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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, July 08, 1903, Image 16

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

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^WEDNESDAY EVENING,
BASEBALL
JDST THROWN AWAY
Millers Drop Another Game to the
Cowboys by Their Bagged
Fielding.
Katoll Pitches Good Ball, but the
Blues Burn Things Up
in Field.
Another game was handed the cowboys
by the millers yesterday afternoon. The
local aggregation Is admittedly in bad
shape with regard to pitchers, but the
defeats of the last two days cannot be
ascribed to this weakness of the twirling
staff. Both contests were simply thrown
away by bad fielding.
Big Jack Katoll appeared In the box
after an absence of some weeks and he
had the goods with him. Had be been
given as fast support by his team mates
as Dale Gear got from the blues the mill
ers would have won hands down. Errors
by I-ally and Mclntyre let in three runs
in the visitors' half of the fifth, and an
other bobble by Oyl er accounted for one
in the ninth. According to the score the
blues were entitled to one run In the
second, the score coming In on two singles
and a sacrifice, but the second of the two
hits would have been captured by a good
many outfielders. Dan Lally appeared to
loaf on the hit. and it dropped safe.
Dale Gear pitched in good form, but he
had lu ck with him, for his team mates
simply burned things up in the field, and
their fast work cut the millers out of at
least three hit s. Even then the three
scores gather by the mille rs would have
been enough to win had the mille rs played
a perfect game in the field.
The local management has signed
Pitcher McDonald, recently with the Kan
sas City team. McDonald was expected
to arrive in Minneapolis to-day, and will
probably pitch to-morrow, when the
mille rs play off a, postponed game with
St. Paul at Lexington park. Friday the
Milwaukee league leaders open a seri es
with the millers at Nicollet park. Yester
day's score:
Totals ...8 27 14 3 Totals ...8 27 13 1
Minneapolis . . 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 18
Kansas City 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 15
Earned run, Minneapolis 1 two-base hits, Ka
toll. Butler three-base hits, Maloney, Martin
bases on balls, off Katoll 5, off Gear 5 struck
out. by Katoll 6, by Gear 1 sacrifice hits. Knoll,
Spooner. Grady, Nance stolen bases, Rothfuss
3, Grady hit by pitched ball, Katoll 1 passed
ball, Butler: left on bases, Minneapolis 9, Kan
sas City 9. Umpire. Cunningham. Time, 2
"lours. Attendance, 1,200.
Mil.
8chaffy 2b . 1
Donahue lb. 1
Wood c. ... 0
tJnglauh 3b. 0
Hemphill cf 3
Dunleavy rf 1
Ganley If . 4
Viox ss ... 1
Elliot p . . 1
Totals ...12 27 8 2 Totals ...2 27 16 4
Milwaukee 2 0 0 1 0 2 0 3 08
St. Paul .-. .0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 00
Earned runs, Milwaukee three-base hit, Gan
ley bases stolen, by Hugplns, Hemphill: double
plays. Hugging to Kelley, Hugglns to Schaefer
to Kelley bases on balls, ofC Klliot 2, off Volz
4 hit by pitcher, by Volz 2 struck out, by Elliot
6, by Volz 2 sacrifice hits, Ganley. Danohue
left on bases, Milwaukee 9, St. Paul 4 time,
1:40 umpire, Foreman attendance, 1,700.
Toledo. h p
Smith lfrf. 2 0
Owens ss.. 1 3
Crlstl'l rf-lf 2 1
Turner lb.. 0 10
Bernard cf. 1 1
Klelnow c.. 0 1
Scnaub 3b. 2 2
Childs 2b.. 1 5
Reisling p.. 1 1
AT TOLEDO.
Kansas City
Columbus . .
Minneapolis
Toledo
BatteriesBartos and Rogers McCaughey and
SpelUcy.
At Dulutb R H B
Duluth 080000001 t 5 2
BatteriesOehrlng and Crippen Foulks and
Bon thorn.
At Devils LakeCrookston 6, Grand Forks 5.
