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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, November 20, 1901, Image 14

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WEDNESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 20, 1901.
WORLD OF" COMMERCE AND
WHEAT FIRM AGAIN AND HIGHER AT THE CLOSE
Liverpool Was Steady, and Coarse
Grains Helped—Some Short
Covering.
ALL RECEIPTS AGAIN HEAVY
Clearance* Moderate—Cash Demand
Satisfactory—Xewi of the
Grain Markets..
Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, Nov. 20.
—Wheat took a firmer turn this morning and
moved up a fraction, although there was
nothing In the news to change sentiment
materially. Liverpool held steady against our
vrav«ring of yesterday, and closed %d higher.
Receipts In the . northwest were again well
up, showing 894 cars, against 463 last year.
The bulk, or 601 cars, came in to Minneapolis,
"which made this market a trifle heavier In
general tone than other markets. Coarse
grains were active and strong, and there was
a good deal of early covering In wheat.
Another heavy run was made in primary re
ceipts. Considerable gossip came from Chi
cago about sales of cash wheat in that mar
ket to go to Kansas City.
Primary receipts were 1,173.000 bu. against
T67.000 bu last year. Clearances, . wheat and
flour, equaled 241,000 bu. Minneapolis re
ceived 601 cars, against 37S last year, and
shipments 293, against 85.
The market turned firmer near the close.
Cash demand was reported good in south
western markets and in Chicago. St Louis
sent some more dispatches as to the need
of rain over the winter wheat sown terri
tory. Still later St. Louis dispatches said
the feeding of wheat to stock in the corn
country Is increasing. May wheat closed at
V2Hc, December at 69% c. Chicago closed May
at 75% c.
The cash market was active and unchanged
from yesterday except for an easier feeling
In low grades. Toward the close consider
able weakness developed in the off lots in
No. 2 and No. 8 that were yet unsold. No.
1 northern sold at lc to 14c over December.
No. 2 northern broug-ht IV4O to l%c under
December, and No. 3 went at 2c to 3c under
No. 2. No. 1 and No. 2 northern to arrive
were in fair demand. No. 3 ranged from
fcoHo t© 67c. Rejected and no grade from 60c
to 64c, with, poor no grade going as low at
THE FLOUR MARKET
Good General Demand—Prices Firm
as Quoted.
No special change Is noted In flour. A little
foreign inquiry has developed, but foreign
Bale* were reported very light to-day. The
domestic trade continues buying freely. Prices
as quoted are firm.
Shipments fell off a little, and to-day's fig
ures show only 47,672 brls.
First patents are quoted [email protected]; second
patents, $3.5003.60; first clears, J2.751&2.85;
second clears, $2.20.
THE CASH TRADE
Finnnen in. Oats—Corn Trade Quiet—
—Flax Turned Easier.
FLAX—The market was a little easier in
general tone, but prices showed no material
changes at first. On later trades moderate de
clines were made all around. No. 1 sold at
11.4201.41. Rejected sold at [email protected]». De
mand was good, and there was no difficulty in
disposing of offerings, everything going
promptly except where sellers held out for
firmer figures. Minneapolis received 49 oars
against 71 cars last year, and shipped 3. Du
luth tfad 142 cars.
Minneapolis, cash, $1.43; to arrive, $1.39 V.;
November, $1.40}*; December, $1.39 Vi; -May,
$1.44. Duhith, cash, $1.42»4; on track, $1.42*4;
to arrive, %lAOW. November, 51.42; December,
$1.39; May. $1.44.
CORN—Not much trading was reported.
Some no grade corn cold at 63c. No. 3 yellow
closed at Ww bid. Receipts, 10 cars; ship
ments, 1.
OATS—An active demand ruled for good
oats. Prices "were firmer and higher. Choice
No. 3 iwhlte or No. 4 white sold up to 4<H&c,
■with an occasional trade up to 41c. No. 3
"white closed at 41c. Receipt*, 25 cars; ship
ments, 7 cars.
FEED AND MEALi—Good demand rules,
end the market is firm and active as quoted.
Coarse corn meal and cracked corn, $21.7r,@
22.25; No. 1 feed, [email protected]; No. 2 feed, $23
©23.25; No. 3 feed, $23.50; granulated corn
meal In cotton sacks at the rate of $2.70 per
tori.
MILLSTUFFS—No further changes are re
ported In millstuffs. Demand holds up well
and shipments are heavy. Bran in bulk, $15.50
<gls; bulk shorts, $16.50@17; flour middlings,
$17.50® 18; red dog, $19.50@ v2O; feed in 200-lb
sacks, $1 per ton additional; In 100-lb sacks,
$1.50 per ton additional. Shipments, 2,322
toes.
RYE— The market was strong and active.
No. 2 rye closed at 65% c bid. (Receipts, 15
car<; shipments, 1 car.
BARLEY—The market is firm. Feed grades
are quoted 50@64c; malting grades, 64@56%c.
Receipts, 17 cars; shipments, 6 cars.
HAY—Upland, fancy, $9.50; upland, choice,
$9.25; upland, No. 1. $9; midland, $7.60@5;
medium, $6.50@7; timothy, choice, $12.50; rye
straw, choice, $4.50@5; wheat and oat straw,
?3.50@4. Receipt 3, 123 tons.
Pats and Calls.
Two o'clock report:
Puts—May wheat, 72% c.
Calls—May wheat, 72% c.
Curb—May -wheat, 72% c.
Cash Sales Reported To-day.
No. 1 northern, 13 cars $0.70%
No. 1 northern, 18 cars 70%
No. 1 northern, 1 car 70%
No. 1 northern, 6,000 bu, to arrive 70?-*
No. 1 northern, 1 car 70%
No. 1 northern, 1 car 71
No. 1 northern, 2 cars, to arrive 71
No. 2 northern, 16 cars 68%
No. 2 northern, SO cars 68%
No. 2 northern, S3 cars 68
No. 2 northern, 8 cars 68%
No. 2 northern, 2 cars 68%
No. 2 northern, 3 cars, to arrive 68
No. 2 northern, 2 cars 68%
No. 2 northern, 3 cars 67%
No. S wheat, 8 cars 66%
No. 3 wheat, 2 cars 67
No. 3 wheat, 5 cars 66
No. 3 wheat, 1 car 66%
No. 8 wheat, 3 cars 60%
No. 3 wheat, 1 car 66%
No. 8 wheat, 2 cars 66V*
Rejected wheat, 1 car 63%
Rejected wheat, 6 cars 63
Rejected wheat, 2 cars 62%
Rejected wheat, 1 car 64
No grade wheat, 1 car 60
No grade wheat, 1 car 63
No grade wheat, 2 -cars .„ 61%
No grade wheat, 7 cars 62
No grade wheat, 6 cars f.o.b 62%
No gradew heat, 2 cars 59
No grade Wheat, S cars 63%
Ear corn, 2 cars, to arrive - 66
No grade corn, 1 car 65
No. 3 oats, 4 cars 40%
No. 3 black oats, 1 <:ar 39
No. 3 white oats, 6 cars 40%
No. 4 white oats, 1 car 40%
No. 3 white .oats, 1 car 41
No. 4 white oats, 1 car 40%
No. 8 white oats, 2 cars 40
No. 2 rye, 1 car 55%
No. 2 rye, 600 bu 65
Ho. 2 rye, 2 cars 65
No. 3 rye-, 1 car 65
No. 6 barley, 1 car 53
Barley, 700 bu, to arrive 53
No. 4. barley, 1 car 63
No. 1 flax, 1 car 1.41
No. 1 flax, 2 cars 1.41%
No. 1 flax, 1 car 1.42
Rejected flax, 1 car 1.39
Rejected flax, 2 cars 1.38%
State Grain Inspection.
