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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, November 26, 1901, Image 15

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1901-11-26/ed-1/seq-15/

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14
Ginter Grocery Co.
23 Sixth Street So.
Groceries Direct to Consumer at Wholesale Prices.
We Want You to Know
we do not quote prices on any article and then add the words "and
up", as that is misleading and signifies no limit in price you are
expected to pay
We Have Set the Pace
in this city, with low prioes and our competitors may vainly try to fol
low us. Even wholesale grocers find it a squeeze to meet our prices.
Mo Second Grades Here
Everything first quality, and we are satisfied
With Small Profits.
Our system of service inaugurated in the city of Boston,
V.ass., where three grand and busy stores hum today with the
activity of selling
'£QOD GROCERIES IN SMALL QUANTITIES
Are monuments of our faithful efforts to give to you household
necessities AT LEAST EXPENSE.
This is the way— dribs, no wastes, less clerk hire, aad a disci
pline of system that works like a charm. '
SEND FOR OUR COMPLETE PRICE LIST.
Young: Turkeys 10c Butter, fresh from the creamery,
Geese 9c 5-lb jars $1.25
Mixed Nuts, new and fine, 5 lbs 6Oc Granulated Sugar, per 100 lbs $5.00
California Figs, 3 1-lb pkgs 25c Sunlight Flour, per bag $1.80
Clean Currants, 3 lbs 250 Warranted by ourselves and the Na-
Three-erowi! Muscatel Raisins, new tional Milling Co. as good as any in the
and tine, 10 lbs 7Oc United States.
Citron Leghorn, 3 lbs 35c Mince Meat, 10-lb palls 80e
Edam Cheese 750 j Very fine. •
Good Prunes. 10 lbs 35c j Fine Evaporated Peaches, 6 lbs 50c
C'offeeii. Teas.
Our Mocha and Java brands, famous | We handle only the choicest pickings, di
faniwus throughout the United States. red from the finest gardens. Many who
F,b «ans 91.00 i could not °rd» the best Quality can
Our \oa" 3Blend- 5° i Finest sun-d or basket-fired,
Mb cans 1.00 i»| \l s 7.7.7.7;.7."7."; 7 VV"SB
3Vi-2b cans 50 Finest Garden* Flower Formosa bo- "
This coffee is a very fine quality and can- long. J2 l,js lbs ?1.00
not be bought at retail for less than 20c ._?'* lb» .. 50
to 25c per pound I Finest English Breakfast, 2% lbs.. 1.00
Hi lbs 50
8-pound cans, good blend $1.00 \ 2 lbs fancy Pekoe Ceylon 1 00
We will send FREE a generous sample of j 1 lb 50
of our TEA OR COFFEE to any one 12-lb chests Basket-fired Ooolong
who will ask for it. We know they or English Breakfast .... 390
will sell from the sample. Call for samples.
BIG GRAIN SHIPMENTS
frY THE ALL-RAIL, ROUTE EAST
X,ast Week's Shipments Ahead of
Those of Any Week: Since
June.
Chicago reports that east-bound grain
Shipments by the all-rail houtes last week
•were the heaviest for any week since the
second week in June. They amounted to
2,267,000 bushels, a gain of 287,000 bushels
over the previous week, and of 432,000
bushels over the corresponding week last
year. Flour shipments were the heaviest
since the second week of May. They
. amounted to 130,835 barrels, an increase
of 2,030 barrels over the previous week
and 90,572 barrels over the correspond- |
Ing week last year. Provision shipments
amounted to 92,627 tons, a decrease of
1,177 tons from, the previous week and a
gain of 15,625 tons over the corresponding
•week last year.
The week was memorable because in it
the Pennsylvania loaded a number of its
100,000 pound grain cars, the first of that
size brought into this section by any of
the roads. Owing to the scarcity of cars
the roads are now allowing shippers to
load cars 10 per cent in excess of the ca
pacity marked on them, so that these
large cars were loaded with fifty-five tons
of grain each.
