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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, December 05, 1902, Image 14

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1902-12-05/ed-1/seq-14/

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All New Fresh Goods Just From the Makers.
Knoblauch's New Shoe House
ASK for OIIP GOPHER $3.50 SHOES.
Gents' double sole Ename and
Colt Skin
Shoes,
per pair..
Gents' Box Calf Leather
Double Sole
Shoes,
per pair.
Boys' School Shoes, box calf and
satin calf,
per pair
$1.50 and
BDRN WALKS AND FENGES
Great Suffering Even Among: Fairly
Well-to-Do Classes for Want
of Coal.
Bpeoial to The Journal,
Omaha, Neb., Dec. 5.The cold wave
has caused intense suffering: among the
poorer and even the fairly well-to-do
classes on account of the lack of coal.
Omaha coal firms are swamped with or
ders. There is no anthracite to be had.
Two Omaha schools and a large number
of schools throughout the state are closed
on this account.
The Omaha street cars, fitted with hard
coal stoves, are without fires. The char
ity organizations and police forces of the
cities have more than they can do to take
care ot the needy. The wooden sidewalks
and fences are disappearing at a whole
sale rate for use as kindling.
78 YEARS OF AGE
HEALTHY KIDNEYS AND BLADDER
Mr. F. M. McDonough of 314 S. Fairfax St.,
Alexandria, Va., -who Is 78 years of age, says
he lias kept his kidneys and bladder healthy the
past 35 or 40 years by tho use of
WARNER'S SAFE CURE
A TRIM. BOTTLE OF THE WORLD'S
GREATEST KIDNEY' CUKB SENT ABSOLUTE-
LY. FREE TO EVERY READER OF THIS PA
PF.R. -*" P. M. M"cDONOUGH, 78 YEARS OLD,
lv"
On April 7th, 1002, Mr. McDonough wrote: I
am 78 years of age, I have used Warner's Safe
Cure for nearly 30 years oft and on. I was trou
bled with lame back, pains in my kidneys and
Inflammation of the bladder. As soon as I would
take a bottle of Warner's Safe Core my lame
ness left me and the irritation of the bladder
stopped. Several tlmea I caught cold and it
settled in my kidneys. I took Safe Cure "and
each time it completely cured me, " Before I
knew of "Safe Cure" I tried all kinds of reme
dies, but they did me no good. I have recom
mended Safe Cure to a number of people who
had kidney and bladder troubles and it worked
like magic. It is a blessing to those suffering
from any disjease of the kidneys. Yours truly,
Thousands of people who have died from kid
ney disease of one form or another because it
had poisoned their systems before they knew it,
. might have been saved had they examined their
urine and found out the true condition of their
kidneys. Put some morning urine into a glass
or bottle, let is stand 24 hours if then it is
cloudy, or has a brick dust sediment, or parti
cles float init your kidneys are diseased and
if not attended to at once your life will be cut
of? with Bright's disease, diabetes, uric acid poi
son or other complication's.
The free trial bottle has often been sufficient
to cure cases-of kidney disease when the simple
home test described abovo has been made in the
earlier stages of tho. disease.
Warner's Safe Cure will cure any disease of
the kidneys, liver, bladder or blood it will cure
Bright's disease, diabetes, gaul stones, rheuma
tism, rheumatic gout, swelling, painful passage
of urine, torpid liver, uric acid poison, indiges
tion and stomach trouble, which are so often
caused by the diseased condition of the kidneys.
Warner's Safe Cure is purely vegetable and
contains no narcotic or harmful drugs. It is
free from sediment and is pleasant to take. (Be-
ware of so-called kidney cures full of sediment
and of bad odorthey are harmful.) It does not
constipate. It kills the disease germs. Warner's
Safe Cure has been prescribed and used by lead
ing doctors for over 25 years and Is used in many
pi ominent hospitals exclusively.
WARNER'S SAFE PILLS move the bowels
gently and aid a speedy cure.
