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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, May 16, 1902, Image 12

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THE MINNEAPOLIS JOURNAL. *
SS^wpj^E
l
FRIDAY EVENING, MAY 16^ 1902.
' Si.
Millers and Hoosiers Were Unable
to Play Yesterday. _
:p
COLONELS DEFEAT THE SAINTS
K e r w l n , t h e Outfielder, S h o w s W h a t
H e Ca n D o i n L i n e of
Pitching:.
Wet grounds caused a postponement of
the game between Minneapolis and In
dianapolis yesterday afternoon. In St.
Paul Kerwin, who orddnarlly works in tho
right garden for Mr. Tebeau of Louisville,
showed the 487 members of the rooters'
club that ho could also do a few stunts in
the line of twirling.
Just what Tebeau's hunch was in switch
ing Kermin to the slab does not appear,
but the sun gardener made good, allowing
the saints only seven scattered hits, two
of which were finally negotiated into runs.
Meanwhile Kelly's men put up an indif
ferent game in the field, and the colonels
accumulated a quarter of a score of tal
lies. The score:
St. Paul.
Geier 4b ..
BlUard If.
Shay ss ...
Kelley lb.
h p
0 2
0 S
2 1
1 11
Shannon of. 1 2
Lumley rf.. 1 1
Huggins 2b. 0 1
Hurley c .. 1 4
FergQBon p. 1 0
Louisv'le.
Kerwin p...
Clymer cf..
Gannon rt.
Ganzell 2b.
Flournoy If. 1
Scurlver c . 0
Tannehlll ss 3
Schauta 3b.. 0
Spies lb
Totals
1 10
Totals .. . 7 27 15 4 Total s .. . 9*26 11 0
St. Paul 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 03
Louisville 0 0 0 1 4 0 0 0 0
Geier out, hit by batted ball.
Two-base hits, Hurley, Gannon, Ganzell
three-baas hit, Flournoy sacrifice hits,' DH
lard, Lumley, Flournoy stolen base, Hug
gins bases on balls, off Kerwin 5 struck out,
by Kerwin, Hurley 2, by Ferguson, Kerwin,
Ganxell wild pitch, Ferguson double plays,
Hurley to Kelley, Ganzell (unassisted) left
on baa*s. St. Paul 8, Louisville 6 time of
game, 1:25 attendance, 487 umpire, Tindill.
Milwaukee, May 16.Milwawkee use up
three pitchers yesterday and were easily
toeaten by Columbus by a score of 13 to 3*
Bailey held the opposing team safe with
the exception of the fifth inning, when
he allowed three hits and hit two bats
men, forcing in one run. Attendance 300.
Score:
Milw'kee. h p
Hallman If.. 2 4
M'A'd'ws 3b 0 0
McBrlde cf. 0 3
Parrott rf.. 0 2
Dungan lb.. 0 9
Clingm'n t 1 '
Grant 2 b 0
Sipeor c 1
Altrock p .. 0
Miller p ..-' 1
Olmstead p. 0
xCross 0
Columbus.
Hart cf ... .
Meaney rf..
Lally If ... .
Grim lb
Evans 2b...
Turner 3b...
Nattress ss.
Fox c
Bailey p... .
h p
3 1
2 2
1 3
0 14
1 3
3 1
1 2
1 1
0 0
-A batting streak, two
singles, a doubje and two triples in the sev
enth inning won the game for Baltimore yeer
tecdaj:. Washington could, not hit
MoGlnnJty''*r
consecutively. Attendance, 3,117.
'-
Washington .........0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 7 1
Baltimore . . . . . . . . . . . 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 - 6 . 1 2
BatteriesLeo and Drill r McGlrihlty-iand
Robinson,. , -'.'- ' ..- - 't'*./- - -
Chicago. May 16.In - order to reduce hip
staff of pitchers, Manager, Selee of the Chi
cago National League'club .yesterday released
Mai. Easo.n. . The latter/ was . _ immediately
signed by the Cfflcgo American League club
...'. - A m e r i c a n ' S t a n d i n g s . ..?*
'""." v
. ' Played,'Won. Lost."
St. Louis .......l... .J6 - 16'' 6
Detroit .16 10 6-
Philadelphia -.vv.v..,, .18 - - ,J1 . . , 7
Boston ....^. ...: !.: .1 1 : - 8
Chicago ...,:,.'....'...17/ 9 "'*. v 8 ..,.
Baltimore .v, .. .... 19' " 8 ,-' 11
Washington 20 8 12
Cleveland , . . . . . . : . . . . .: $ 14 ' .
- . - . -.
Pet.'
:626
- .625
ff.Ml
?9
35 .421
,.400
?..264
G a m e s T o - d a y . '{: -'
Washington at BalUmore. '/. ' ' - ?. .
Detroit at Cleveland, ''. ..:,' .
f V
:
St. Louis at Chicago. '..- .'.'.:- /
Philadelphia a.t Btfston. . . . . .' . ,,. ,'"
Griffith. Is. S u s p e n d e d . .*'v'~'."'.
Chicago, May 16.^-Glftrk" Griffith, manager
of the American League baseball team, bi s
been suspended by President Johnson for. a
period which will coverMher present series with
St. Louis, virtually five days. The suspension
Is intended as a
punishmentUmpire'Johnd
for allege
abusive language used toward-
-
stone at Detroit last'week.