Among the western roads the Milwaukee
& St. Paul retained its place at the head
of the list so far as the amount of grain
• taken into Chicago was concerned. It
brought 30 s>er cent of the whole. The
Burlington took a bound from fourth to
second place, bringing 18 per cent of the
total receipts. The Chicago & North
western brought 13 per cent, the Rock
Island 8, the Illinois Central 6, the Chi
cago Great Western 4 and the Santa Fe 2.
The percentages of the Illinois Central,
the Santa Fe and the Rock Island are
smaller than they would have otherwise
been were it not that much of the grain
they are hauling is consigned by way of
the gulf ports.
TO DISCUSS COMPILATIONS
"Western Railroad Presidents to Meet
in New York.
Denver, Col., Nov. 26.—Presidents of all
■western * railroads meet in New York on
Dec. 5. President Frank Trumbull, of the
Colorado & Southern leaves for the con
ference Thursday. This meeting, which
"will be one of the most important in the
listory of western railroading, has been
Called mainly for. three purposes:
First— discuss the probable effect the
JhL tTBAOE UABKI
one-sixth pure glycerin, and
containing vegetable oils, is
transparent.
Carries the perfume of nat
ural flowers. Most delightful
for toilet.
A trial of it will convince
you that nothing better can be
made for use on skin or hair.
aa JAMES S. KIRK & COMPANY
vast railway consolidations will have upon
state legislatures.
Second—To devise measures to meet the op
position threatened from many quarters over
the country against the proposed combination
of railroad systems. Leading attorneys for
railroad corporations will present their views
through short written reports submitted by
the presidents.
Third—Maintenance of freight rates.
THE PASS SYSTEM
| Western Managers Will Meet to Dis
enss Eastern Action.
The abolition of the pass system by
many of the eastern lines will be dis
cussed at a meeting of the general man
agers of western lines at Chicago next
week. The eastern roads have notified
the western lines that there wil be no ex
change of annual passes the coming year,
and no issue of free transportation to any
one. This makes the pass system a live
issue in railroading. The eastern lines
have notified their representatives to pay
cash while traveling on western lines,
and about all that remains for the latter
to do is to take the same action toward
the eastern systems.
Western lines several weeks ago decid
ed to continue the pass system with cer
tain limtations. This action of the east
ern lines puts a new face on the question.
Gets Big: Log Contract.
The Omaha road has secured the contract
for hauling 50,000,000 feet of pine logs from
northern Wisconsin to Hudson. Sidetracks
and other facilities are being constructed
along the shore of Lake St. Crolx, where the
logs will be unloaded. It will require over
two years steady hauling to complete the
contract. The Central Lumber company of
Hudson, which will receive the logs, has
hitherto had its supply rafted down the St. |
Croix, but low water has greatly hindered the
work in. late years.
C. S. Fee's Anniversary.
Charles S. Fee, general passenger agent of
the Northern Pacific railway, yesterday com
pleted twenty-four years in that position. He
has been connected with the Northern Pacific
for twenty-six years continuously. The two
porters first employed by Mr. Fee are still in
the service of the company.
Where Minot People Stand.
Special to The Journal.
Minot, N. D., Nov. 2C— The people of Minot
are intensely interested in the proposed mer
ger of the Great Northern and Northern Pa
cific roads, through the Northern Securities
company. The decided stand taken by Gov
ernor Van Sant, of Minnesota, is indorsed,
and public sentiment is strongly in favor of
immediate and vigorous action upon the part
of Governor White and the state authorities.
The railroad combine has always controlled
legislation in this state, and people here
seem to think that relief can only come
through the medium of national legislation.
Candy Made in Sight.
Home made Candies at Yerxa's.
POUND THE BOARD
- .
Ancient Enemies of the System Cut
Loose in lowa.
IT'S LATE REPORT GAVE A CHANCE
Certain Stricture as to the College
at Amei May Be Mod
ified.