Ind'polls. h
0 1 Hogriever rf 0
3 1 Heydon c . 1
0 0 kox 2b ... 0
0 0 W'dr'ff c-rf 1
0 0 Coulter cf.. 1
1 0 .Tones If ... 1
3 0 Kihin l b . . 0
0 0 Tamsett 3b. 1
1 0 Marcan ss.. 1
Kellum p.. 1
Totals ..10 24 8 2
Toledo 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 08
Indianapolis 0 1 0 0 4 0 0 1 x6
Earned runs, Toledo 3, Indianapolis 6 two
base hit3, Heydon, Woodruff, Marcan home
runs, Smith, Schuub, Coulter Jones, Kellum
stolen base, Smith struck out, by Reisling 2,
by Kellum 4 bases on balls, off Reisling 1,
off Kellum 1 double play, Tamsett to Fox left
on bases, Toledo 7, Indianapolis 3 wild pitches,
Kellum passed ball, Klelnow time, 1:45 um
pire, Mullane attendance, 700.
..2 2
..1 0
,.0 0
Totals ...8 27 16 2 Totals . .11 27 12 2
Columbus 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 03
Louisville 0 0 5 0 0 0 2 0 18
Earned runs, Louisville 2 stolen bases, Ker
win sacrifice hits, Kerwin, Odwell two-base hit,
Clymer double plays, Qulnlan to Brashear to
Hart, Gleason to Bannon to Mellor stmck out,
by Walker 1 bases on balls, off Bailey 1, off
Walker 2. Time, 1:40. Umpires, Wagner and
Bohannon.
How They Stand.
Played. Won.
Milwaukee 63 40
St. Paul ...66 40
Indianapolis 65 3f
Louisville 66 34
Grand Excursion Down the Mississippi to Camp Lakeview
4*3
Friday, July 10, The Journal will
give its Popular Excursion No. 49, which
is full of attractions.
I t will include a rail trip from Minne
apolis to Red Wing, where the steamer
J. J. Hi ll will take the party down the
beautiful Mississippi and into Lake
Pepin, touching at Camp Lakevlew.
A t picturesque Camp Lakeview the
party will see encamped the First
regiment, N . G. S. M . (formerly the
Thirteenth Minnesota volunteers). Here
will be found one of the liveliest military
scenes imaginable, and a special program
will be presented by the regiment for
The Journal's party, including a
mock dress parade, guard mount and
a concert by the First Regiment
band. The trip back to Minneap
olis will be made by boat to Red
Wing and then on a fast special train to
Minneapolis. The whole day's program is
one that will appeal to the best class of
people, and the accomodations provided
will be the best possible in every way.
There will be more than plenty
of room on the J. J . Hill
and Journal' special train, and
the ticket sale will be limited, so there
will be no crowding and everybody can
move about and enjoy the scenery from all
sides.
'%'
w
X
.
? - f &-i
THE MINNEAPOLIS JOURN^iL.
.56 .64
65
.63
31 3T 38
41
.446 .422 .415 .348
N0RTHEB.N STANDINOS.
Played. Won. Lost.
Winnipeg 42 32 10
Superior 35 8 2T
NATIONAL LEAGUE
At Pittsburg R H B
Pittsburg 10100000 02 7 5
Brooklyn 2 0000120 05 fl 2
BatteriesSmith and Dobeoy Rltter and
Jones.
e K. City, h p a e
0 Rothfuss Qt. .1 5 0 0
0 Maloney rf. .2 2 0 0
1 Nance 2b . . .1 2 4 0
0 Grady l b . . .1 11 0 0
1 Knoll If 1 4 0 u
1 Lewee ss . . .0 2 S 0
0 Butler c ...1 1 0 1
0 McAn'ws 3b.l 0 4 0
0 Gear p 0 0 2 0
Mpls. h
McCreery cf.2
Spooner l b . . 1
Lally If ...0
Smith rf . . .0
Oyler ss ...0
Mclntyre 3b,3
Martin 2b .. 1
Ludwig c ... 0
Katoll p ...1
At St. Louis R H B
St. Louis 2 0001001 *4 p 1
New York 00200100 08 6 2
BatteriesRyan and Currie Bowerman and
Taylor.
At Chicago R H B
Chicago 00000300 08 8 2
Philadelphia 1 0 112000 16 12 3
Batteries-T-Kllng and Wicker Roth and Dug
glesby.