Nov. 19.
Inspected In—Wheat—Cars —Great North
ern—No. 1 hard, 1 car; No. 1 northern, 26;
No. 2 northern, 51; No. 3, 21; rejected, 14; no
grade, 54.
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul—No. 1
northern, 23; No. 2 northern, 92; No. 3, 22;
rejected, 11; no grade, 22.
Minneapolis & St. Louis —No. 1 northern, 2;
Ko. 2 northern, 20; No. 3, 8; no grade, 2.
Soo Line — No. 1 northern, 2; No. 2
northern, 18; No. 3, 8; rejected, 2; no
grade, «.
Northern Pacific—No. 1 northern, 11; No. 2
northern, 39; No. 3, 6; rejected, 2; no grade, 7.
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha —
Ko. 1 northern, 4; No. 2 northern, 43; No. 3,
82; rejected, 7; no grade, 15.
Totals—No. 1 hard, 1; No. 1 northern, 68;
No. 2 northern, 263; No. 3, 97; rejected, 36;
no grade, 106.
Other Grains—No. 2 winter wheat, 34 cars;
Ko. 3 yellow corn, 3; No. 3 white corn, 1;
No. 3 corn, 5; No. 4 corn, 1; no grade corn,
2; No. 3 white oats, 11; No. 4 white oats, 6;
No. 2 rye, 9; No. 3 rye, 1; No. 3 barley, 3;
No. 4 barley, 11; No. 5 barley, 7; no grade
barley, 1; No. 1 flax, 25; rejected flax, 39; no
grade flax, 4.
Cars Inspected Out—No. 1 northern wheat,
29; 2 northern wheat, 27, No. 3 wheat.
RANGE OF WHEAT PRICE IN MINNEAPOLIS '
Close Close Close
Open. High. Low. To-day. Yesterday. ' Year Ago.
May..? .72 $ .72%@72% $ .71%@72 $ .72% $ .72% $ .75%@76
Dec. .69*4 .69%@69% .69%@69% .69% .69%<g>69% .73 @73^
THE DAY'S RESULT
May Wheat. Minneapolis. Chicago. Duluth. ■ St. Louis. New York
Close to-day $.72% .7574 $.73% $ .77%@77% $ .81%
Close yesterday 72% .75% .73% .76% .80%
CLOSING CASH PRICES
On Track— 1 hard, 73% c; No. 1 northern, 70% c; No. 2 northern, 67%@63%c
to arrive, 67% c; No. 3. wheat, 63%@66%c. '
No. 1 flax, $1.42; No. 3 yellow corn, 60c.
No. 3 white oats, 41c; fs'o. 2 rye, 55% c.
Barley, 52c to 57c. .
34; rejected wheat, 6; no grade wheat, 34;
No. 3 white oats, 12; No. 4 white oats, 6; no
grade oats, 4; No. 4 barley, 5; No. 5 barley,
2; no grade barley, 3; No. 1 flax, 26; rejected
flax, 5.
lieceiptti iiutl Shipment*.
Nov. 19.
Received—Wheat, 601 cars, 525.580 bu; corn,
6,900 bu; oats, 24,750 bu; barley, 15,810 bu;
rye, 12.450 bu; flax, 38,990 bu; flour, 1,611 brls;
niillstuffs, 55 tons; huy, 123 tons; fruit, 301,
--010 lbs; merchandise, 1,971,121) lbs; lumber,
17 cars; posts and piling, 2 cars; barrel
stock, 2 cars; machinery, 150,100 lbs; coal,
1,651 tons; wood, 509 cords; brick, 10,000;
cement, 625 brls; household goods, 20,000 lbs;
pig iron, 27 cars; salt, 1 car; dressed meats,
28,670 lbs; raiiroad materials, 4 cars; sun
dries, 48 cars. Car lots, 1,075.
Shipped—Wheat, 75 cars, 62,250 bu; oats,
10,570 bu; barley, 5,600 bu; rye, 870 bu; flax,
1 4,750 bu; flour, 47,572 brls; millstuffs, 2,322
j tons; fruit, 113,750 lbs; merchandise, 2,422,110
I lbs; lumber, St> cars; posts aud piling, 22 cars;
machinery, 108,600 lbs; coal, 20 tons; cement,,
9 brls; household goods, 2o,00o; ties, 3 ears;
live stock, 1 car; linseed oil, 400 brls; oil
cake, 692,150 lbs; railroad materials, 4 cars;
sundries, 37 cars. Car lots, 842.
The Visible Supply.
New York, Nov. 20.—Special cable and
telegraphic advices to Bradstreet's shows the
following changes In available supplies from
the last account:
Wheat—United States and Canada, east of
the Rockies, increased 7,770,000 bu; afloat
for and in Europe, Increase 2,800,000 bu.
Total supply, increased 10,17u,000 bu.
Corn—United States and Canada, east of
the Rockies, decreased 590,001 bu.
Oats—United States and Canada, east of the
Rookies, decreased 1,457,000 bu.
Among the more important increases re
ported to Bradstreet's are those of 1,500,000
bu at northwestern interior elevators, 1,300,
--000 bu in Manitoba, 512,000 bu at Chicago
private elevators, 210,000 bu at Depot Har
bor and 52,000 bu at Portland, Maine.
The leading decrease is that of 150,000 bu
at Minneapolis private elevators.
"Wheat Movement,
Nov. 20.
The following are the receipts and ship
ments at the principal primary wheat mar
kets:
Receipts. Shipments.
Bushels. Bushels.
New York 17,100 67,071
Philadelphia 49,703 56,000
Baltimore 60,636 64,000
Toledo 8,998 , 1,000
Detroit 6,145 .None
St. Louis 19,000 16,000
Boston 26,761 44,167
Chicago 218,825 126,726
Milwaukee 48,800 2,640
Duluth 304,644 143,000
Minneapolis 528,880 62,250
Kansas City 36,000 42,300
Wheat Movement by Roads.
Nov. 19.
Received—Milwaukee, 207 cars; Omaha, 43;
St. Louis 36; Great Northern, 136; Burling
ton, 39; Soo, 77; Northern Pacific, 52; Chi
cago Great Western, 12.
Shipped—Milwaukee, 35 cars; Omah,a, 15;
St. Louis, 1; Great Northern, 10; Burlington,
9; Chicago Great Western, 5.
RAXGE MAY WHEAT
/g-3p //&> /*&> i.ijT
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7A 1 1—
OTHER GRAIN MARKETS
CHICAGO GRAIN
Wheat Opens Lower, but Improves
Immediately.
Chicago, Nov. 20.—The improvement ehown
in all grains at the close yesterday continued
to-day, December wheat opening %@%c low
er, at 71%@71^i-c, on lower cables, but at
once advanced on general improving condi
tions. Sales to Mexico were reported, the
northwest was buying May, and, though re
ceipts were still large, the crowd began to
bull the pit on the report of dry weather In
the winter-wheat country. The early trade '
was light, but a demand began to spring up
and, aided by strength In the other grains,
December soon sold up to 72c. Receipts, 66
cars; Minneapolis and Duluth reported 894,
a total for the three points of 950, against
671 last week and 564 a year ago.
December corn opened quiet, %c lower, at
59% c on cables. The crowd was inclined to
sell early, but an advance in oats sent shorts
to cover and December rose to 60% c. Re
ceipts, 89 cars.