Special to The Journal.
Dcs Moiries, lowa, Nov. 25. —The first
serious outbreak of criticism that has
been directed against the board of con
trol of state Institutions has come about
recently.
That which has Invited the attack on the
board consists mainly in criticisms in its
biennial report of the educational institu
tions. In particular, the board reflected
in plain terms on certain practices at the
lowa State college at Ames. The trustees
were criticized for paying a bill of $200
that went to meet the expenses of mem
bers of the faculty while living in Dcs
Moines hotels and lobbying before the
legislature for appropriations.
The system of paying for banquets and
other entertainments at the educational
Institutions out of state funds also came
in for a share of the board's criticism, as
well as various other matters which the
members of the board of control thought
smacked to much of loose buslnes meth
ods.
The board "was created after a bitter
(but vain fight against it by the disciples
of the old, separate trus'te system. Slnqe
its' creation it has met with such unex
pected sm?ces3 in the management of state
institutions that is enemies have found
scarcely any vulnerable points.
But the strictures on the conduct of
things at the educational institutions
have called forth columns of harsh ob
| servations and for the first time in its
I career the board is finding itself dished
I up with a dressing of editorial jibes and
I invectives such as one may see rarely.
For the most part, these attacks pro
i ceed from the ancient enemies of the
i board of control system. Starting in with
I belaboring the board for being captious
! with the 'board of trustees of the educa
tional institutions, these opponents also
I criticize the board for being prejudiced
I against the system of county institutions
j for the insane and assault whatever is in
; sight that seems to Invite being scored.
Probably the most absurd of these at
j tacks is that made on the board because
I some weeks ago it -ventured to please the
i young women at the Mitchellville reform:
j school by purchasing a quantity of mor-
I tar boards and uniforms such as are fa
| miliar in colleges.
j Now the board is being raked over hot
J coals for this, and is accused of recklessly
I trampling on the sacred traditions that
i are supposed to hang around the college
and the university.
The board is being criticized for putting
petty items of expense into its expense
account. It remains to be seen what view
the legislature will take of all this up
roar.
It is maintained by those that have been
the stanchest friends of the board from I
the beginning, however, that the board has
dealt impartially and justly with the
weaknesses of the educational institu
tions. ;
It is pointed out that the Healy in
vestigating committee's report to the leg
islature in 1897 followed similar lines in
some instances.
The trustees at Ames have taken up
with the board of control one matter in
the board's report fo which they especial
ly object.
This relates to the appropriation by the
legislature for Engineering hall. The
board pointed out that after securing the
appropriation, the trustees built a $160,
--000 building.
It is maintained 'by President Beard
shear there ■was an understanding with
the legislature that the proceeds of a
I one-tenth mill building tax could tie used
to add to the $85,000.
A conference will be held soon and the
board may modify its report in this par
ticular. \
STATE BOARD A\D TRUSTEES
Latter Will Make a Format State
ment for Modification of Report.
Special to The Journal.
Dcs Moines, lowa, Nov. 26. —President
Beardshear, of the lowa State College at
Ames and several.trustees conferred with
the board of control to-day in reference
to parts of the board of control's report
reflecting on the college. The board gave
the trustees a hearing and the latter will
i submit their objections to the board's
findings in a formal statement. On re
ceipt of this statement, the board of con
trol will decide whether to modify its re
port.
The trustees object particularly to the
charge of the board of control that after
the trustees had secured an appropriation
for an- $85,000 building for Engineering
Hall, they proceeded to erect a building
costing $160,000. The trustees urged upon
the board to-day that they had an under
standing with the legislature they were
to be permitted to use for this purpose
so much as they saw fit of the one-tenth
mill building tax which the legislature
authorized.
Secretary Haddock, of the University of
lowa, has forwarded a statement to the
board of control denying that the trustees
have authorized the payment of any
bills for lobbying purposes, as indicated
by the board of control in Its report.