COLLEGE GAWIS - ^
- For seven -Innings, on .-Northrop field/'yes
terday, It looked, as 'if the Luthdr^college
nine would ^emulate the example of, St. Thomas
the day before and hand out a coat of .white
wash to the gophers, but In the eighth innijng
Captain Me'tcalf, struck by , a. happy/fnsplr'a
tion, sent Brlgham to bat for Llyermbre. L.
Then things started, and between bathers-hit
by pitched balls, bases on balls, errors, arid
hits, three runs were scored before the Inning
was ended. In the ninth, Grangmard, in an
attempt to catch, Brlgham at,second* hurled
the sphere far into the outfield, -and J&uuder
son, who was on third, trotted leisurely home,
winning, the game, for skl-u-man. The. aeore:
Minnesota .':,4..'..V.0 0,-Q4h 0,0/3,1-^ , 3 - 6
Luther College ,.V..V.10L:O^O '2 0 0,-.0%-3 *.:- Z
: Batterles^-iiogers iahd, Gunderpon/
Smely'
and Grangaard. -
: '...' . . - _,/.', V . ,-
College games resulted:
At Beloit, Wis.Belolt College, 4 Univer
sity of West Virginia, 2. - V
At Madison, -Wis.Knox' College, 9 Uni
versity of Wisconsin, 6.-.
At Lawrence, Kan.4rUniviBr|Uy of Kajsaas,
0 .University of Nebraska^-^v -r*' jf
v
At Galesburg, IH.^-Lombafd Gpllege, 8 Uni
versity of Iowa, 0. - - r ':.-.," . r
Totals ...12 27 16 3
Totals .. . 6 27 14 4
xCross batted for Olmstead In the ninth.
Milwaukee 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 03
Columbus 3 0 3 0 1 .0 6 0 013
Earned runs, Milwaukee 1, Columbus 3
two-base hits, Hallman three-base hits, Tur
ner, Fox home run, Nattress base on balls,
otf Altrock 2, off Miller 4, off Bailey 3 hit
by pitched ball, Andrews, McBrlde, Hart
stolen bases', McAndrews, Hart, Lally, Grim
wild pitches, Olmstead struck out, by Alt
rock 1, by Miller. 1 double play,, Evans, to
Nattress to, Grim left on bases, Milwaukee
8, Columbus 7 innings pitched, Altrock 3,
Miller, 3% Olmetead 2% umpire, Haskell.
Time, 1:55.
Kansas City, May 16.Weyhing - and
Pardee engaged in a pitchers' battle yes
terday and until McBride's single brought
In the winning run in the ninth the re
sult was uncertain. Attendance, 320.
Score:
Toledo K. C h p
Nance cf 1 5
RotbfuBs rf. .1 0
Grady lb ...1 8
Beville c ..0 8
O'Brien 2b ..0 1
Lewee ss ....1 4
McBride 3b..l 1
Gear If 0 0
Weyhing p...0 0
Totals 6 27 9 2
Burns ss
Miller rf
Smith 3b .
Turner lb
Gilks cf .
Myers 2b .
Geyer If .
Kleinow c
Pardee' p
Totals . 5*25 12 0
Rotbfuss out, hit by batted ball.
Two out when winning run was scored.
Kansas City 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 12
Toledo 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 01
Earned run, Toledo bases on balls, off
Weyhing 1, off Pardee 6 two-base hit, Lewee
three-base hit, Geyer stolen bases, Grady,
Lewee, Gllks sacrifice hits, Grady, O'Brien
struck out, by Weyhing, 8: by Pardee 3. Time,
1:36. Umpire, Bulger.
F i g h t o n S u n d a y B a s e b a l l . ',.
Special to The Joutnal.--- ' "
Fargo, N. D., May 16VThere'isr
some-agi
tation here over Sunday iba'sebairplaylng,
aride
a committee has been appointed by:
some o f th
religious organizations to see"^t jthe Sunday
games can be headed off. If'hdaK'bair-is
not permitted. It is. probable" toe-'city
will.^ e
without a team, as it ftlfl* b$i3mposslble to
support the organization otherwise... .-- /
AMATEUR'S: COLUMN " ^
- ^ - i . - - f
The E. E. Townsends defeated the North
Stars by the score o*-9 to'7,^yesterday,-- - "
The Strollers or Tickers were defeated by
the Pages.by a score of 9'to-6. Batteries^
Saridelland Gallagher Walsh arid Hoffman/
The J. I. Case Implement company's, ball
team
wantIs
Sunday games wit-hany
old teairi
n the city '' Adtfress-t . A.18*year- Wyiltf ,
241% Fburth avenue* S...--"- **- l :-
The Holtzermanns" defeated td Tip .Tops B
a score of 24 to-7r-Batterles*iCrbn.fn"ny
d
Gardner Fenceler and Johnson/ 'Th e Holtz
erinanns wish games with any 12-year-old
team in the city. Address Harry- Asper/ 416
Fourteenth avenue S.
The Guiwltz & Jflnes baseball -team will
cross bats with the Boutell Brothers team,
Sunday afternoon,:
'a t Nlrieteebith" avenue S
and Twenty-fourth street. % BatteriesGlea
son, McDonald and Buckles Kerste.n
and JarveyiA. ..:\.
v'" /^'. ''!.=Kelley.,
' /'*'' ?* H
SATOHDA I R E S M I l Y
DRIVING HORSES OJT f X H | B I T
S p l e n d i d A r r a y o f H o r s e i W i l l B e
S h o w n a t M i n n e h a h a v D r i v - '_, Vg
H o w T h e y Stand.
Played.
Columbus 2
Kansas City 19
Louisville 19
Indianapolis 17
St. Paul 18
Milwaukee 18
Minneapolis 18
Toledo 17
Won.