If you already know Warner's Safe Cure is
what you need you can^bny it at any drug store,
two regular sizes, 50 cents and $1.00 a bottle.
s Refuse Substitutes and Imitations
There Is none "Just as good" as Warner's.
Insist on the genuine, which always cures. Sub
stitutes contain harmful drugs which injure the
- j stem. '(-
: ' '
ft'? P
TRIAL BOTTLE FREE
To convince every sufferer"rrom diseases of the
kidneys, liver, bladder and blood that Warner's
Safe Cure will cure them, a trial bottle will be
sent, absolutely free, postpaid. Also a valuable
medical booklet which tells" all abont the diseases
ot the kidneys, liver and bladder, with n pre
scription" for each disease, and many of the
thousands of testimonials received daily from
grateful patients wlto^ have been cured by .War
ner's Sufe Cure. All'you have to do is to write
jjS'l. Warner's Safe Cure Company, Rochester, N. Y.,
*/* and mention having road this liberal otter in the
M, Minneapolis Journal. The genuineness of this
oitme in fully guaranteed.
*2 -
WINTER SHOES
OVERSHOES
517 Nicllet Avenus.
$3.5l 0
Cal f Leathe r Line d
83.5Lined 0
Shoes , box calf and
$L75
and Fleece Lined
(Syndicate Block.)
F. M. McDONOtJGH.
f^r v ^ ,,
Rubbers
Ladies' Skating^ Shoes, box calf
fine calf
tops,$2.50,
per pair
only.... Ladies' Fur Trimmed Romeos
hand sewed,
per pair
only Misses' Box Calf and Vici Kid
School Shoes,
per pair,
only ,
WHY 'FRISCO FELT HURT
A Typographical Error Gave Her
2,233 Cases of Bubonic Plague
Cruelty to Mr. Loud.
From The Journal Bureau, Room 45, Post Build
ing, Washington,
Washington, Dec. 6San Francisco peo
ple are much disturbed by the conse
quences of a slight typographical error
which occurred in an eastern paper.' I n
reporting the number of deaths from bu
bonic plague in that city, the paper stated
that "since February 2,233 deaths" had
occurred. The item should have read
"since Feb. 22, 33 deaths" occurred. The
misplaced comma swelled the score by
2,200. The Merchants' association of that
city has taken the matter up and is do
ing all possible to head off the mistake.
Meantime, the head, of the federal quar
antine service has determined to call a
conference of all the health officers of the
states, to meet in this city and talk the
matter over.
Trimme d Romeos ,
81.00,
3al f and Vic i Ki d
$1.50
Same Old Uncle.
Speakership plans and acquisitions have
not made any apparent change in Uncle
Joe Cannon. The day of the opening of
this session he sat in his committee room,
in his familiar seat at the end the long
table, in his familiar attitude (feet on
table), chewing the familiar stub of the
same old cigar, and greeting his friends
with that same heartfelt kindly profan
ity which seems like a, benediction. Con
gressmap. Roberts of Massachusetts voiced
a general sentiment when he said to him:
"Unless I can go on calling you Uncle
Jo e, why, damn it, I won't vote for you."
Whereupon they damned in unison and
it was agreed that Uncle should stand.
This Was Cruelty.
Among many magnificent floral pieces
seen in the house, of representatives on the
opening day, none was more so than a
huge basket of roses, Jamaican lilies and
orchids presented to Loud of California.
O n the card wa's the name, "J. C. Keller,"
and the inscription, "President of the Let
ter Carriers' association."
I t wi ll be recalled that this is the man
and the association credited with the
defeat of Loud in the campaign just
closed. '
The floral tribute was evidently in
tended as an expensive and exquisite sar
casm. I t was laying flowers oh the grave.
W. W . Jermane.
"PARALYSIS OF HEART"
Cause of the Sudden Death of Min
ister Alfred E. Buck in
Japan Yesterday.