At Cincinnati R H E
Cincinnati 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 03 11 8
Boston 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 2 05 8 0
BatteriesBergen and Poole Moran and Pratt.
AT ST. PAUL.
fight took place at the end of the first
half of the seventh inning, and the par
ticipants were Jack Sheridan, the um
pire, and Dan Green, the right fielder of
the Chicago Americans.
Green was the second man out in the
seventh inning. H e was thrown out
clear ly at first base and turned around
to the umpire with a kick. H e was or- ,
dered out of the game. When the half of
the inning was finished, Green from the
bench, called Sheridan a "bullhead,"
and, according to one spectator, Sheri
dan walked over toward the Chicago
bench, removing his mask a she did so .
The first intimation the spectators had
that Sheridan was moved by prize ring
emotions was when he raised his left
hand and let drive at Green. H e In -
stantly followed the left arm blow up
by swinging at Green with the hand that
that he ld the mask. The men clinched so
Quickly that it was difficult to see what
damage Sheridan's swings had done, but
Green had time to get in a hard smash
on Sheridan's head.
Games To-day.
Kansas City at Minneapolis.
Milwaukee at St. Paul.
Indianapolis at Toledo.
Louisville at Columbus.
N0RTHEKN LEAGUE
At West Superior It H E
S 2
Pot.
.762 .667
.600 .368
.825 .228
DELEHANTY IS MISSING
Well Known Player Believed to Have
Killed Himself.
Washington, D . C. July 8.Word re
ceived in Washington leaves little doubt
that E d Delehanty, the famous ball play
er, committed suicide or was accidentally
drowned at Fort Erie, Ont. , on the night
of July 2.
H e left Detroit that day in a very de
spondent frame of mind after several days
of dissipation. A letter received by Mrs.
Delehanty says that an unknown man on
the night in question had a difficulty with
a bridge tender at Fort Erie and a mo
ment or two later fell or jumped Into the
river. A dress suit case was recovered
and in this was found baseball ticket No.
26 issued by the Washington olub to Dele
hanty.
Manager Loftus and the players here
regard the proof received as conclusive of
Delehanty's death. H e had been In any
thing but good form owing to his disap
pointment in not being able to accept the
large salary offered by the New York Na
tional league club. His heart was not in
his work and he was at no time himself.
National Standings.
Played. Won.
Pittsburg 68 47
New York 62 40
Chicago 69 39
Brooklyn 68 33
Cincinnati 61 30
Boston 64 27
St. Louis 67 23
Philadelphia 63 20
0
e St. Paul
1 Geler 1 . .
0 Shannon c.
0 Jackson rf . 6 2
0 Schaefer ss. 0 2
0 Hngglns 2b. 0 4
0 Kelley l b . 0 12
0 Wheeler 3b. 2 0
1 Sullivan c . 0 3
0 Volz, p 0 0
0 1
0 0
0 0
5 0
6 0
t) 1
1 0
2 2
2 0
Police Captain Halpin of the One Hun
dred and Fifty-second street station was
one of the first to reach the struggling
men. H e grabbed Sheridan by the arm
and assigned a couple of cops to lo ok af
ter the umpire while he saw that order
was restored. Sheridan was taken to
the One Hundred and Fifty-second street
station and there detained while Presi
dent Gordon was getting ba il for him.
Green declined to make a charge of as
sault against the umpire, and the charge
on which the lat+er was held was dis
orderly conduct.
Games To-day.
Brooklyn at Pittsburg.
Boston at Cincinnati.
New York at St. Louis.
Philadelphia at Chicago.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
A t Boston R
St. Louis 0 0100000 23
Boston 101000C0 02
BatteriesCriger and Bvans Ryan and Sud
hoff.
At Philadelphia R H E
Detroit 11801011 08 8 2
Philadelphia 0 0001801 27 9 7
BatteriesMcGuire, Donovan and Coakley
Scbreck, Henly and Plank. '
At Washington R H B
Washington 0 0012020 *5 8 1
Cleveland 0 0010001 02 11 3
BatteriesKittridge and Orth Bergn and
Dorner.
