OCR Interpretation


The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, April 09, 1904, Image 9

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1904-04-09/ed-1/seq-9/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 9

fj tt^T^^^
if''
5*'
Automobile Tires
Pneumatic Carriage Tires
Solid Carriage Tires
Bicycle Tires
Rubber Patching
Rubber How
Rubber Cement
Vulcanizing
First Class Repairing
Both Phones 1989
I
Yale
4
is for the man who
inspects critically
before he buys
the man who
knows a good wheel
Get the Yale and
have the best.
|"?T Sl^V^
Fawkes' Indestructible
JEFFRIES TO WORK HARD
CHAMPION WELIi TAKE NO
CHANCES IN TRAINING FOR
HIS FIGHT WITH JACK MUN
ROE.
SATU^6A
LM ROBERTS
mm Ml WmW 103 WESTERN AVE.
BUSINESS IS BUSINESS-WE WANT TOURS
you have plenty In the bank
And no one but yourself to thank
That's your business.
But If your wheel Is on the shelf
And you can't fix It up yourself
That's my business.
TONY JOHNSON.
Jfow York Sun Special Service.
New York, April 9."Jim" Jeffries,
accompanied by "Billy" Delaney,
"Joe" Egan, and "Joe" Kennedy, left
for the Pacific coast yesterday to train
for his fight with Jack Munroe. Upon
his arrival at the golden gate city he
will at once proceed to his old train
ing quarters, where he prepared for
the fights with Fitzsimmons, Corbett
and Ruhlin.
"For this fight with Munroe," says
the champion, "I will work just as
hard as I did for the other men I
have met. I do not mean to belittle
the ability of the ex-miner in the least,
but still I think I will finish him
quickly. However, if the story of the
fight tells another story it will be be
cause Munroe is the better man. He
showed when he defeated Sharkey
that he was eligible to fight for the
championship and that is why I am
giving him a chance. I expect to
start hard training in about ten days
aud, I wilL not let up until the day of
M^^^^J^J^i-^^^^^
iiVENiNO,
TIRES...
Airless
For Automobiles
Carriages
and Bicycles
WHAT EVERYBODY
WANTS.
CAN'T PUNCTURE.
LASTS TWO TO THREE
YEARS.
.-....$40 to $100
Cleveland .w. $40.00 to $60.00
Rayoycle $40.00 to $60.00
Dayton $30.00 to $60.00
Great Western .$25.00 to $85.00
Snell & Favorite Juveniles.
GREAT WESTERN CYCLE GO.
Stores: 6121st Av. 5. Garage: 619-6231st Av. S.
1fT J. N. JOHNSON CO.
Exclusive Dealers in
Rubbe Tires
-For-
Antomobiles, Carriages.
BICYCLE TIRES...$1.50 to $3.00
915 Nicollet Ave.
Minneapolis, Minn.
riftiL IKttp rKtti
A FREE TRIP TO THE ST. LOUIS EXPOSITION.
SULLIVAN CYCLE CO,
THE
We will give to every purchaser of a
Bicycle a chance to go to the St. Louis
Exposition Absolutely Free. We will
pay your Railroad Faro- both wayaj
Sleeping Car Fare, Hotel Bills, admis
sion to the ground. In fact you can
leave your pocketbook at home. Our
line is the PI*ROE linethe best in
the world Wheels from BUS OO to
&7H.OO. Sold on easy payments.
If you intend buying a Bicycle you
can't afford to miss this chance. We
have a large stock to choose from.
626 FIRST
AVENUE SOUTH.
THE
WMB&
record is a part of
the history of
cycling on track
and on the road.
The *Yalealways
the choice of the
fastidious rider.
We will repair your
Fishing Tackle,
Restock your gun,
Rebore your gun,
Repair your gun,
Make your keys,
Repair your locks,
In fact do any old thing.
HOFFMAN oun
IV. J, nwr 1
BASEMENT PHOENIX BUILDING.
aad Locksmith
the battle. I have been doing some
light work since the fight was ar
ranged and will have little more to
do to fit me properly. I am down to
235 pounds now and expect to go into
the ring weighing about 220 or 225
pounds"
Charley Neary of Milwaukee was
given the decision over Jimmy Briggs
of Chelsea, Mass., after a six-round
bout before the Badger Athletic club
at Milwaukee last night. The bout
was one of the fastest of the season.
REJECT CAPTAINS' UNION
Lake Vessel Owners Decide to Per
sonally Engage Masters.
Cleveland, Ohio, April 9.Owners
of lake vessels decline to treat with
the Masters and Pilots' association,
desiring to deal with the captains in
dividually The executive committee
of the Lake Carriers* association will
not, therefore, make any arrange
ments with the union for the coming
season.
In explanation of this action H.
Coulby of the Pittsburg Steamship
company said:
"We want to get back to the old
plan where the captain will be master
of the ship in every sense of the word,
so that when he gives an order it will
be carried out at once before the
rules of some organization of which
he is a member are consulted."
l^
~n pfx* ^5- TBJB
^^MSkMM. f-$ SfsSsMssS
'^\^"^THB-MINNBAPOLIS
MI.......
"BIKES" ALL THE GO
1904 Is to Be a Popular Season
for Bicycles.
Regarded Now as a Necessity and
Not a Luxury.
The prevailing impression with the
general public that the bicycle is a
thing of the past is erroneous, to say
the least. It is very evident that the
bicycle "fad" has passed. It must also