. Yokohama, Dec. 6.Paralysis of tho
heart caused the death of United States
Minister Alfred E . Buck, which occurred
yesterday. The end was tragically sud
de n. Mr. Buck was the guest of the em
peror in a duck hunt in the Shinkhama
preserves. A bird had been netted and
the minister, with a jocular remark,
started to reset the net. Suddenly he
fell and without a word or groan expired
instantanteously. H e had suffered from
a weak heart for some time. Mrs. Buck
was not with the party.
Minister Buck was held In high esteem
in Japan and the flags on government
buildings have been placed at half mast.
Funeral has been set for Monday next.
Secretary J. M. Ferguson is in "charge of
the legation.
Alfred E. Buck owed his success in the diplo
matic service to the wflrm political and personal
friendship existing between himself and Presi
dent McKinley. Colonel Buck played an impor
tant part In the doings of the republican party in
the south. He was born at Foxcroft, Me., In
1832. He made his own way through college
and was gradnated with high honors, having been
the Latin salutatorian of his class. He taught
school at Hallowell, Me., and afterward became
principal of the Lewiston high school.
At the close of the civil war, through which
he fought with great credit, he was appointed
clerk of the United States circuit and district
courts of Georgia, resigning his position to be
come United States marshal in 1887.
A Proposal to Do Away With the
Naval Transport Business.
/t.
Washington, Dec. 5.Secretary Root
conferred yesterday with Quartermaster
General Ludington and Colonel Paltington,
in charge of the army transport service,
with regard to the bids recently received
for the transportation of troops and mili
tary supplies between tho Pacific coast
and the Philippines.
The lowest bid received was that of the
Boston company, running a line of steam
ships between Seattle and Manila. I t was
at rates below the regular commercial
rates. \
The main question to be determined
was whether the rates offered by the
Boston company will justify the govern
ment in the abandonment of the navy
transport service across the Pacific.
Although no bid was received, from
lines running out of-San Francisco, the
business interests of that city are active
in opposition to the transfer of the busi
ness to Seattle or any other port.
If you are too busy to bring your want
ad to The Journal, call up No. 9, either
line and The Journal will accommodate
you by taking your ad over the "phone.
If you wi ll kindly call in and pay for same
at your earliest convenience it will greatly
facilitate tho handling of these small
.amounts. *
.-,,.-.,
SEATTLE'S BID
*
ir ! ..
STILL ROOM FOR MORE
Great Northern's Manager's Ideas of
the Extent and Resources of
Canadian Northwest.
Special to The Journal.
Montreal, Dec. 5.J. A . Stevens, gen
eral manager of tho Great Northern, who
was in this city to-day made what he
called a friendly visit to Si r Thomas
Shaughnessy and David McNicbll of the
Canadian Pacific road. ' *
O n being asked as to the Great North
ern's plans in regard to Canada h o re
plied: "Just at present w e are .staying at
home and looking after our business which
keeps us pretty busy.
"No, I don't think it is Mr . Hill's inten
tion just at present to invade either your
northwest wheat belt or British Columbia,
"I think the Grand Trunk-Pacific pro
ject a grand thing for the Grand Trunk
and also for Canada. I t is just what you
want to open up your country. Room?
Why that country is so vast you eastern
people have no conception of its possibili
ties. D o you know in a few years a bil
li on bushels of wheat a year will be pro
duced !n that region. There is room for
half a dozen roads to open up, settle and
develop that vast region." '- .-
RAILROAD BUMBLES
The Possibility of Getting Government
Business Away from "'Frisco.
SEATTLE'S JOY
Senator Foster of Washington believes
that the transportation fight for govern
ment shipping has been won by Seattle.
H e says:
"The war department is profoundly im
pressed with the bid of the Boston Steam
ship company and with, the showing which
has been made by the business men inter
ested in securing for the Northern rail
roads and shipping companies the gov
ernment's carrying trade. General Lud
low figures out that the bid will amount to
this, that goods or men can be shipped
from Chicago to the Philippines for the
same cost that it costs now to. ship them
from San Francisco. I n other words, they
throw in 2,500 miles of railroad trans
portation.