At New York R H E
Chicago 110 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 11 3
Now York 0 00100010 02 8 1
BatteriesMcFarland and White O'Connor
and J. Tannehill.
Totals ... 7 27 12 0
AT COLUMBUS.
Colu'bus.
Bason ss
Bannon 2b.
Arndt, If .
Turner 3b
Rouach 3b
Mellor l b .
Toosey cf .
, Fox c ...
Bailey p
a P
.0 3
.0 8
.2 3
.2 4
.0 0
.1 12
a e Lou'ville. h
5 1 Kerwlu rf . .1
S 0 Hart l b 0
0 0 Brashear 2b.2
3 0 Odwell cf ..0
0 0 Sullivan 3b.. 3
0 0 Clymer If . .2
0 1 Schrlver c ..1
0 0 Qulnlan ss ..0
5 0 Walker p ..2
AMERICAN STANDINOS.
Played. Won. Lost.
Boston 66 .42
Philadelohia 66 38
Cleveland 62 33
New York 59 30
Chicago 61 31
Detroit 61 29
St. Louis 59 27
Washington 52 18
Iowa-South Dakota League.
Sioux City 2 Sioux Falls 3.
Le Mars 5, Sheldon 4 (ten innings).
IOWA-SOUTH-DAKOTA STANDINGS.
Played. Won. Lost. Pet .
Sioux Kails 35 25 10 .714
Le Mars 87 22 15 .595
Sheldon 36 10 17 .528
Sioux City 38 19 19 .500
Play for $100 Purse.
The Javas will play the Palace Clothing team
Sunday on the Javas' grounds. Laurel and Du
pont avenues N, at 3 p. m. Rennix or McDon
ald and Fryer will be the Java battery. The
game is for a purse of $100.
WITH THE AMATEURS
The Rapid Runners have organized for their
fifth straight year, and Mill challenge all com
ers among the 14 and 15-year-old teams. Ad
dress J. Kane, 406 Fifth avenue N.
The J. W. Paulys defeated the Blue Labels by
the score of 5 to 7. The J. W. Paulys wish a
same with any 11-year-old team in the city. Ad
dress Peter Weiduer, 1218 Fourth street N.
The P. V.'s will leave Saturday night for Lake
City, where they will play the Lake City team
Sunday. The P. V.'s want out-of-town games.
Address R. Anderson, 2328 Sheridan avenue N.
NORTHWESTERN GAMES
Howard, S. D., July 8.The Howard amateur
team beat the Salem professionals here by a
score of 9 to 1.
Garner, Iowa, July 8.The Flandrau ' Indians
and the Algona brownies played ball here yester
day, the game resulting in the score of 2 to
1 in favor of the Indians.
Sauk Center, Minn., July 8.Sauk Center de
feated Grey Ragle here yesterday in a thirteen
inning game, 5 to 4. BatteriesSauk Center,
Saunders and Smith Grey Eagle, Booth and
Sharp.
Oakes, N. D., July 8.The St. Cloud baseball
team defeated the Gales club here yesterday in
one. of the fastest games of the season by a
score of 7 to 8. BatteriesKllroy and Dolan
Middleton and Thibadeau.
Lost.
21
22 30 SO 31 37
44 43
Pet.
.691
.645 .565 .524 .492 .422
.:UK .317
Spectacular features in the trial of the Sham
rock III. were missing yesterday, and the two
yachts that had left their moorings at New York
during the morning drifted about in'the vicinity
of Sandy Hook lightship until nearly 2 o'clock.
No time was taken, but the new boat, "which
was on the weather quarter of the Shamrock I.,
quickly hauled away from her opponent. At the
end of one-and-one-half hours, when the yachts
were recalled and headed for home, the newer
craft had a decided advantage.
Sir Thomas' plans for the remainder of the
week, which will be altered if Pope Leo's death
is reported, are as follows:
Wednesday, sail over a. triangular course
thirty miles, with one leg to windward, weather
permitting.
Thursday, sail over the windward and leeward
course.
Friday, the flag officers and regatta commit
tee of the New York Yacht Club will view the
races from the flagship Delaware and R. A. C.
Smith's yacht. Privateer, after which they will
be entertained on the Erin.
