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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, September 23, 1903, Image 12

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1903-09-23/ed-1/seq-12/

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DECEMBE R OF F AGAIN, SELLING DOW N T O 75 3-4C
JThe Wheat Market Opens Steady
With Indications of Strength
/ to Come.
JBut Near the Close Prices Break
World's Visible Increases
4,779,000 Bu.
Milling Strike Expected by Traders
Local Stocks Gain 600,000
Bushels.
Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce. Sept. 23.
"Wheut was stubborn again thib morning and
aarU to force dowu. Yestei day's low points
were reached but the pilceb \.ei e steady after
the dip, aud the general tone much bettei.
Lightei receipts weie the piiuclpal influence,
and the bulls took coinage fiom the showing.
The Duluth figures were positively startling,
with only 52 cais In against SS7 last year. Last
jear's receipts covered a forty-eight-hour move
ment, but even so, the comparison was a stiong
one. Fifti-seven cars of jesterday's Miunr
auolls leeelpts turned out to be winter vhtsat.
ah is morning Minneapolis had 311 cais agalust
4J0. Chicago 103 against 310, Kansas Cltj 200
against US , and St. Louis 102,000 bu against
150.000 bu. It was such a showing on the whole
as to make the bears a little neivous at tirst.
but the effect of it was largely offset by a
Soorer
demand outlook. The locul millets weie
ot in the cash market, as was Quite to be ex
pected HI view of the verj dubious outlook for
operating the mills. With a tie-up in sight and a
laboi situation showing no improvement over
night, the millers were not disposed to mi up,
and some of the big buyeis would not take a sin
gle car of wheat. The elevators took it, and
the cash market did not suffer very much consid
ering everything, but the impoitant point was
that bad the millers been buyers, much of the
wheat would have been lost to sight, whereas
the purchases to-day went principally to ele
vators and helped swell the local stocks which
eo far this week have already lncieased by
600,000 bu. Outsiders have been watching the
fhenIncrease
ai in Minneapolis stocks, and the leport that
here this week is likely to run close
to 1,000,000 bu has had bearish effect all around.
Chicago showed no important change in senti
ment. The early strength there was largely on
corn. Colder weather is predicted for to-night
and frosts are llkelj in northern Iowa. This
made the oorn shoits cover and gave a better
feeling, but even so, there was no bull enthusi
asm.
Wheat is likely to follow pretty closely on any
change in corn, hence wheat traders were In
tel ested to learn that there are, in Chicago,
some veiy influential bulls in corn. "History is
repeating itself is the corn market," said James
Patten last night. "I have been on the floor
of the Chicago Board of Trade twenty-five jeara
and have seen a number of frosts come in the
month of September which affected the corn. In
variably there were a lot of traders in the coun
try who would report that no damage had been
done to the corn and on the contrary it had done
the corn good. I never have seen the time when
a tempeiature of 32 and under would assist in
maturing a crop of corn In the past, when frost
has occuired, the market has gone down on re
ports of no damage similar to those that are
being circulated to-daj. We are getting
tronger reports to-day of damage to the corn
crop than we have had yet,, I am of the belief
that this corn is going to sell materially higher.
It is simply common sense to believe that a
freezing temperature will do damage."
Bradstreet's report showed an increase of
4,779,000 bu In the visible supply The quantity
east of the Rockies increased by 2,179,000 bu and
the quantity in Europe and afloat gained 2,600,-
000 bn.
Broomhall oabled "Larger and cheaper Rus
sinn offerings caused an easy opening, and the
market wag still lower later on a very favora
ble Rumanian crop report. The Rumanian of
ficial report estimates the wheat crop at 71,000,-
000 bu against 73,000,000 bu last jear. Oats.
83.000,000 bu against 26,000,000 bu last year.
Clear weather continues thruout the west,
northwest and southwest. The only rain shown
on the entire map is a trace in Manitoba. Con
ditions could not be improved upon for the wheat
movement and threshing. There Is a decided
drop ia temperatme, and fieeaing thru part of
the northwest lip to 7 a. m. there was no
freezing teranerature la the corn belt, but indi
cations are for colder Temperatures about sea
sonable thru the west and southwest, but looks
as If the corn belt might get frosts to-night.
Primary receipts. 1.235,000 bu against 1,659,000
and shipments, 006.000 bu against 386,000 bu.
Clearances wheat and flour, 332,000 bu.
The market had a sharp break after noon.
Statistics were ail against the price and on a
little wavering many made haste to sell, Decem
ber going to 75%c and May to 77%c.
The close was easy, December at 75%@76c
May, ulfafa 78c, and September, 82c.
In the cash market the elevators took the
wheat, thetmillers, being out of it. No. 1 north-
fj?/^5
i-
-J.
v 5
a
84ru 84ftp , and No . 2 northern at
51% Co 82c for the average. Oood wheat sold
fairly well, but the low grades suffered in price
and some were slow on sale.
THE FL0URMARKET
THE SITUATION PECULIAR AN D THE OUT
LOOK UNCERTAIN.
The situation is lather mixed in flour. Millers
are Inclined to feel a little easier on prices in
view of the easier cash market, but against
this there was the consideration that the clos
ing down of the mills, should a strike result
from the present labor contioversy, would be
an offset Millstuffs have had considerable of
an advance of late and feed prices would prob
ably be affected very seriously by a prolonged
strike. Demand for flour was reported erratic
this morning, some buyers taking flour freely
and others holding off, some actuated by fear of
the bull effect of a possible lighter production
and others going on the basis that there will
bp no strike and that meanwhile wheat is on
the decline and flour prices should follow
Suipments. 42,222 barrels.
Quotations, in wood, f. o.
II
J *
4
WEDNESDAY EVENING,
JtANGE OF WHEAT PBICE IN M|NITEAP0LIS
- Open.
Sept.? .82
Dec. .77%77
May. .79%
b.second
Minneapolis:
First patents, [email protected], second patents, $4 20
^T,
3 ^'o
r8
t
clears - [email protected] clears ,
ip* 70QA 2 80.
THE CASH TRADE
RECEIPTS LIGHTERPRICES GENERALLY
WELL MAINTAINED.
FLAX-No. 1 seed was in a range of %c
between 0914c and 98%c. The tendency was
firmer at first, but easier later. Rejected sold
at Die.
Minneapolis leceived 43 cars against 66 and
shipped 12. Dulnth received 5 cars.
Closing pricesMinneapolis cash, 99c to ar
rive 99e, September, 99c October, 99c De
cenibei 90^c, May, $1.00%.
CORNBusiness was moderate and the mar
ket not very strong. No. 3 jellow closed at
Receipts, 5 shipments, 3 cars.
OATSChoice oats were Arm and in good
,Nt_8i much was on sale. No. 3 white
sale.
sold to S~Y4.c for choice, but ordinar.y
as low as 36c. No. 3 white closed at 36c.
Receipts, 62 cars shipments, 5'5l cars.
FK13I) AND MEA1L Coarse corn meal and
cracked corn ian n sacks, 519.25 No. 1 ground
JVl
2nCOrx"
d
3 i
atB'
80
b
8ack
e\tri._$19 No 2 grounda feed5." U, corn and %
oata. lu-lb sacks, sacks3 extra, $20 No. 3 ground
i
eVtrii clc
1
t.
High. Low.
% .82 $ .81%
,77%@77% .75%
79% .77%.
Minneapolis $ .75%@76 $'.77%
Chicago 77%@77% .78%@78%
Duluth 75% .77%
St. Louis 80%@81 .82%@82%
Kansas City 67%g)67 .68%
New York 83% .84%
8 awent
$2025
at
ck s
n ^
2 "
t8 '
?
l
b
Sacks
M1LLSTLFFSDemand is good and millers
sav the^ have all the business they can con
veniently carle- for, and some of the mills
heavilty8 ahead. Bran In bulk, S13.75ai
T
ll V,
,
r
sack
,Jsold
n J
CLOSING CASH PRICES
On TrackNo. 1 hard, 84%c No. 1 northern, 83%c to arrive, 78%c No .
northern, [email protected]%c to arrive, 75%c No. 3 wheat, [email protected]
No. 1 flax, 99c No. 3 yellow corn, 47c.
