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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, October 22, 1903, Image 7

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1903-10-22/ed-1/seq-7/

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SEMBRIC H
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TWO SPECIAL
FOR GENTLEMEN
$ f .00
Just received a new French Enamel,
Fall and Winter Lace Shoe, with heavy
double soles and full calfskin lining.
A beauty at
A handsome, new, patent, Coltskin,
Lace, with full vici kid lining
and double soles.
Splendid value at
TWO SNAPPY, STYLISH STREET SHOES.
SEE THEM.
307 NICOLLET AVE.
Two Heads Are
Better Than One!
A saying- amply Illustrated by a visit to
your home by our Mr Zonne He will
give you suggestions on how your pictures
should be arranged
I
Great Special Sale on Framed
and Uflframed Pictures
the balance of this month. Everything
marked in plain figures We can save you
money
BINTLIFF MFG . CO.
417 1st Avenue South
GET ACQUAINTEDWITH
Cloves for Mcn.Womcn.Children
AMUSEMENTS
The Philharmonic Club Announces the
FIRST CONCERT
International Auditorium
(Exposition Building)
Thursday Eve., Nov. 5t*h,
Prices: $2, $ 1.50 and $ 1.
Seats now on sale Metropolitan Music Co.'s store
$20,000 Concert Course
Philharmonic Club.
Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra.
Emll Oberhoffer, - fluslcal Director
10 Concerts with world-renowned artists
Course tickets from $2.50 to $10 00
selling at Metropolitan Music Co.
DEWEY J Hnee Dally.
THEATRE. "i To-night at 8.15
THOROUGHBREDS
(Ladies' Matinee Every Friday )
Next Week. "TIGER LILIES'
CITY NEWS.
The immediate, positive success of our
^^w
THTOSDAY EVENING,, ^
TOWN TALK
Fine home In L.ynnhurst, Lake Harriet
a bargain Walter Badger, Oneida bldg
Prescriptions free to introduce new meth
od of fitting glasses. G. F. Kansom, 1033
Guaranty Loan
There will be a Christian Science meet
ing this evening at Mrs Delia Whitney
Norton s, 1013 Nicollet avenue, flat 2.
Miss Stella Wood will give a course of
lectures to mothers on "Child Study" in
the lecture room of the Park Avenue Con
gregational church The first lecture will
be given Friday, Oct. 23, at 3 o'clock.
A meeting of those interested in the or
ganization of a Swedish Athletic club will
bo held to-moirow evening at the rooms
of S\enska Amerlkanska Posten, in the
Times building A beginning has already
been made and it has been decided to call
the new organization * Svenska Gymnas
tik Klubben" and the meeting to-morrow
evening is to perfect the organization and
firmly establish it
THE WEATHER PREDICTIONS
MinnesotaFair to-night and Friday
cooler to-night, warmer Friday, brisk
northwest winds, becoming variable Wis
conslnFair to night and Friday, cooler
to-night, brisk northwest winds Upppr
MichiganPartly cloudy and colder to
night with rain or snow near Lake Su
perior, Friday fair, brisk to high north
west winds, diminishing IowaFair to
night and Friday, cooler to-night, warmer
in northwest portion Friday, northwest
winds North DakotaFair to-night and
Friday, warmer Friday, variable winds.
South DakotaFair to-night and Friday,
colder in east and central portions to
night, warmer Friday, variable winds.
MontanaFair to-night and Friday
warmer in northeast portion, variable
winds.
of the
Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra
(Emil Oberhoffer, Director)
TIGER LILIES ARE COMING
The Dewey theater will offer the Tlgar
Lilies company as the attraction next
vdek A superb vaudeville olio, a two
act musical comedy and the usual number
of pleasing voung women go to make up
the clever aggregation Howe, Berry and
Walters, a trio of clever musicians, have
been engaged as an extra feature.
RIN||URE
Liquor and Drug
Habits
Fully restores mental and
physical health.
No injections. No bad effects.
Minimum of lapses.
Used only at
Prices.
EXTRAVAGANZA
COMPANY.
PIANO
St. Anthony Institute
603 So. 10th St.,
Minneapolis.
