-day fell a little short of last Tues
day's aggregate marketing but was still a
little in excess of a year ago. Early quota
tions east" ruled lower, but the demand here
warranted prices fully as high as yesterday.
Quality was only fair. The best on sale sold
j from $6.35 ' to ' $6.50 with " commonish, mixed
i grades selling from $8,25 to $6.30. Common
I rough packers sold at $5.85. Stags sold at
I $5 and boars from $3 to $3.25.
'No. Ay. Price. 11 No. Ay. Price.
20 187 $6.50 I 7 177 $6.50
12 342 6.45 30 211 6.30
55 ........ 269 6.30 138 ..: 226 6.30
37 ........ 272 6.30 18 ........ 302 6.10
Common Rough Packers—
No. ' Ay. Price.|iNo. Ay. Price.
1 330 $5.85 II 5 270 $5.85
6 310 5.85 II 4 220 5.85
Pigs-
No. Ay. Price. No. Ay. Price.
1 100 $5.00 ||4 95 $5.00
Stags-
No. Ay. Price. 11 No. Ay. Price.
1 480 $5.00 Hi ........ 380 $5.00
Boars-
No. Ay. Price.
1 450 $3.00
SHEEP—Offerings In the sheep division
consisted of only a small supply. The local
inquiry for both choice fat sheep and lambs
was fairly good at prices steady with last
week's sharp decline. Sales:
Sheep—
No. Ay. Price.
5 lambs 72 $4.00
44 lambs .......................... 75 3.75
5 sheep ;.:.......:.....:.....:... 102 3.00
7 sheep 65 3.00
28 feeders 11l 2.50
4 stock lambs 65 2.25
1 thin buck ■.....:.....;......... 110 - 2.00
On the market: M. Schuchart, Hutchin
son; Weunzerl Brothers & Co., St. Bonlfa
cius; G. J. Guerkink, Baldwin; Tyley Broth
ers, Ellsworth, Wls.; P. H. Brannon, New
Hampton, Iowa; A. L. McDowell, Hutchin
son; E. G. Brown, Grove City; M. Condon,
Clara City, O. W. Stuart, Hancock; Powell
& St. John, Bellingham; C. H. Homan, Har
ris; J. Randgaar & Co., Danvers; Guy C.
Perkins, Cokato; T. H. Tnorenson, Milan;
H. J. Hanson, Milan; Breckinrldge & W.,
Big Stone City; E. B. Wadsworth, Danube;
J. H. Person, Montevideo; F. B. Wood, Dex
ter; Frank White, Farmington; L. E. If.
Gllmore, Lagus, N. D.; Henry Erickson,
Towner, N. D.; Hegenson, Glendlve, Mont.
Sioux City Live Stock.
Sioux City, lowa. Sept 10.— Receipts, 4,000
hogs, 1,000 cattle.
Hogs—Shade higher. Sales:
No. Ay. Price.
62 240 $6.25
|56 244 6.37%
57 .' 25C 6.40
68 2fl fi.45
68 250 6.47%
47 250 6.56
Cattle —Steady. Sales:
No. Ay. Price.
2 beeves 1,050 $3.75
17 beeves 1,240 6.25
2 canners 840 2.25
4 cows 1,040 365
6 stock heifers 040 2.60
5 stock heifers 500 2.76
2 bulls 520 2.40
4 bulls 1,040 2.70
6 stockers 840 2.76
30 stockers 1,140 3.50
6 yearlings 650 2.75
8 yearlings 550 3.40
6 calves 360 3.25
5 calves .-. 290 3.75
Sheep—None.
Chicago Live Stock.
Chicago, Sept 10—Cattle receipts, 8,000,
including 1,200 Texans and 2,£00 westens;
choice steady, others steady to slow; Texans
and westerns shade easier; good to prime
steers, [email protected]; poor to medium, $4.25®5.70;
stockers and feeders, [email protected]; cows, [email protected]
5; heifers, [email protected]; canners. ■ [email protected]:
bulls, [email protected]; calves, [email protected]; Texas fed
steers, [email protected]; Texas grass steers, $3.40®
4.10; western steers, $4.10<§5.50.