No. 3 white oats, 36c No. 2 rye, 52%c.
Barley, 45c to 55c.
No grade wheat, 1 car . .
No grade wheat, 1 car ...
No grade wheat, 1 car .
No. 2 white corn. 1 car.
No 3 white oats, 6 cais
No. 3 white oats, 6 cars 3 6
.37%
No. 3 white oats, 2 curs
No. 4 white oats, 2 curs .
No. 4 white cats, 1 car . .
No. 4 white oats, 1 car
No. 3 oats, 7 cars
No. 3 oats, 1 car
No grade oats, 1 car ....
Vo grade oats, 1 tar ...
No grade oats, 2 cars
No giade oats, 1 car
No. '& rye, 1 car
No. 4^barley, 1 car 54
No. 4 barley, 1 car -o^
No. 4 barley, 1 car 51
No. 5 bailey, 11 cars 50
No. 5 barley, 2 cars 52
No. 5 barley, 1 car 45%
No. 5 barlej, 9 cars. 48
No. 5 barley, 3 cars .46
No grade barley, 1 car, hot 44
No grade barley, 2 cars 44
No grade barley, 1 car 43
No grade barley, 1 car 48
No grade barley, 1 car 49
No. 1 flax, 1 car 89%
No. 1 flax, 2 cars 99
No. 1 flax, 5 cars 98%
Rejected flax, 1 car 97
Macaroni Wheat.
No. 2, 2 cars 68
s
nk [email protected] flour mlddlingsTare in
bulk. [email protected] 25 red dog. [email protected] al f7ro b
'"Minneapolis:
l
n 100-l b sacks. $1.50l pe 'to n
additional Shipments. 1,276 tons.
BAULKYLow gradesn were rather alow, but
there was a fair market on the whole. Re
ceipts, 97Jcars shipments, 34 cars. Feed grades
t5
46c
m alg grades , [email protected] .
RYENo. 2 rye closed at 32&c. Receipts. 9
cars: shipments, none.
HAYPricee s are very Arm as quoted. Upland,
choice, upland. No. 1, [email protected] 50
upland.n,[email protected] No. 2, [email protected] midland. No. 1, $8
2
J$0A,
.r
ad
lough, [email protected] Receipts, 32 tons. ^
in
. ^ CASH SALES REPORTED TO-DAY,
L \ No. 1 northern wheat, 3 cars $
,l
No. 1 northern wheat, 1 car *
*
No - * northern wheat, 2 cars, choice..'.!.'
^K t No. 2 northern wheat, 3 ccrs
J No. 2 northern wheat, 1 car winter
I 'r No. 2 northern wheat, 1 car
if*, No. 2 northern wheat, 5 cars "
[tX No. 2 northern wheat. 2 cars ,',ii/
i No. 2 northern, 1 car old, f o b 3i*
fL- No. 3 wheat, 2 ears .70
ST.*. Njj. 3 wheat, 2 cars \\ \so
jfe - No grade wheat, 4 cars '76
dig, No grade wheat, 5 cars ^79
V' No grade wheat, 9 cans [74
/ No grade wheat, 1 car, fob 74
No grade w heut, 1 car 72
No grade wheat, 3 cars ^73
" N .erade wheat, 2 cars .75
J - No grade wheat, 3 cars 78
* ? i . No grade wheat, 1 ct r .'70
*. So grade wheat. 1 car -.65
v \ No grade wheat, 1 car 77%
" * Is'..No grade wheat, 1 car 66
f No grade wheat. 3 cars, f o b 74
JfevNo grade wheat, 4 cars ."es
.. 3*&No grade wheat, 1 car. smutty 63
f\ No grade wheat, 1 car, f o b 76
'Mi
:
u P
ln nd . [email protected] timothy, choice*
$11 @U.o0 timothy. No. 1. [email protected] timothy
No. 2, |[email protected] rye straw, choice,
[email protected] 0 ""
.84
.84^, .85
.81 .80 .82%
82
o z
Opening Highest
I owest
Close
To-day Yesterday 36%
Year ago 33
87 87% 36%
G-T
C. C. WYMAN CO.
_ |? Grain Commission, 505-506 New Chamber off Comneroe, ^
Send Us Mall Samples. We Will ftuote You Grades and Prices.
?:J,
t
1
.77 ."i%
.67 .47% .36%
STATE GRAIN INSPECTION.
Sept. 22.
Inspected InWheatCarsGreat Northern
No. 1 northern, 18, No. 2 northern, 11 , no
grade, 48.
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. PaulNo. 2 north
ern. 3 No. 3, 3 , rejected, 1 no grade, 18.
Minneapolis & St. LouisNo. 8, 1: no grade 4.
Soo LineNo. 1 northern, 1 No. 8, 1 no
grade, 8.
Northern PacificNo. 2 northern, 1 re
jected, 1.
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha
No. 2, 1 No. 3, 1 no grade, 26.
Minnesota TransferNo. 1 northern, 1 No.
2 northern, 1 no grade, 1.
TotalNo. 1 northern, 20 No. 2 northern, 17
No. 3, 6 rejected, 2 , no grade, 95.
Other GrainsCarsNo. 2 macaroni wheat,
1 lejected macaroni wheat, 2 winter wheat,
57 No. 2 yellow corn, 1 No. 3 yellow corn,
2, No. 3 corn, 4 No. 4 corn, 4 No. 3 white
oats, 13 No. 4 white oats, 15 No. 3 oats, 17,
no grade oats, 12 No. 2 rye, 7 no grade rye,
1 No. 3 barley, 1 No. 4 barley, 12 No. 5
barley, 51 ,no grade barley, 13 , No. 1 flax, 14
rejected flax, 11 no grade flax, 2.
Cars Inspected OutNo. 1 hard wheat, 1
No. 1 northern, 15 No. 2 northern, 33 No. 3,
5 rejected wheat, 8 no grade wheat, 23
No. 2 macaroni wheat, 1 rejected macaroni
wheat, 1 no giade winter wheat, 1 No. 4
corn, 3 No. 3 white oats, 18 No. 4 white oats,
7 No. 3 oats, 6 no grade oats, 1 no grade
rye, 4 No. 3 barley, 1 No. 4 barley, 23 No.
5 barley, 80 no grade barley, 14 No. 1 flax,
6 No. 1 northern flax, 1.
DAILY WHEAT MOVEMENT.
The following are the receipts and shipments
at the principal primery wheat markets:
Receipts,
Bushels.
New York 24,675
Philadelphia 15,109
Baltimore t
74,000
1,632
113,658 210,61(5
45.92C
160,000
PUTS AN D CALLS.
Two o'clock report:
PutsDecember wheat, 75%@75%c.
CallsDecember wheat, 76%c.
CurbDecember wheat, 76c.
CHICAGO GRAIN
WHEAT OPENED SLIGHTLY EASIER, BU T
FIRMED U P SHORTLY AFTERWARDS.
Chicago, Sept. 23.There was wheat for sale
at the opening to-day, and the market was a
little easier, with December at 78%@78%c to
78%@78%c. Lower temperatures in the north
west, piedicted light frosts and heavy buying by
commission bouses offset the influence of large
country offerings, prices bettering early. Decem
ber went to 78%c, and receded to 78%c. There
was a large trade in May wheat, which opened
at 80%@80%c to 80%c, and held at about the
lower figures. Minneapolis and Duluth reported
receipts of 363 cars, which, with local receipts of
103 carB, only 2 contract, made a total for the
three points of 466 cars, against 760 cars last
week, and 985 a year ago.