"It is a great thing for the northwest
for our section of country and for all the
country bordering on the northwest lines
of railroad."
Senator Perkins has requested the de
partment to reopen the bidding in order
to allow San Francisco to put in another
bid. -
ADVANCES IN WEST
Freight Schedules Will B e Readjusted
Meeting In Chicago.
A telegram from Chicago states that the
example of eastern roads. in "readjusting
schedules" is to be followed by western
lines. Announcements indicate that the
advance wi ll be 10 per cent. A s high as 16
per cent was claimed on provisions, from
Chicago to New York.
The Central Freight association, meet
ing with Chairman J. F . Tucker, has been
making rates that will go into effe ct Dec.
8 on grain products, but not until Jan. 1
on some of the other classifications. Its
rates determine not only the shipping
charges to New York from here, but also
for western roads from the Mississippi.
The new figur es go to make up the rates
on through shipments to and from points
west of the river. That there were
changes in freight rates west of the. Mis
sissippi river was frankly admitted by
Chairman James V . Mahoney of the west
e m trunk line committee yesterday in
Chicago.
Strike Talk Not Authoritative.
Grand Master Morrisey of, the Brother
hood of Ra'ilWay Trailimen lias'dictated a
.statement concerning - the supposed .com
bined movement of four organizations for
an advance in wages. H e says the reports
emanating from Chicago that 170,000/ men,
represented by the established' railway
labor organizations were forming a federa
tion or combination for the purpose tof
making a concerted demand for increased
wages on the railway companies in the
territory west of Chicago are hot ' authori
tative.
C. G. W.'s Plans.
The circular issued by President A . B .
Stickney of the Chicago Great Western
calling for the February meeting of the
stockholders, has the following:
"The company has arranged with the
proprietors of the Mason City & Fort
Dodge Railroad company to extend its
lines to Omaha and Sioux City and to pur
chase and improve certain branch lines
belonging to this company, together mak
ing a system of about 503 miles connecting
with the main lines of the Chicago Great
Western at Oelwein, Iowa, and Hayfiel d,
Minn."
Iowa Railroad Figures.
The annual report of the Iowa railroad
commission shows a $4,000,000 increase in
earnings and a ?2,000,000 increase in oper
ating expenses. The compensation to em
ployes has decreased from $1.S8 in 1901 to
$1.82 in 1902. The aggregate increase,
however, from $22,253,822.79 to $23,097,-
385.32.. The earnings figures are as fol
lows:
1902
Mileage Cross earnings. ,
Net earnings
Expenses Net earnings per mile ,
1901
Mileage ,
Gross earnings
Expenses Net earnings '.'.,
Net earnings per mile ...-
The Great Western'Is in the market for $800,-
000 worth of equipment.
K. B. Thomas has been elected president of- the
Lehigh Valley road to succeed Alfred Walter.
The taking over of the Fort Townsend South
ern road yesterday by the Northern Pacific gives
control of all the smaller lines of the state.
The Chicago. Milwaukee & St. Paul has Issued
a booklet on "The Pioneer Limited," Illustrated
with cuts of the coaches and views along the
line. It is Yery attractive. -
The Rock Island has declared the - regular
quarterly dividend of l\i per cent. No action
was taken as to dividends on the stock of the
new Rock Island company.
Diners are to be attached to the Minneapolis
Chicago train of the .Rock Island, so that passen
gers inuy breakfast before entering Chicago. On
Wednesdays, beginning Dec. It , a special tourist
sleeper will be attached to the train for Los
Angeles over the El Paso-Southern Pacific route.
A CUBAN TREATY
The Outlook for Reciprocity Is Now
Considered Good.
RAILROAD NOTES.