14 12 12 10 10
8 4 3
Lost.
6
7 7 .
7 8 -
10 14 .
14
Pet.
.700 .632 .632
.588 .556
.444 .222 .177
W h e r e T h e y P l a y .
Indianapolis at Minneapolis.
Louisville at St. Paul.
Columbus at Milwaukee.
Toledo at Kansas City.
* :
- - NATIONAL LEAGUE
Chicago, May 16.A wild throw by Dahlen
that netted three bases, and Taylor's hit,
gave the locals the winning run after twelve
innings of all kinds of ball. A great double
play by Lowe and O'Hagen and a sensational
catch by Williams were remarkable bits of
fielding. Attendance, 2,400.
R H ET
Chicago 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 3 0 0 18' l^' 4
Brooklyn 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 07 11 7
BatteriesSt. Vraln, Taylor and Kling
Newton, Ahearh and Farrell.
Pittsburg, May 16.Both pitchers were ef
fective yesterday and the game was snappy
throughout. Tenney and Clarke were put
out of the game in the eighth inning for en
gaging in a fist fight. Attendance, 2.600.
,TJ TT W
Pittsburg 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 o' 9 3
Boston 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 01 4 2
BatteriesDoheny and Smith Malarkey
andv Klttredge.
Cincinnati, May 16.Cincinnati won the last
game of the series with Philadelphia. Ewing
pitched godd ball. Pitcher. Stimruel and
Outfielder Bay were released yesterday. At
tendance, 400.
Cincinnati 0 1 2 0 0 4 1 0 8 9 1
Philadelphia . . . 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 7 2
Batteries^Ewing and Bergen ^Iberg, - Vor
he'es &nd Dooin.
Weather permitting'^ to~morrow
rwiH"ie
a:. gala .'day at the Mfoaehjaha Driving
Park, for nearly every, fine, .team, single,
double four-in-hand and tandem, prbmlses
to turn out.
This ia review day and, prizes will be
distributed to all worthy rig'.
'" No, fee for
gate, grandlsta'nd or entry of equipage will
be charged. From .St.. aul - ^ 9 7 . ?$$&&
have promised to appear an'd "wl'tn " th.e
grand array of horses already-at the.nark-,
one of the finest exhibits ever? witnessed
in the state will be shown. *--* - y- :
The work of judging and difitt"tbutijng
ribbons\ will commence promptly at 3 p.m.
and as it will be conducted rapidly the re
View wlft be finished in.at'.least two',hp ur6.
Many improvements are being started
at the 'Ha' ha -course for-1 he=aeason.-and it
is already ln^^he'bihk'of^r.aBtngXcmditiott,
with newly . wnitewas'hea \ ^ehcee^' and
drives ahdAribks itf perfect.tfaer . ' - . .0-
Anoka- horsemen have, brgah.ijsed/ the
Riverside Park assoeiatlbji,vcapitallied at
$5 000. whhih^ yeeterdayyvfliled (articles:, of
ihcbrporatfoh with th^ secretary of state.
The object^df the company/is improveineht
in the scienceVbf hprsen^anship..,.
i ! / , '.'-
The inc^rporaVora kre.-G., A. ^cCaTiliJSf.
John Brandell, H.-rH. Bra'deen George ..i.
Gldddngv I i & Greenwald, L Avv^aswfe)!,
W. W. BtdekwerF.iHJ'C? JohhsonivCteougs
Sanderson, and" - j*m_etf:mwey. ^ - . ^.~ ^ S
K n o l l L o a n e d t o itoledio.' .f'"-iv
Special to The Journal.
? ''
: :., ':'"'.." '
Milwaukee, Wis., May.16.It i s learned this
morning thati -the Coluinbus club will loan
Hub Knoll to the Toledo club for the balance
of the .season. ' Knoll will- join Toledo in a
day or two. .The Milwaukee club tp-d%y-re-
leased Pitcher Miller. .'- - '-"
^ N a t i o n a l S t a n d i n g * . '
Pittsburg,. Chicago ...
New- York
Played. Won.
pV .
fte .:/^Boston
p | / v /Philadelphia
Brooklyn Cincinnati .,
,- St. Louis ...
.24
.....20 .....22 .....21
22 24
.....24
29
Lost ' 4' .
7 '-
ir"
n -
12 .
15 i
16 - -
15 -
Pet.
.833
1.650
.591 .476
,.455
. . - : . *
G a m e s T o - d a y .
Philadelphia at Pittsburg.
BaRton at Chicago.
Brooklyn at St. Louis. / .
New York at Cincinnati. '
:'.'' *''""'i/'-- W e s t e r n e L a g n e . '*
Denver, 6 Peoria, 4.
Omaha, 1 S t Joseph, 0. "
Kansas City, 11 Des Moines 3.
Colorado Springs, 7 Milwaukee, 3.