Sale of
55 Sterling Pianos
At Practically Half Price
Is another evidence of the fact that a
genuine sale is always a winner. These
are all new pianos, styles that have just
been dropped from the catalogue*
Terms cosh, or $6 a month.
FOSTER & WALDO,
36 Fifth Street South, Corner Nicollet.
*fy
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v ? * THE MINNEAPOLIS JOUBNAL.
CLAIMS ABE LARGE
A Receiver Is Named for the Minne
apolis Cold Storage Com-
pany.
Liabilities Will Be About $400,000
With Assets Estimated at
$260,000. ,
Jacob Kunz of the Kunz Oil com
pany, this city, has been appoint ed re
ceiver of the Minneapolis Cold Stor
age company, as the result of a peti
tion filed by creditors asking that the
storage company be declared bank
rupt. The appointment was made by
Judge Lochren of the United States
district court, who has ordered the
company's representatives to appear
before him Oct. 31, and show cause
why the petition should not be
granted. The signers of the petition
are the president of the company, A.
L. Flanders of Boston, whose clai ms
are placed at $31,660, the Iowa Dairy
Separator company, with claims of
$8,000, S. H. Thompson, who demands
$854, a nd the Kunz Oil company,
which asks for $631. The petition al
leges that the value of the company's
stock on hand is $5,000 and that the
value of its machinery is $15,000.
.00
A s ground for this petition, the
signers declare that the Storage com
pany, being practically bankrupt a
month ago, has since that time entered
into various transactions that would
give undue preference to certain cre d
itors, a nd especially that the company
has mortgaged all its assets, exce pt
its merchandise, to Stephen Under
bill of New York, to secure a claim of
$25,000.
Liabilities About $400,000.
Receiver Kunz said this morning
that the liabilities of the Storage com
pany are about $400,000, of which
nearly seven-eighths is due to eastern
creditors. The principal creditor is
Steuhen Underhill, a New York com
mission man, his claims amount to
$265,000, and he holds a second and
third mortgage on the property of the
company for $110,000. The indebted
ness of the company in the west is
about $55,000, with bank liabilities of
less than $3,000. The total amount
that the Minneapolis plant of the com
pany owes to farmers does not exceed
$22,000, yet three months ago the
same plant paid to farmers $83,000 for
cream supplied in a single month, the
principal business of the company be
ing the manufacture of cream into
butter. Nothing is due to the butter
trade in Minneapolis.
The assets are about $260,000. What
proportion is made up of accounts r e
ceivable cannot now be designated. Of
the authorized capital stock$150,000
$71,000 has been issued. It is he ld
exclusively by Preside nt Flanders of
Boston, by Vice President Frank C '
McMullen, formerly of Boston and
now of this city, by Secretary and
Treasurer S. M. Rich of Minneapolis,
and by the families of Messrs. Fland
ers and Rich. All of the stock has
been pledged in the east to secure a
loan of $55,000.
Did a Large Business.
The company has been doing a
creamery business for about three
years. It h as branches at Aberdeen,
S. D., at Fargo, N D , a nd at Wahpe
ton, N . D . Its transactions have r e
cently amounted to $250,000 a month.
Its method of selling separators to
farmers, who sent cream to the several
plants for manufacture into butter,
has proved so admirable, under the
supervision of Vice President McMul
len, that no less than eighty-two other
plants have been started within three
years on the plan first developed by
Mr. McMullen.
Inability to collect on farmers*
notes, of which about $35,000 are now
outstanding, is given by Mr McMullen
as the cause of the company's distress.
H e declares, howeve r, that in all prob
ability the concern will be able to con
tinue business.
"If it isn't," he adds, "a similar
company will at once be .started to re
tain in Minneapolis the industry into
which we have put so much money."
LABOR DISPUTE ABBITRATED
Trouble Between Beer Barrel Coopers and
Employers Ended.
The long drawn out fight between the
beer barrel coopers of Minneapolis and
the shop owners has been settled by ar
bitration, says the Northwestern Miller.
The men accept the schedule of wages in
force in 1901, which is something of a
reduction, compared with that of 1902.