Washington, Dec. 5.The . outlook for
reciprocity with. Cuba is considered good
by those senators who will have charge of
the treaty.
Information from Minister Squiers is to
the effe ct that the treaty has been prac
tically agreed upon and will be signed
within a few days. The provisions of the
treaty are similar to those of the reciproc
ity bill before the senate last session for
a 20 per cent reduction on Cuban products
coming into the United States,, and reduc
tions ranging from 20'to 40 per cent to be
granted on various products of the United
States imported into Cuba.
OLD aiVEE CAPTAIN SICK. ' --
Cairo. 111., Dec. 5.Captain James Fitzgerald
of the Peters Lee, one of the oldest ..river men
now in the service here, wastaken..off his boat
here "to-day In a delirious condition,,. having been
taken sick during the trip ' , .Jiis condition is
considered serious. ' ^_v -'V^ - -~-r j ^
"The Golden State," '^Uijio^r the" Tur
qupise Sky," "Glimpses of Mexico""Lo s
Angeles," are the titles of-some of the
elegant booklets" which ca,n"b'e had at the
Rock Island ticket office, #22 Nicollet av.
You Make N o Mistake ' - *
When you use Journal Want Ads only
1 ceftt a word under any heading. Noth
Ling le?s ,thaja ji$ cfn^.,
"wyw^1
$9,814.00
59,106.191.41 19.266.39t5.58 33,830 T94.8.i
' 2.003.98
$9,353.90
54.764.635.95
37,449.781.10
17,314.665.85
1,851.06
t
jiS*
Meiifs House Coats
We are now talking to womenfor women buy
most of the . House Coats. There's easy and
splendid choosing here. The styles here are dif
ferent from those shown in many storesours
are exclusive. We refer especially to the hand
some "Tuxedo" style, cut either single or double
breasted, in fancy and quiet two-tone effects.
All this fineness
$5, $6,$8 to $12.
A most handsome selection of "Oxford" Silk
Mufflers, made of costly short silk endsnot one
worth less than $1.00. Very choice patterns
divided?int0 two lots
Meq's Winter Caps
RIGHTS *N QUOTATIONS
Bucket-shop Qases Come Up, in Court
in Illinois, y
Chicago, Dec. 5.The property rights of
the board of trade in its market quota
tions, carrying the right to prevent buck
e t shops from, issuing them, was more
fullyl established yesterday, by a decision
of Judge Humphrey in the "United States
circuit court sitting at Springfield.
H e enjoined! rorty so-called bcket-
Should be attractive to all ladies from this time on. For the
next four months you can expect to a certainty that we will have
weather cold enough to make Furs and heavy Cloaks almost a
necessity. You who have delayed (on account of mild weather)
will come all in a rush and want a coat or wrap at once, but don't
forget that every store is crowded with orders already taken, and
that you will have to wait a long time to get anything made to
orderand even from ready-made stock in Cloaks you will have
to wait to get any needed alterations made So be wise, and attend
to this npw-^.for you have waited foo long already. We are in
eleifant shape in our department of ,
CLOAKS AND SUITS
- Stock ail new and fresh, and (just now) the alteration room
well cleaned up, so we enn give quick deliveries. One week may
change the situation.so stock will be broken and alteration room
crowded, thus causing delays. We stand on the merits
goods in both - -. ."''y
FUKS AND CLOAKS
and know our goods are right in style, quality and price. Come
and lo6k us over, and no matter where you buy get at it or
you'll regret it.
wmmmmm
ftjr
50c and 69c
:i A special offering of genuine
Alaska pieced Seal CapsDe
troit, Turbin and College
shapes. Choice fi "5 K A
at...... $Oe
Fine selected Seal Caps, in all
shapes
- STSlN^tOCM Q
t at
$7.50 and $10
Plain Kerseys and fancy Scotch
Caps, in great variety, e|^_
at r^,,..... uUC
All the leading style Caps, in
fancy Scotches, Plain Cloths,
including the celebrated "Gor
.don Caps"
If^fll
Tailor-Made Suits
and Overcoats
Just take a look at ours--you can'' t help but notice how different they are front the
ordinary ready-made. They have that smart-, - natty
appearance. We claim our garments to be the perfection of tailoring and we
assume all risks. Nothing pleases us more than to have a customer examine closely
the fabric, the lining and workmanship. Such buyers appreciate our clothing.