H
13
9
GAMES TO-DAY.
Cleveland at Philadelphia.
Chicago at Boston.
Detroit at Washington.
St. Louis at New York.
Western League.
Peoria 6, Kansas City 1.
Colorado Springs 3, Des Molnetf 2.
Omaha 7, Denver 5.
Three-I League,
Cedar Rapids 6, Decatur 8.
Rockford 6. Rock Island 5, twelve innings.
Davenport 2, Springfield 3.
UMPIRE SLUGS PLAYER
Sheridan and Green Have a Lively Set-to
In New York Game.
New Yor k, July 8. A fight on the field
between an umpire and a playe r, with
the umpire striking the first blow, was
the unprecedented occurence which took
place at the ball same at American
League park yesterday afternoon. The
Lost.
23
26 26 S3
Pet.
.635
.606 .600 .515
Clarke National Bank Removal ...
The Clar ke National Bank has moved
from its old quarters at Nicollet avenue
and Fourth street to the banking room
in the Globe building where it occupies
the whole of the ground floor reserved
for banking purposes. E . R. Gaylor d,
formerly cashier of the Metropolitan
bank, has been elected a director in the
Clarke National bank.
Journal's Popular Excursion No. 4Q, Friday, July w.
FRIDAY, JULY W
*'
The Going Trip.
Leave Minneapolis Great Western Station
9 a. m. , on "Journal Special," via .
Chicago Great Western Ry.
Arrive Red Wing 11:30 a. m .
Down Mississippi and Lake Pepin to Camp
Lakeview. r
Arrive Camp Lakevlew 2:30 p. m .
' Special Military Program.
Mock Parade 3:30 p. m.
Mock Guard Mount 4:15 p. m.
ConcertFirst Regt. Band..4:30 p. m.
First Regiment, N . G. S. M .
(Formerly Thirteenth Minnesota Volun
teers. )
Colonel C. McC. Reeve, Commanding.
First Artillery, N . G. S. M . .
Major George C. Lambert, Commanding.
- . The Return Trip.
Leave Camp Lakeview on
Steamer J. J. Hill 6:00 p. m.
Arrive Red Wing 8:45 p. m.
Leave Red Wing via Chicago,
Great Western Railway .. .9:00 p. m
Arrive Minneapolis 11:30 p. m
An enchanting steamboat ride down the
beautiful Mississippi into peerless LakePepin.
A Splendid Military Program at Camp Lake-
view and Return on Fast Special Train.
Round Trip for only
Limned Number Tickets will De en sale at
The Journal counter Monday, July $in,
SPORTS.
PLAN
Dubuque Men Are Trying to Secure
Top Notchers to Appear
There.
Special to The Journal.
Dubuque, Iowa, July 8.-The officers of
the Dubuque Athletic association are al
ready mapping out plans for the proposed
boxing carnival to be he ld here in Au
gust in conjunction with the street fair
and carnival. They have not yet opened
negotiations with any of the big fighters,
as several of the men whom they are fig
uring on securing for the carnival have
matches on hand and are not in a posi
tion to consider any terms at the present
time. However, they are confident that
they will be able to secure Tommy Ryan
and some other good middleweight for a
twenty-round go, as Ryan has never
turned down any offer made to fight in
Dubuque. They are fearful that Jack
Root's manager may want too big a purs e.
I t is expected that many of the Chicago
feathers who fought in Dubuque last fall
will agree to come here this year. I t is
the idea of the promoters to pufl off the
boxing carnival at Nutwood park, where
the great race meet was held four years
ag o, and with a fitst-class card, they
figure on drawing a great' chowd from
Chicago.
Mayor Berg has agreed to issue a per
mit for the boxing contests, and the pro
moters do not entertain any fear that
the governor will interfere. George Slier,
who has officiated here on numerous oc
casions, will be selected to referee the
bouts.
Joe Walcott, the champion welterweight,
passed thru St . Paul yesterday, and asked
Charles D e Witt, manager of Hughey Mc
Mahon of Chicago, for a match with the
latter fighter. Walcott wil lmake a match
at 154 pounds, at which weight he will be
giving about six or eight pounds to Mc
Mahon. D e Witt agreed to give Walcott
a match, in case the bout between McMa
hon and Young Peter Jackson falls thru.
