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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, January 23, 1903, Image 10

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1903-01-23/ed-1/seq-10/

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WE MUST CLOS E
'i
ALL DAY MONDAY
To oantftloto altf&ratgontt, and will mako Saturday tho
greatest Shoo and Qvorooat Day in thin olty'a hMory.
Take your choice tomorrow from our stock of over
1.0U0 pairs men's $5 00 box calf, enamel, patent
leather Shoes, in all sizes and 4*9 R(l
widths
800 pairs men's $3.50 box calf, velour calf, vici kid
and patent leather shoes, in all sizes d 4 " 7 R
and widths, choice ^ m m m %3
100 pairs men's high cuts, worth $3.50,
choice
Take your pick to-morrow of any Over- d* i %
coat in the house, worth up to $30, choice *K - "
Take your choice ot any Overcoat flj"7 ft ft
worth up to $20 at, choice, only
All our $1.00 Men's Caps go at
only
All our 75c and 50c Men's Caps "f If*
gfo at only - *J* **
H.E.HUSKINS
INSURING RAGE HORSES
Practice Not So Common Here as in
Europe, Says C. H.
Shaier.
C H Shafer of St Louis, a representa
tive of E J Arnold & Co owners of one
of the largest racing stajbles in the coun
t s is now at the West Hotel in this city
Speaking of the insurance policy of $112,
000 taken out by M W Savage on t*he life
of Dan Patch, Mr Shafej said
' I was surprised at the amount of the
policy, because it is not common in Ameri
ca to insure race horses, especially harness
horses I do not suppose lhat more than
lou runners In this country are insured,
although certain firms make a practice
of insuring all their valuable animals
Arnold & Co carry insurance upon all
their good horses
'Generally speaking however the in
surance carried on American horses is
email American companies will not in
sure race horses, and all the insurance
carried in the United States is with Eng
lish concerns In England it is not un
usual to see a horse insured for $100 000
"Possibly one reason the American
Pre=Inventory
Sale of
t Buckingham, Ebomzed case, full size, just out of our 6|QR
shops, in fiuecondition Wlw
/ WillafdOnly slightly used in tine condition. Mahog
any case
1 Emoi*son9 No* 5538In extra fine order. Very handsome, rose
wood case, full, rich tone, an exceptionally good ^fii^l
piano for
t Lemuel Gilbert Good for practice purposes. QAA
Tnis sale only
1 Ohiokorlng Brand Full size and in good order a Qf|*A
hue instrument for conservatory or lod?e room ^ I %9 %M
'SurSheet Music DepUs3ilHZ.
-
Popular Music Day,i?^iTo^ Z^l
sell us. (A complete stocK of the Latest Hits of the day to select from)
REMEMBER/
10,000 new pieces went on
sale this morning at 6 cents
per copy. If you didn't
look them over to-day, do
so tomorrow. 41-43 8. SIXTH ST.
m^
34 SOUTH SIXTH STREET.
When you order
crackers sent with your
other groceries
and don't want them
scented by
your other groceries,
tell the grocer
Uneeda B
Protected by the In-er-seal Package
with red and white seal.
m - -
ISCUlt
NATIONAL BISCUIT COMPANY"
UPRIGHT PIANOS
J
SQUARE PIANOS
EASY MONTHLY PAYMENTS
New Stool and Scarf with each instrument.
FRIDAY EVENING,
companies do not like to take this sort of
risk is because the life of the race horse
especially a runner is so precarious A
runnei that is worth $2 000 to-day (and
you can buy a very good horse for that
amount) may not be worth a dollar to
morrow The average life of a runner is
about six years at least after that age
most of them are worth little f6r racing
purposes Some horses however, are
good for years after they pass this limit
Take Scotch Plaid, for instance That
horse will hobble up to the post on three
legs but when the word is given will run
himself fairly out and never fail to land
a piece of the money "
The Foresters basket ball team of Red
Wing has started a ten days* trip through
Wisconsin to play Foni du Lac Appleton,
Sheboygan Port Washington Milwaukee
and Portage These are the six best
teams in the state
PIANOS
*
q^&l#
$1.95
V'IW V
GREAT TRIP FOR A TUG.