The attempt of some of the men cm
strike to run a co-operative shop, seems
to have been a total failure. They worked
up considerable stock and then were un
able to sell the packages, still having them
on their hands Four of the large shop
owners are fitting a plant with machinery,
and the men are expected to keenly feel
the effect of it With fourteen operatives,
they count on the turning out of 200 pack
ages per day Heretofore the work has
all been done by hand, and the shop own
ers found that they could not compete
against machine-made packages coming
from Peoria and other outside points.
For
The directors of the Twin City
Telephone company have declared a
quarterly dividerfd at the rate of 7
per cent, payable Nov. 1. Stock books
will be closed Oct. 26 and open again
Nov. 1.
HIS INJURIES FATAL
A Young Minneapolis Man Crushed
neath Wagon Wheels.
Frank A. Andrews of 527 Fifth street
SE, died yesterday at Napoleon, N D ,
from accidental injuries received on Tues
day. With James Gllfillan of this city, he
was driving across country in a heavy
wagon when he was jolted from the seat
and two wheels passed over his abdomen.
His brother, George C Andrews, was no
tified by wire and left at once for Napol
eon accompanied by Dr Wilcox and a
trained nurse, but the Injured man died a
few hours before their arival
Mr. Andrews was 26 years of age and
the son of Mrs T. S Andrews of this city.
A year ago he was married to Miss Cath
erine Gerhard.
HUGGER GETS 10 DAYS
John McPeake Pleads Guilty and Is Sen
tenced.
John McPeake, the modern "Jack the
Hugger," who has given the police con
siderable trouble, was in police court this
morning charged with disorderly conduct.
He pleaded guilty and Judge Holt sen
tenced him to ten days in the workhouse.
McPeake was arrested last night by De
tective Gallagher who caught him in the
aot of embracing a woman at Fourth
street and Nicollet avenue.
SOLD BAD WHISKY
Charge Against Nefs Nelson, a Saloon
Man in Court To-
day.
Nels Nelson, the keeper of a saloon at
229 Washington avenue S, was arraigned
in police court this morning charged with
selling whisky which contained 35 per cent
fusel oil. H e pleaded not guilty and his
case was continued until Oct. 2ff.
Talk is cheap. Results are what
count. Journal Want Ads steadily
grow, because they bring results. Try
it, if you haven't,
less than 20 cents.
i
GUP CLAWS OF VICE
Police Continue Their Crusade to
Prevent Liquor Sales to
Minors.
Strict Regulations Will Be Adopted
to Keep'Girls at Home
Nights.
The police are keeping up their cru
sade against the sale of liquor to
minors and as a result three saloon
keepers were arraigned in police court
this morning for selling liquor illegal
ly. The saloonkeepe rs were E d R.
Nehring, who is charged with selling
liquor to a 15-year-old girl in his sa
loon at 829 Cedar avenue, George
Bauman, 228 Washington avenue S,
who is accused of selling liquor to a
16-year-old boy, a nd James R. Buck
ley, the keeper of a saloon in the
"Hu b" district, who is charged with
selling liquor to Walter Gannon, a 16-
year-old boy arrested by Patrolman
McLeod Tuesday night. All entered
pleas of not guilty a nd the cas es were
continued until Oct. 23.
T o Check Erring Girls.
I n connection with the campaign to
protect minors from vicious influences,
Captain John Landberg, in char ge of
the South Side police district, has a
pl an for driving young girls off the
streets at night. H e would have all
patrolmen ta ke the name and address
of every young girl found on the
street after 9 o'clock in the evening.
The followi ng day an officer will be
sent to call upon her parents, and
they will be informed that the next
time she is found on the street, she
will be arrested.
I n the recent crusade against vice in
the South district, it has been found
that many young girls, from 14 to 17
years of age, are roaming about the
streets every night. Two or three of
these girls have been arrested, but the
practice has not yet been stopped.
After pondering over the matter care
fully, Captain Landberg has decided
that the best pl an is the one he has
adopted.
Chief of Police Conroy highly ap
proves Captain Landberg's pl an and
it is likely that he will order the same
system adopt ed by the other pre
cincts.
THE BLIND NEED ROOM
The Board of Control Appealed To for An
other Building.