LONGEST"OF~MESSAGES
ROOSEVELT'S OVER 30.000 WORDS
And the Report of Secretary Root la
So Lonu It Mast Be Printed
in Sections.
Mmw York Sun Spmolal Smrvlo*.
Washington, Nov. 26.—Secretary Root's
annual report is to be so voluminous that
it will have to be printed in sections. It
cannot be prepared in all of its details
for the opening of congress. Most of the
executive reports this year are longer ■
than usual.
President Roosevelt's message is beyond
doubt the most voluminous document that
has ever come out of the White House.
It will contain nearly 10,000 words more
than President McKinley's last message,
which exceeded the 20,000-word limit.
Everybody who has read President Roose
velt's message, or heard it read, says that
It is written In a crisp, direct style,
which will make it very popular.
President Roosevelt has, it is said, de
cided not to incorporate in his message
the recommendation of the cabinet officers
that usually forms a part of the docu
ment, but to have them published as an
appendix. Reciprocity, the trusts and
Cuba are the subjects that will command
the largest share of the president's at
tention. He will urge upon congress the
wisdom of negotiating reciprocity treaties
upon a protection basis, the publication
of the doings of the so-called trusts in
order that the evidence will be at hand
for prosecuting them in case they violate
the law, and the making of a commercial
treaty with Cuba. The president is re
ceiving all sorts of advice as to what he
should and should uot say.
New British-Mediterranean Service.
First sailing from Boston to Gibraltar,
Naples and Genoa, November 27. New
gigantic twin screw S. 8. "Commonwealth"
(18,000 tons, 600 feet long) choicest ac
commodations, perfect service Apply Do
minion Line Office, 127 Guaranty Building,
Minneapolis.
Passenger Service to Hutoiiiusoß via
Great Northern.
Passenger train leaves Union Depot,
Minneapolis, at 5:05 p. m. daily except
i Sunday for Hutchinaon over Ureat North
ern Railway.
THE^ MINNEAPO LIS JOURNAL.
Last Chance Before Thanksgiving
Wednesday, the last day, a larger stock than ever of those Thanks
giving Necessities at prices so extremely low that only an extraor
dinary large sale will justify our placing these goods at such prices.
Extension Table {'*■**•■ Special 1 %^w _«^#
Golden Oak, high- \ IMM Offer. <
. ly polished, mas-Ji ¥Tfi f Otter. \> y<^^-J^-^^^^^
WW^sdayf ;| mkk fn7 Inth^ Very \ Carving Set,-faeerhorn handles,
N^/V^V^ VVN^N^/VVVVV%/N~S^/N^^ <! |sf rn^l Wednesday, ( ; This is a big bargain.
Dinner bet !' Op^J ©€lg& il^^^s^^^
Just in, of best fa | B^m B ]> Knives and Forks, warranted rive
porcelain de- • B • TB& ty <! years, worth $3.50, »J dftCfe
facvdl very ,-^*^\ '!; ' _n_r,n^_-_ r^u -^__,, < > Wednesday 9laA«f
iki^*™ worm tig <^\j.y- (' Teaspoon, warranted 8 years, 70,
?pIo.UU. ior v% 2z£*!£jf~?e* C!ft»<^®&ft«!f^JSNve(o <, worth'sl.7s, Wednesday 100
sale Wed. at, ■ ■"4*3S@*j£MS!-£jftf. i vw^iafn^ijnm^OT Rv-itdlUnißSiw^ '' Tablespoons, set of 3, warranted fll"T»*
mn d C '%£l^S=^sS''^ wMuUll WiiWr {\ 5 years> worth 75C< Wedueiida-V ** ■ G
's^rt^^~%^^^^^^^^^^~VVNi^WN' J; A large assortment of Glass- f^^^^fi^^^^ f^^^
C Qf*npf P^P»r\f" $ ware—odd pieces which we can Pp-W^l
vai cl UCFI' < afford to let go cheap. Look M
.. our Carpet Depart,™-, we have £ S£™ .f^ $52 |g|
Art Squares. Misfit Carpets and ,» cost. For instance: Fruit AA A
Rugs—Special for Wednesday. 1 1 Dish, worth 35c. Wed'day, fiiiUrU All Prices Accordingly.