New York Jan 23 The comparatively small
naval tug Fortune built thirty eight years ago
sister craft of the tug Leyden, which was
wrecked on Wednesday off Bloct island is now
on her way round Cape Horn from Culebra W
I to the Bremerton navy yard state of "Wash
ington a distance of more than 13 000 miles
Only once before has a small tug boat attempted
the feat of rounding the Horn The Fortune s
gross tonnage amounts to only 378 From stem
to stern she measures but 137 feet with a beam
of 26 feet She has however strong engines,
with an indicated horse pow er of 340
35c
AND
$14w 8
wOv
^mm%M
IT GOT THE FLOUR
Wisconsin Central in 1902
Into First Place as *^*
Flour Carrier.
It Took Out of Minneapolis 17.31
Per Cent of Entire Output
of the Hills,
The year 1902 witnessed a shifting In
merchandise movements in and out of
Minneapolis, so important as to change the
relathe position of several of the railroads
entering the citj A suiprising change
is found in the outwaid movement of
flour, three of the greatest systems en
tering the city being forced into the back
ground, while a small, aggressive road
mo\ed up to first place The Wisconsin
Central has become the'^mo'st important
distributing factor in the Minneapolis flour
industry having taken out of the city
2 912,000 barrelsa greater quantity than
carried bv anj other road
The gain is better illustrated by the
percentage figures For the ten roads
TV hose solicitors met in competition in the
lich field of the Minneapolis milling m
dustiy, thore weie last year 16 818,000
barrels of flour to carry out The "Wis
consin Central saw this as an inviting field
and was at all times an aggressive bid
der for business From figures compiled
in the office of the secretary of the Min
neapolis Chamber of Commerce, it Is
shown that, while in 1901 the Wisconsin
Central got 9 07 per cent of the total busi
ness and ranked seventh in importance,
in 1902 it captured 17 31 per cent, jump
ing from seventh to first place While
there was again of 823,000 barrels over
1901 in the flour tonnage provided by the
Minneapolis mills, this was not enough to
account for the phenomenal gain in Wis
consin Central shipments even If the road
had been able to get all the increase
against the other nine roads It was not
enough for the Wisconsin Central man
agement that their load should have a
proportionate share of the business They
had the Manitowoc car ferry air-line route
to utilize, they proposed to make their
road carry the largest proportional ton
nage of flour of any road In the world,
and they came into Minneapolis not to
ask for business but to take it
The Soo about held its own The Great
Northern hauled a little more flour to the
head of the lakes than in the previous
year The Burlington and Minneapolis
& St Louis made slight gains The North
ern Pacific lost slightly The Rock Island
was too new in the field to cut much
figure But the big Minneapolis-Chicago
lines had business taken away from them
From 19 16 per cent of the total traffic in
1901 the Milwaukee fell to 13 50 per cent,
shipments decreasing from 3 064 000 bar
rels to 2 281 000 Ihe North-Western took
out 1 651 000 barrels In 1901 and 1 488 000
in 1902 falling from 10 31 to 8 84 per cent
The Great Western handled 2,509 000 bar
rels in 1901 and 2 077,000 in 1902, falling
from 15 70 to 12 35 per cent
The fact that at times the Minneapolis
Chicago roads were congested with mis
cellaneous freight made them somewhat
less active in defending themselves
against the Wisconsin Centrals aggres
siveness than would otherwise have been
the case The Wisconsin Central mean
while has been exhausting every effort in
exploiting the Manitowoc-Lake Michigan
line as the natural eastern outlet for Min
neapolis, with a view to maintaining first
position in a year of less general activity,
when competition for Minneapolis flour
business may be fiercer.
MAY CUT RATES AWAY DOWN
Western Roads May Go After Philippine
Flour Traffic.
A strife between the Atlantic and the
Pacific routes over the first shipment of
flour from Minneapolis to the Philippines
will undoubtedly result in the establish
ment of a new waterway route to the new
possessions in the orient
One of the roads reaching the Pacific
coast from this city is expected to make
a rail rate off 25 centfa a hundred to the
coast on the Pillsbury-Washburn ship
ment of 1 000 barrels to Manila Ihe^rate
to the coast is now about 70 cents
The late to the Atlantic coast for e x
port is 25 cents Added to this the prob
able rate to Hongkong from New York of
32 cents will make the shipment cost
about 57 cents a hundred To compete
with this the Pacific steamship lines will
undoubtedly make a rate as low as the
Atlantic ocean rate of 32 cents This
would give the west route a time advant
age with equal rates
A cut from 70 cents to 25 cents in the
cost of rail transportation will insure
prominence to the demands of the new
Pacific coast water route The opportun
ity has come to make good the assertions
made bjr railroatd managers of north coast
lines as to the advantages of transpor
tation over their sy&terns as against those
of the eastern routes.