Wheat was quiet toward the end of the ses
sion, but held well on a good speculative de
mand, December closing firm and %@%c
higher, at 72%@72%c
Close: November, 71% c; December, 71%@
71 Vie; May 75% c. Cash: No. 2 red, 73%@
|74% c; No. 3 red, 71%@72%c; Xo. 2 hard win-
I ter, 71%@72%c; Xo. 3 hard winter, 70%@
71% c; Xo. 1 northern spring, 72%@73%c; No.
12 northern spring, 70%@72c; No. 3 spring,
68® 70c.
Corn continued to show strength through
out the session, based largely on covering
and high prices at Kansas City. December
closed firm. %@%c higher, at 60%@60%c.
! Close: Xovember, 59% c; December, 60%
i(S6O%c; May, 63% c. Cash: Xo. 2, 60%@61c;
i No. 3, 60%@61c.
December oats opened unchanged at 39% c,
but the big improvement in the cash situation
started yesterday, still influenced the market,
I and buyers had to bid up to secure anything.
j Offerings were very scarce, though receipts
I were larger than estimated. December sold
| up to 40% cat the end of the first hour, but
sagged %c later on profit-taking. Receipts,
193 tons.
Close: November, 40% c; December, 40% -
May, 41%@41%''. Cash: Xo. 2, 41@41%c;
No. 3, 410.
The following was the range of prices:
Wheat— Dec. May. July.
1 Opening 71%@% 75%@%
Highest 72% 76
i Lowest 71% 75%
Close-
To-day 72%@% 75%
Yesterday 71% 75%
Year ago 71%@%
Corn-
Opening 69% 62%®%
Highest 60% 63%
Lowest 69%@% 62%
Close-
To-day 60%@% 63%@% 63%
Yesterday 59% 62%
Yfcar ago 35% 36%@%
Oats-
Opening 39%@% 41@40%
Highest 40% 41%
Lowest 39%@% 40%
Close-
To-day 40% 41% 37%
Yesterday 39% 41%
Year ago 21%@% 23%@24
Duluth Grain.
Duluth, Minn., Nov. 20.—Wheat was steady.
It opened off from last night's close at 69% c
December and same for May at 73% c. De
cember sold to 70c and back to 69% c, where
it closed. May sold to 73% c, and back to
73% c, and closed stronger at 73% c. Flax lost
%c for the day. Trading was brisk, demand
was good, but there is a lot of flax to be
absorbed.
Receipts—Wheat, 293 cars; oats 3; rye, 2;
barley, 10; flax, 142; total, 450. Shipments-
Wheat, 143,000 bu; corn, 1,850; flax, 628,488.
Close: No. 1 hard, cash, 73% c; No. 1
northern, cash, 70% c; to arrive and Decem
ber, 69^4 c; May, 73% c; No. 2 northern, 68% -
No. 3, 65% c; flax, cash, $1.42%; to arrive
$1.40%; Xovember, $1.42; December, $1.39-
May, $1.44; track, No. 1, $1.42%; oats, 39% c;
barley, 49c to 68c; corn, 60%; rye, 66% c.
New York drain.
New York, Nov. 20.—Flour—Receipts, 22,476
brls; sales, 4,250 pkgs; state and western
more active and steady; Minnesota patents,
[email protected]. Wheat—Receipt!, 17,000 bu; sales.
THE MINNEAPOLIS JOUKNAL.
1,785,000 bu. Opened easy with cables and
later railed sharply on the upturn in corn.
December, 79%@79%c; May, So 13-16@81 B-16c.
Rye steady; state, 63@64c c. i. f.. New York
car lots; No. 2 western, 66c, t. o. b afloat.
Corn—Receipts, 38,000 bu; sales, 75,000 bu;
opened easy but turned strong on covering
and a good outside demand; December, 67®
«7Vic-; May, 67%©67% c. Oats—Receipts, 123,
--700 bu; firmer on good shipping demand;
track, white, 42c.
Close: Wheat—December, 79% c; May, 31% c.
Corn—December, 67% c; May, 67% c.
Milwaukee Grain.
Milwaukee; Nov. 20.— Flour—Five cents
higher. Wheat— Close: No. 1
northern, 71%@72c; No. 2 northern, 70%@71c;
May, 75% - Rye—Steady; No. 1, 58% c. Bar
ley—Firm; No. 2, 69@59%c; sample, 50@59c.
Oats— Firm; No. 2 white, 43@43%c. Corn-
May, 63% c. .
Wheat—Puts, 75%@75%c; calls, 76«4@765bc.
Corn—Puts, 62% c; calls, 63% c.
Toledo Grain.
Toledo, Ohio, Nov. 20.—Wheat—Cash, 76% c;
December, 76% c; May, 79% c. Corn—Decem
ber, 62c; May, 6414 c. Oats— December, 41% c;
May, 42% c. Rye—sß%c. Clover Seed—De
cember, $5.46; March, $5.55. Timothy, $2.72%.
St. Louis Grain.
St. Louis, Nov. 20.—Wheat—Higher; No. 2
red cash, 73% c; December, 74c; May, 77%@
77% c; No. 2 hard, 72% c. Corn—Higher; No.
2 cash, 63% c; December, 62@62%c; May, 64% c.
Higher; No. 2 cash, 44c; December, 41%
@41% c; May, 43%@43%c; No. 3 white, 46c.
Chicago Seed and Coarse Grains.
Chicago, Nov. 20.—Flax—Cash, northwest
and No. 1 northwest, $1.46; November, $1.45 V&;
December, $1.44^; May, $1.47@)1.48. Rye-
Cash, 58% c; May, 62% c. Barley—Cash, 54
@61c. Timothy—March, $6.10. Clover, $8.85.
Liverpool Grain.
Liverpool, Nov. 20.—Close: Wheat—Spot,
No. 2 red western winter, steady, 5s lOd; No.
1 northern spring* steady, 5s 9*4 d; No. 1
California, firm, 5s lid. Futures steady; De
cember, os 9V4d; March, be 10% d. Corn—Spot
firm; American mixed, new, os 4^d; futures
steady; December, 5s 3%d; January, 5s 2%d;
.March, 5s l%d.
Kansas City Grain.
Kansas City, Nov. 20.—Wheat—December,
G7%c; May, 72V6c; cash No. 2 hard, 65%@69c;
Xo. 2 red, 72% c. Corn—December, 63% c; May,
C4%c; cash No. 2 mixed, 65V 2 @66c; No. 2
white, 66c. Oats—No. 2 white, 43%@44c.
MISCELLANEOUS
Cotton.
New York, Nov. 20.—Cotton opened steady
and I@4 points higher, on fair buying for
both accounts. Before 11 o'clock, January
was off to 7.50 c under scattered sales by
room longs, brought out by free port receipts
and a late bad turn of Liverpool. Southern
spot markets were steady to firm, with prices
unchanged to l-16c higher. At noon the mar
ket was dull but steady, with last night's bids
In vogue. Room sentiment was bullish, but
absence of new business checked buying.
Spot closed quiet; middling uplands 8c;
middling gulf, B%c. Sales, 116 bales.
Futures- closed steady; November and De
cember, 7.52 c; January, 7.51ej February, 7.49 c;
March, 7.50 c; April, May and June 7.50 c;
July, 7.47 c; August, 7.37 c.
Sugar and Coffee.