\ 73-75 Sixth Street South. UlllllUCU.
REMOVED TO MASON CITY
HEADQUARTERS OF THE M. B. A.
Change Froiu Tiptoii, lowa Made
With Great Secrecy to Avoid
. Trouble.
Special to The Journal. .
-Mason 'City, lowa, Nov. 26.—Secretary
E. L. Balz and his clerical 'force of fifteen
arrived this morning to establish the na
tional headquarters of the Modern Broth
erhood of America. For the present the
M. B. A. has headquarters in unused of
fice rooms of the new courthouse, but in
the course of three months it will be
transferred to Hew and commodious quar
ters in the Elks' block now in course of
erection. The M. B. A. headquarters were
secured for this city at the recent con
vention held in Sioux City and they come
here from Tipton, where they have been
since the founding of the fraternal insur
ance organization, about three years ago.
When the Modern Woodmen attempted
to move their headquarters-from Fulton
to Rock Island, 111., a year ago, they were
confronted by divers injunctions from an
gry Fultonites who did not wish to see
the headquarters slip away. Profiting by
the troubles of a similar organization,
If )
-JL- PREMATURE GRAYNESS
NWttiaay Is th» fate of m»a>- a young flics
nfta Imperial Hair Regenerator'
IP^/l -v*?t ? 1'" t ha™lleM Preparation known
tsFsfrSiS 10" "ißtantly restores hair to any
color or shade. Durable, lasting anl
Send for pamphlet. Privacy assured.
Imperial Chemical Mfg.Co., 135 W.23d st, N.Y.
Sold by Virgil Dillin, 101 Washington ay S.;
R. H. Hegener, 207 Nicollet ay.; Feeley and
Crocker, 515 Nicollet ay. ■
Man's Mission on Earth
KNOW THYSELF! JS/jg^S^
As set forth In THE GOLD MEDAL
PRIZE TREATISE, the best , Medical
Work of this or any age, entitled . -
. The Science of Life, or Self-Preservatlon
Treating on Physiology of Marriage, Premature
Decline, Manhood, Nervous and Physical
Debility, Atrophy (wasting^' Varleoeele and
Ail Diseased and Weaknesses of Men
from whatever cause arising, 870 pp., with en
graving*. 125 prescriptions, embossed Muslin,
full gilt. ONLY ftl.OO by mall, sealed. Infer
ior abridged edition. 29 cents. Get the best.
Write for It to-day. The Key to Health and Hap
piness. Address : '
The Peabodr Medical Institute.
No. 4 Bulflnch St. (opposite Revere House, Bog
ton. Mass.). the oldest and best in this country ;
established In 1860. Consultation by letter or In
person, 9to 6. Sunday 10 to 1. Skill and experi
ence. Expert Treatment. .
POSITIVE CURE Th^7f
Manual, a Vade Mecum FREE, sealed, to men
only, mentioning this paper, 6 cents postage.
CniTflD'o - IMTC For 40 years the Peabody
till lUn 11 Medical Institute has been
a fixed fact, and It will remain so. It Is as stand
ard as American Gold. - ■ "ir ■*>"!' 'VniMniMffl
■r^Sr'The Peabody Medical Institute has many
W<? Imitators, but no eaaals.—Boston Herald,
the officials of the M. B. A. moved every
thing from Tipton in the greatest secrecy
and very few in that city save draymen,
who were sworn to secrecy, knew tliey
had lost the offices until "for rent" signs
were tacked in the windows of the rooms
formerly used.
HEADING OFF AMERICANS
Attempt to Keep Tliem Out of (ier-
inuii Steamship Companies.