TRANSPORTATION OF TROOPS
Many Will Have to Be MovedBids Al
ready Advertised For.
Ihe railroads are figuring on the trans
portation of large bodies of troops to the
stations on the coast Bids for the First
regiments of infartry and cavalry havo
already been advertised for The Thir
teenth infantry and Fourteenth cavalry
have been ordered to be ready to leave
San Francisco by March 1
The chief quartermaster of the Depart
ment of Dakota, who will have charge of
the transportation of the Thirteenth cav
alry, stationed at Forts Meade, Yellow
stone, Keogh and Yates will boon adver
tise for bids The Northern Pacifc and
the Great Northern will ha\e the business
as far as the coast, and the Southern
Pacific will have it from Seattle and
Portland to San Francisco, a/? the latter
is a free lard grar road and must carry
the soldiers without charge The North*
era Pacific will be required to carry the
men at half fare Competition will come
in for transportation of the Fourteenth
infantry at Forts Wavne, Brady and Por
ter For the men at Fort Brady, Mich,
the Soo is contemplating offering a bid
That road could carrv the soldiers from
the Soo over its line through St Paul and
over the Canadian Pacific to the coast.
The men could also be sent from Fort
Brady across Michigan, through Ashland,
Wis , Duluth, and thence o\er the North
ern Pacific /
MR. STICKNEY'S DEFENSE.
It Includes Severe Ararlgnment of
cago Live Stock Association.
A B Stickney who was responsible
for the live stock rates of August, which
brought about the present hearhrg before
the interstate commerce commission at
Chicago, denied his seven-year" eohtract
with the packers yesterday on the stand
Mr Stickney's defense was coupled
with an attack upon the Chicago Live
Stock exchange and upon his competitors*
"In his criticisms of the Chicago Live
Stock association he declared that com
pany, whose assets were a few chairs and
an office desk, collected during 1901 com
missions amounting to $3,500,000, against
an income of $2,451,956 received by the
Union *Stock Yards company, and that
these commissions amounted to over 4o
per cent of the local freight charges upon
the stock brought into Chicago
Mr Tomlinson, of the exchange, hojw
e\er, showed that the commissions col
lected amounted to $2,514,526, ^while ihe
freight charges were $14,258,400, about ,15
.per cent instead of 40 ^ ^anw^r 5*d*
Speaking of the ltc r^cMnTrafeThSue
THE MINNEAPOLIS JOURNAL.
byt ihH Great Western, Mr Stickney de
clared that as soon as It became known
three of his competitors made a 12c
Tfltte on live stock betwaap. the Missouri
river jftnd Chicago, whiolrleft them a net
rate pf 7 and 8 cents per hundred weight
for Ruling
lj
t
Injured none but themselves
M P Stickney followed the lead of other
railroad officials, who unanimously as
serted that the rates as at present ad
justed favored Chicaga^ajgd Vent further
by giving figures, wl^h^te said proved
th#fe*hfc Missouri river points .and St Paul
"w*r& ^entitled to slaugMefeJbout 40 per
cent" of all the hogs^fifa* c1|le raised in
the, entire country
A. C Bird, third vice president of the
Milwaukee, declared that rates, on li\e
stock were too low, and did not bear a
just share df transportation charges F
A Delano, of the Burlington, was also a
witness , w
the traffic 600 miles and which
G. N.-C. P. Alliance.v
Information comes from Montreal that
"a leading director of the Canadian Pa
cific railway" is authority for the state
ment that an alliance has been foimed
between the Great Northern and the
Canadian Pacific interests New York
representatives of the Great Northern
say that they know nothing about an al
liance between that company and the
Canadian Pacific
KAILROAD NOTES
The Milwaukee road yesterday sent to the state
treasurei i click foi S25 000 to apply on its
gross earnings taxes foi 1V) The total paid
by the company to date is $165,000
General Manager W A Scot of the Omaha
road is seriously ill in St ?aul Mr Scott hai
been confined to his heme for ten davs oi more
tsom an intestinal trouble which has become
acute, and complications are threatened
A few changes have been made in the general