New York, Not, 20. —Sugar—Raw steady;
fair refining, 3 3-l«@3%c; centrifugal, 96 test,
3 11-16@3%c; molasses sugar, 3c; refined
steady; crushed, 5.40 c; powdered, 6c; granu
lated, 4.90e. Molasses—Steady. Coffee futures
opened steady, with prices s@lo points higher
on European, Wall street and "metal clique"
buying. Covering and professional support
helped sustain prices during the first half of
the session Trading ruled moderately active
to midday, sales reaching a total of 13,000
bags, including December at 6.50 c; January
at 6.60 c; March, 6.80 c; May, 6.95@7c; July,
7.15 c; August, 7.25 c; September, 7.35 c; Octo
ber, 7.35(g7.40c. Spot was quiet but steady
on the basis of 6%c for Rio No. 7 and B%c for
Santos No. 4, invoice lots.
Boston Mining, Stocks.
Boston, Nov. 20.—Adventure, 22@22%; At
lantic, 38%@39; Baltic, 43@45; Bingham, 29®
30; Calumet, 660@670; Centennial, 17%®'1S;
B. C, 13@14; Copper Range, 61@63; Daly
West, 30©32; Dominion Coal, 47%@48; Hum
boldt, 50@75; Isle Royale, 23%@24%; Massa
chusets, 23%@23%; Michigan, 14@14%; Mo
hawk, 41%@41%; Old Dominion, 26%@27; Os
ceola, 99Vi@99%; Parrott, 36%@57; Quincy,
150@168; Tamarack. 285@295; Tri-Mountain,
42@45; Trinity, 26%@26%; United States Min
ing, 16%@15%; Utah, 22%<g)23; Winona, 2@
2%; Wolverine, 57%@-58%; Wyandotte, I@l%.
Lead.
St. Louis, Nov. 20.—Lead—Firm, $4.27%.
Spelter—Strong, $4.12%.
Whisky.
Peorla, 111., Nov. 20.—Whisky—$1.31.
PROVISIONS
Chicagro Provisions.
Chicago, Nov. 20. —Provisions showed activ
ity again to-day at the start on a good mar
ket for a large run of hogs and on a good
speculative demand. Prices for January
were all unchanged at the opening, but Janu
ary pork advanced from $15.40 to $15.50; Jan
uary lard from $8.77% to $8.90, and January
ribs from $7.87% to $7.90. Close: Pork—Xo
vember and December, $14.25; January, $16.60;
! May, $15.85. Lard—Xovember, $8.90; Decem
ber, $5.87%; January, [email protected]%; May, $9.10.
Ribs—Xovember, $7.92%; January, $7.92%@
7.95; May, $8.12%.
New York: Provisions.
New York, Nov. 20.—Beef firm. Pork
strong; mess, [email protected]; family, $17.25®
17.50; Short clear, $17.50*519. Lard firmer;
prime western steam, $9.25.
SPECULATIVE GOSSIP
Chicago to Sowle: The northwest keeps up
its selling of wheat here, and receipts there
■continue large. Elevators are turning their
wheat from December to May at 3*4 c differ
ence—the widest spread so far. It has held
at that figure for two days and elevators ex
pect to see it 4c. Some of the large interests
have turned their wheat over into May at
3@3%c spread, but commission houses have
not been changers to any extent.
Liverpool—Wheat closed %d higher; corn
%d higher for the day.
Paris—Wheat closed s<Blo centimes higher;
flour, 3@15 centimes higher.
Antwerp closed unchanged.
Chicago to Lewis: Outside trade in wheat
increasing. Corn shorts have covered freely,
very little corn offering. Selling at present
mostly against calls.
Weather map this morning shows no rain
in the winter-wheat belt. It is generally
ciear west and northwest and southwest.
The temperatures are seasonable. There Is
some rain on the Pacific coast.
Total Clearances—Wheat, 231,000 bu; flour,
2,385 brls; corn, 35,000 bu; oats, 7,000 bu.
Wheat and flour equals 241,000 bu.
Broomhall cabled: Liverpool opened Inac
tive at %d advance, with practically no busi
ness being done. Later the nearby option
eased off an eighth on the large American
northwestern receipts. Corn was also very
dull at the opening, initial prices being Vfed
higher. This slight steadiness and a later
gain of %d in December was due to a fair
spot demand.
INVESTMENT GOSSIP
New York to Watson: "The market con
tinues to be held In check by the export of
money, but at all concessions there appears
to be vgery good buying, especially in the
Coalers and Tractions. Think the market
has very strong undertone and look for an
improvement after anxiety In regard to money
is over."
New York to Whallon: "There have been
some misgivings and anxiety concerning the
attitude the president will take with regard
to the trusts and industrial combinations in
his message to congress, which Is now ready.
Those who know him best frankly assert that
no anxiety need be felt concerning any legis
lation the president will recommend with ref
erence to the trusts aad industrial combina
tions.
STOCKS ARE QUIET
Small and Mixed Price Changes at
the Opening.
BUYING ORDERS BRING ADVANCE
Hut Little Business (» Trai
in the I NiiaJ Market
Leaden*."'
New York, Nov. 20.—The opening trading
in stocks was quiet and the price changes
were small and mixed. There was a firm
tone in the local traction stocks aud in St.
Louis and San Francisco second preferred.
American Smelting rose \V A , Otherwise the
changes were insignificant.
Large buying orders appeared in some of
the railroads, Coalers and specialties, and
prices all around advanced well above yes
terday's close. The improvement reached
from 1 to 1% in Sugar, Manhattan, Metro
politan Street Railway and New Jersey Cen
tral. Chicago Great Western preferred B
was sold down 2 points and St. Louis &
San Francisco first preferred half as much
but the last-named recovered. Toward 11
o'clock the general market became easier
In tone in sympathy with realizing in th*
Pacifies, Sugar and People's Gas, the last
named breaking 1%.
A renewed rise in the Coalers occurred
and many large blocks or the low-priced
stocks changed hands. New Jersey Central
extended its rise to 5, Lackawanna gained
2Vz. Delaware & Hudson 1% and Heading sec
ond preferred and Ontario & Western about
a point. There was a better tone generally
but changes were narrow and but little
business was transacted in the usual market
leaders. St. Louis & San Francisco common
and second preferred rose a point each.
Pressure against the transcontinental stocks
was resumed and their weakness gradually
permeated the general market, causing prices
to dip sharply. Losses of from 1 to 2 points
were made by St. Paul, Union Pacific, South
ern Pacific, Missouri Pacific, New York Cent
ral, Lackawanna, Reading second preferred,
Sugar, Manhattan, Metropolitan Street Rail
way, People's Gas and Locomotive. Some
buying to cover developed later and recoveries
of a small fraction were general. Chicago,
Indianapolis & Louisville advanced 1% and
local tractions rallied strongly, led by Man
hattan, which went higher thm before.
The junior Vauderbilt stocks became active j
and rose strongly, net gains reaching 3!
points in New York, Chicago & St. Louis com
mon, 1% in thf> second preferred, 2% in C, C,
C. & St. Louis and 2 in Lake Erie & Western ]
and Peoria & Eastern. New York Central and !
Canada Southern rallied 2% and 1" 3 respeo-!
tively above their forenoon lowest, and 500
shares of Michigan Central were bought at j
140. These movements strengthened the mar
ket elsewhere but there was little interest dis
played.
The pressure to sell overbore the buying
demand again and there were declines of 1 to 2
points in the principal stocks. People's Gas
fell to 98%, Sugar reacted 1%, Rock Island
1% and there were losses of a point or more
in the local tractions, some of the Coalers,
New York Central, Union Pacific, St. Paul
and Locomotive preferred. General Electric
rose L'% and Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault
Ste. Marie 2%. The heavy selling of People's
Gas unsettled the late market. The closing
was rather dull and easy.
Bonds were irregular. .'•■-.
Stock quotations reported for The Journal
by Watson & Co., Chamber of Commerce,
I Minneapolis, Minn. ■ r/- •
Closing figures are bid. .