W^
AMERICAN LEAGUE
?f?5t'
. PhHadelphia May 15.Cy Younpwas inu*
perb form yesterday, but seven hits, scat
tered through six innings, being-made by
the local, who would have been shuj but btft
for,the errors of the Boston fielder*. "Chick"
Frazer, one of the enjoined players of! the
? GOLF ^
Neither Philip B. Hoyt, western cham
plon, nor William Waller,''- the 'present holder
of the Chicago cup, qualified for the trophy
yesterday j n the annual tournament bt the
Chicago golf, clubs. Both men, ..however,
got in the first set of sixteen who' are .eligible
for the second cup, which is to be-played
for to-morrow. Louis N. James of Glenvlew
made the best score of the day, covering the
eighteen hQles in eighty-six." HoyJ and -Wal
let took ninety-eight and ninety-^ur Respec
tively. .. . '- ..^?*jsf- .*?- ,': -4?.'*--
The. annual golf tournament for.the chairi-
pionshlp-,.of Wisconsin will be played.on the
Milwaukee country club links July'2^ .25"and
26. This was decided at a special ".m^etini?
of ^.the directors of the^W|s pnste .St^te Qolf
association at Milwaukee yeBterdayy called
by President .Ktamlitbh Vose, -who now holds
the trophy- . The qualifying round will ^b'e
sixteen Wholes and the 'finals thly-"siy"medal
plays. There are now'about',*orfcy: golt clubs
In Wisconsin. All' clubs that remit dues.to
the secretary by Julyv20
will be 'members of
the association and those of thttt members
who are actual, residents pf .Wlsjeonsm ' a.rjp
eligible to corijpete^ lor- -the -xjiampiprishlij^
' - : i ' / H o , i o r ' C a n ''*'/'.".
' _- - - -, ':''Fra'nclaeo!'":
"''"'? ..=- -',- rr^o
Zurah:Tempie - Mystic Shrlhe will leave
Mlnenapolis at 8:35 p. m. June 2d, via1 the
Minneapolis 8f St. I,iouifr
railroad to
ai r
tend-the 28th .annual.-meeting Imperial
Council A- A. O. N. W. to be h e l d ' i i San
Francisco June-10th to 14th." The Shrine
Special-will run via r^Deayer,. Goloradp
Springs and Salt. Lake City, stopping one
day at each .place. V : A_^
4For/fuW i h ^ r m a t i o ^ c a f c :0&?mfr, l*i
Ha*hawayJ i3. TX AM% M t ^ f c r a B & ' l
Washington aveittte S / V r**F .:_ &
At t/ 'Plymouth Corner
1 Men's Clothing,
2 Boys* Clothing,
3 Hats and Caps,
4 Furnishings,
5 Shoes,
6 Trunks and Bags.
Boys' Clothing.
For Saturdaywe shall
make some startling
prices forr
up-to-date
clothing. This ad will
fcpnvince you of that'
fact when you con
sider that everything
offered is nothing but
the better class of
merchandise.
T h e F i r s t I t e m
Tells of strict y all-wool su ts
coats,cut double breasted the'
pants in most cases are made,
double seat and knees, sizes
7 to 16 years easily a $ 4 value. Saturday at $2.50,
_ SuitsAnother item is our five dollar line, which con
sists of fast-color, a 1-wool blue cr black serges, as well as
some fire mixed cheviots and casimeres sizes 7 to 17 years?
a big bargain. a great suit at $5.
S u i t s T h e best that money can. buy .in double-breasted.
t two-piece, or three- piece style-, is what we say of this item '.'
all our finest suits in either the above styles worsteds, fancyt '.,
or plain cheviots or cassimer s, in fact all-the-best fabrics-.
- made. Remember out finest.suits at only $8.50. / ,-vji
.'/Sailor S u i t s A l l our suits of this style now marked
' hr stock and considered cheap at $6'. Your choice for $5'
,:dark or light blues, red, two shaie?, all new this season*,'
. *izes 3-to 10. Your,choice Saturday at $5. ^ . V.^f
T h r e e - P i e c e SuitsSingle-breastedwithvest, strictly '
..all wool fabrics made to fit same as men's clothes. We have
r
'' an unusually big line to show and we have made some special."
prices for Saturday in all the new cloths, worsteds, cheviots,-*-
"pr cassimeres, sizes 10 to 17. Two special prices, $ 6 and'$5 '-'
..".:"
rfo'rfolk SuitST-About "fifty suits of all wool materials,
all made with belt, plaits and yoke effects, all sizes 3 to 9 "
and about ten kinds small lets. Any suit in our stock marked.
1 ..$5, Saturday at $4.00. ' . . . .,
- Y o u t h s * S u i t s F o r dress-up purposesneat dark .
effects, plain black or blue worsteds,-fancy cheviotsno bet- -
ter tailored-garment at twice the pricesizes 14 to 19 yesii, ''
fit guaranteed* Saturday special $10. ' '"'' '
Wn.istsMother's Friend style,-with -separate collar'pr '
collar attached, nicely laundered, all ready to wear' forrdr^S'ii ,
i a beautiful line of this season'spatterns, siz^s 6 to 12 years? ^
75c values at 50c. , Special, 25c. '
W e J s t s O r BlousesPercales with small, or lai'ge '
. fauntleroy style collars, unlaundereda good bargain ia-all
sizes to 14 years. ,-.,
dbab
-r-+
i ~
Of a character that will be sure to interest every
man, woman and child in Minneapolis. ,... . ..".
100 pairs men's plain toe
vici kid lace shoes and pat
ent leather 'welt sole oxfords
in small sizes arid -narrow
widths, regular $3.50" and
84. Saturday Bar- .-(m ' -
gain Price . . . . vIpX
75 pairs of men's $3.50,
$4 and $5 tan shoes that are
all good sizes and new spring
styles, some Dr. -Reed's
cush'on sole shoes, among the
lot, also a few pairs, of Ban
ister's. Saturday j *J
Bargain -Price...:... H'**
Women's shoes rand slip
pers in small Sizes that were
sold at $2.50, $3 and 3.50.