freight office of the Omaha us a result of the
lesignation of It W Ilubbell, formerly rate
clerk H M Warren tariff clerk, succeeds Mr
Hubbell and C M Stow til chief clerk of the
Omaha's division office at Omaha, becomes tariff
clerk
W G Johnson has been made auditor of die
burements of the Northern Pacific He will
have change of bills of other companies for
rentals, car repaiis etc as well as his other
duties as also that in regard to payrolls and
the distibutton of labor and material All mat
teis relative to geueial accounts will be ad
dressed to Controller Gray
The ad valorem railroad tax in Michigan
which affects the Soo among others, has been
i educed bj the state tax commission $9 522,000
The aggregate valuation is $208,212,500 The
Michigan Central was reduced fiom $47 000,000
to $45,000,000, Pere Marquette from $27,000 000
to $26,000,000 Grand Rapids &, Indiana reduced
$1,000,000 Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul re
duced $600,000 Xhe valuation of the Lake Shore
& Michigan Southern has increased $1,000,000,
and that of the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic,
$1,120,000
Rothe and Thompson won high score at the
Minneapolis Whist Club last night with fifteen
tricks plus
Section ANorth and SouthGage and Luther
$1, Fox and Ha\es, SO, Rothe and Thompson, 92
Nantr and Mucker, b6, Lane and Kneeland, 87
Prince and Johnson, 40 Gulwltz and McKusick,
82 Parsons and Sackett 80, average 8S%
Kast and WestLederer and Guderaine 114
Pe Lewen and Hawkins, 115 Pierce and Barnes
103, Clarke and IvlJbourne 109 Austin and Jan
nev 108 Boutell and Moulder, 116 Mileli and
"VVesbett, 118 Sykes and Perkins, 15 Average,
111%
Section BNorth and SouthWodob and
Sprague, 115 Pike and Bechtel 111 I ongbrake
and Carpenter, 110 Kerr and Holbeit 110
Mcholson And -FalmePtockv 111, Giay and Sulli
van, 115, Haris and Brown, 116 Average,
112 4 7 "
East and W estPugh and Jones 80 Chase and
Murphv 81 Taul and Barnard 85 Todd and
Bagley 85 Bamev and Jennison 84 Taylor
and Brinsmaid, 80, Kennedy tfnd Satterlee 4
Average, 82 3-7
Section ANorth and SouthCage and Luther,
110 Lederr and" Guderaine, 110 Fox and ilaves
113, Hothe and lhomn&on 120 Nantz and Muck
o\, 110 Lane and Kutilnnd 111 Prince and
Johnson, 114, Guiwftz and McKusick, 116 Aver
age, 113%
fcast and WestUP Lewen and Hawkins 85
Pierce and Barnes, S2 Clarke and Kilbourne,
82, Austin and Janney in' Boutelle and Moulder,
f5, Millers and Wesbett 84, Sykes and Per
kins, 81, Parsons and Sackett, 79 ( Average
81%
Section BXcrth and SouthWoods and
.^Prague, 101, Pugh and Jones, 96, Harris and
Brown, H Longbiake and Carpenter 97 Kerr
and Hobert, loo Nicholson and rahnestoek 98,
Gray and Sulllvjn, 102 Average 99 4 7
East and WestChase and Murphj, 94 Paulp
ind Barnard, 90 Todd and Bagley, 101 Barnrj
and Jennison, 9S liylor and Brinsmaid 86
Pike and Bechtel, 97, Kennedy and Satterlee
9I Average, 1)5 3 7
horses ever gotten together in the west in a
decade, which stable is headed by McChesney
was not permitted to race in New York or Call
fornla orting to the ruling against him in
France Durnell was of the opinion that Mc
Chesney could beat Herrais the crack colt of
the east, and had friends and admirers of his
colt who would have wagered a fortune on his
chances had the jockey club not blocked the
match
Durnell stated last night that he would not
ride or race in France, but that America and
especially f.ew York, was good enough for
him
McChesney, Golden Rule Aliban, The Lady
Lucien Appleby and Rolling Baer are the stars
of the thirty eight horses in the stable but
none has been nominated for the big fixtures
in the east According to Durnell he is will
ing to race them in the over night events to
show Just the kind of horses that he has in his
stable
WHIST
TURF NOTES
i
Through A Coulois the turf editor of Le
Sports, of Paris, France, Charles Boots Dur
nell. who was ruled off the- turf for life by the
French Jockey Club for being left at the post In
a race in Paris was Informed yesterday that
he would be restored to all privileges and would
also be ^granted a license to ride and train