George P. Flannery of Minneapolis, B
B. Sheffield of Faribault, and J J Dow,
superintendent of the school for-the blind,
waited on the state board of control yes
terday in behalf of the board of trustees
of the Fairbault schools, urging the im
perative need of the new building, for
which the legislature appropriated $16,000
The board of control has not favored the
erection of the building, believing the
school for the feeble minded more in
noed of the room, but the arguments of
the delegation will be considered by the
board.
RTTN OVER BY STEAMER
Charles H. McLean Run Down by Fire
EngineMay Die.
Charles H McLean, a watchmaker liv
ing at 201 Twelfth street S, was seriously
Injured by being run over by a fire engine
last night The engine was responding
to an alarm at Ninth street and Nicollet
avenue and was going down the street at
a high rate of speed when McLean at
tempted to pass in front of the engine.
He was knocked jflpwn and his skull frac
tured H e was taken to the city hospital
where it is though* that his injuries will
pro\o fatal.
t
GOOD UETTER WRITING
Professor Cody Offers Some Good Sug
gestions on Letter Writing.
The Journal has made arrangements
with Mr. Sherwm Cody, the author
and expert on English, whose books,
"The Art of Writing and Speaking the
English Language," have been so well
received by business men, to present a
series of actual business letters with
brief criticisms. It is hoped that this
series will prove suggestive and help
ful to the business men of Minneapo
lis, who are invited to send to The
Journal their own suggestions a nd re
marks.
Letter Sent Out by Chicago Lumber
House.
Dear Sir (1)
Referring to your esteemed ( 2)
favor of December 9th, wherein (3)
you state that you have received in
structions that a refund on four cars
of lumber for Lansing would be
made (4). Under date of January
(5) 6th, we received $6 00 ca sh from
your Mr. Harper in payment of three
(6) carsNos. 40555, 28036 (7) and
2173. W e Would ( 8) be pleased to
receive the other $2 00 covering the
other car (9) at your convenience.
Yours truly,
Mr. Cody's Criticism.
1. It has been the custom, in the past
to capitalize "sir" in "Dear sir" or
"My dear sir," a nd of course no one
can say that is incorrect, but the tend
ency of recent usage is to dispense with
capitals as much as possible, and the
most up-todate business men now em
ploy the small letter in both "sir" and
"dear," following the analogy of "Very
truly yours," in which only the first
word is capitalized.
2. "Esteemed" is a hackneyed word
and means nothing in this case.
3. Why should an antique form like
"wherein" be used when the simple
and natural "in which" serves the pur
pose just as well' Simplicity is a
strong feature in a business letter.
4. Here is a sentence with no subject
or predicate. After "referring," what
happens' I don't know
5. Some tell us that abbreviating the
months is an insult That is not true.
I n the body of a letter like this it is
probably best form to spell the words
out. I n dating a letter most persons
abbreviate. ^ W e may use "6th" or
simply "6," b ut assuredly it is awk
ward to write out "Janua ry six," an
affectation of som e.
6 Except m dates, series of num
bers, etc, any number und er t en
shou ld always be spelled out, as here.
Itl is betetr not to write the two ciphers
after dollars (as in $6.00), tho in ad
vertising the ciphers are used to make
the amounts look big to the reader.
In this letetr the ciphers are not only
useless, but they may be confusing.
7. I n a series of three or more items
in which the last two are connect ed by
"and," we may place a comma before
the "and" as well as between the other
items or omit it "Usage is divided.
The best writers retain the comma to
show that all the items stand in exact
ly the same relation to what goes be
fore or follows, and that the "and"
does not conne ct merely the two words
between which it stands.
8. "Would" should not be used after
the first personal pronouns "I" and
"we" except to express the idea of wil
lingness, tho mapy persons erroneous
ly employ it on all occasions. "I
would be pleased" means "I shou ld be
willing to be pleased," which is absurd.
"Should is absolutely required to make
sense.
9. "Covering the other car," being
injected Inta the senten ce by way of
additional explanation, should be set
off by commas. Without the commas,
"at your convenience" hangs very
awkwardly at the end of the sentence.
Sherwin Cody,
Be-
1 cent a word, not
Cheap enough.
ifii
ji$?u*
M
NEW CONCERT COURSE
Whatsoever Bible Class of Wesley
Methodist Church Arranges
for Attractive Series.