Saturday Bargain ^ j
Price........../... 9
Children's and Little Gents' Shoes in good styles and^
good solid soles and uppers. A lot that were intend- fv '
ed to sell ior $1.25 and $1.50. Sat'y Barg-ain Price 3 F O p
Boys' and Youths' Solid School Shoes,, in any se, :pesjt,,
Satin Calf, artd a fine lot of iike Shoes. Satur- ^ - C / i
day Bargain P r i c e . . . . . . . . . . ... 2 M * 0 U
Women's Patent Vici Welt
Sole Oxfords and fine Don -'
gola /Kid Lace Shoes with
patent leather ftps, all sizes-- .
these are $2.5a and $3 shoes '
Saturday Bargain - . , '
Price.. .... I p l . 9 5 ,
Women's Patent Leather^
French Heel Lace - Shoes, -
hand turn soles, any size of-'
widthrr-these are straight
$3.50 shbesi Saturday b ar*
Prce....-... $ 2 : 4 5 .
: 300 pairs of"nirn's pateift "j.
calf and enamel'lace and baUk
ton sjboes,alI this spring's new ^
rStyiish 'astsjsome.liave'heav^'"
soles, more have-single' scles, -.
'jjl ar? $4 arid $5-shoes Sat
urday.Bargaii ^ c A
Price ..... ... , / 4 Z , 3 U
Men's *&r\d Yburig Men's
CLOTHING.
If ever a man wants smart, handsome
clothes, it is when the first warm days appear.
Nowhere can the niostparticular man find a finer,
fresher or more satisfying stock of suits to choose
from than is here at this moment. -'
Yet, with all the character and style which
Plymouth Clothing possesses, prices are as .low,,
as a careful man could wish. * J $X2 to $30.
y
s15 Blue Serge Suits
$10.
This should be welcome news, for it is not a bit too early to plan
about getting your Blue Serge Suit. There are about 500 suits all
told, made in the ^test style by one of bur- best makers. - .^ - '- *
/ Like all Plymouth suits, we have jgiveh special attenti-n to the hidden workmanship
in these, serge.suijs, so ap to give them t^e shapelihess which will held throughout "W&g-
service- Of course all are strge lined and haiid tailored, This is a great to, . ^ V .
reduction for so staple a garment, and you should avail yourself of the oppor- * I I I -
-tunity. ' Price . / . . :.r:.: ..\r..... . ' . ' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ~ U
Men's Ne^r Blegligee Shirty.
The Dollar Dress Shirt is
famousthis'The
.
Dollair
Negligee Shirt/will
probably, be equally fambu's!
' belEor e summe r s over. ''':
WehavedipSieour parttomjikeit so.- ^irst.we have selected, excellent fabrics, arid
every pattern is new this season the line of colorings includes the smait tan shades that
you have seen heretofore only in quite"expensive shirts.. The,making js of high character
the finish is refined, and the shirts fit comfortably. Cuffs are attached or detached.
Such shirts are unprecedented at a dollar and will please well-in-
formed and particular men better than most dollar-and-arhalf' shirts
they see. May we show them to you? $1 each.
N e g l i g e e S h i r t s J u s t received a
beautiful assortment of the/'' 'Stat" Neg-.
ligee S&irts. in all the la est patterns, in
light and dark effects, plain and plaited
bosoms, $1:50. *"
S w e a L t e r s M e n 's
: pure,/' worsteii
sweaters in a""large variety of plain colons
the $3.50 value for $2,50.
' M e n ' s U h d e r w e a i r ^r'Men's-fine
French balbrig^ah shirts and drawers of.
our own importation reg. 75c value, 50c.'
H a l f HoseMen's lisle threid and
cotton half hose, our regular 50c and 75c
.values ...sizes 10, 10# and 11. Special
price 35c^ 3 for $1.
: N e c k w e a r A n attractive assortment
'' of stocks, in figures, stripe and pla.in.cpl-: *
ors, made of cheviot,, rpadras and silk, 50c, -
'- 75cand $1. ..-- --
.
Ask to see our hew invention, -theJ
/"Panama" tie, easy to put on and very
stylishi 50c.
j\t Sixth and fficollel
7 Cloaks and Wraps, - - - * ^ # -
8 Furs, H:*^?*k -5".*'*-* .^ vH ^?'gff i
9 Millinery, .'&$ *V'*
v^^.'*.
10 Custom Tailoring, r
11 Shirt -Tailoring, v . \x i % '-% *- y v- -
12 Bargain Basement ..-.. ....
F i r s t M O L V S o c l e s of ^^-
Women's Tailor Sviits.
A most important event. Here is the idea.
In one style and another we have accumulated
over 100 suits, broken sizes, but all sizes in the
lot, this spring's fine, garments, in Broadcloths,
Cheviots and Venetians, Eton, Tightfitting and
Fly Fronts. , - ' - . ^ / '', /:.%"::'
T h e V a J u e s A v e r a g e A r b v n d $ 3 0 .
To close them all, we pay no attention to
'value. T/ake your pick Saturday, if you're
early enough, from two lots
*l Ih e one sold to $30.00, nov/ $19i75.
The ether sold to $25,00, npw $14.75.
1
Lot 2 at $12 worth
- u p t o $18Ladies' Suits
that cannot be duplicated at
this price we mean for this
season's goods, up-to-date in
every respect Eton, blouse
and ti ht fitting effects,
beautifully tailored and best
mateials colors, brown, tan,
castor, gray arid red. We
advise ycu to come early if
you would get first pick, $12.