On weaker outside markets with free scattered
selling and light demand, the market later be
came very weak, December receding to 77%c, but
rallying on buying at the decline to 77%@77%c,
closing easy at a loss of l%c .
Close: WheatSeptember, 75%c old, 76c:
December, 77%@77%c old, 77%c: May, 791/.
@79%c.
Cash WheatNo. 2 red. 79g80c No. 3 red.
77%(@79c No. 2 haid winter, 77(^80c No. 8
hard winter, [email protected] No. 1 northern spring. 88
CPOc No. 2 northern spring, [email protected] No. 3
spring, 80(^87c.
The corn market opened strong, with prices
Vic to %c higher. Decidedly colder weather in
the corn belt and predictions of frosts were the
influences. December started at 47%c to 47%c.
went to 48c on commission house buying, and
then dropped to 47%(!47%c. Trade was scat
tered and of large volume. Receipts, 422 cars,
39 of contract grade.
The weakness In wheat caused a *break in
prices, local traders leading the selling. Decem
ber went back to 47%cf but steadied to 47%@
47%c, where it closed, %@%c lower.
Close: Corn, September. 47%c December, 47%
??47%c May, $47%e cash corn, No. 2, 48g?
48%c No. 3, 47%@48Vic.
There was only a small early trade in oats,
but the market showed strength in sympathy
with corn. December opened at 37%c to 37%c,
%c to %c over yesterday's close, and went to
38%c, holding fairly well. Receipts small, only
83 cars.
Close- Oats. September, 36%c December
37%f!S7%c May. 38%c cash oats, No. 2. 36U
@36%c No. 3, 35%@86c.
The followlrg was the range of prices:
Wheat Sept. Dec. Mar.
Opening 77% 78%@% %:
Highest 77$ 78% 80%
Lowest 75% 77% 73%
Close
To-day 75% n%% 79}[email protected]%
Yesterday 77 78%| So%
Year ago 80 69% 70%@%
Corn
Opening 48%@%
Highest 48%
Lowest 47%
Close
^THEMiNNBAPoiyis JOURNAL.m^mMm^mms^^^^ **
Close
,
v
To-day, \ '
$ .82
.76%@76 77%@78
THE DAY'S RESULTS
1 noitheni, /9%c No. 2 northem. 76%c No.e3.
7o%e September, 70%- December, 75%e Mav,
78-v4c- macaroni, No. 1.0 No. 2, 08c flax,
cash and Octobera November. $1.01, Decem-
52%c
%
NEW Y0SK PRODUCE, Sept. 23.Butter-
Receipts, 9.156 pkgs market steady state dairy,
[email protected] extra creamery, 21%c creamery, com
mon to choce, 16^210. CheeseReceipts, 4,494
pkgs market firm state and full cream fancy
small colored, ll%c large colored, ll%c small
white, ll%c large white, ll%c. EggsRe
ceipts, 6,305 pkgs market irregular state and
Pennsylvania fancy mixed, [email protected] state and
Pennsylvania seconds to firsts, [email protected] western
extras, 24c western thirds to seconds, [email protected]
western firsts, [email protected] refrigerated, [email protected]
47%,
47% 62%
To-day Yesterday .
Year ago .
Oats
CHICAGO PRODUCE, Sept. 23.Butter-
Steady creameries. [email protected] dairies, [email protected]
CheeseSteady daisies, lie twins, 10%@10%c
Young Americas, [email protected]%c. EggsFirm it
mark, cases included, [email protected] PoultryEasier
turkeys, lie chickens, hens, lie chickens,
springs, ll%c.
37% 31%
OTHER GRAIN MARKETS
DULUTH GRAIN, Sept. 23.Wheat lost l% c
to-dav, lprgely on the Minneapolis flour strike.
December opened %c off at 77c and closed at
75%c. after a steady decline. September lost
l c even to 79%c. Receivers are getting reports
of large shipments this way and expect much
wheat soon. Flax was a little stronger most of
the session.
ReceiptsWheat, 52 cars flax, 5 oats, 4 rye,
1 barlfy, 12.
close. Cash, No. 1. hard, 79%c No. 1 north
ern, 78%e No. 2 northern, 75%c on track. No.
MISCELLANEOUS
NEW YORK COTTON, Sept. 23.The cotton
market. Influenced 1 cables and covering in the
near months, opened steady, 4 points higher to
3 points lower. After a few minutes of steadi
ness offerings became very heavy as a result
of the expanding movement and clear weather,
under liquidation and bear pressure, September
broke to 11.30c. October to .70c and ttfe latter
position showed net loss of from S to 12 joints.
This decline attracted profit-taking by shorts,
however, and also brought in buying orders from
commission houses, which were heavy enough to
rally the market 5 to 9 pints from the bottom.
At noon the market was quieter and several
points from the bottom on a flurry of profit,
taking by room shorts and a lull in liquidation.
Spot quiet: middling uplands 11.60c middling
gulf. 11.85c.
CottonSpot closed quiet, 10 joints lower
middling uplands, 11.50c middling gulf, 11.75c
sales, 705 bales. , ,
NEW YORK COFFEE AND SUGAR, Sept. 23
Sugar, raw, firm fair refining, 3%c cen
trifugal, 96 lest, 3%@3 15-16c molasses sugar,
3%c refined, firm crushed, 5.50c powdered, 5c
granulated. 4.90c. Coffee, steady No. 7 Rio,
5 5-16c. Molasses, firm New Orleans, [email protected]
NEW YORK OIL, Se
refined, all poets, $8.5
M&
WALLSTREETPRICES
They Take Another Tumble To-day,
the General List Showing
M yan*d1
J
er ' 8* % @S4%c Decemberd ,
84%@84 13-16c May, S4 [email protected]%c.
RyeEasy state and Jersey, [email protected]%c No.
2 western, 61%c t. o. b. afloat.
CornReceipts, 120,850 bu sales, 55,000 bu.
Advanced on low temperatures west and fears
of frost to-night. September, 54%@54%c De
cember, 53%@54%c May, 53%@53%c.
OatsReceipts, 120,000 bu market nominal
track white, [email protected]
CloseWheat: December, 88%c May, 84c.
Corn: December, 53%c May, 53%c.
MILWAUKEE- GRAIN AND FLOURSept. 23.
~-*lo.?d!$*aa
J' WheatSteady No. 1 north -
ern, [email protected] No. 2 northern. [email protected] new De-
77%@77%c bid. RyeDull No. 1, 57%@58c.
BarleySteady No. 2. 65%@66c sample. 47
62c. Oats%c higher standard, [email protected]%c.
CornDecember, 47%c bid puts, 46%c bid
calls, 47%c.
^--Consistent Losses, v * .
Close
Dec Wheat.
Close Close
To-day. Yesterday.
s -
Saturday
% .82%
.77% ~*-
.79%@79%
Close
Year Ago,"-
$ .65%
United States Steel Bonds Hake a
New Low Record j
May Wheat.
Close Close
To-day. Yesterday.
$ .77%7 $ .79%@79
.79%@79% .80%
.78%
New York, Sept. 23.Prices opened lower than
last night with a tevt exceptions on a fairly
large volume of business. New York Central uud
Manhattan were down %, and Intel national
Puper preferred a point. Stocks of railroads in
the southern region were notably heavy.
Standard stocks became affected by the selling
of New York Central, and their weakness induced
a bear attack on the specialties. The general
selling disclosed little support anywhere, but
pleasure was not very severe in any one quar
ter. Ne w York Central declined 1%, atod losses
of 1 to 1% were recoided for Amalgamated,
American Car preferred, Republic Steel preferred,
Tennessee Coal, Railway Steel Spring, Sugar,
General Electric, People's Gas, Union Bag, Man
hattan, Metropolitan Street Railway, Illinois
Central, Southern Railway preferred, Baltimore
& Ohio, and Chicago Great Western.