Jfeu> York Sun Special S»rvte«
Berlin, Nov. 26.— Notwithstanding all
denials, efforts are undoubtedly being
made to induce ihe government to se
cure permanent control of the German
trans-Atlantic steamship lines with
the view of preventing Americans from
buying a controlling interest in the com
panies. This agitation, it is said, will
lead to the introduction to another sub
vention bill at the present session of the
reichstag.
Fast Time Debate Delayed.
The meeting of the executive heads of vari
ous western roads which was to have been
heid in Chicago yesterday to consider the fast
time schedule between Minneapolis and Chica
go was again postponed. Dec. 2 is the new
date.
Wftter Tourist Rates. \
Great reduction in rates to all winter
resorts. Call on Minneapolis & St. Louis
agents.
I had been troubled with the sick
headache for years until 1 started tak
ing Ripans Tabules. 1 have experienced
such relief from their use that I would
not be without them in my house. I
find them good for sickness at the
stomach and dizziness in the head.
At druggists.
The five-cent packet is enough for an ordinary oc
casion. The family bottle, 60 cents, con
tains a supply for a year.
TUESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 26, 1901.
TO HOUSE VETERANS
Spanish War Survivors to Have a
Uulldiiib at St. Loaia Fair.
JV'ew lor A- Sun Special Sorvioe
St. Louis, Nov. 26. — The Spanish war
vterans will build a splendid building of
their own at the St. Louis world's fair
and fill it with trophies and relies tak
en during the West Indian and Philippine
campaigns. This structure will cost not
less than $50,000.
The national convention of the Spanish
war veterans will be held at the world's
fair grounds in 1003, and Adjutant Gen
eral L. C. Dyer, of Washington. I). ('.,
says that at least 100,000 members will
attend.
Hailroud and Ferry Line.
Special to The Journal.
Manistlqae, Mich., Nov. 26.—Great interest
is being taken in the projected Traverse City
Leelanaw & Manlstique railroad and ferry
line, the establishment of which is expected
to add p.rav'a to the importance of this point
as a transfer sort. The railroad is to be
constructed from Traverse City to Northport,
a llstance of thirty milp=, through a fruit
belt second to none in the state, and from
Northoort a ferry line to this city completes
the project. Three townships traversed by the
road has re voted $30,000. It is designed to have
the line completed by next fall.
Thanksgiving delicacies in bakery goods
at Yerxa's.
WANTS-Pages 14 15
Heal Estate Transfer*.
James Adcock to Mary E. Laundry;
north one-half lots 1.2 and 3, block
17, Village of Champ1in..........„;... $700
Ole E. Anderson and wife to Edward
Heddy; part lot 1. block 9, Murphy's "
addition ..................: ....;, 700
Gertrude L. Baxter and husband to * "
Frank A. Shipley et al.; lot 4, block
13, Wolverton's addition '..' 500
Andrew J. Bl<ss to Frederick V. Brown;
in section 4, township 118, range 21,
etc 200
Mary Tuerpe to M. Murray Carpen
ter; lots 18 and 19, block 3, W. J.
Lewis' addition.;.j. 1,200
Amanda Olson and husband to John
Ound Brewing company; part lot 11,
block 29, Murphy's addition 1,550
Alma W. Lyman to Edward Kerr; lot
17, block 1, Allan & Anderson's second
aid j ton 300
Matthew N. Dean and wife toAgda
Carlson; lot 33, block 1, Peteler &'
Goodrich's addition 125
Bessie D. Lasley et al. to R. L. Earl;
lot 14, block 1, McCrory's rearrange
ment , -900
Olive A. Parker to Lemuel O. Peppard;
part lots 1 and 2, block 3, George
Galpin's addition...: 2,80')
Cornelius B. Shone et al. to Hall Novel- '
ty Manufacturing company; lots 27
and 28, block 39, Whitcomb's subdi
vision 1550
Sophia E. Wagner et al. to George B.