If you are looking for something at a moderate
price in a suit or overcoat, why not buy the kind
that is made right. We are showing a great va
riety ot* newest fabrics, cor- d* 4 C \f\
rectly fashioned. Suits and ^ n I - T ti lwl
overcoats at $10, $12.50 and * ^ * ** *
Special good Overcoats of excellent quality frieze,
black or Oxford shades, plain /t 4 g\ g\ g\
aar?... $ 10.00
Cheviot and Vicuna finished d* -f ^ & \
Overcoats.all shades.all lengths,2% I JL~*H\ 1
handsomely tailored ..........^ ***** v
$1, $1.50 and $2
shop keepers in the southern district of
Illinois from "obtaining, receiving, sell
ing, or distributing the market quotations
of the board of trade of the city of Chi
cago, and from aiding, abetting or assist
ing others in the taking or distribution of
said quotations, and the defendants are
ordered to-plead or answer herein by Jan.
1, 1903."
Sfelghfng Is Here.
Now is the time to buy, sell or exchange
your cutter. Use the Journal Classified
Columns and the results wi ll be sure.
' ''*.'-:'. v''
j
L-, IVIIIMN
Headquarters for Boys' Wear.
An Unusual Sale of Boys' Long Pant SuitsSizes
14 to 20 in all the newest fabrics $10.00, $12.00 and
many $14.00 suitsbunched at one price Saturday
only LONG OVERCOATS for boys 7 to 16 years
in Oxfords, grays, blacks and plaidsmade
with vertical pocketsworth to $8, for
ALL WOOL BLUE CHINCHILLA REEFERSMade
ulster collarin sizes 6 to 17 years
seldom sold at less than $4.50.
Saturday NORFOLK SUITS for boys 3 to 16 years
breasted Suits, in heavy Kersey, Cassimeres
and Sergesbig variety of nobby patterns.
$4, $5 Suits for quick selling only
NOBBY NORFOLK SUITS3 to 12 years
in a dark, fancy striped Cassimere
while they last
EXTRA SPECIALVest Suits for boys 8
to 17 yearsin Kerseys and Sergesthe
new cut. Saturday
A SENSATION50c and 75c Knee Pantssizes
3 to 16in Corduroys and All Wool Cheviots
extra special for one day, Saturday.
BOYS' SWEATERS Strictly all woolin
plain and college stripesworth doublefor
sizes 24 to 34
BOYS' LEATHER FACED MITTENSheavy
wool lined, close-fitting wrists.
Special..... .v
of' ou'r
Just received, a handsome lot of merchant-tailored
Suitsarrived too late for our early fine tradehave
bought them to sell at $22.00 and $25.00.W
a concession and are now
offering these exclusive*designed
suits at
Extra Heavy Melton Overcoats,
in Worsted, Cheviots and
Vicunas, at
Most Handsome Overcoatsin black, Worsted, Chev
iots, the celebrated St, George
Kerseys and high grade Chev
iots and Meltons, at
v
ORTH
LIMITED
Electric LfehtedObserva-
tion Cars to Portland, Ore., via
Butte, Spokane, Seattle, Tacoma
. Pacific Express
Fargo,Helen a, Butte, Spokane, *10:45
Seattle, Tanoma, Portland pm
Fargo and Leech Lake Local
St. Clond, Little Falls, Brain- f 9:10
erd. Walker, Bemldji, Fargo....