Prices fell sharply all around. Amalgamated
and Sugar fell over 2 points, Car 1%, General
Electric 2%, Southern Railway preferred 2%,
Rock Island prefened 1ft and quite a number
of stocks a point or more. The market was
quiet and steadier at noon. United States Steel
second 5s broke thru yesterday's low record of
73 and touched 72%. Bonds generally were
weak at noon.
i. The selling movement was suspended for a
brief time as fresh liquidation in Amalgamated
and the Pennsylvania gioup drove the market
down again. Amalgamated fell to 41%, a loss
of 2%, and Pennsylvania touched 121. Standard
stocks generally sold slightly lower than in the
forenoon.
The market fell Into semi stagnation without
important rally. St. Paul joined the group of
stocks that had lost as mucnh as a point, and
Southern Railway preferresd extended Its decline
i t
.82% .69% .84
.80
.84% .70% .85
''
r '
'
- 870c: ^
:
.35% .SGVi .35% .83% .35% 34% .33
.34 .53
^t
8 '
36 %
NEW YORK GRAIN AND FL0UE, Sept. 28.
FlourReceipts, 22,996 brls sales, 2,600 pack
ages market dull and irregular.
WheatReceipts, 24,675 bu sales, 1.870.000
bu market opened steadier on the corn advance,
but encountered liberal selling by foreigners an
SSfSk* i .?t2
c
ten
2,700
500 300
200
1,000
100 100 200
200
5,100
200
2,700
200
54,500
300
36,500
500
44,300
100
8^00
Sales, Stocks High-] Low-
I est. I est.
GRAIN, Sept. 28.Close:
T4c.: December. 87%
KANSAS CITY
WheatSeptember, W74C juecemoer . 04M,M
7%c cash. 2 hard, [email protected]%c No. 3. 69
F
(1 y ^Sv-,
4:No. la4c rejected . 6060%c No .
SJF&.A^
81 ^
NO -
8 '
78e - Corn-December,
40%@40%c May, 40%e cash. No. 2 mixed.
4J%@43^ C No . 2 wLIte 44c
o
OatsNo. 2 white, 39340c NoN. 2 , 87,
.
8mixed% ( 43 c
ST. LOUIS GRAIN. Sept. 23.Close: Wheat
Lower No. 2 red, cash, elevator. 80c Septem
bor, 80c December, 80%gSlc May. 82%c No.
2 hard. [email protected] CornLower: No. 2, cash, 46c.
December, 43*ic May, 44%@44%c. Oats
Fiim No. 2, cash, 37c September, 35%c De
cember, 36^0 May, 3S%c No. 2 white, 41%c.
CHICAGO SEED AN D COARSE GRAINS,
Sept 23.Rye, September, 54%c December,
54%c May, 56c. Flax, cash northwest, $1.02
southwest, 97c September, 97c October, 97c De-
S3.20,
cember, 98c May, $103 . Ttmothv, September,
October, $3 20 January. $3.25. Clover,
ctober, $9.75. Barley, cash, [email protected]
LIVERPOOL GRAIN, Sept. 23.WheatSpot
No. 2 red western winter, dull. 6s l&idj No. 1
northem spring, no stock. Futures firm Sep
tember. 6s 3%d October, 6s 3%d December,
6s 4%d.
CornSpot American mixed. 4s 5d futures
firm September, 4s 4%d October, 4 s 4%d.
GENERAL PRODUCE
Wednesday, Sept. 23.Butter, firm. Eggs,
firm. Poultry, steady. Veal, firm.
BUTTERExtra creameries, per lb, 21 %c
firsts, 20c seconds, 17c- dairies, extras, 19c
dailies, firsts, 15iatl6c dairies, seconds, 18c
packing stock, [email protected] renovated, extra, 17c
renovated, firsts, 16c
EOGSNew laid eggs at mark, cases included,
17c cahdled, toss off, per doz, 19c dirties, $4.15
per case for candled seconds and checks, per
case. $3.90x April storage, car lots, charges paid,
$5 25.
CHEESETwin or flats, fancy, ll%c twins
or flats, choice, 10fo)t0%c: twins or flats, fair to
good, S(fi9c Young Americas, fancy, [email protected]
13%c brick. No. 1, 12c brick, No. 2, 10c brick,
No. 3, 7.7%c primost. No. 1, 8c pultost, 9e
Swiss. No. 1. block:, 15c Swiss, No. 2, block.
12c daisies. No. 1. 12%c.
LIVE POULTRYTurkeys, mixed coops,
12%c turkeys, thin, small, unsalable chickens,
hens, large, fat, 9c hens, thin, small, 8c
chickens, roosters. 6c springs, [email protected]%c ducks,
young, white, 10c ducks, young, colored, 9c
ducks, old, 7c geese, fat, large, [email protected]
DRESSED MEATSVeal, fancy per lb. [email protected]
8%c fair to good. [email protected]%c small, overweight,
[email protected] mutton, fancy, 6c lambs, yearlings,
fancy, [email protected] milk lambs, pelts off. 889c hogs,
light, 6%c hogs, medium, 6%c hogs, heavy, 6c.
FISHCrapples, medium to large, 8c small,
[email protected] pickerel, 5c buffelo, 8c bullheads, 6c
pike 7c
TOMATOESBushel $1.25.
CABBAGEPer crate, $1.
POTATOESPer bu, 50c small lots, sacked,
per bu. 60c.
ONIONSPer bu, 50c.
POPCORNOld rice, per lb, 3c.
PIGEONSLive, per doz, 75c dead, per doz,
50c squabs, per doz, $1. -
DRIED PEASFancj yellow, per bu, $1.76
medium, $1.50 green, fancy, $1.76 medium,
$1 25 marrowfat, $2.25.
BEANSQuotations include sacks: Fancy navy,
per bu, $2.75 choice navy, $2.50 medium, hand
picked, $2.25 medium, fair, $1.75: medium,
mixed and dirty, [email protected] brown, fancy, $2
brown, fair to good, $1.50 Lime, Califor
nia, per lb, 7c.
APPLESFancy eating, per brl, $3 [email protected] Jon
athans, per brl, [email protected] Maiden Blush, per brl,
$3 [email protected] Wealthy, per brl, $3.50 cooking,
per brl, $3 crabapples, per brl, $6.50 per bu,
$2.25.
PINEAPPLESPer crate. $5.
ORANGESValencias, all sizes, $4(3)4.25.
LEMONSCalifornia, fancy, as to size, $4.50
4.75 Verdillas. choic as to sis, $4.25.
CRANBERRIESPer brl. $7.
SWEET POTATOESJerseys, per brl, $4.75
Virginias, per brl. $3.50.
WATERMELONSP?r c-ate, $2.
PEARSMichigan Bartletts, $5.
PEACHESMichigan, bu, [email protected] Mich
igan, % bu, 85c 1-5 baskets, 3540c.
CALIFORNIA FRUITSPeaches, per box, 90c
(H$1.15 prunes, per crate. $1 pairs, Bartletts,
boxes, California, $2.75 Washington, $2.35.
GRAPESConcords, per basket. 20c Dela
wares, pony baskets, 20c Malaga, $1.25 Tokay,
[email protected]
BANANASFancy large bunches, $3 medium
bunches, [email protected] small bunches, $2.25.
HONEYNew. fancy white. 1-lb sections, 14c
choice white, 1-lb sections, [email protected] amber, Sic
goldenrod, 12c extracted white ln barrels, [email protected]
7c: extracted amber, 7%c.