I ~7~- ~) | —Close—
Sales i Stocks— Hi- | Lo- Bid. | Bid.
_ I ■__ est. | est. Nv.2o|Nv.l9
|Adams Exp ; 135 j 190
Am. Express 206 208
| Am. Cot. Oil ..! 27 27
i do pr j -..v '85 85
400 Am. Car 29%' 28% ; 28% 29
900 do pr ......V. i 85' : -84% 84% 84%
Am. Locomot . , 33% . 32% 32% 33%
do pr ....... : -89% 89 -89% 89%
Am. Ice .... -27.;;,. 26% 26% 27
Am. Linseed „ „ '..'..., 18 18
I do pr .:■• ..:.y:v: 47% 46%
6,500 Am. Sugar ..... 120% 118% 118% 118%
do ' pr ..'.. 115 116
Am.. Smelting 46% 45%
do pr 97% 97%
Am. Tobac. Pr 146
8,600 Amal. Cop ..... 86% 86% 86% 86%
: 200Anacon. Cop .. 34% 34% 34%; 34%
9,200 At., Top. & S.F. 80% 79% SO I 80%
3,200 do pr ....... 100% 100% 100% 100
1,300 Bait & Ohio .. 107% 106% 106% 107%
200 do pr 95 95
6,700 Brook. Rap. Tr. 69% 67% 68 68
I 100 Brunswick Co 10% 10%
3,400 Can. Southern . 84% 82% 83 82%
4,600 Canadian Pac . 115% 114% 114% 114%
4,700 : Ches. & Ohio 46% 46%
200 C. & E. 11l 135% 136%
500 Chi. & Alton ... 37% 37 37 37%
200 do pr 77 77%
2,000 Chi. Gr. West. 25% 25% 25 25%
100 1 do pr A ....„ 88% ......
2,400 do pr B .... 47. 46 46%.....:
Chi., Ind. & L. 48% 46% 48% 46
do pr 74% 74 74% 73%
C.,C.,C. & St.L. 99% 98% • 95% 96%
do pr ..:... 120 120
Chi. Term 20% 20% 20 20
do pr 37% 36% 37 37
Col. Fuel & Ir 91% 91%
do pr 128 128
100 Col. Southern .. 13% 13%
do Ist pr 54% 54%
do 2d pr 25% 25
700 Consol. Gas ... 222 220% 221% 220%
. Con. Tobac. Pr | 117 I
3,800 Del. & Hudson. 176% 174% 174% 174%
2,000 Del., Lack. &W. 242% 241% 242 240
Den. & Rio Gr. ..:.. 46% 46%
800 do pr 94% 94 94 94%
DesM. &RD. 39
do pr 100 "
Du., S. S. & At. 11%
do pr 21% 20% 20% 20%
4,300 Erie ... ....... 42% 42% 42% 42%
5,500 do Ist pr ... 73% 72% 72% 72%
3,000 do 2d pr .... 60% 59% 59% 59%
700 Evans. & T. H. 69%. 69 59 58
200 do pr : 80 82
100 Gen. Electric .. 259% 258 259 257%
100 Glucose 40 40%
I do pr 96% 96%
Great Nor. at. A 197 195% 196% 197
Hocking Valley.) 61% 61 61% 61%
do pr [ -78% 78%
2,000 Illinois Central 138% 138%
lowa Central 40% 40%
do pr .." 77% 77
. Inter. Paper... 20% 20%
I do pr........ ....: 75% 75%
200 Lake E. & W 71
i do pr 128
9,200 Louis. & Nash. 107% 106% 106% 106%
1,700|M.,5t. P. Si Soo 33% j32 33% 31%
I do pr. ......V 87% 186 87% 85%
10,400 Manhattan ..... 131%! 130% 130% 130$ i
27,500 Met. St. Ry.... 170% 168% 168% 168%
100 Minn. & St. L.. ...... ...... 107 107
I do .pr 120% 120
700 Missouri Pac... 101% 99% . 99% 100%
M., K. & T 25% 26
200 do _ pr. 52% 52 52 52%
Mexican Cent ..:... 21% 21%
Mex. Nat:...;...... 13% 13%
300 Nat. Biscuit 42% 42% 42 42%
•do pr ..■:■. 102% 103
200 Nat. Lead 1 19 19%
do . pr.... : 85 85
3,600 N. J. Central.. 182% 177% 182 177
Norfolk & West 57% 56% e57 "56%
do pr.:;:.... 90% 90% 90% 90%
North Am; Co.. 94 93% 93% 92 '
1,500 Nor. Pac pr .. 100% 100% | 100% 100%
300 Northwestern 208 208
do pr 230 230
N. Y. Air Brake 157 156 155 | 156
8,900 N. Y. Central 162% 162%
N.Y., C. & St.L. 52 49% 50%! 49
do Ist pr ... ...:.. ...... 115 115
do 2d pr .... 89 87%
Omaha pr ;.-. 194
' Ontario & W... 36% j 35% 36% 35%
900 Pressed Steel .. 43% 42% 43% 43% I
do pr 87 86%
Pacific Coast 68 63
700 Pacific Mail ... 47 46% 46% 46%
Perm. R. R .... 146% 146% 145% 145%
19,300 People's Gas .. 102% 98% 98% 101%
Pullman 1 ~ 216 216
4,7001 Reading ........ 49% 48% ' 48%! 48%
4,300 do Ist pr .... 79% 79 78% 79%
12,500 do :2d pr .... 59% 58% 58%! 58%
100 Repub. Steel .. 15% 15% 15%! 15%
100 do pr ....... .'.... 67% 67%
1,100 Rock Island ... 146% 145% 145 146%
St. L. & San F. 54% 53%
I' do Ist pr 81% 80
I do 2d pr .... 73% 71% 72%! 71%
. 100 St. L. & S. W. , 28% 27%
200 ■do . pr .60 59% 59 59%
10,000 St. Paul ....;... 169 167% 167% 168%
do pr 185 185
14,500 Southern Pac .. ,60% 59% • 60% 60
2,9oo'Southern Ry . 34% 33% 33% 33%
I do pr ...... 90% 89% 90 I 90%
300iTenn. Coal &I. . 63% 62% 62% 62%
1,500 Texas & Pac ... .41% 40% '40% 40%
Third Ay Ry... ..: .'.. 120 | 120
Twin City R Tr ..;.......:. 105% 105%
8,000 Union Pacific .. 104% | 102% 102% 103%
3,200 do pr 91% 90%*90% . 91%
. ■ U. S. Express 1 94 - 94%
U. S. Leather .............. 11% n%
. do pr .."........:........ 81% 81.
*U. S. Rubber .j j j 15% .15%
. do; pr ■„'....■... ...... ...;.'. , 50 - ;.sO™,
12.60010. ?S.^. Steel ... .V 42%; , 42 ? f. •, 42 •■ i ,42%
- ■ -■ ■ ■ .
8,600| do pr 92% 92 92 92%
3l)0| Wabash 20% 20% 20% 20%
POO do pr 36% 37%
|Wells-Far. Exp 190 190
l,ooo| Western Union. 91*4 90% 90% 90%
,'Wheel. & L. E 18 18%
I do Ist pr ...| 5u 61
j do 2d pr 1 30 30%
Wisconsin Cent 21% 21% 21 21
62°J__ d.°__Pr_- •- ■ ••■! 43 42% 42 42M,
Total sales. 653.800.
LONDON FINANCIAL
Couola and Quotations of American
Securities. ~
London, Nov. Consols for money, 91%;
for- the account, 91 13-16.