Rice; lot 3, block 10, Motor Line ad
dition , 325
•Eight minor deeds 10
Total, twenty deeds $10,860
Building? Permit*.
Vender, Weyer & Lohman, 248 Twelfth
avenue X; flats ...."..... JO 000
I Home for Aged Women and Children,
; 101 E Thirty-second street 8 000
| Mrs. Elizabeth Hirschfleld, 1803 Emer-
I son avenue X; dwelling 2,008
| Mrs. Elizabeth Hirschfleld, 1112 Eight
eenth avenue X; dwelling 1,500
Simond Gettelson, 1343 Nlcollet ave
nue; addition 2,500
A. H. Gibbon, 3803 Bloomington avenue;
dwelling 1,200
1 M. C. Darrow, 4122 Lyndale avenue X;
dwelling 1/jco
IM. C. Harrow, 3118 Pillsbury avenue;
I dwelling 1,500
! T. T. Andrews estate, 812 Ninth aye
; nue SE; dwelling 2,500
T. T. Andrews estate, 901 Eighth street
SE; dwelling 3,500
Total $29,700
I AGENTS WANTED
THE PLYMOUTH-SIXTH AND NICOLLET.
Good r.Oe and! Toe neckwear for iioc.
PROFITABLE WORK OFFERED AGENTS
in every town to secure subscriptions to the
Ladies' Home Journal and the Saturday Eve
ning Post. We want agents who will work
thoroughly and with business system to cover
I each section with our illustrated little book
; lets and other advertising matter, and to
i look sharply after renewals from old sub
i scribers. The pay is first rate, and at the
j end of the, season $20,000 will be given the
best workers as extra prizes ror good work.
! How well some of our agents have succeeded
is told in a little booklet we would like to
send you—portraits of some of our best agents
with the' story of how they made it pay. Too
Curtis Publishing Co., Philadelphia. Pa.
WANTED— CAPABLE~GENERAL"aGENW.
who have had experience in selling subscrip
tion books, to travel, employ and train can
| vassing agents; write, stating age, extent of
experience, number and name of books Bold
. etc. N. D. Thompson Pub. Co., St. Louis, Mo.
THANKSGIVING NECKWARE IN ABUND
ANCE, STYLE AND__PRICE,
AGENTS WANTED AT ONCE; GOOD MEN
to sell steroscopes and original stereoscopic
views; President McKlnley's funeral and a
full line of general subjects; great sellers and
big money made. American View Co Chi
cago; Englewocd station.
THE CONTINENTAL CASUALTY CO.. A3~
sets $750,000, issues the best and cheapest
health and accident policy on earth. Reli
able agents wanted throughout the state. D.
H. Evans, state agent, 210-311 Audius build
ing, Minneapolis, Minn.
2 ANNOUNCEMENTS
THE PLYMOUTH—SIXTH AND NICOLLET.
Good 50c and 75c neckwear for 25c.
R. C. BLACK & CO., plumbing, heating and
lighting; jobbing a Bpeclalty._72j> lit. ay.
•••••••••••••♦••••••••••a*
• THIS. PENETRATING NOVEMBER •
• AIR •
• which strikes you "where you live" •
• when you venture out, should be a •
• sufficient reminder of the fact that •
• winter is at hand (you know what •
• that means in Minnesota), and that •
• heavy outer wrappings will become •
• a necessity within a few day». One •
• thing, however, is certain, •
• REINER'S FUR-LINKED COATS •
• are warm, light in weight, durable. •
• handsome and moderate in price; they •
• are made from imported Kersey, lined •
• with selected skins, and in every way •
• desirable, in fact, (fliite indispensable •
• to comfort during the season when the •
• mercury is shrunk out of sight much •
• of the time. •
• A. REINER, CUSTOM FURRIER, •
• 15 &th st S. Phones, main 2729 J3; T. •
• C, 1835. •
A NEW TIE FOR THANKSGIVING FROM
Barnaby's— first-class investment.