Misses' and Children's
Jackets for Saturday at %
off. '
:^B\ry/fcL Ha t Nov
If you-buy a stiff or. soft hat now. you can.save from $1 to 82. We need the room ,
for Straw Hats. /
/*
:-Attshapes arid colors in soft andare "stiff'hats $2'and" $3. -
-
Bicycle Golf and-Automdbie Caps, complete a/s^ment/frpm-50c to $3.00. %~ \*
At $3
0 u
r
n
w ^
t
e finerat* and nobbier than the $4 Hats*r
.'.,, shown 'elsewhere. They meet the wants of fastidiousr
dressers^o a "T. : " The softs includethei "Manhattan" and "Wind-
sor - '.shapes, al with the nef w Panama effect wavy turned-up brims
The^'Stiffs,
J atl$^consis t o the "Waldorf^ and 'Englis h shapes/'.
our own ^exclusive styles, so ^ - -
:/: : ]'- /...'-.
Boys'new GolfrCaps^n/all-wool clothsi silk- lined, the king- t o -
^be found elsewhere for 50c , here at only 25c. - ' ,
vf
y^*'.-:5ri^CKildreri's'Headwear.
'
:
. . . The largest assortment of Crash, Duck or Sbaw Sailors in the city. --
Boys'and Cb.ildreri !s Straw Sailors, plain or fancy straw and bands, medium or.-
wide brims, 5 0 c to $3 - .v.,'
- v "White and blue duck Hats, patent leather band, long streamers, $ 1 . /,,. / , / * .
Boys'Crusli Hats,* black and pearl, all sizes, regular $ 1 quality, 5 0 c '/'.'_-
*'
Also about 250 Suits at
lesser price divided into. lots.
, L o t 1 a t $ 1 0 w o r t h
t o $15Venetian Broad
cloth, Homespuns and Chev-
' - i o V ser suits, styles aie
Eton, ^blouse and single and
double breasted ti^ht fitting
- effects: Silk lined Jackets,
Skirts, percaline lined, trim'd
w:th taffeta silk or moire
bands, other's plain tailored.
A most excellent, $15 Suit
at $10.
Ladies' Jackets, none re
served, Saturday at X off?
Women's F\iri\isKii\gs. %*
Women's fine imported Union Suits, in lisle
thread and fine cotton, hand crochet heck and
arms or trimmed with very pretty lace edge,
plain of,umbrella lace trimmed drawers. These
: are.veiy.fine and dainty. Special prices, $1,
Y$^
5fr and $ 5 0 . / f ' /
, - - / - / ' /-,
*':-/ Gorset Department.
A small lot of slightly soiled corsets, rang-,
ing in price from $1.50 to $4,
t.o
close
Satur,/
day, 95c^. / /
l //- ' .
/ ^ . Ladies' Hosiery* /
.:.Wje
are showing a splendid.assortment of plain and fancy
Hosiery j lis'.e thread with lace ank es, all over laces, clocks
and stripes, in all color?, and novelties in . black C / V - _
and white effects. Your choice, a t . . . . . . . . . . . . . J\J^Z
10, dozen plain black, fine Sea Island cotton Hose, with
double soles, heels and toes. Special for Satur- ^fc C ^ ^
day pair. .. M 3 C
- Ladies' Neckwear, lace collarSj stocks, long ties and
...Jabots, in plain white and colors. Prices: 2 5 c , $ ^
^ O c , 75c.and - * - f ^ A U - & ' -
^
rLadies* fancy kce back lisle, also nlain silk C / " ^ - ^
', fdouble tipped Kayser Gloves, all shades, price %J\J^Z
S o m e Effective N e w Folia.g e H a t s .
""- The leaves which form the most important
part: of these charming Foliage Hats are done
with /remarkable fidelity _ to nature. In fact,
they are' jetriiniscent of the flower-trimmed
-chaplets of old, and no more appropriate style
of mUlinery could b^ devised for summer wear.
Saitird.Q.y- ^SpecfalK collection of de
sirable hats for street or dress occasions, made
- from unusually good, serviceable materials and
trimmed in a great variety of pretty styles
"Vfjdrmer values, $3.00, $4.00, - ^ - e/%
:/^5.00. Your choice . W.y - ^lmDU
L
The Tlymotith Ctoihng Hotis*. Sijcth and jiwottet.
GYGIISTS WORRIED
Rumor of a Movement to Destroy
*%'' Lake Street Path.
SUMMIT AVENUE PATH PRAISED
J o h n L a r s e n o* T h i s City W i l l T r y
- toi B r e a k . H u n d r e d - M i l e : / '
":-'/'''. R e c o r d .
m
L a d i e s ' Sbirt jWvqi Pat*.ernji r
, : cltflr'e~H*re'.',
.-" *mr.
South side wheelmen are considerably
agitated over rumors of i movement to
have the Lake street cycle path torn up
According to the story told by the cyclists,
Ben Ward, president of the Seventh Ward
Republican club," is the leader in this
ihoveipent. He helieves, .it. is asserted,
that his children are placed in peril by
the presence ipf a .cycle /path directly in
front of M B house,' which is at" 1530 East
Lake street.
' The cyclists are of the opinion, however,
l%at Mr. Ward objects-to the'presence of
a cycle -path adjoining his boulevard in
itself, irrespective of any possible damage
that may result. They- hint darkly that,
anyone, who arrays. himself against the
wheelmen wiii have something coming to
rihim if hie ever seeks 'political honors.
Alderman Frank Main of the' Seventh
ward also is stated by the, cyclists "to be
opposed to the cycle path on Lake street.