VEGETABLESWax beans, per bu, 90c egg
plant, per doz, [email protected] radishes, per doz
bunches, [email protected] lettuce, per doz, 2pe lettuce,
heads, per doz, 30c mint, per doz, 25c celery,
per doz, 25e: new beets, per doz bunches. 60c
spinach, per bu. [email protected] squash, per doz, $1.25:
cauliflower, per doz, [email protected] parsnips, per
bu, 75c.
Shipments,
Bushels.
10,257
Toledo ^. 38,000
Detroit 10,119
St. Louis 102,000
Boston JL, . . 783
Chicago 283,475
Milw aukee 44,880
Duluth 214,973
Minneapolis 835,450
Kansas City 206,400
9,800 1,333
1,0*0
5 lOOlCau. Southern
Can... Pacific
Ches. & Qhio.
Chi. & Alton .
do pr
1,100 Chi. Gr. West.
1001 do pr A . .
100 do pr B . .
100C.,C.,C.& St.L.
do pr
Chi. Term ...
do pr
Col. Fuel & I.
Col. Southern..
do 1s t pr. .
do 2d pr . .
Col. H. C. & I.
Consol Gas ..
Con. Tobac. pr.
Pen. & Rio G.
do pr .....
DesM. & Ft.D.
Erie
do 1st pr.
do 2d pr .
Gen. Electric
Hocking Val.
do pr
Illinois Central
Iowa Central
do pr
Inter. Paper
do pf
K. C. & So
do pr
Louis. & Nash.
M., St. P. & S.
do pr
Manhattan . .
Met. St. Ry..
M. & St. L..
do pr
Mo. Pacific . .
M., K. & T..
do pr
Mex. Central.
Nat. Biscuit.
do pr
National Lead
do pr
Nor. & West..
do pr
North Am. Co
Northwestern Nor. Securities
N. Y. Central
Ont. * W....
Pressed Steel.
do pr
Pacific Mail...
Penn. K. R...
People's Gas. .
Reading
do 1st pr...
do 2d pr
Repub. Steel..
do pr
Rubber Goods.
do pr
Rock Island..
do pr
St. L. & S. W
do pr
:. Paul
do pr . .
Southern Pac
Southern Ry
do pr . .
Tenn. Coal & I
Texas & Pac
Twin City R T
Union Pac
do pr
U. S. leather.
do pr
V. S. Rubber
do pr .
U. S. Steel
do pr .
Wabash ...
do pr .
Western Union
Wheel. & L. E
do 1st pr
do 2d pr.
Wis. Central..
do pr
1,700 1,600
100
100
100 300
200 700
600 300 200 200 300 100
300
15,700
2,400
900
1,800
2,600
100 300
200 100 100
100
7,800
400 100
1,300
72,600
100 100
11,100
300 300
2,900
200
2,700
200
300
2,200
15,900
1,600
900 300
100
35,000
800
24,900
500 200
1,000
600
1,000
200
15,900
3,600
100
1,900
14,800
100
4.800 7,300 3,000 3,200
1,500
100
24,300
300 800
300 200 200
34,000 12,900
100
1,100
SOO 200 200 100
200 200
HIDES, PELTS, TALLOW, WOOL.
^
Green salted heavy cow hides 8% 8%
Green salted steer hides 8% 7
Green salted light hides 7% 6%
Green salted calf, 8 to 15 lbs 10% 9
Green salted veal kip 8% 7
Green salted deacons, each 35 @45
Green salted horse or mule hides,
large
Green salted horse or mule hides,
medium 2.50 1.75
Green salted horse or mule hides,
small ... 1.70 1.00
s
Dry flint Montana, Oregon, Washing
ton and Idaho butcher hides, flat... 16%
Montana bulls and fallen hides 11
Dry flint Minnesota, Dakota, Wiscon
sin and similar 12 10%
Green salted pets, large to small,
each 20 ffll.oa
Dry Hint calf skins 16 @14
Dry flint territorial pelts, per lb 10 @11
, of 72%.
Tallow, ln cakes 4% 4%
Tallow, in barrels 3%ei 3
Grease, light 8%@ 3
Wool, medium, unwashed 16 17%
Wool, coarse inu^iflu.
Wool, fine, unwashed ...'.'.Y.'.IZ |l 4
Feathers, goose 40 045
Feathers, duck " "34 ffi4
Feather, chicken q x ,
Feathers, turkey .".'.7.7 2% % 3
Beeswax, yellow. 00
Beeswax, dark **)]24
Dry ginseng, *e lb *K 15,3,5 OA
Green, ordinary, per lb...!.!" . * 'Jj
Green, for planting, per lb !!! l!l5
Losa^F?s8
Independent Meat Packers Organize
at Kansas City.
Erl
C
&
Weter
Preferred lost 4
Stock quotations reported for The Journal by
Watson & Co., brokers, Chamber of Commerce.
Closing figures are bid:
89%
18% 37%
1 %
13%
80% 60
88%
73%
156
88%
117%
21% 34
122%
93%
121
92%
Total sales, 466,800.
Ex. dividend.
MONEY REPORTS
MINNEAPOLIS, Sept. 23Bank clearings to
day, $2,717,500.49. New York exchange, selling
rate, 25c premium buying rate, 35c discount.
Chicago exchange, selling rate, 35c premium:
buying rate, 25c discount. London 60-day sight
documentary, $4.82%.
BERLIN, Sept. 23.Exchange on London, 20
marks 38% pfgs for checks. Discount rates,
short bills, 2% per cent three-months' bi#,
3% per cent.
LONDON, Sept. 23.Gold to the amount of
50,000 was withdrawn from the Bank of Eng
land to-day for shipment t oEgypt.
PARIS, Sept. 23.Three per cent rentes 96
francs 42% sentfanes for the acocunt. Exchange
on London, 25 francs 21% sentimes lor checks.
ST. PAUL, Sept. 23.Clearings to-day,
$1,070,968.49.
LONDON CLOSING STOCKS, Sept. 23.Con-
solbfor money. 88 9-16 consols for account,
8S% Atiaconda, S% Atchison, 66% Atchison
preferred, 92 Baltimore & Ohio. 80% Canadian
Pacific. 125%: Chesapetke & Ohio. 31% Chi
cago Great Western. 16 Chicago. Milwaukee &
St. Paul, 143% Denver & Rio Grande, 24,
Denver & Rio Grande preferred, 77% Erie, 27%
Erie first preferred, 66% Erie second prefered,
49: Illinois Cental, 133% Louisville & Nashville,
104% Missouri. Kansas & Texas, 19% Ne w
York Central. 121: Norfolk & Western, 62%:
Norfolk & Western preferred, 90%: Ontario &
Western, 21% Pennsylvania, 62% Rand Mines,
9%: Reading, 25 Rerding first preferred, 39.
Reading second preferred, 44% Southern Rail
way. 21%f Southern ltailwav prefened, 86A.
Southern Puinc 43% Union Pacific. 74% Union
Pacific preferred. S8? United States Steel. 18%:
United States Steel'pieferred, 69% Wabash.
20% Wabash preferred. 33.
Bar silver steady, 27 3-16d per ounce.
Money. 3% 3% per cent. ^
The rate of discount ln the open market for
short bills is 4 per cent. The rate of discount
iu the open market for three months' bills is
[email protected]% per cent.
Petroleum steady
Un
No.l. No.2.
ag^asgg&^g-
saws?a ^sa^Stffesr
NEW PACKING COMBINE
Kansas City, Sept. 23.A meeting of
the promoters of the Independent Pack
ing company, incorporated recently to
fight the packers combine was held in this
city yesterday.
The company is. capitalized at $5,000,000.
The board of directors comprise almost
every state in the west, as follows:
H. S. Gosney, Arizona P. J. Gastro, A.
M. Watkins, Nebraska Noah Newbanks
and C. J. Bull, South Dakota I. C. Camp
bell, Paul Russell, T. M. Walker and
Georgre Plume, Kansas B. B. Frayser and
S. T. Williams, Indian Territory J. T.
Brown and W. T. Lindsey, Montana L. F .