DeWitt and Hereford, manager of Jack
so n, have agreed upon a match if a club
can' be induced to offer a suitable purse.
POOLROOM QUEEN DEAD
Gussie McKee, a Noted Woman
Plunger, Passes Away in
. New York City.
YACHTING
New Yor k, July 8.Grace Dodd, better
known as Gussie McKee, 't'h pool-room
queen," died last evening at her home,
118 West Forty-seventh street. For a
year or two she had been trying to cure
herself of a malignant abdominal cancer.
She was an Indiana girl and went to Chi
cago as a bookkeeper at $10 a week. One
day she went to the race track, won $16
on an 8 to 1 shot and then gave up book
keeping to play the horses. She made
$50,000 in one season.
When she got started in the racing game
she opened a women's poolroom in Chi
cago and later came here and started an^
other. Several years ago she married
Lieutenant Kdward H . Martin of the Unit
e d States army. H e was dismissed in 1900
for. irregularities in his canteen accounts.
'%'". CRICKET V ,'"-
The Philadelphia cricketers beat the Lanca
shire eleven - at Manchester, Enjf., yesterday,
by 0 The w*$ 143 for one
1 wicketwickets. in the visitersseoee. second innlifcs. ^
That tired, languid feeling and dull
headache is very disagreeable. Take two
of Carter's Little LiverPills before retir
ing and you will And relief. They never
fall to do good.
TENNIS
Play wns continued yesterday in the special
lawn tennis tournament on the courts o t the
Country Club of Westchester, near New York
city. The pair from Chicago, Kreigh,'Collins and
Louis H. \Vaidner, performed much better- than
on the opening day.
Men's invitation doubles: Second Round
Kreigh Collins and Louis H. Waidner, Kenwood
Country club, Chicago, defeated C. Millett and
Joseph D. Forbes, Orange Tennis club and Coun
try club of Westchester, 6-1, 6-2, 6-2. Holcomb
Ward and Leonard E. Ware, Harvard university,
defeated William A. Larned and Malcolm D .
Whitman, Orango Tennis club and Crescent Ath
letic club, 7-5, 8-6, 6-2.
24 28
29
29
30
82 32 34
Pet.
.636 .576
.532 .508 .508 .475 .458 .846
FOOTBALL
Coach A. A. Stagg, of the University of Chi
cago, returned yesterday from New Haven,
Conn., where he went to attend the reunion of
the Yale class of 1888. Mr. Stagg says that he
had offers of football dates, one from Columbia
and one from Syracuse, but refused both because
of the West Point game next autumn, which, he
thinks, is enough in the east for one season.
The Chicago coach says there is considerable
dissatisfaction in the east 'with the new foot
ball rules. He says that Captain Rafferty, of
the Yale team, and some of the Yale coaches are
opposed to them. He thinks it probable that
the changes may not be adopted in the west.
Yost, of Michigan, is not in favor of them, and
Coach Stagg expressed his disapproval of them
when the changes were first recommended.
$1.25, $1.00,
75c and 50c
Straw Hats
For Men, Boys and
Children,
only.. . .
Greatest surprise ever known in hats.
$1.25, $1.00, 75c and[50c hats at choice
ROUND TRIP, $t.3B.
An Orchestra Will Accompany the Ex-
cursion, and Those Who Wish to Dance
Can Do So Without Charge*
Defective Page j
^r^^was^^
a?KF3F^\*irwip^^%J^^ -*r* 'sryW'*.. V^SF-HS??"^ fry??- iwsssi^-'^^,^l?3w*Tw
Irish "Donegal"
AFRICANDER A WONDER
Great Eastern Three-Year-Old Wins
Realization Stakes and Breaks
Records.
New York, July 8.Capping a climax of
victories unprecedented in the history of
the American turf, Africander proved him
self yesterday the greatest 3-year-old
thorobred of his generation. H e has sur
passed the triumphs of Hanover and Her
mi s, beaten the best handicap horses, and
stamped his superiority among his con
temporaries in decisive style.