The wheelmen say that the Lake, street
path is used more than almost any other
in the city, and they think it would be a
-great calamity to have it torn up. The
more conservative"men are positive that
no amount of pressure would- induce thj
ct.ty authoHttes to consent to such-a-
step.*
Minneapolis riders w h o h a v e tri^id the
new" cycle path on Summit avenue in. Sf
.Paul ate loud in its praised. The p a t h i s
consltucted "of Crushed stohe, whichv
this
recent rains have packed down until .the
road is as smooth as a billiatd tajle
This Is held by most cyclists to be the
finest -path In the srtafe.
. Local men^ ^escribe ..the-^^ ride via Lake
street, Marshall avenue and Summit to t:
Paul as the most delightful that can he
found ahywihere. / I t leads through a
stretch or country whete song birds by. the
thousandsare found, and, accordrng-to the
desenptiohe/df the pbetlcai' ^iiniieapollfj
wheeinie|i isvlike .a grifmpse of the Qarditf
oflEden. - " ' . ' / ' / : / ' ' y::".
:. '.^"."*t.,:
John Larsenv the - game iMiaoeapolis
pjugger, ha s started in trainijig and ex
pects to try fbr.'ttieI'-lOO.^ilei^^ road^^^ record
during, the latter 'part*' 6f "the".: summer.
Laraea i s riding stronfly this season and
hit friends predict that he ca n ^ n (^
hational championship for the century -
ises to be largely attended/judging from
the number of wheelmen who,have signi
fied their intehtjon of taking part. All.
wheelmen and wheelwomen in the cityare
invited to attend-this run. Captain Hail
sen will be in charge of the run arid the
party will leave the Flour City club house
on ..Sixth street'and Second avenue S at
"&: 30 Sunday morning. The' pace will be
easy'and ho attempt at record breaking or
scorching will be made. ^
IN THE SQUABED"ClRCLE
It looks as ifr a match between Spike Sul
livan, and Jabez -,'White, the clever English
lightweight, to be.decided befcre the Nattonal
Sporting club of London, will be clinched to
day. Dr.' Ordway, representing the foreign
organization in New York, has received word
that the National Sporting club is prepared to
arrange a fifteen-round go between Spike and
the Englishman, provided the pair efcn, agree1
on, weight'.
r
According to a dispatch from.Denver* "Kid"
Broad has been selected*to box Young Corbett
ten rounds at Denver May 23. The weight Is
126 pounds, -weigh in at 3 o'clock on the day
of the encourter./ Dave Sullivan was origin
ally to- have faced.,Corbett on this date, but
the negotiations fell through
Kid Abel of Chicago was given the*decision
in. his- bout with Tommy SUllivan - of New
York a t St. Louis last night in the fourteenth
round oh the.disqualification of the New York
min, the latter's ^manager jumping Into the
r,lng. Sullivan practically won .the battle.on
a. foul: blow delivered below the belt At the
conclusion of the bout the police, managers
and handlers of the'boxers/and several spec
fators jumped into, the ring and became mixed
in. ah indiscriminate mass. It was with great
difficulty that order was finally restored.
Tom Jenkins last night again - demonstrated
that he is the superior of all the men
whoShep'ard,
have tried to conquer him in wrestling, by
throwing Jim Parr,.as he agreed to do. twice
in an hour. Jenkins secured' the first fajil. in
thirty-one minutes and the Second in about
nineteen^' Part* gav-:s_
him a fine battle, how
ever. '- - - - - " -
l '. : -- ".'-
Parr challeflges'Dan McLeodfor a purse of
12,000 in a straight catcli-as'-citch-can match.
Four thousand persons saw the contest t
: '-.Joe.'' Berpstein,- the featherweight:
pugilist
of New. Ywki/and Young. Corbett,- were
-hatched' yesterday for a fight t,o take place
on* June 2 at .Chicago. - "A- ''-- --':''- .-\-
Tihe run to Sha*bpee Sjinday under t h i
'~ ?-^*^r.L",*J^tt!B flour -Cfty cyclfsti^p'ro^r-..
Crocker and Hughes beat Hellstrom and
Hamlin by 208 pins in the* two-man bowling
tburiuimeht "at vth.e K. C. ,%Heys last.night
Crocker made high score and high-average.
The' score': , ' /..
Crocljcer ^......155 'Uo 21- 1771''
198 .2191,113
Hughes .159^ 14? 168 172' 175-' 1*8 Vtp
' Team total
! ...*.... .:,..:'..'...'.i,Q8&
HeilStrom ....133 154 178 W 179 184 976
Hamlin ......V.156 167 143 123. .167.143 89?
sola'made the highest percentage f increase,
raising her tbtal fr'ohJ 56,100 to /66,8O0. In
1901,-, Minnesota -had five men. in . ihe total
fifty. ^This year ten rain secured.A -place. .
-Minnesota men- who secured a place among
the all-fifty, *wjth their records'* are as fol
lows: G. W. Harsh, 1796.1 N.. P. B. Nelson,
1730.4 A'. P. Ashtr, 1654.1 '%. A. Alexander,
156i5 J - P. Walt*, .1553.7 A. ^KuBlman,
1548.5 O. L. Novig, ii53.1 "W. E. Johnston,
1527.1 L. S. Alden, 1499.9 E. Btsbee, 1473.5.
Seniors won more than half the. points--in
the St. Paul Central, hig^ schbpl?s annual
field day at Hamline yesterday/afternoon.
Rain marred the condition of the- track and
made the records poor. The summaries:
'100-yard DashBenham." '02 Edwards, *03
McDonald, 'MI Time,: 11 1-6.- "
"220-yard DashNolan, ''02',.. Edwards, *02
Benhaln./who-was third, disqualiffed and there
was no ,othe finish- Time 25.'