Wilson, Burr B. Bennett, W. E. Halsell
and S. B. Lucas, Texas F. W. Flato and
N. H. Gentry, Missouri John W. Spring
er, Frank Benton, C. F. Martin, Colorado
J. H. Gwynn, Oregon.
-Close-
Am. Cot. Oil.
do pr ....
Am. Car ....
do pr ....
Am. Locomot
do pr ....
Am. Ice ....
do pr
Am. Linseed.
Am. Sugar . .
do pr
Am. Smelting
do pr *...
Amal. Cop . .
Anacon. Cop
At, Top &. S F
do pr ....
Bait. & Ohio
do pr ....
Brook. Rap Tr
28% 82
24% 78 16% S4
5%
20%
10%
Bid.
Sep.21
110% 117%
4194 87% 41% 70U
J?* 118
41% 87% 11%
70% 64% 88% 7T% 85
79% 84%
130 129%
BANKERS MEET
Pennsylvania Money Lenders Get
Together at Pittsburg.
Pittsburg, Sept. 23.Bankers from every
section of Pennsylvania and Ne w York,
Chicago, Cincinnati and other cities were
present to-day, when the ninth annual
convention of the Pennsylvania Bankers'
association was called to order. Addresses
of welcome were made by City Solicitor
Rogers on behalf of Pittsburg and James
H. Willock for the bankers.
Presidenc McAlister's annual address
was then presented and was followed by
the reading of the reports of officials. The
convention will elope to-morrow with an -
other business session, when addresses
will be made by ex-Controller Dawes and
W. H. Smith of Philadelphia, representing
the banking department of Pennsylvania,
10 18
42% 12%
49% 20%
79%
35%
11%
35
11%
129
18%
33%
11% 62%
20 36
100%
52%
125 132 111%
52-J4 84
89% 18% 37% 11% 38 99T4 13% 80% 59%
'PINO BARRED OUT
101%'' 100%
Youngster Can't Attend Princeton,
Ind., Public Schools.
132V4
1H%
53%
131%
111%
52%
New York Sun Special Service.
Evansville, Ind., Sept. 23.The school
board at Princeton, this state, have de
cided not to admit a Filipino boy into the
public schools of that place. P. T. Gil
bert, who is the instructor in English of
the Princeton schools, took a fondness to
a Filipino boy while in the islands and
decided to take him to Princeton. The lad
is 12 years old and intelligent.
When Professor Gilbert expressed his
Intention of placing the boy ln the public
schools the "color line" was raised and
the prejudice against the lad became so
great that the members of the school
board were forced to call a meeting and
decide against him.
90 19 38% 11%
LOSES HER BABIES
Mother Couldn't Pay for Medical
AidDeath Claims Them.
New York Sun Special Service.
New York, Sept. 23.Mrs. Maria Marcus,
who was trying to support herself and
five children on $3 a week has lost two of
the babies because she could not afford
to hire a doctor. The two who died were
twin sisters, born seven weeks ago.
They were sick from the start and their
mother took them to Bellevue hospital.
They were sent home from the hospital
on Friday, "cured," according to the rec
ords. One died on Monday and the other
to-day. The mother came to this country
from Germany with her husband a year
ago. The husband died six months ago.
25% 60%
13% 32%
62%
14% 33%
138% | 1J0%
84%
34 ?5%
72 85%
6"
76 10 37 17 67% 19% 31% 82%
WOMAN AND CHILD BEATER
Assailant Leaves Mother,for Dead
Child Will Recover.
17% 37%
Northfleld, Vt., Sept. 23.Neighbors
who went to the house of Mrs. Stephen
Trembler at South Northfleld early to
day found the woman and her young child
lying apparently dead on the blood-stained
floor. Besides them was a club with
which they had been beaten.
The woman revived sufficiently to re
late that a strange man whom she had
discovered in her room had inflicted her
injuries in an attempt to assault her and
then she lapsed Into unconsciousness and
is expected to die. The child will prob
ably recover.
POISON IN THE BEEF
Second Case of the Kind Reported
Prom La Crosse.
PROVISIONS
La Crosse, Wls
Phaeton, haying, gained permission of Phoebus,
mounted on the driver's seat as charioteer of
the sun.
He drove awkwardly, as you remember.
Whereupon Jupitei, who was watching his per
formance with ill-concealed vexation, hurled a
thunderbolt at him.
Jupiter could throw straight. He seldom
missed.
The thunderbolt bit Phaeton and knocked blm
into the River Po.
"Po fellow!" compassionately exclaimed Juno.
"Why did you do that. Jupe?"
"Because, madame." replied Jupiter, flashing
an angry glance at her, "he wasn't wearing a
union button."
.- . A
CHICAGO PROVISIONS, Sept. 23.Provisions
opened steady to firm. There was October lard
for "Bale at the opening, but It was speedily ab
sorbed by packing interests, and the price re
covered to yesterday's closing figures. October
quotations were:
Pork, $13.70% lard, $7.87% ribs, $9.47%.
May pork opened at $13.50 January lard at
$7.02% (17.05, and January ribs at $6.75.
Close: Pork. September, $13 October, $13
January. $12.86 May, $12.97%. Lard, Septem
ber, $9.82% October, $7.75 December. $7.17%
January. $7.02%. Ribs. September. $9.30 Oc
tober, $9.40 January, $6.70. ,ffl* / *
* - SF* '- - 7 if
NEW YORK PROVISIONS, Sept. 23.Beef,
firm. Pork, quiet mess. [email protected] family, $18.50
@19 short clear, [email protected]\ Lard, quiet
prime westera steam, $8.16, ^x'
HIS NOSE TO TH E GEINDSTONE
* Chicago Tribune.
"It's gittin* so. " grumbled Goodman Gonrong,
depositing his last 5-cent piece on the bar, "that
a pore man jist can't support a fam'ly these
days."
The saloonkeeper dropped the coin in the till
and wrew a glass of beer for his thirsty- cus-
tomer.
"You lunen't any kick coming that I know
of," he said. "What family have you got to
support?"
"Yours." said Goofman Gonrong. ^^,.
,- v .WHAT H E THOUGHT.'" "
/" \ Washington Star.
"Hiram," said Mrs. Corntossel, "did you buy
anything when you was to town?"
"Yes"' "Didn't get mixed up in no deceptions?" *
"Well, I won't say positive that I didn't. Of
course, I didn't invest In no gjld bricks, but I
got a lot of canned vegetables to work off on
the summer boarders.'!
1903 - . w
VEAL CALVES WEAK
Hog Prices 5c to 10c HigherOther-
. "- wise the Cattle Market ,
Holds Steady.
$3.10 2.10
Receipts Moderate Except of Sheep
- Which Are Pretty
%
South St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 23.Estimated
receipts at the union stockyards to-day Cattle,
1,1W calves, 100 hogs, 1,400 sheep, 2,200
cars, 75.
The following table shows the receipts from
Jan. 1, 1903, to date, as compaied with the
same period in 1902.'
Year. Cattle. Calves. Hogs. Sheep. Cars.
1903 ....MG.OSS 84,494 490,340 308,778 14,307
1902 ....163,720 32r791 416,800 200,368 13,505
Inc 1,703 73,540 4,410 742
Dec 16,737
The 'following table shows the receipts thub
far in September, as compared with the same
period in 1902:
Year. Cattle. Calves. Hogs. Sheep. Cars.
1903 31,870 2,384 20,899 51,443 1.894
1902 38.P38 2,058 16,164 55,600 2,175
Ind 326 4,735
Dec 7,061 4,157 281
Official receipts for the past week are as fol
lows:
S y ,
Date. Cattle. Calves. Hogs. Sheep. Cars.