Anaconda, 7%; Atehison, 82%; Atchison pre
ferred, 162%: Baltimore Ohio, 110; Canadian
Pacific. 117%; Chesapeake & Ohio, 47%; Chi
cago Great, Western, 26; Chicago, Milwaukee
& St. Paul, 173; Denver & Rio Grande, 47%;
Denver & Rio Grande preferred. 96%; Erie.
43%; Erie-first preferred, 74%; Erie second
preferred.. Go%; Illinois Central, 142; Louis
ville & Nashville, 109%; Missouri,. Kansas &
Texas, 26%; Missouri,. Kansas & Texas pre
ferred, 55%; New York Central, 166; Norfolk
& Western. 58; Norfolk & Western preferred,
92%; Northern 5 Pacific preferred, 103%; Onta
rio & Western, 36%; Pennsylvania, 74%; Read
ing, 24%; Reading first preferred, 40%; Read
ing second preferred, 30; Southern way,
34%; Southern Railway preferred, 92; South
ern Pacific, 61% c; Union Pacific, 107%; Union
Pacific preferred, 93%; United . States • Steel,
44%; United States Steel preferred. 94%; Wa
bash, 21; Wabash preferred, 38%; Spanish '4s.
69%; Rand Mines, 10; De Beers, 39%.
Bar silver, flat, 26 l-16d per oz.
Money, 2%@3V4 per cent. The rate of dis
count in the open market for short bills is
3 3-16@3 5-16 per cent; three months bills, 3%
@3% per cent. . ;.,-v
Gold premiums are quoted as follows: Bue
nos Aires, 132.20; , Madrid, 82; Lisbon, 35.75;
Rome, 2.40. ■ ' . ".
Bullion amounting to £7,000 was withdrawn
from the- Bank of England to-day for ship
ments ta Gibraltar, etc.
New York Bonds.
New York, Nov. 20.—
United States refunding 2s, registered... .108%
United States refunding 2s, coupon 108%
United States 3s, registered 108
United States 3s, coupon 108%
United States new 4s, registered 139
United States new 4s coupon 139
United States old 4s, registered 112%
i United States old 4s, coupon 112 Vi
| United States ss, registered 107
i United States ss, coupon 107
i Aichison general 4s 103%
Atchison adjustment 4s 93%
Baltimore & Ohio 4s 1u3%
Baltimore & Ohio 3%s 96%
1 Baltimore & Ohio converted 4s 107%
Canada Southern 2s 109*4
Central of Georgia 5s 106
Central of Georgia first Inc 72
Chesapeake & Ohio 4%s 107%
Chicago & Alton 3%s 85%
Chicago, Burlington & uincy new 4s 98%
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Gen. 45..11 l
Chicago & North-Western consol 7s . ...135%
Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific 4s 107
C. C, C. & St. Louis Gen. 4s 104
Chicago Terminal 4s 90
Colorado & Southern 4s 88%
Denver & Rio Grande 4s (bid) 103
Erie general 4s 100
Erie General 4s 89%
Fort Worth & Denver City Ist 107
Hocking Valley 4V 2 s 107%
Louisville & Nashville unified 4s 102%
Mexican Central 4s 82
Mexican Central Ist Inc 29%
■Minneapolis & St. Louis 4s 103
Missouri, Kansas & Texas 4s 100%
Missouri, Kansas & Texas 2ds 82
New York Central lsts 105%
New York Central general 3%s 108%
New Jersey Central gen. 5s 131 %
Northern Pacific 4s 105%
Northern Pacific 3s 72%
Norfolk & Western consol 4s 102%
Reading general 4s 99%
St. Louis & Iron Mountain consol ,5s 116
St. Louis & San Francisco 4s 95
St. Louis Southwestern lsts 97
St. Louis Southwestern seconds 80
San Anionio & Aranaas Pass 4s 88%
Southern Pacific 4s ". 94%
Southern Railway os 120%
T^xas & Pacific firsts 120
Toledo, St. L. & Western 4s 81 %
Union Pacific 4s 106%
Union Pacific cony. 4s 106%
Wabash firsts 118%
Wabash seconds (offered) 111%
Wabash deb. B 59%
West Shore 4s 113
Wheeling & Lake Erie 4s 92
Wisconsin Central 4s 88%
Con. Tob. 4s 64
MONEY MARKETS
NEW YORK, Nov. 20.—Close: Money on call
firm at 4<&'4% per cent; last loan 4. Prime mer
cantile paper, 4%@0 per cent. Sterling ex
change, firm, with actual business in bankers'
bills at $4.88 for demand and at $4.84%@4.84%
for 60 days. Posted rates, $4.85% and 54.89.
Commercial bills, [email protected]%. Bar silver,
st»%c: Mexican dollars, 45c. Government
bonds strong; railroad bonds irregular; state
bonds steady. Exchanges, $249,817,657; bal
ances. $10,614,062.
MINNEAPOLIS—Bank clearings, $2,933,
--496.46; New York exchange, selling rate, 25c
premium; buying rate, 25c discount; Chicago
exchange, selling rate, 20c premium; buying
rate, 30c discount; London sixty-day sight
documentary, $4.54%.
ST. PAUL—Clearings, $1,083,176.75.
PARIS, Nov. 20.—Three per cent rentes, 101
francs 10 centimes for the account. Exchange
on London, 25 francs 17 centimes for checks.
Spanish 4s, 70.97%.
BERLIN, Nov. 20. —Exchange on London,
20 marks 44% pfennigs, for checks. Discount
rates: Short bills, 2 per cent; three months'
bills, 2% per cent.
PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 20.—Clearings, $21,
--035,675; balances, $3,030,801. Money, 4%@5 per
cent.
CHICAGO, Nov. 20.—Clearings, $28,304,648;
balances, $3,603,388. Posted exchange, $485%
@4.89; New York exchange, 16c to 20c pre
mium.
$22,427,752; balances,
Prominent Man Accused.
Special to The Journal.
Jamestown, N. D., Nov. 20.—Frank Genzel
had some flax stolen from his granary, north
east of Jamestown. Some of the flax was
sold at Jamestown and some in Wimbledon.
A warrant for the arrest of a Splritwood lake
man was Issued, but he could not be found.
The affair has created a sensation, as the sus
pected man is prominent.
Good Year for Millers*.
Special to The Journal.
Fargo, N. D., Nov. 20.—The North Dakota
Millers' Association held a regular meeting
here and the attendance was large. Several
Minnesota millers were present, including
some from the twin cities. The association
reports satisfactory business, with all mills
running full time. Despite the fact that the
wheat is somewhat off grade, on account of
the wet weather early in the fall, it is of
much better quality than that which the mill
ers were able to secure last fall.
Bigr Cattle Shipments.
Special to The Journal.
Mandan, N. D., Nov. 20. —Shipments of cat
tle have been unusually large this fall. The
nutritious quality of grasses has greatly Im
proved stock, and feeders originally intended
for another season of grazing are being
shipped as mature beef.
Meddlers Not Wanted.
Special to The Journal.
Bismarck, N. D., Nov. 20.—Much feeling
prevails in all parts of the state against two
disturbers who claim to represent James Ben
nett of Brooklyn «nd are searching county
records for defects in legal documents relat
ing to tenure of land that is now valuable.
Many discrepancies no doubt exist, and
trouble could easily be stirred up for old
settlers. In many localities, the citizens have
threatened to use violence when the presence
of the men was known.
MeElwain's Trial Commenced.
Special to The Journal.