Q BUSINESS CHANCES
THE PLYMOUTH—SIXTH AND NICOLLET.
Good 50c and 75c neckwear for 25c.
GET YOUR FURNACE"REPAIRED NOW":
don't wait until you want to start a fire; re
pairs for all furnaces. Great Western Stove
Repair Co. Tel. 161. 312 Hennepin ay.
THE SAVINGS FUND CO., Ill) TEMPLE
Court, pays 4 and 5 per cent oa deposits: cap
ltay, $350,000; surplus, $30,000.
ANY ONE HAVING $150 TO INVEST CAN
make |25 per week. This will stand investi
gation. Address 4559, Journal.
FOR SALE—GENERAL MERCHANDISE
business, doing a trade of $25,000 yearly; full
information furnished on application; stock
can be reduced to suit purchaser. Address
4842, Journal. ■
HALF INTEREST IN* EXCELLENT PAYING
wall paper business In large western city;
long established; investigation invited. Od
lum-Kurtzman Co., Phoenix building.
FOR SALE—OLD-ESTABLISHED MlLLl
uery business, on Nicollet ay. One of best
locations in city. Generous discount If sold
soon. Correspondence solicited. Address
4911, Journal. "
OLD FUR COATS WANTED — HIGHEST
reasonable cash prices for old fur coats, any
kind. J. S., 114 Washington ay N.
CIGAR, CONFECTIONERY AND BILLIARD
business. Fine opening for bowling alleys,
with no extra rent. No opposition. Every
thing in first-class condition. Address 4938,
! Journal.
i FOR SALE—WELL-ESTABLISHED HARD
j ware business, In one of the best towns in
Minnesota; 1,800 population. Will make easy
terms to right party. For full particulars,
address owner, 431 Lumber Exchange, Minne
apolis, Minn.
-WANTED—PARTNER TO HELP MANU
facture and handle tne same; man must have
some money to start with. Address C. Fos
ter, general delivery, Minneapolis.
NEWSPAPER-HALF' INTEREST in one
of the test paying county seat paper* in
northern Minnesota. A snap. Address C,
box A, Park Rapids, Minn.
A PHYSICIAN IN W TERN PART OK
state will sell property and turn over paying
practice. Call or write Air. Robinson, 315
Masonic Temple, Minneapolis.
FOR SALE ONE OK THE BEST RESTAr
rants, bakeries and confectionery stores in
western Minnesota for sale at a bargain. 637.',
Journal.
NEW. NOBBY NECKWEAR FOR THANKS
GIVING. AT BAR"NABY'S. 4TH AND Nl£.
$660—CLEAN STOCK GROCERIES; KENT
with living-rooms, $9. Must sell Immediately.
Corner 3d ay and 10th NE.
WANTED—TO BUY A GROCERY BUSINESS
) in South Minneapolis. Address S. a., 2305 15th
■ av_ 9. '. ■
SPOT CASH FOR GROCERIES, HARD
ware, furniture, machinery, wagons, buggies,
clothing, general merchandise stocks and fix
tures of all kinds. T. B. Davis, Minneapolis.
FOR SALE—DRUG STOCK. IN LIVELY
southwestern Minnesota town, 400 to 500; sales
about $3,000 annually and steadily Increasing.
Rent cheap. Reason for selling, I have been
advised to go to coast states for my health.
For particulars, write P. ' 0.. Opsahl. Avoca,
Minn.
Country store] clear stock; clearing $500 moa.
Roomlng-houce, filled year round. ___
Grocery; frei'i stock staples; $60 d^.ly bus.
Hotel; $2 da;'; modern; large translint busi
ness; railway center; snap. _ HOP V.urn. Ex.
STOVE BUSINESS, ESTABLISHED 18
years, for |«50. Or will sell in parts, cooks,
ranges and heaters. 602 .4th ay S.

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