Dakota and Manitoba Express
Fergus Falls, Wahpeton,
Moorhead, Fargo, Jamestown, _ _ _
Bismarck, Mandan, Crookston,, 8135
Grand Forks, Grafton, Winnipegl pm
"Duluth Short Line1'
TRAINS TO
DULUTH AND SUPERIOR
"Daily. tKx. Sunday, i
NOTE"Duluth Short Line" trains for Duloth
and West Superior arrive at and Depart from "Mil
waukee" Station. Minneapolis. All other trains at
Union Station in Minneapolis.
All trains use Union Station, St. Paul.
TICKET OFFICE
Chicago, Milwaukee &
SI. Paul Railway.
Ticket Office. 328 Nicollet av. 'Phone 122.
aUaily. bEx. Stm. dEx. Sat.l Leave. | Arrive.
'Chicago, La Crosse. MiHw'keeia-.7:50am
Chicago, La Crosse. MJlw'kee a 5:2rn
Chicago "Pioneer" Limited a 8:00pui
Milwaukee, La X.. Wtnona.. a-2:20pm
Chicago, Faribault, Dubuque a 3:50n.m
Red Wing and Rochester 1) 2:2ip
Lacrosse. Dubttq.. Rk. Island b 7:50am
Northfield, Faribault, K. City a 7:"0a
Ortonville, Milbank, Aberd'n b J:23auij
Orlonville, Aberdeen, Fargo, a 7:00pm
Northfield, Faribault. Austin b 7:1.5pm,
bDaily except Sunday.
"Tho Maple Leaf Route."
ty Ticket Office, 5th & Nicollet. MlnneapoH*.
Depot: Washington & 10th Are. S.
aEx. Sunday. Others Daily.|Min'polis.]Min'poHs.
Kenyon, Dodge Center,
Oelwein. Dubuque, Free
port, Chicago and East..
Cedar Falls, Waterloo. Mar-j 10:00 am
shall town, Des Moines, 8:00 pm
St. Joseph. Kansas City.. 10:45 pm
: -
Cannon Falls, Bed Wing .1 10:00 ami 1:25 pm
|a 4:35 pm|all:20 am
Northfield, Faribault,
terville, Mankato . .
Hayfield, Austin, Lyle, Ma-a 7:40 ami 11:20 am
son City j 4:35 pm|a 8:00 pm
Eagle Grove, Fort Dodge. .|a 7:40 am|a 8:00 pm
^^r^ilfrtJuRjriM
Office, 300 Nlc. 'Phone, Main S60. Union Depot.
Leave, laDaily. bE^c. Sun. cSun. only..! Arrive.
19 NICOLLET BLOCK.
TELEPHONE MAIN 1134.
Telephone Main 262.
I Leave. I Arrive.
9:55am
v$
. . JLIUIUU A
b 8:30am|St. Cloud, Cass Lake, Bemidji|b 4:51pm
b 8:30am|..TIntah,, Aberdeen, Fargo. .|b 4:51pm
To Montana & ) -
Pacific Coast $* 2:00pm
blO:23ani|WiUronr. Sioux Falls, Fargo, |
I... Watertow n. Sioux City ...lb 5:55pm
b :12pm|Elk River. Milaea, Sandstone!b :50aui
b 5:10pm|..Wayzata and Hutchinson. J b 8:55am
a 8.4.pm| .Minn, and Dak. Express.. |a tj:55aiu
a 7:40pra)Fargo. Gd. Forks, Winnipegla 7:10am
a 8:50pm|Willmar, Sioux Falls, Yank
I ton, Sioux City |a 6.48am j
all:50pm \ , ,.
{nvtR
b 9:25am \ Minneapolis to Data* )
Sleeper for 11:50 train ready at 9 p. in.
I Leave
*10:02
y '{built-for-you-alone
NORTH-WESTERN |INEJ
li" lir.CTDUAftDVl'^ 8
Ticket Office, 600 Nicollet. 'Phone, 240 Main.
Ex. Sun. Others daily. | Leave. | Arrive.
Chi'go, Milw'kee, Mad'n..