Hogs, receipti to-d»y, 19,000; to-morrow, 28,
--000; left over, 3,560; generally about steady;
I mixed and butchers, [email protected]; good to choice
j heavy, [email protected]; rough heavy, [email protected]; light
, [email protected]; bulk of sales, [email protected]
I Sheep, receipts, 15.000; steady; lamb* about
steady; good to choice wethers. $3.75<g4; fair
to choice mixed, [email protected]; western sheep.
\\ *.'■]* v ■ ■',' ;'" = ESTABLISHED 187» ■1" ZJ - IJ. .'.'.l ■»*■'■
WOODWAED «& CO.
«,«*»«,,.» GRAIN COMMISSION «»"»
»£4KCHES-Cfaicago aod Mllraukef. Orders lor future deliyerr executed la *11 »|r»«tt
Bhas. E. Lewi* St 0 (:
■ * Co. Bonds,
1, 2 and 3 Chamber of
Commerce, Minneapolis. (I flttOQ
GRAIN, PROVISIONS.
Chicago i Bartlett. Pnudar C*.
Correspondent., 1 J. F.Harrij™ -m*T
Dally Price Current mailed free on *>
plication. ~ - . .... ... *■.;
J. F. , WHALLON. GEO. C. BAG LEY.
GEO. P. CASE. CHAS. M. CASE.
Whaiion,casc&co.
STOCKS, GRAIN, PROVISIONS.
i . i New York Stock Exohangs
■EMBERS] Chicago Board of Trad*.
' Mpls. Chamber Commtroi
Private Wirm to Mmw York and Ohicman
18 Chamber of Commerce.
Duluth, " . Chicago
£ A. BROWN & CO.
Grain Commission.
WHOLESALE COAL.
Consignments Solicited, Prompt Returns
• ' ■" Guaranteed. •* ■ •-• •
Minneapolis, ...... ninnesota.
[email protected]; native lambs, [email protected]: western lambs.
[email protected] • ... -- ..'
Official yesterday: Receipts, cattle, 25,785;
hogs, 25,1f.5; sheep, 3,321; ahiproents, cattle,
5,918; hogs, 6,281; sheep, ZfilAT"-- '
South Omaha live Stock.
South Omaha, Sept. 10.—Cattle—Receipts,
3,200; steady to strong; native steers,' |[email protected]
6; Texans, [email protected]; cows and heifers, $2.75
@4; canners, f1f2.50; stoclters and feeders,
[email protected]
Hogs—Receipts, 5,300; [email protected] higher; heavy,
|[email protected]; mixed, • $6.42 1/2®6.45; pigs JS.TO®
6,25; bulk of sales, $6.42%@6.45.
Sheep— Receipts, 10,000; slow to [email protected] low
er; sheep, [email protected]; lambs, 13.75(24.50.
St. Loulh live Stock.
St. Louis, Sept. 10.—Cattle, receipts, o.OOOi
steady; native steers, - [email protected]; stockers and
feeders, [email protected]; Texans, |[email protected]; cows anc
heifers, |[email protected] * - ' *
.Hogs, receipts, 6,500; strong to steady; pigs
f0.60&6.65; packers, [email protected]; butchers, ?«.6<
(itxb.ys.
h^ ep ,' recelPts. 3.500- steady; sheep, $3 21
@3.40; lambs. $4.35(&4.55.
Kansaa City Live Stock.
Kansas .City, Sept. Cattle, receipt*, 14,.
000; strong; native steers, [email protected]; Texans,
$2,70(53.85: cows and heifers, $2.25(35 25- stock
ers and feeders. ?2.40<g4.
Hogs, receipts, 9,000; steady; bulk of sales.
[email protected]; heavy, $6.50<g6.G0; packers $6,350
6.55; mixed, [email protected]; yorkers."}6©6.3s; pigs
[email protected] T
' Sheep, receipts, 3,500; steady; sheep. [email protected]
3.60;-lambs, [email protected]^0. ~*°* »«
Midway Horse Market.
In MiS nesota TrarLsfer. St. Paul. JAinn.. Sept.