horses Mr Coulois bore a letter to the effect
that Durnell would be leinstated to all privi
leges and that the Trench Jockey Club would
gladly accept his entry of any horses and would
gladly permit him to ride Durnell after the
letter bad been tianslated to him was all
smiles, and remarked Now I will have a
chance to race in New York and also show that
my horse McChesney is fully twenty pounds
better than Heimls '
It will be remembered that Durnell who
with Hers
rOURTH MATCH
FiriH MATCH
Nowns one of the best stables of
CAPITAL CULLINCrS
The statehood bill occupied the time of the
senate yesterday
Senator MeCnmber has secured the passage
of i bill to increase the pension of Austin Almy
of I airmont to |24ftmonth He is a veteran
of the Mexican and civil wars and 85 years
old
"If you ever come to Arizona again yon will
be killedj" wrote a "bad man" out in that
territory to United States Senator Beveridge of
Indiana Since the dignified young senator has
taken a determined position against the statehood
bill New Mexico and Arizona people the very
sore at h'm
Senator MeCnmber scys "Similar bills have
been introduced before, and this bill is not
aimed at any firm or corporation but is slmplv
for the purpose of fixing* a standard system of
grain inspection and grading that will give the
same lesults on all giain at every grain center
of grain of like character "
Widows of soldieis, dependent mothers ami
sisters, will lose their pensions when they re
marry, if the bill reported by the senate com
mittee on pensions becomes a law It has al
ieady been passed bv the house It also pro
vides that names of widows taken from the
lolls because of remarriage may be restored
upon the death of the sec/i husband eft unou
a divorce when the widow is not responsible for
the cause
Chi-
D. O. MILLS "SWORE OFF "
New York, Jan 23Last year, D O Mills
was assessed in this city on $1 000 000 personal
property He then told the commissioners that
his legal residence was San Mateo, Cal , which
fact relieved him from any personal tax here,
but that he was willing to pay on an assessment
of $250 000 as he spent so great a part of bis
time in New York. His offer was accented
Mr Mills, it is understood was willing to pay
on the same assessment this year, but the com
misstoners put up tbet assessment to $500,000
and insisted that Mr "Mills should pay on this
amount, whereupon.., he promptly swore of)t -en
tlrelj
Tomorrow is the opening
day of the Annual Reduc
tion Sale of Suits and Over*
coats at The Plymouth
^Clothing House, 6th Si
and Nicollet Ave. The ex
cellence of the garments of
fered at this sale is unsur
passed and the prices ex
ceptionally^ low.
.1'
See these
EXTRA
SPECIAL
BARGAINS
for
ITOMORROWl
If you ore going to buy shoes
tomorrow, don't* fail to come
and see our SPECIAL BARGAINS
Boys' best moose hide moc
casins, Saturday, per Ifeflfc^
pair vtfv
MenfS day, halt price, per AC
Men's self acting rubbers,
good quality, Satur- J% bg*
Misses' vici kid and box
calf school shoes, AO^
worth $1.50, cut to.. vOI
Ladles' vioi kid and box calf fl^*i ML n%
lace, worth up to $3 your choice V I *"
Ladies' winter Shoes and high-cut Boots,
worth $2.50, $3 00 and $3.50. On |^| Q A
table Saturday at 9 livU
Ladies' $3.00, $3.50, $400 and $5.00 Shoes,
in broken sizes. Choice for Sat- (^A AjSm\
urday
Ladies' $5.00 enamel and vici kid double
sole winter Shoes. Clearance ^^4B O C
sale price...
Don't Forget Your Stamps. Gall for Trading Stamps,
NEW RECORD FOR GOLFERS
Walter J. Travis Makes a Drive of
382 Yards on Links at
Garden City.
A drive fhat is a new record in golf
was made by Walter J Tra\is fiom the
eighth tee at the Garden Citv Golf links
during a threesome with the well known
amateurs Bruce Price of Tuxedo and Ar
den M Robbins of St Andrews Th e
drive was 582 yards The ground was
frozen and free from snow or ice, and
there was a following wind
"I somehow managed to get off an as
tonishing long ball ' said Travis yesterday
in telling of the feat ' The diive was
from the eighth tee to the road in front
of the green, 382 yards in all The actual
MANUFACTURERS, WHOLESALERS
GbO. /?. NEWELL & CO.