Yankton, S. D., Nov. 20.—1n the circuit
court, the case of George McElwain, for the
murder of John Gray, in a saloon row at Gay
lord, was called. A Jury was secured and
the taking of testimony was begun at the af
ternoon session. The case will probably last
the greater part of the week. George W.
Argo, of Sioux City, is assisting the prosecu
tion and FTench & Orvis, of this city are the
defendant's attorneys.
New Mining: Companies.
Special to The Journal.
Pierre, S. D., Nov. 20.—Articles of incor
poration have been filed for the Unity Con
sumers' company, at Pierre, with a capital
of $100,000; incorporators. Henry T. Crapo,
Ashton W. Davis, William P. Davis, L. L.
Stevens and F. A. Stevens. For the Mala
chite Copper-Gold Mining company, at Pierre,
with a capital of $1,000,000; incorporators, S.
A. Barrett, A. P. Hays, F. W. Stoddard,
James B. Cook, William F. Harris, Oscar
Nelson, M. A. Goodner and G. W. Sanders.
For the Worcester County Gold Mining com
pany, at Pierre, with a capital of $1,000,000;
incorporators, George A. Emery, C. M. Law
son and G. W. Sanders. For the W. J. Gib
sou company, at Huron, with a capital of
$100,000; incorporators, W. J. Gibson, Alva
L. Ringo and Philip Lawrence.
Kindred's Second Route.
Kindred, N. D., Nov. 20.—A second rural
maiL route has been established, to run west
of town, and will soon be In operation. There
is a movement to establish the third route,
to run south of town, and the farmers in
that locality feel confident of securing it.
HOGS ARE UP IOC
Despite a Very Liberal Marketing
£ very where.
THE RECEIPTS TOTAL 90,000
Liberal Sheep Receipts With Prices
Steady With Venter
day's.
South St. Paul, Minn., Nov. 20.—Receipts
to-day were about 300 cattle, 50 calves, 2,500
hogs and 4,000 sheep.
The following table shows the receipts from
Jan. 1, 1901, to date, as compared with the
same period a year ago:
Year. Cattle.Calves. Hogs.Sheep.Horses.Car*.
1901 .... 42,850 32,881 490.K86 281,590 15,126 14,196
1900 ....158,346 41.694 413,319 448,727 26,521 15,259
Dec .... 15,496 8,812 167,137 11,395 1,063
Inc 77,667
The following table shows the receipts for
the month of November to date, as compared
with the same period a year ago:
lear. Cattle.Calves. Hogs.Sheep.Horses.Cari.
1901 .... 13,128 1,494 61,110 56,585 242 1,418
1900 .... 11,581 8,471 37,816 56,603 467 1,194
I}ec 977 225
Inc 1,547 13,294 912 ... 224
Receipts-
Date. Cattle. Calves. Hogs. Sheep. Cars.
Isov. 13 .... 964 62 3,870 7,294 114
Nov. 14 .... 237 S4 2,614 11,107 93
Nov. 15 .... 209 155 2,377 370 43
Nov. 16 .... 39 8 2.057 132 23
Nov. 18 .... 857 35 2,556 7,525 303
Nov. 19 .... 823 83 3,984 1,068 84
Estimated receipts by cars to-day of the
railroads centering at these yards: Chicago
Great Western, 1; Chicago, Milwaukee & St.
Paul, 9; Minneapolis & St. Louis, 5; -Chicago,
St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha, 28; Great
Northern, 5; Chicago, Burlington & Quincy,
3; Wisconsin Central, 2; Northern Paciflc, 15;
total, 69.
Disposition of stock Tuesday, Nov. 19:
Firm— Cattle. Hogs. Sheep.
Swift & Co 425 2,962 2SI
Cudahy Bros., Milwaukee... 938
W. K. McCormick 10
Slimmer & Thonms 14
Hankey Brothers 28
J. E. Boltou 8
Peter Evans 8
J. B. Fitzgerald 20
Leo Gottfried 6 131
W. E. Bronson 6 53
Louis Hertz 1
B. Kasewitsi 4
J. H. Woolphy 2
R. N. Katx 1
King Brothers 54
J. R. King 7
J. T. McMillan ' 81
Weirs 66
Other buyers 13
Country buyers 562 731
Totals 1,085 4,051 1,267
CATTLE—Receipts here were again limited
to only a few head. Eastern supplies were
quite liberal, with prices generally showing
more weakness. There was a good, strong
demand here for all grades of killers, and
buyers were ready to pay prices fully as
high, with cases considered a shade higher
than last week's close. Veals were in good
demand at prices about steady.
There was very little business done In the
stocker and feeder division. Prices ruled
about steady. Sales:
Butcher Cows and Heifers—
No. Ay. Price. jNo. Ay. Price.
1 1,140 $3.40 ! 3 860 $3.35
3 936 3.00 3 873 3.00
1 940 3.00 1 1,160 2.70
1 840 2.50 1 1,054 2.55
1 770 2.00 1 890 1.90
1 9JIO 1.85 6... 935 1.50
1 970 1.50|| 1 770 1.25
Milkers and Springers—
3 cows and 3 calves for $75.
1 cow and 1 calf for $30.
1 cow and 1 calf for $29.
Feeding Bulls-
No. . Ay. Price
1 1,110 $2.25
Stockers and Feeders—
No. Ay. Price. 11 No. Ay. Price.
8 699 $3.00jl 1 740 $3.00
11 689 2.00| | 5 822 300
3 886 2.85|| 4 682 2.55
1 450 2.75|l 3 640 2.50
2 725 2.40|i 1 610 2.40
1 560 2.25|| 5 6SB 2.25
1 730 2.25|
1 1.110 2.25 M
Feeding Cows and Heifers —
No. Ay. Price.'HNo. Ay. Price.
6 405 $2.60 I 3 520 $2.60
4 720 2.50 | 4 622 2 50
2 760 2.50 2 700 240
1 Jersey.. 470 1.75;
Veal calves —
No. . Ay. Price
5 126 $5.00
HOGS—There was another very liberal mar
keting of hogs at all market points to-day.
Receipts at prominent markets totaled about
90,000, against 82,900 last Wednesday and 76,
--200 a year ago to-day. While prices at all
i other markets were only quoted a shade
stronger, sales here ruled fully 10c above
yesterday's average trading. Best on sale
sold from $5.50 to $5.65, with mixed grades
selling from [email protected] and common, rough
packers around $5.30. Sales:
Hogs—
No. Ay. Price. I No. Ay. Price.
57 328 $5.80 !108 167 $5.60
79 224 5.60 |83 207 5.55
58 188 5.55 iB4 193 5.55
87 194 5.55 61 200 5.55
78 18."> 5.55 27 202 5.55
53 206 5.50 110 171 5.50
46 189 5.50 110 164 5.50
15 138 5.35 |
Common Rough Packers —
No. Ay. Price. ] No. Ay. Price
3 406 $5.35 3 403 $5.30
3 356 5.30 1 440 5.30
3 360 5.20 3 346 5.00
SHEEP—Receipts were very liberal. Offer-
Ings consisted largely of feeders consigned
direct to feed lots. There was only a fair
Inquiry for fat kinds at prices about steady
with yesterday's trade. Sales:
Sheep—
No. Ay. Price.
37 lambs : 74 $3.75
50 lambs 80 3.75
16 stock lambs 82 3.60
94 stock lambs 54 3.25
44 sheep 108 3.00
4 sheep 132 3.00
8 stock lambs 106 2.25
1 buck 160 2.25
On the market: C. J. Gummelgaard, Ells
worth, Wis.; Maiden Rock Love Stoc? com
pany. Maiden Rock, Wis.; Guy C. Perkins,
Cokato; Carver Brothers & Co., Morristown;
Schneider Brothers, Charles Huber, Alma,
Wis.; M. Kinsella, Glasgow; Goodrich &
Harkness, Durand, Wis.; Mabey & Jacobs,
Lake City; L. Rausch. Howard Lake; E.
