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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, January 24, 1903, The Journal Junior, Image 30

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1903-01-24/ed-1/seq-30/

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8 THE JOURNAL JUNIOR, MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA, SATURDAY,. JANUARY 24, 1905.
^ Book Plate'Contest
i_
A
BOOK-PLATE, according to the Century dictionary, is "a label bearing a name,
crest, monogram or other design, pasted in or on, a book, to denote its own-
ership." Several bookplates from an* article on "Book-plates for Children," printed
in St. Nicholas -are given below to show what is meant and what may be dpne.
-. Every true book-lover covets a book-plate. . Pasted upon the inner side of the
cover, it is* nojt only an ornament,, but it marks, the book as belonging to a certain
person in a way that can not be obliterated except the binding itself is destroyed.
Then, too, a book-plate is generally designedwith some special reference to the
owner, so that no two book-plates are the^same. -This in itself is a satisfaction. But
book-plates are among the luxuries of life and are not indulged in by the majority
of people.
The offer above asks Juniors to design their own book-plates and then to those whose
designs arc deemed worthy of publication. The Journal gives the etching mounted
ready for printing the labels. This is really the greatest expense in the making of a
book-plate, after the design is drawn, so that each prize winner receives a book-plate
as a prize. --. .,,." . .. - ..~-~.:-'..."'?-i"-~
The article in St. Nicholas gives some very good suggestions for designs for chil-
dren's book-plates and among other things says:
"What are1
to size. Little book-plates are suitable for little people but as many books for chil
dren, are auite large, this rule of
smallness need not be absolute. It
^s nice to have a design repro-
EX LIBR1S
JOYCE WOOLMEK
white only. India ink should be used.
printed than the largest book-plate among these illustrations.
Rectangular, etc. Do not make the designs too crowded.
Be sure to do clean cut work. Mussy lettering or pictures or designs will not be chosen
be, and must be no larger when
be chosen, square, round, oblong.
A Junior button-is given to every contributor for his first
paper printed, provided it is neither a prize winner nor an
"honorable mention." Only one Junior button is given a year,
and this is sent without application. The new year began.
September 3, 1902.
An Honor Button is awarded for an "honorable mention**
find is sent without application.
An Honor Button is awarded to every Junior who has
three papers printed which are neither prize winners nor hon
orable mentions. These must be claimed,by the winner, giv
ing dates of publication.
An Honor Button is awarded for an accepted contribution
to the Storyteller column, and is sent without applfcation, to
gether with an order for a book.
Any number of Honor Buttons may be won.
- - v' A Prize Button-is awarded for every prize paper, without
application. Two picture prizes only in one year may be won.
All of these, except the Honor Buttons awarded for three "
papers printed, are sent out the Monday" evening following
publication, and all notices of failure to receive them must-be
sent to the editor within the week following publication. ,
- . __ The High School CredUncontests.
These contests are for writers in and above the ninth
grade. '}}. ^: '..- v ' , . "
Two prizes of $15 arid $7.50 for pictures .or books' for the '
school are awarded every three months to the two high
schools winning the highest number of credits.
The first prize of $15 may be won but once during the
school year.
Winners of the second prize of' $7.50 are not barred from
winning the first prize,, ." * '.:---._
No school in Minneapolis and no town in the northwest
will be given more than one credit a week. At least four
papers must.be sent in on a topic for a high school to be con
sidered in the contest, andv there must be at least twelve pa
pers a month.
A Journal Junior prize button is sent for the first high
school credit paper of each competitor during the quarter.
The first quarter begins December 13 and ends February
t, :&M>3 inclusive.
f ' j The Prize Pictures. ~
The pictures which are given as prizes during the school
year become the exclusive property of the schoolrooms upon
whose walls they are hung. They are to remain permanently
in the room which the winner attended when he or she won
the prize and under no_circumstances are they to be rehioved
to another room in the same school, to another school or to
a private house.
Express charges on all prize pictupes are prepaid by The
Journal.
__ How to Prepare the Papers. ^ -
-Write in ink, on one side only of the paper. Leave a
space of three inches at the top of the fir,st page. Use no
headlines. Put the number of words in* the upper left-hand -
corner of the first page. Sign the name arid residence at the
end at the right, the grade and school at the end at the left. ~
The Storyteller. "~.
Any pupil of a public school, in any part of the United
States, who is in or above the fifth grade, may contribute to
the Storyteller. These stories may be true or fiction, and C.
upon-any* subject preferred by the writer."* They must not be \
less than 500 wtords inJLength, nor more than 1,Q00,_
' -~"~~ . Binders. ' ~-T"~ " ,/ ^
Sou cannot keep your copies of The Journal Junior in
.v
,1* t" S * ~ -""r* ^ V-\-~ V^V *5" * *,"'--- V
the essential features of a successful book-plate for a child? First, as
THE SOUVENIR BUTTONS.
r
They must be twice the they are intended to
Any proportions may
-'-*-,*,
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duced in two sizes, so as to be
suitable for large and small books.
But if you have only one size,
have it small. Then, simplicity of
design should rule, and picture
plates should be chosen in prefer
ence to all others, the meaning of
the whole thing being* plain to the
youngest.
"For a child's plate, let us have
children, books and toys in pro
fusion. Then, the out-of-door
spirit, with *woods and flowers, has
a fitness always. The humorous,
and grotesque are also appropriate,
and the youngsters are usually
keen to catch the point I think
that the Mother Goose and fairy
land folks are any favorites in chil
dren's bookplates. -They always
give me true delight and a rare"
sense of, satisfaction.
these designs touch the children in
the same way. It is like meeting
old friends."
These designs must be" In the
hands of the editor of The Journal
Junior^ Not Later Than Monday
Evening, February 9.
* The designs must be in black and
r *' _ '
_-.-'-
V ' ^.f.-S*^*- j 5i - *"
SUGGESTIONS.
good shape without a binder. There are a few substantial
binders now at the office, at the very reasonable rate of 50
cents each.
M
Meddle once signified "to concern one's self with." It Is
so used in the scriptures where the expression occurs "meddle
with your own business."
/
- The Argentine Republic is the strongest In artillery of any
South American state. She has 346 field guns, 246 mountain
guns. 36 siege guns and 4i howitzers.
, _
Design by Aimer Grimsrud.
"
''"*l726 Irving Avenue 3.
To all Juniors whose book-plate designs
- are accepted, the etching mounted for
use will be-given as a prize.
% I believe that
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LISABETH HI IDE
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Ancient Use of "Meddle."
A Weil-Armed Republic.
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MARJORIE
PARKHURST
&ILMORE
- -fT-A 8th Grade, --'
'"*"'- Douglas SchooL
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Wh
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Design by Esther Chapman,
1918 Fourth Street SE.
PCK
FRO M BAKER
4V HOME
# DAILY. I
SEVENTH STREET SO.
Design by Lee Mero,
3336 First Avenue S.
Desigri by' Frank H. Craft,
618 Tenth Avenue SE.
/-^Design by Irene Merkert, _, A ilth Grade,
'.J? 1S27 Sixteenth Avenue S. ..
m.cToaKsvfur's
\suits. waists
SKATESVCHAFINGBISHES,
MDCRRUrnGSETS.
CHRISTMAS GOODS M
shopping,
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kMillmerv.dna
403 NICOLLET AV,
DCUVERY*1*ilOTY
ii inn viiiui,, *
East Side High School.
PHDHE-
A 10th Grade,
Central High SchooL
BlOth Grade,
East Side High School.
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MIRY PHOO&Oi
yniuc 7 - -
South Side High SchooU
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