GROCERS,
Comer First Av. N. and Third St.
WINSION, HARPER,
FISHER & CO.,
Grocers & Cigars
WYMAN, PARTRIDGE
Wholesale
DRY GOODS,
Corner First Avenue i\orth and
Fourth Street.
W. S. NOTT COMPANY,
WHOLESALB
2d Av. S and 4th St.
MINNEAPOLIS, - MINN.
GREEN & DELAITTRE
COMPANY.
Importers and
Wholesale Grocers.
1I7-U9-12I Second Street South.
MFRS. FURS, SHIRTS, CLOTHING
PURS, CLOTHING, HATS AND CAPS
H J. Burton, Pres Ward C. Burton, Sec
H. L Tucker, V Prea E A Drew, Tre*s.
Sixth st and Nicollet av, Minneapolis
R. Herschel Mfg. Co.,
IMPLEMENTS.
r M. S. THURBER, Manager.
406-408 Third Avenue No.
Manufacture mowers, .knives, sections,
rivets, cutters, rake teeth, link chain,
belting, etc Jobbers agricultural supplies
Write for 1903 catalogue, No 55. Factory,
, f%oria III - ,+. ~ * , ^
DRY GOODS
RUBBER GOODS
200-206 First Avenue S.
Leather Be/ting,
JJJW^pSfjSC^pr.sFJ.^ t^p^^^^^^l^^^ *^**%QgF$
Saturda y Bargains.
canvas leggins, Satur-
Manufacturers ci
kubber and Cotton Belting, Hose.
Packing, etc Jobbers ot Macklw
toshes, Rubber Boots and shoes.
NICKE L PLATE
Nicollet
Avenue
JAOTARY 23, 1903.
307
ANO
GROCERS
Wholesale
SHOE CO .
& CO.,
LatHos' overgaiters, worth up
to 75c, cut to, per 4(^f%
pair Ift#
Boys' $1.25 brown shoe pacs,
special Saturday, per ye*
pair lUU
Children's $1-00 Leggins -
red and brown. Satur- Ktffcf%
lay one-half price... O w w
Ladies' $2.Sb Satin Slippers,
red and white. Choice " y Cf
Saturday # i f W
^fciTV
9VBO V
distance of the hole is 408 vards The go
ing is practically level a shade up grade
if anything, for some 360 ^ ards then there
is a gentle slope to the road of some 15
\ards So fat as I know this is the long
est ball ever driven on this or any other
hole on the course '
The hole is recognized as a haid par
four, for after the second shots the pla
ers are more often in the road than on
the green Under the hcale adopted by
the New Jersey State Golf association the
par would be four and a half Tra\ is
spoke ver modestly, for he is in fact on
titled to a world s record The onlv drive
on the books that exceeds it is not defin
itely established an has never been ac
cepted as the record It 'was of 387
yartls and made three years ago b\ Ed
ward Blackwell always famous, for his
long game the play being from the
eighteenth tee at St Andrews to the steps
of the Royal and Ancient club house at
St Andrews the ball rebounding back
some distance after hitting the steps
The lecord drive had been C41 -\ards 9
JOBBERS OF MINNEAPOLIS
MINNEAPOLIS PAPER CO.,
M 1 Manufacturing Company
420-428 Third Street North,
Minneapolis, Minn.
WHOLESALE} DRUGS
Lyman=Eliel
Drug Co.,
3rd STREET AND 1st AVENUE N.
JANNEY, SEMPLE, HILL
30, 32, 34, 36 Second Street S, Cor
ncr First Ave. S.
Pittsburg Plate Glass Co.
oucVs'o?- \\ Plate Glass \\ % &
WINDOW A ORNAMENTAL GLASS.
407-409 Main St. S. E.
\\^OJ\M\^^ COMPANY
MINNEAPOLIS
We carry a Complete Stock of
Noithwestern Distributing Agents of Patton'a
faints, and carry a tutl line ox Painters' sun.
dries. Buyers of Hides, Furs, Wool, etc.
Northwestern
Hide 6t Fur Co.
vv
PAPER
Wholesalers,
Manufacturers and
Mill Agents.
200 Second Street N.
Paper Boxes, Envelopes, Printing
and Embossing.