Chicago^Atlantic Exp....
ChicagoFast Mall 1
North-Western Limited
Chi'go, Milw'kee, Mad'n. |
Duluth, Superior, Ashland.
Wausau, F.dn Lac, Gr. Bay|
Twilight Limited i
Duluth, Superior, Ashland.)
Elmore, Algona, Des M. .
Su. City, Su. Falls, Mitchell
Huron. Redfield, Pierre...
Su. City. Omaha. Kan. City
New Ulm, St. James
Watert'n, Huron, Redfield.
D. Moines, Mitchell, S. F.
Omaha Limited I
Su. City, Omaha, Kan. City|
Arrive
*1:50
am pm
* 7:05*
am
t5:20
a m pm
*6:50
t0:15A *2:00Hp *IO:30.Mp
- 7:40 ami 10:40 pm
8:00 pm 8:00 am
10:43 pm| 1:25 pm
t
am
*7
MINNEAPOUS S Wash, and Hen. Avs
ST. LOUIS R. R.
"7:0 0:
_ ... I a 0:10am
'Phone No., 225. St. Louis Depot.
aEx. Sunday. Others Dally.! Leave. | Arrive.
Watertown and Storm Lake! I
Express ,. la 8:47 amfa 5:15 pa
Omaha. Des Moines. Kan-j 1
sas City, Mason City and| . j
Marshalltntvn la 9:35 arofa 6:50 pm
Estherville and Madison... 1 6:15 pml 10:00 am
"NORTH STAR LrMITED-n.iKo
Chicago and St. Louis..I-
Peoria Limited 7:45 pml 8:15 am
Omaha nnd Des Moines i
Limited 1 S:35 pm) 7:25 am
0. m r^%, -
OFFICE,
'Phones, N. W.
Trains leave and
aopm
:01pm :0Oam
20pm 20ain
:01pm
30pm 20piu
45pm
:00am
20am
Albert Lea. Cedar Rapids, I j
Davenport, Rock Island, Moline 9:10 am 4:53 pm
Chicago. Burlington, Quincy |
and St. Louis |7:10 pm!8:40 am
Minneapolis, St Paul & SanltSte. Marie
Lv. Depot, 3d and Washington avs S. - Ar.
9:45 ami Pacific Espres, daily 16:00 pm
6:35 pm) Atlantic Limited, dally |9:30 am
Depot. 5th and Washington avs N.
6:15 pml
8:55 ami
TRAINS
FOR
Letv 7:25 a.
Arrive 8:50 a
8:00 pm
8:00 am
1:25 pm
7:40 amla 8:00 pm
5:0 pm| 10:20 am
Burlington Koate^SSgSaffiSr*
Leave for
b C:0 8
$18.00emade
$15.00
ck , Worsted , Chev -
$18.00
1.
..Dakota Express, ex.
. Rhinelander Local, e i
MILWAUKEE and CHICAGO
Nico i i r
e
m fi.IC-
w P'
| "'"-
4
m
n
L
A
822
2147
arrive Milwaukee Depot daily.
Leave I Arrive
For. I From.
WISQtNSIN CENTRAL RV.
%
*" Corner
Nicollet and
Third St,
$8
*
7:50 am
10:20 pm
5:35 pm
8.00 ..
p m
10:25 pm
11:25 pm
7:35 am
5:35 pm
4:00
p in
*7:10 am
9:30 am
7:10 am
9:30 am
*4:20 pm
7:30 pm
7:30 pm
8:30 I
p m I
Ry
^**w
NICOLLET AV.
T. C. 635.
m. and 7:05 p. m. daily,
m. and 5:35 p. m. dally.
7.-M a m
8:00 pa
9:00 am
9:85 p m
8:10 pm
8:10 pm
8:10 pm
8:10 pm
10:35 am
8:45 am
8:45 am
8:10 a m
Sun...|S:S0 am
. Sun..)6:05 pm

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