Mark Live Stock company, Princeton.
Sioux City Live Stock.
Sioux City, loWa, Nov. 20.—Receipts—Cattle,
900; hoga, 4,500; sheep, 100. Hogs—Fully 5c
higher. Sales:
No. Ay. Price.
69 232 $5.50
65 232 5.55
6ft 305 5.60
59 276 6.65
Cattle—Steady. Sales:
No. Ay. Prie?
4 beeves ;. ...1,202 $4.75
36 beeves 1,202 5.35
8 beeves 1,302 5.60 |
18 cows 1,012 3.00
5 cows 798 3.25
15 cows 990 3.75
9 stockers 780 2.50
11 utoekers 800 3.25
9 stockers 1,100 3.60
9 yearlings 520 2.50
14 yearlings 605 3.25
8 yearlings 550 3.20
Sheep—Steady. Sales:
No. Ay. Price
20 lambs 75 |4.00
104 yearlings 88 3.25
Chicago Live Stock.
Chicago, Nov. 20.—Cattle—Receipts, 22,000,
including 500 westerns; good to prime, $6.20
@7.10; poor to medium, $4@6; stockers and
feeders, [email protected]; cows, [email protected]; heifers.
SYLVESTER STRONG, H. L. KAHRIOK B.*G. WILLIAMS, X. E. GARDNER.
President Vice Prudent, - Secretary. TroMuror.
S. STRONG& COMPANY
" (Incorporated.) .. ; ;
Grain Commission Merchants
: Grain Sold by Sample Diroot to Mills.
niNNEAPOLIS, >J Office* In CMtmiro Office
UOLUTM. • V t Chamber of Com more* .r!!?^.!^.^* :
niLWAUKBB. l« Buildings . . it! Rhilto BullJlng,
WOODWARD & CO.
«H««n^:' QjRAIN COMMISSION BU»™
83AMCHE3—Cliicago ana Mliraoke*. Orders for tutus* d«mr«rr execut«l la all markUfc i
'. ' ' ..■■■.". .-■'. ■■:■. : .' ' „--:'-■' .■' - " ' ' ' ' ■' —■...- ■■.;■._
.
J. F. WHALLON. QBO. C. BAGL.EY.
GEO. P. CASE. CHAS. M. CASE.
£«s£©.
STOOKS, GRAIN, PROVISIONS,
i New York Stock Exehanga'
MEMBERS-! Ohloago Board of Trad*.
' HpSs. Chamber Oommeroo
Private Wli-m to How York and Shlcum
18 Chamber of Commerce.
Vermilye&Co
BANKERS,
Nassau and Pine Sts., New York;
13 Congress Street, Boston.
Dealers In
U. S. GOVERNMENT BONDS
and other
INVESTMENT SE6URITIES
Deposits Received and Interest Allowed oi
Balances subject to draft at sight.
?1.50@5; canners, [email protected]; bulls, [email protected];
calves, [email protected]; western steers, [email protected].
Hogs—Receipts to-day, 46,000; to-morrow,
40,000; left over, 7,33 ii; steady to strong;
mixed and butchers, [email protected]; good to choice
heavy, [email protected]; rough heavy, $5.35(50.55;
light, $5.25®0.50; bulk of sales, [email protected].
Sheep—Receipts 22,000; weak; lambs, steady
to lower; good to choice wethers, $3.40@4;
fair to choice mixed. [email protected]: western
sheep, $3(ij4; native lambs, [email protected]; wes
tern lambs, [email protected].
Official yesterday: Receipts—Cattle, 6,606;
hogs, 45.744; sheep, 24,263. Shipments—Cat
tle, 2,360; hogs, 4,235; sheep, 7.275.
South Omaha Live Stock.
South Omaha, Nov. 20.—Cattle—Receipts,
4,500; strong; beef steers, $4^0.60: Texans,
$3.<[email protected]; cows and heifers, [email protected]; stock
ers and feeders, $L'[email protected].
Hogs—Receipts, 12,000; steady to 10c high
er; heavy, [email protected]; mixed, [email protected]; pigs,
$4.50® 5.50.
Sheep—Receipts, 10,000; slow, lower; sheep
[email protected]; lambs, [email protected].
. Kansas City Live Stock.
Kansas City, Xov. 20.—Cattle—Receipts,
11,000; steady; beef steers, $4.50®6.10; Tex
ana, [email protected]; cows and heifers, $1.8o@5;
stockers and feeders, $304.10.
Hogs—Reeipts, 20,000: strong; heavy, $5.85®
5.95; pakers, [email protected]; yorkers, [email protected];
pigs, $4.25@5.
Sheep—Reeipts, 6,000; steady; sheep, $2.50
@4; lambs, [email protected].
St. LouiH Live Stock.
St. Louis, Nov. 20.—Cattle—Receipts, 4,000;
steady; beef steers, [email protected]; Texans, $3@
5.40; stockers and feeders, [email protected]<J; cows
and heifers, $2@5.
Hogs—Receipts, 20,000; strong; heavy, $5.85
@5.95; packers, [email protected]; yorkers, [email protected];
ers, [email protected].
Sheep—Receipts, 6,000; steady; sheep, $2.50
sheep, [email protected]; lambs. [email protected].
Kirhy-Carpenter Out of It.
Special to The Journal.
Menominee, Mich., Nov. 20. —The Kirby,
Carpenter company sawed It last log last
night. The company has been in existence
forty-five years and has cut over 4,000,000,000
feet since it started. Its best year's cut was
150,000,000 feet.
Suspected Horse Thief Caught.
Special to The Journal.
Lake Preston, S. D., Nov. 20.—Deputy
Sheriff Peterman received a message from the
sheriff at Waseca, Minn., saying that the
latter had captured the thief who stole a
team and buggy from A. M. Pultz, northeast
of here, about two weeks ago.—The derrick
and machinery are in position over the city
well and work will now be pushed.
Mast Sustain an Operation.
Special to The Journal.
Winona, Minn., Nov. 20.—After a consul
tation of physicians, it has been decided best
to undertake an operation for appendicitis
in the case of Rev. S. F. Kerfoot, pastor of
the Central Methodist church in thia city.
The operation will be undertaken at the Wi
nona hospital thia week.
•"orster Does 3>ot CJive L'p.
Special to The Journal.
Winona, Minn., Nov. 20. —The Winona and
Houston county road case, which was recent
ly decided by the supreme court of the state
in favor of the commissioners of these coun
ties as against the petitioner, William Forster.
is not yet settled. A petition for a rehear
ing has been filed by the attorneys of the
appellant and a stay or proceedings granted.
Chas. H. F. Smith & Co.
MEMBERS OF THE
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE and
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE.
Room 34&, Cham, of Commerce Bldg.
Telephone, Main 1195.
riinneapolU, - Minnesota.
T£OKAB & Co
Grain Commission ani Stole Brokers.
Write for our dally market letter, which we
mall FREE on application.
Members Minneapolis Chamber of Com
merce. Telephone—Main 1897-J.
S OHAMBER OF OOMKKRSK.
Watson & Co
BfOkofa In Grain, Provisions,
Stooks and Bonds,
Members N. Y. Stock Exchange
Chicago Corroipondents— Schwartz. Dupse&Co.
Private wire Chloajto <t New York. Tel. M 6 Main
35 Chamber of Qommoroo*
.
13

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