10.—Barrett & Zimmerman report that tbe im
provement in demand was In favor of heavy
drafters tor Jogging -work, which showed
considerable strength under more active buy
ing. Carriage horses and drivers also showed
more activity, due to the material drop in
prices on those grades. Values:
Drafters, extra $1550195
Drafters, choice 125**45
Farm mares, extra 1100130
Farm mares, choice 9o|hoo
Farm mares, common to good 50' c7O
Hides, Pelts Tallow and Wool.
_ N0.1.N0.2.
Green salted heavy steer hides 9% 8%
Green salted.heavy cow "hides 8% 7%
Green salted light hides 8 7
Green salted heavy cow and steer -
hides, branded ...■ 1.......... 7% 64
Green salted bull and oxen 7l| t>%
Green salted veal calf, 8 to 15 lbs. .10% 8%
Green salted veal kip, 15 to 25 lbs.. BV4 7
Green salted long-haired or "runner
kip .....;.....;....:v..7..:v.....::.:. m, G^i
Green salted deacons, each ....'. 50' 40
Green cattle hides and skins, [email protected]£ per
pound less than "above quotation?.
Green salted horse or mule hides,
large $2.80 2.CMJ
Green salted horse or mule hides,
medium 2.35 1.50
Green salted horse or mule hides,
small 1.50 1.00
Dry flint Montana butcher hides...l 3 @14V6
Dry flint Minnesota, Dakota and
Wisconsin hides 11 9
Dry flint calf skins lfi 12}£
Dry flint kip skins 14 11
Green salted pelts, large, each |[email protected]
Green salted pelts, medium, each... .50® .70
Green Baited pelts, small, each 20® .45
Diy flint territorial pelts, butcher.. .10®. 11
Dry flint territorial pelts, murrain. .8 & .9V6
Dry flint territorial shearlings 6 @ 7
rallow, in cakes 4% 4
rallow, in barrels .....'. 4J$ 2%
Grease, white .......:;......."........ 4 " 3>4
Gcrease, dark :'.*. 3% 2V4
Wool, medium, unwashed .........12%@13%
Wool, fine medium, unwashed.. 11&@12%
Wool coarse, unwashed .....". 11%@12%
Wool, fine, unwashed ...... 9 {iIDVk
Wool, broken fleeces, unwashed ....IV ©12
Wool, seedy, burry, unwashed ......10 ©11
Bright Wisconsin and similar grades, [email protected]
higher than above quotations. . *
Sugar and Coffee.
New York. Sept. 10.—Sugar, raw, Quiet; fair
refining, 3 5-16 c; centrifugal, 96 test, 3%c;
molasses sugar, 31-16 c; refined steady;
crushed, 3.76 c; powdered, 5.35 c; granulated,
5.25 c; molasses, steady. Coffee, dull: No. 7
Rio, 5 9-16 c. Coff'oe futures ' steady, with
prices unchanged to 6 points lower. Early
trading was very active. The tone of the
market was steady all the forenoon. mM-day
bids indicating net 'unchanged prices to 5
points decline. Sales to that hour were 17,
--750 bags, including December at 4.95 c; Febru
ary, 5.10 c; March, 6.20 c; May. !>.35c; June.
5.40 c: spot was dull but steady with prices
unchanged. '
WILLIAM DALRYiPLE
Grain Commission Merchant
Consignment solicited; receiving a spe
cialty. Money advanced to farmers, ship
pers and elevator companies. Member
Duluth Board of Trade, " Minneapolis
Chamber of Commerce. Office, 501 Board
of Trade, Duluth; 30 Cbamber Of Com
merce,' Minneapolis.'
THOMAS A Go |
Grain Commission ail Stock Broken I
Write for our dally market letter, which we B
mall FRBE on application. . ■, ' M
Members Minneapolis ' Chamber of Com- ■
merce. Telephone—Main 1897-J. H
6 CHAMBER OF COMMERBI. fl
Watson & Co
Brokers In Grain, Provision*,
" Stock* and Bond*,
Members N. Y. Stock Exchange
Chicago Correspondents— Schwartz, Dupee&Co.
Private wire Chicago & New York. Tel. 806 Main
35 Chamber of Commorco.

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