440-yard DashNoian,
: :.Heine, '02 Mag
nuson. Time,. 68 3-5. ' '-
Half-mile RunKennedy, f04*7Dawson, '02
PM'hke'rs, "03. ffm 2il5.
: / "'-"
:
:
'Mile Ruh-^Jjiiwson.: '02 Barton.,/03 Prln
gl*. 't3." Time. 5:11 1-5. " : /
I20^yard Hurdle^-Shepafd, '04^ Strain, '04
Graves, '02. Time, 191-$. . .
-
220-yar d "Hurdle^McCartit?^ *04 i Nolan," '02
Graves, '02.' Time,.30. ' / / :
Quartef-nxlle Slcycle-wymap, 102 Bunker,
'03 Brownu,*05. Time, 37. 2r5.
' One-mile /Bicycler-F.r6st,' '02 " Woods, '04
Wymah! '02.' T|me,.2::52'fr5. --
Two-mile. BicycleWyman', '02 ''Frost,- *03
Bunker, '05. Time, 7.
High Jump^-McDonald^ '041 Benham, *03
Nolan, '02 :.S- feet 5V$ inches'.
. Broad JuEDp^-Hernwthni '02 McDonald, f04
Benham, '03. 19 feet.finches. -.
Pole Vaiilt--Brnet^ '02 Smith.- '02 Brill,
t05. 8 feet 8V4 inches,- - :-? -
Shot PutHermann '02 Rade*r/'04 Plank
ers, .'03. 35 fe^t 5 .Inches.
Discus Throw-rPlttukers, '03 Iferinanij, '02
Rader, '04. 86 feet, 7 inches.'
Hammer ThrowMecbam, - '03
PI-ankers,'-*
TO,- ?onhdil'y !05/ 100 feet 1 Inch
'-
Rielay RaceDawson, Hermann, Edw*"^*.
Nolan, seniors r * McCartney, ' Rader, Kennedy,
Sophomores time, 4i5Q 4-5.
"The Iowa state cpliege tonnis tournament
at' Oskalopsa. yesterday .was,'not-largely st
tended. / Balled /'brothers Of.fthe itate.' uni
versity took the first - place, defeating the
state normal-pair. Score,-6-0, 6-0, 6-0.
J / H . Bailey'was-.fjrst' 1$ the singles Hol
brook of Ames second,, aid Zerfey of the state
normal third." '.-..,' i.-' './.- -.'-r.-.U.:*. .]','"'/' ',
being a shoot at,ten targets .with an entrance
fee of $1.20. Thejdlvision of.money wHl be
.according to-- the- Jack Rbbit" system, each
shooter "getting: 10 e^ats for'every target 'tro"-
ken, and th'S'^alatfce- in/ach event being
divided into jthfee ^inoneysi 40, .30 and 30 rpsr
cent. .' / - *
Twenty dollars will be divided for the'best
general a (.erases. The shoot is to be open
to all amateurs.
The twenty-fifth annual tournament of the
Iowa State Sportsmen's association closed
at. Ottumwa, yesterday, Fred Gilbert and
Russell, Kline of Spirit Lake won the honors
of all three days. Kltne yesterday won the
Ottumwa diamond badge for ten live birds.
Team': total, .1,875
WITHOOtUGE MHLETESf
Dr. L." G. Cooke, the university gymnasium
director,* .has received from Dr. Sargent of
Columbia university the 'oBlc'lal returnsi^
' - ottiER^ppRiHNaiiEws^
:The f^ev'against'tinfjj by ali?ohol automoT
biles prgahized by ..the/njinlstfcr of %gricul
ture, ty, Dupuy,. ,from. CbanpJ83iy France,
to -Arras- and ..r-e,tu^t-^to.-/St.--GerTnain,- 922
kilometers, began yesterday mbrnjng.'
--W.T- K. /ykn'derbilt,- J^.f\- was' nuber .53.
Hie "machine was'"sent' away"it''4:1(6.'' a. nj.i
running at the rate of sixty kilometers an
hour. -^-.v-: - -,- y-./ : --^'- '-'"-/.:.''
. Maurice Farnum,. the second-competitor to
stort^Waa thel'ilrstitQ, reaeh^Xyras,.' 410 kilo*
meters .frofei.'the s t * i ^ g . plaice. - Hlsv\time
was -four hours. - forty-eight minutes and flv?
and four-fifths seconds! - . / / / - - i
A' pinion/Of Mr.- Vande'rbilt's' autpmebiU
broke aid be. /^as ^bHS^, ^or/ih^doh 'the
racJe- at FOltwayil' *. .{, \.:.^* -,./ /
,The ^ n o n a iportsmtn'*- ^li hasVcewDieti
edj arrangements ,Tor, nolding V ^aurj^aqjsejat at
Winona.onVlieW*rfel: D*yr.%eeoranf
a
plan different frhpvythiti b^jfm* Jfied here
owe-sixth pure glycerin, is used.
byf Uis^riminating people | ' %
Its ^delicate odor of natural
flowers, the soothing effect of
th$-glycerin, its uniform tex-:
ture and ^risparenqy make it
the Mioice of those who know
for toilet anct hath. "
, c*^^.
gtinj3i snampoo.
Kirk's Rain Water MakerSoftens the Hardest Water
Send ten cents postage for free sample
Imparts to^hii^ WateU, ljoens and Muslins a del^
ca^and freshness such as no other starch can give

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