H e won the Lawrence Realization stakes
at one and five-eighths .miles at Sheeps
head Bay after a battle with probably the
best collection of 3-year-olds that has ever
struggled in that classic prize.
H e overcame speed, courage and endur
ance in his adversaries, and, in spite of
riXjJVj. - t
Minneapolis:
SlStoSZSNicoUet
Avenue.
Greatest Straw Hat Offering Ever Inaugurated.
iS
The richest kind of outing suits in odd new
colorings. The suits are airy, light, chic
and genre in single and double breasted
and in Norfolk
fashions great
value at
3TTLT, 5,, ivu*.
$1750
Scotch Outing SuitS.
hiShly
Ho! for Camp Lakevlew.
Don't fail to go on the Journal excursion
to Camp Lakeview, Friday, July 10. See
large ad.
Sunbonnet Baby Fans Free.
The prettiest fans of the year may be
had free at North-Western City Ticket
Office, 600 Nicollet aV.
MONEY CHEERFULLY REFUNDED.
Thousands to pick from. We meet all demands. These hats are
best styles. All fresh and clean. No odds and endsor broken sizes.
Call Early
for Your
Tickets.
They are
soiling
fast.
fashioned
-J2 excepting the haircloth front
and silk yoke, single and double breasted, d* y~* fif\
hand tailored, equal to any %\i garment, *P 3^
at choice for
Men's silk coats, of course, hand
tailored, very superior grade,
at $10.00.
Men's linen pants, all sizes, $1.50
qualities, at 98c.
All-wool crash suits and flannel
suits, nowhere sold under $8.
Best outing suits, at $4.50.
Automobile Ulsters, made from
mohair, double-breasted, very
swagger, at $8.50.
Men's dock pants, cut full, right
ly tailored, worth $1, at 50c
misl.-"::t
ui?.4T after misfortune in his own
battle '^tsr-the front, sprang to the lead in
the very last strides after racing at a
speed that broke two records before the
winning post was reached and set a new
mark for future Realization winners.
Africander won by a head from Golden
Maxim, which was two lengths in front of
Savable. Whorler followed, four lengths
backShor t Hose was fifth by a length
and twelve lengths In fro nt of Black Hus
sar. Cardinal Wolsey was a sixteenth of a
mile behind the winner.
The time was 2:451-5, faster by 2 2-5
seconds than the record made by Major
Daingerfie ld last year. Africander was sec
ond choice at 3 to 1 in the betting. Short
Hose, backed from 4 to 1 to 5 to 2, was fa
vorit e.
and unlined
9
Clergymen's coats, cut nice and
long, made from fine serge,
at $4.00.
High class serge coats, all sizes,
taped seams, indigo blue serge,
worth $3.50, at $2.95.
Mohair coats, a supreme quality,
rich black, looks like silk this
sale, at $2.00.
Men's drap d' ete vests, all sizes
up to 48, and are worth $2.50,
for $1-50.
Men's cotton offBce coats, in TiA^t
effects, worth 50c, at 19c
WHIST
The American Whist League tournament, wHfc
representatives from all parts of the country,
opened Monday at Detroit, and the games wert
not concluded/ until long after midnight. Tha
greatest interest was centered on the battle for
the Brooklyn trophy for teams of twelve, now
held by New York state. The entries were teems
representing New York, Michigan, Chicago and
Wisconsin. Michigan and Chicago tied in the
match score, each winning three matches and
losing one. In the trick score Michigan won,
the standing betng eighteen tricks plus to Chicago
one trick minus.
The league dropped playing enough yesterday
to devote a short time to the consideration of
business matters. After the reading of reports
and a talk given by the president, John T. Mitch
ell of Chicago, it was voted to bold no more
business sessions until Friday morning, when ths
election of officers will take place.
Isle Royale and Port Arthur.
A delightful rail and water week-end
trip via the Omaha road. Forty- seven
hours on the cooT, green waters of Lake
Superior. Only $12.00 for round trip, in
cluding meals and berth on board steam
er. Call for full particulars at City
Ticket Office. 600 Nicollet av.
A Glorious
one-Dag Trip
lor lime
Money.
GO ana Take
Your Friends

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