Sept. 15 1,991 372 2,009 686 J.03
Sept. 16' 736 79 1,489 1,979 61
Sept. 17 497 40 914 520 30
Sept. 18 814 31 l
Total 2,647 2,163 4,997
HOGS
Date. Av. Wt. Av. Cost. Price Range.
Sept. 15 248 ?5 63 [email protected] 00
Sept. 16 239 5.72 5.45(0,6 05
Sept. 17 263 5.66 5 35&6.15
Sept. 18 243 5 64 5 20fct6.00
Sept. 19 243 5.71 5 35
Sept. 21 253 5.S2 5.50^6.10
Sept. 22 247 5 80 5.50&6.15
Prices [email protected] higher: receipts moderate, aver
age quality fair price range, $5.40 to $6 05
bulk, $5.60 to $5.85, common to good heavy hogs
are quotable from $5.35 to $5.95 fair mixed from
$5.60 to $5.85 light mixed and butchers, $5.95
to $6.10, and good to choice lights from $6 to
$6.20.
Hogs54, 191 lbs, $5.95 11, 200 lbs, $5.90
62, 211 lbs, $5.85 46, 238 lbs, S5.80, 11, 277
lbs, $5 65 11, 210 lbs, $5.60 23, 255 lbs, $5.70
18, 281 lbs $5.60 29, 300 lbs, $5.50 40 , 175 lbs,
$6 05.
Odds and Ends9, 173 lbs, $5.95 6, fe66 lbs,
$5.40 6, 166 lbs, $5.75 4, 292 lbs, $5.40.
CATTLEReceipts moderate. Killing cattle
selling in god demand at steady prices with the
decline noted yesterday. Quality averaged poor.
Bulls steady Veal carves a shade lower. Milch
cows unchanged. Stockers and feeders selling
generally about yesterday's prices.
Butcher Steers6, 1,073 lbs, $3.25 8, 953
lbs, $3.
Butcher Cows and Heifers7, 1,190 lbs, $2.75
1, 1.160 lbs, $2 60 2, 780 lbs, $2.55 2, 910 lbs,
$2.50.
Cutters and Canners2, 1,115 lbs, $2 25, 1.
1,040 lbs, $2.10: 3, 993 lbs, $2 3, 910 lbs, $1.75,
8, 886 lbs, $1.55, 3, 873 lbs, $1.25.
Butcher Bulls1, 1,080 lbs, $2.50 1, 1,110 lbs,
$2.35 1, 1,128 lbs, $2.15.
Veal Calves1, 210 lbs, $5.35 4, 207 lbs.
$5.05 1, 150 lbs, $5.25: 2, 220 lbs, $4.60 1, 90t
lbs, $4, 1, 350 lbs, $3.85.
Stock and Feeding Steers28, 268 lbs, $3
9, 842 lbs, $2 55j 3, 973 lbs, $3.50 11, 1,091 lbs,
$3 35 34, 385 lbs, $2 50 8, 667 lbs, $2 85, 5. 802
lbs, $2.70 7. 934 lbs, $2.65, 4, 845 lbs, $2.25
Stock Cows and Heifers-^, 702 lbs, $2 2, 510
lbs. $1.60.
Stock and Fedeing Bulls2, 880 lbs, $2.
Milch Cows and Springers1 cow, $20, 2 cows,
1 calf. $63.
SHEEPReceipts fairly liberal. Market on
killing stuff less active than yesterday, but
prices generally considered about steady. Qual
ity ruled only fair, with nothing good on sale.
Desirable feeding sheep and lambs in good de
mand at steady prices.
Sales. 36 lambs, 64 Iambs, $4.50 21 lambs,
76 lbs, $4.25 15 lambs, 67 lbs, $4 83 lambs,
63 lbs, $3.85 22 feeding ewes, 100 lbs, $2.15
20 ewes, 95 lbs, $2 90 18 ewes, 105 lbs, $3 ,
5 ewes, 136 lbs, $2 95 19 stock ewes, 84 lbb,
$2.30, 3 wethers, 113 lbs, $3.25.
Among the shippers on the market were:
H. Hoefer, Tirah O. F. Olson, Brandon Spoon
er and N., Clarissa G. Olson, B. Vogt, Eagle
Bend V. A. Hunt, Big Timber, Mont. Benson
Brothers, Milaca E. Marks L. S. Co., Princeton
H. O. Hanson, Dallas, Wis. A. E. Nelson,
Grantsburg, Wis. E. Morner, Dawson, N. D. :
G. E. Stolzenburg, F. Spike, Glen Ullem, N. D.
G. Keih, W. Thiele, C. Briar, New Salem,
N. D. F. E. Brockway, Royalton H. Beckley,
Norstrand W. Thompson, Aitkin O. J. Quam,
Starbuck J. A. Duffy, Red Lake Falls E.
Thieme, Zimmerman R. A. Holman, Harris.
CHICAGO LIVE STOCK, Sept. 23Cattle-
Receipts, 17,000 stronger. Good to prime steers,
[email protected] poor to medium, [email protected]: stockers and
feeders. [email protected] heifers, [email protected] canners,
[email protected] bulls, [email protected], calves, $3 [email protected]
Texas-fed steers, [email protected] western steels,
[email protected]
HogsReceipts to-day, 24,000 to-morrrow,
20,000 steady to 10c lower. Mixed and butch
ers, $5.75(g.6.35 good to choice heavy, [email protected] 3o
rough heavy, [email protected] light, [email protected], bulk
of sales, $5.856.10.
SheepReceipts, 28,000 sheep and lambs,
slow, steady to work. Good to choice wethers,
$3.40(J?4: fair to choice mixed, $2.25(^3.25 west
ern sheep, [email protected] native lambs, $3.75ft
5.75 western lambs, [email protected]
SOXTTH OMAHA JOIVE STOCK, Sept. 23.Cat-
tleReceipts, 7.O0O market setady to stronger
native steers, $4.25t$5.65 cows and heifers, $3.25
jff4.25: western steers, [email protected] Texas steers,
$2.75i3.S5 cows and heifers, $2 [email protected] can
ners, [email protected] stockers and feeders. [email protected]
4.25, calves, $335 bulls, stags, etc., [email protected]
HogsReceipts, 3,00: market steady to shade
lower heavy, [email protected] mixed, [email protected] SO
light, [email protected] pigs, $5(i|5.75 bulk of sales,
$5.70(^5.85.
SheepReceipts. 7,000 market steady: western
yearlings, [email protected] wethers, $3.20?3.65
ewes, $3 25 common and stockers, [email protected] 50
lambs, $4 5.
SIOtTX CITY LIVE STOCK, Sept. 23.Cat-
tle, 1,100 hogs, 1,200.
HogsSteady. Sales- 64, 267 lbs, $5.65 63.
256 lbs. $5.70 64, 230 lbs. $5,85.
CattleStockers slow, killers strong. Sales:
12 beeves, 1.180 lbs. $4.75 18 beeves, 1,473 lbs,
$5.40 8 cows, 980 lbs. $2.50 11 cows, 1,040 lbs,
$2.75 9 cows, 1,230 lbs, $3 75: 18 stockers, 780
lbs, $2.50 21 stockers. 800 lbs, $3.25: 14 stock
er*. 1.140 lbs, $3.80 18 yearlings, SSOlbs, $2.50
19 yearlings, 670 lbs, $3 14 yearlings, 654
lbs, $3.50. ,
KANSAS CITY LIVE STOCK, Sept. 23.Cat-
tleReceipts, 15,000, including 2,500 Texans
market steady to lower. Beef steers, [email protected]
5.40 Texans, [email protected] cows and heifers, $1.50
3.25stockers
4 and feeders, [email protected] bulls, $2.25
,
HogsReceipts, 7,000 market steady. BulE
of sales, [email protected] heavy, [email protected] packers,
[email protected] yorkers, [email protected] pigs, [email protected])
SheepReceipts, 10,000 mnrket strong. Sheep,
[email protected] lambs, $2 [email protected]:50.
v Sept. 28.Mrs. Mary
Russ, Mrs. George Williams and two
others were taken violently ill last night
as the result of eating canned beef. All
have recovered except Mrs. Russ, who Is
still in a serious condition.