^ _,., OCTOBER 22, 1903. m #t*-w^BB
* - v
A course of entertainments of rare
a nd delightful character will be given
at Wesley church the coming season,
under the auspices of the Whatsoever
Bible class. It will open Nov. 17 with
Slayton's Women's Orchestra of
twenty-one young ladies under the di
rection of Joseph Hecker, one of the
most successful ba nd and orchestra
leaders in the United States. The
company not only plays, but sings,
a nd its chorus work with stringed ac
companiment is a new a nd most pop
ular feature of an orchestral concert
program. The Hecker quartet of vo
cal and instrumental soloists, is an
other drawing card on the progra m.
Another attraction is Charles Den
nlson Kellogg, the "bird warbler" (not
a whistler), with a voice range of nine
a nd one-ha lf octaves. His lecture on
bird life is preceded by a recital, m
the course or which he will warb le in
bird voice "II Corregio," D e Grau,
"Boure," Tours, "Consolation," Shaf
fer, "Le Serenata," Moskowsk i, and
"The Narcissus," Nevin. H e will also
give illustrations of tone production
a nd his astonishi ng powers of vocal
ization. I n the warbli ng solos, the
theme is played by piano, a nd Mr. Kel
logg elaborates it with brilliant and
exquisite variations.
Ross Crane (C Edgar Rosecrans),
chalk and paint brush cartoonist, hu
morist, monologist a nd "rapid-fire"
clay modeler, will be the third in the
series. Valentine Abt, the world's
greatest harpist a nd mandolinist,
composer of the well known "Slumber
On," "Sweetheart" and "O, Happy
Bird," a nd Wallace Bruce Amsbary,
"the bearer of a story," whose pro
grams are made up of selections en
tirely novel, a nd drawn from sources -
hitherto neglected, are other attrac
tions.
The object of the Whatsoever class
is to secure funds for carrying on its
relief, mission and other activities. It
Is one of the most energetic and
progressive organizations in the north
west, having nearly 200 members, a nd
new ones are added every week. It has
outgrown its classro om in Wesley
church a nd is endeavoring by these
entertainmen ts a nd by the voluntary
pledges of its members to secure funds
for enlarging its place of meetin g.
The course tickets will sell for $1.
Reserved seats for the course on either
main floor or balco ny $1.50. The gen
eral admission will be 50 cents. Re
served seats remaining will be sold at
75 cen ts to those not holding course
tickets. Reserved seat sales for the
course will open at 9 a. m. Nov. 11 at
the Metropolitan Music company's
store. The sale for single entertain
ments will open three days before
each entertainment.
FRACTURE PROVES FATAL
Wm. O'Brien, a Horseshoer, Who Fell and
Cracked His Skull, Dies.
William O'Brien, the man who fractured
his skull by falling on tho sidewalk near
the Merchants' hotel in St. Paul a week
ago died from the effects of his injury
yesterday. O'Brien was in attendance
upon the horseshoers' convention when
the accident occurred
Collars Last Twice as Long
Done up at Phoenix Laundry. W e
call and deliver,
agents solicited.
"THIS LITTLE Plfi
WENT TO JONES'S"
COUNTRY SAUSAGES feXlSf K
exclusively from Little Pic Pork of our own raising
and are not a by product of a ' plant " Little Pig
Sausages, 8ausage Meat Hams, Bacon, eto Maple
Syrup, Maple Sugar and Pure Buckwheat Flour are
borne grown and home made Write for Booklet.
Jones Dairy Farm, Ft. Atkinson, Wis.
Sold in Minneapolis by O 8 Braekett
Examined Froo
Artlflolal Eyes.
BEST,
OPTICIAN. 409 Nicollet.
H. H. HEGENER
807 llloallet Avs.
Bawn hollow vroand. Bason
and Clippers sharpened. Chine
decorating. Barbers' Supplies, Kalvas, Bog*
Ush Carvers. Kasers, Shears.
Jail flow at TolUt Articles.
THE OLD PROVISION COMPANY
In Its New Home, Now Ready for Business.
No money OP pains have been spared to make this a MEAT HOUSE, second to
none in this country, with every MODERN CONVENIENCE.
THE PUBLIC ARE INVITED TO CALL AND EXAMINE OUR NEW QUARTERS.