J-fEYWOOD
The BEST BARGAIN EVENT
OF THE SEASON. Shoes going
for a Fraction of Their Value.
MenfS
shoes. Late styles, cut
to
Men's $1.35 gum buckle arctics, cut AA^
to Cl06 vOv
Broken sizes men's $5 and
patent leathers and enamels, at..
Men's $3.50 box calf and vici kid,
winter shoes, best styles, cut
to
Established 1890.
Independent Manufacturers of
Fine Biscuit, Cakes, Etc
17-19 3rd St. & Minneapolis, Minn.
Srirt^.i! / **t3*L&$fei$$2 * ^kt 5%S h = * #&*sk !&*-
1' Y^T" " ' ' - - - y ' '- ' -Hi i u . -. . - - -j - .-1 . . . - - . .,-,-,*- * A -
HARDWARE
WHOLESALB
Hardware.
CABINET HARDWIRE.
O. P. DERICKSON & Co
Wholesale
CabinetHardware
121-123 Washington Av. N.
MANUFACTURER SHOW CASES
307
Nicollet
Avenue
Ladles' broken lot of lamb
wool soles. Choice Sat- E^%
urday Ull
Ladles' $1.25 felt lace and
button. Odd sizes % K g^
choice 45Ow
Ladies' $1.50 and $1 25 felt
and velvet Juliets. "fRA
Cut to close I U U
Ladles' storm rubbers, nearly
all sizes. Choice Sat- QA^
urday Vvv
$2.50 double sole,
inches, made bv "Feddle' Tait at St
Andrews in 1895 on a cold frosty da
much like Saturdaj ira\is dr ne is now
the record, for it is thoroughly authen
ticated
One of the most hotly contested bow ling
games ever played in Canton S D was
pulled off Wednesday night between th*
High Rollers of Sioux Falls and a select
team of Canton players The result was
2584 to 2703 in favor of Canton Ave games
being played, three-men teams
Danburr ConnSamuel Edln of Brookfiell
spent seven hours on Wednesdav nieht in a
sluiceway containing five feet of watei kdl i
slipped while on his wav home about 10 o clock
and fell ovor the edge of the s,luiee\\i He
had to keep his blood in circulation b\ moving
about His cries were heard at o o clock in
the morning when he was rescued
Muncle Ind The Strntton Carriage Mann
factory hai been forced to suspend oitoratioM
owing to mumps All the foremen and supei
intendents besides many workman have fallen
victims
A SALE to
CLEANUP
NOW'S
YOUR
CHANCE
box calf, winter
MJLL MACHBERx
F. E. Satterlee Co
Iron and Wood Working
Machinery and Supplies.
215-217-219
Second Avenue South.
$1.95
$2.60
lid , double sole ,
$2.85,soleedoubl
SASH AND DOORS
Smith 6t Wyman,
Doors, Sash, Blinds, etc.,
& CO.,
Specialties: Stair Work, Office Fittings an J
Interior Hardwood Haish
Shipping Wharves: At ail principal western
Lake Ports.
OliicesA.ianeapolls, 45 S 4th Street St Paul
37 kobert Street: Duluth, 302 W. Superior St.
Willmar Creamery Co.,
WHOLESALE
Cor. 2d Av. S. and 8th St.,
East Side, Minneapolis, Minn.
THE PIONEER FUEL CO.,
COAL AND COKE
COMMISSION.
16, 17, 18, 19 Central Market.
Wholesale
Fruits & Produce
Pbonea: T. C, 134. N. W. Main 202S.
COAL.
GENER AL MERCHANDISE
McClelland Bros. StRavicz
North Star Gen'l Merchandise Co
21, 23, 25, 3rd Street N.
Wholesale Jewelry^ Watches, Aotfons, Station
ery, Gents' Furnishings, Toys and House'
furnishing Hardware, Etc
American Tent &
Awning Co.
Awnings, Tents, Flags, Umbrellas, Cotto
Buck, Horse Blankets, Hone Covers, Wacom
Covers, Paulina, Feed Bags, Leggins.
TENTS FOR KENT
126-127-129 First Avenue N.
North Star
Shoe Company
PROPRIETORS
Manufacturers,
Cor. First Av. N. and Fifib St. ]
Minneapolis, Minn.
5-*
V*,
f^k & 'larJe^fi&^S^Mt^fcai^*
C M. Rawltzer,
Manager.
,y

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