This is the second family in this vicin
ity pojsoned by eating canned beef.
DXSTIHGtnSHED PRECEDENT.
Chicago Tribune.
ST. LOUIS LIVE T0CK, Sept. 23.Cattle-
Receipts, 6,000, Including 4,000 Texans market
steady to strong. Beef steers. [email protected]
stockers and feeders, $2.503.96 cows and heif
ers. $2.25(ft4.25 Texas steers. [email protected]
HogsReceipts, 4,500 market steady. Pigs.
$5 75(?6.25 packers, $5.45g5.95 butchers and
best heavj, [email protected]
SheepReceipts. 3,000 market Arm. Sheep,
[email protected] lambs, [email protected]
MIDWAY^ HORSE MARKET, Minnesota
Transfer, St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 28.Bar-
rett & Zimmerman report that heavy prime
offerings were sold whenever shown. Light
classes of all kinds were much neglected and sold
at low pdces In line with the slow demand.
Values: Drafters, extra, $17.)fT235 drafters,
choice. $15Q(g/175 drafters, common to good,
[email protected] farm mares, extra, [email protected] farm
mates, choice, [email protected] farm mares, common
to good, [email protected]
PYTHIANS ELECT OFFICERS.
Indianapolis, Sept. 23.The supreme lodge of
the Improved Order of Knights of Pythias has
elected the following officers: Past supreme
commander, Oscar Brede, Detroit supreme com
mander, Captain J. Bieler, Indianapolis supreme
vice commander. Otto Mueler. Baltimore- su-
preme, prelate, Charles T. Schwelgler. Washing
ton supreme treasurer, Charles Kaum, Balti
more supreme scribe, E. F. Knole. Indianapolis
supreme sergeant-at-ai ms. Wolfgang Bauer,
Syracuse supreme medical examiner. Dr. C. R.
Schaefer, Indianapolis.
,
v
* GRAIN COMMISSION"
MM NCHBaWfiMnagn and Milwaukee. Orderstorfuture deliver? executed in an sBiTWa
CHAS. L LEWIS
GRAIN COMMISSION^1
and STOCK BROKE RS
Minneapolis,GrandforKs, Winnipeg
WeJlITp..
MEMBERS ALL PRINCIPAL EXCHANGES.
Private Wires to Winnipeg, Duluth.
Chicago, St. Louis and New York. * "'-
Execute orders in all markets of the world.
EDWARDS,
WOOD
t 18S 42U 57
Sept. 19 2,030 59 730 6,738 140
Sept. 21 4,450 148 999 10.105 240
Sept. 22 2,734 489 2,258 10,976 181
Uailroadb euteiing the yards reported receipts
for the day by loads as follows: Chicago Great
Western, 1 Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul, 5
Minneapolis & St. Louis, 13 Chicago, St. Paul,
Minneapolis & Omaha, 11 Great Northern, 14,
Northern Pacific, 28 Soo Line, 2 Chicago, Rock
Island & Pacific, 1 total, 75.
Disposition of stock Tuesday, Sept. 22:
Firm. Cattle. Hogs. Sheep.
Swift & Co 469 2,107 940
W. E. McCormlck.... 35 . . 4
Haas Bi others 38
Weirs 36
Elliott & Co., Duhith 2
W. G. Bronson 1 . . 104
J. B. Fitzgerald 154
Stimmer & Thomas... 147
P. Evans 159 . .
C. W. Stephens 124
City butchers 1 ^
County buyers 1,531 2 8,695
King Brothers ...... . . . . 171
Gottfried . . 83
Ship Your Grainto Us.
Best Facilities Liberal Advance*,
Prompt Returns.
'110-111 New Chamber of Oomneree*
812 Guaranty Loan Baltdlaf,
.MINNEAPOLIS.
Watson Co
01
co
BROKERS I N
GRAIN, PROVISIONS,
STOCKS AND BOND?
Members N. Y. Stock Exchange.
New York Office24 Jltoad St.
Chicago CorrespondentsJ. H. Wrenn & 3 j
Private wire Chicago and New York.
TelephonesN. W. Maln331.
N.W. Main 517.
T.C.1S4.
420-421 Chamber of Commerce.
The
Security Bank of Minnesota
Minneapolis,
Capital stock fl.000,000.00
Surplus aud undivided profits ....... 350,000.00
Deposits F. A. CHAMBERLAIN, President.
PERRY HARBISON, V. Prest.
E. F. MEARKLE, V. Prest.
T. F. HURLEY, Cashier.
FRED SPAFFORD, Asst. Cashier.
M. C. HAMER, Asst. Cashier.
A LONG TOW
Helpless Ship Will Be Taken to Ital
ian Yard.
Philadelphia, Sept. 23.The German tag
Tftan arrived here to-day from Amster
dam to tow the Italian bark Erasmo from
Philadelphia to Genoa for repairs. The
bark Is new and on her maiden voyage,
was caught in a gale and damaged. On
her arrival here bids for repairs were re
Qiiested but were thought by the owner*
to be excessive. It was Anally decided to
send the bark to an Italian shipyard and
the German tug was chartered to do the
towing. It Is said this Is the first In
stance of a foreign tug having crossed the
ocean for a tow.
FOREIGN FLASHES
BrusselsConsternation has been caused here
by a cablegram announcing that American plate
glass manufacturers have agreed to reduce the
price of their wares enormously to defeat for
eign competition.
J. F. WHALLON, GEO. 0. BAGLEX.
GEO. P. CASK. CHAS.
.case sco.cALCASf
STOCKS, GRAIN, PROVISIONS.
( New Yoik Stook Exohanga
MEMBER8-( Chicago Board of Trade,
(Mpls. QhambarOommerea
Private Wire to New York and Chloaga.
8 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.
316 FIRST AVE SO.
Ship Your train and Send Your
Orders In futures to
H. POEHLER CO.
Grain Commission.
MINNEAPOLIS. OHLUTM
GRAIN COMMISSION.
New Chamber Commerce,
Minneapolis, Mianesots.
Offices: Chicago, ntlwaukee, and DutotB.
Send us your \ ^pWordere.
Receiving a specialty. Advances made to
Tarmers. shippers and elevator companies.
4 Ifaa Dusen
Harrington Go.
Brain, Provisions,
Stocks and Bonds
MEMBERS PRINCIPAL EXCHANGES
New Chamber of Commerce.
We Oet Highest Karket Vtteaav
PITCH & CO*
XJv* Stock Commission^ Merehaata.,Paul. Stockyards, South St
Established la 1687.
ESTABLISHED 179
WOODWAR8 D & CO.
3ya \e ?*&*.< $&
1 r
Vtll
&C0.
Minneapolis, St, Paul, Duluth.
Grains, Stocks, Provisions
Bought and sold in all markets for eaab or ca
reasonable margins.
netnbers of Leading Exchanges,
Private Wires.
Write for our dally market letter aad prVrat*
telegraph ciphermailed tree.
8,700,000.00
Finley Barrell & Co
Brokers in Grain, Provision*,
Stocks and Bonds.
Members New York Stock Exchang*
Denman F. Johnson, Wgr.
408 New Chamber Oemmeree BuHdlagi
TelephoneMala. Ufta, T,0.27*1.
1
801 Board efTraoe
Oaloth.
Win. Dalrympla,
Wm. Dalrympl* 0t., VSZtf
GRAIN COMMISSION
4
M
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