' 9r,s..n.cl
%*#,
Your Credit is Good at the New England.
FOUR BIG STOVE BARGAINS FOR FRIDAY,
BARGAIN NO. 1.
25 "Jewel" Combination Base
Heaters and Self Feeders exactly
like picture, with Duplex Grate,
Screw Draft, Generous Illuminat
ing Front, Artistically Nickel Plat
e d, as handsome as economical, as
effective for results as artistic.
Guaranteed to heat three room s.
Special Friday,
Try us. Country
SHOPLIFTER SENTENCED
May Clark Changes Plea to Guilty and Is
Given Sixty Days.
May Clark, who was arraigned in the
police court a few days ago on two charges
of shoplifting and pleaded not guilty,
changed her plea to guilty this morning
and Judge Holt sentenced her to the work
house for sixty days on each charge She
is an old offender and has served several
terms in the workhouse
$28.50
Cash, or $4 down and $1 per
week, or old stove in exchange or
as first payment.
25 "Jewel" Cook Stoves with
Reservoir exactly like picture reg
ularly $19,
week.
BARGAIN NO. 2.
50 "Leader Jewel" Ranges exact
l y like picture, with si* holes and
large, roomy Oven, Extension End
Shelf Patent Pouch Feed, "Dean"
Patent Ov en Plate (impossible to
warp it), a nd with every other up
to-date feature Special Frida y,
complete with Warming
$29.50Closet,
Cash, or $4 down and
week, or old stove taken
change or as first payment.
Minnesota Will Win
Crescent Creamery products are used exclusively at
University Football Training Table. There is no bet-
ter butter, cream or milk than that sold by
The Crescent Creamery Co.,
618-629 HENNEPIN.
j - 1^ - with lll-fittmsr plates or poor work la
Exasperating Experiences -3ssHsL T
Setof Teeth -
Gold Crown, 22-k. fine 5 2 Set
Porcelain Grown ............ . .- 9S
7/ WW I Mill EXAMINATION EXTRACTION
Hours8 tL. 6 Sundays10 to L
gKS%"
C
B HARVARD DEHTAo OFFICES
H E A
Full line of repairs always on hand.
A small payment down buys a stove.
Great Western Stove & RepairGo
Both Phonss 181. 312 Hennepin A v.
Faultless Malleable
Steel Ranges
THE HIGHEST PRICED RAjiQE
ON THE MARKET.
Dust Proof. Air Tight. Fuel Savor.
Our Proof for this is backed by over 200 satisfied
customers. Cash or Easy Payment. Your old store taken In exchange.
Complete Kitchen Furnishing DepartmentSecond Floortake
elevator.
W. K. MORISON & CO.,
Hardware. Cutlery. Mechanics' Toels, Stoves. Ranges, Kit
chen Furnishings. Etc. Agents Sherwin-Williams Paints,
Robin Hood Loaded Shells
247-249 NICOLLET AVE.
*ffc i *
BARGAIN NO. 3 .
$14.95,Friday
or $3 down and $1 per Cash,
wee k.
50 ditto, except without
voir, Special
or $2 down and $1 per
BARGAIN NO. 4 .
100 Gas Radiators like ptotvet
the Ideal Heater for this kind of
weather or for heating a single
room in the coldest weathera ll
the heat you want at 1% cents per
hour, Special
"* %
*\
$7.75,Friday
Cash,
$3.76,yadirF
t
+/8A
r^L
i
Journal, Oct. 22.
Would Yon Like a Copy of
"HOME NEWS."
an illustrated Magazine of Fashions In
Furniture and kindred subjects, issued
monthly, mailed you free for a year? If
so, cut oat this coupon and mail it to us
with your address
NEW
ENdLAND FURNITURE
& CARPBT COMPANY.
New England
Furniture &
Carpet Company
$1
in
The One-Price Complete Housefurnishers,
5th St, 6th St. and 1st Ave. So.
FOOTBALL!
Ks'"jjass
s^gypws
~* % -
"ii
fir
3 25~fS
Fillings 800 up
o
MMBFF.FatRFm-if
ANY STYLE
ANY MAKE
ANY PRICE
t.AA
!(Sk**
*"-"*-

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