be admitted that with its exit the
bicycle business suffered a temporary
backset, from which it may take sev
eral years to fully recover. But that
the bicycle will ever remain as a con
veyance of general utility is estab
lished beyond a doubt.
Last year the business probably
reached the low water mark, yet the
total receipts of the bicycle trust ag
gregated in round numbers $25,000,-
000. The general outlook for the
coming season is such as to warrant
a conservative estimate of an increase
of $10,000,000. Taking the local sit
uation as a barometer for the business
of the entire United States It would
indicate that this estimate is most con
servative.
In Minneapolis the prospects never
were brighter than they are this
spring. The local dealers have not
been as enthusiastic over the outlook
in the last four or five years as they
are this season, and they have reasons
to be. In the first place, the manu
facturers have discontinued the pro
duction of freak models, feather
weights and lightning-speed wheels,
and have settled down to the manu
facture of a serviceable, easy riding,
business machine. This has been an
important factor in reviving the busi
ness on a more substantial basis than
ever before. There has already been
many orders placed with local dealers
for high-grade wheels by people who
discarded bicycling four or five years
ago, as they thought, for good. But
since the bloomers, short skirts and
high boots and freak attire for both
men and women have disappeared the
practical features of the bicycle have
become more emphatic. The bicvcle
has come to stay, and is recognized
as a standard article the same as a
sewing machine or a watch.
There is no dity in the country so
favorably adapted to the use of the
bicycle as a general means of per
sonal conveyance as Minneapolis. The
city now has almost fifty-five miles of
bicycle paths, and Chief Conroy has
issued orders to the police depaitment
to keep a sharp lookout for teamsters
and others that in any way damage
them. The city now has in the path
fund a surplus of $1,171 left over from
last year's receipts, which will be used
exclusively for repairing these paths.
The Minneapolis Cycle Trade associa
tion has received assurances that work
will be started on the paths as soon as
the weather will permit of their per
manent improvement
This matter within itself is encour
aging compared with conditions at
the beginning of last season. Last
spring they were confronted with a
deficit from the previous year of over
$2 200 and the city officials positively
refused to spend a dollar in improv
ing the paths, until this deficit was
made good from the sale of bicycle
tags.
The records show that during 1903
there were 13,423 tags sold at 50 cents
each, making the total receipts
$9,711.50. Of this amount, $2,224.28
went to cancel the red ink balance on
the city's books $3,975.44 was ex
pended in repairing the 51..43 miles of
old paths, and $2,340 78 was used in
building 8.56 miles of new paths. In
summing up the outlook an enthusi
ast who is perfectly familiar with
the situation locally said:
"It is safe to say that this season
will finish with a handsome surplus
in the path fund. While the city has
ordered only 15,000 tags thus far,
this does not imply that this is all
that will be necessary. There will
be nearly twice that many tags pur
chased by bicyclists before the sea
son closes."
A dealer who overheard the state
ment vouched for the conservative
ness, and added1
"I never 8aw the prospects brighter
for a big bicycle business in my life.
The price of good wheels has now
gotten down within the reach of every
one and the convenience and saving
in both time and money, to say noth
ing of benefits derived from the out
door exercise, has begun to appeal
to the people.
"I'll tell you a wheel will pay for
Itself in one season with the saving
car fare and lunches. Tou can
figure It out for yourself. Car fare
and lunch at noon will cost at least
30 cents a day, or about $8 per month.
Now, jo can take the price of a
wheel and divide it by eight and you
can see how long it will take to pay
for a wheel
"That a bicycle is a convenience
inone can deny. For instance, you
rT
BICYCLES ARE O BE IN POPULAR FAVOR THIS YEAR!
How the Bicycle Saves Time, Health and Money.
&&&&JM&
JOTJBNALf!P?fJ
take a man who lives forty or fifty
blocks from his* work, if he is for
tunate enough to catdh a car right
away, it will take at least thirty min
utes to get home on a car, and the
chances are that he will be obliged
to stand up and hang on to a strap,
or if he is lucky enough to get a seat,
he is walked over and crowded to
death, and has to pay for these privi
leges besides With a wheel it is ho
trouble at all to cover forty or fifty
blocks in twenty minutes and have
plenty of fresh air and the outdoor
exercise which is very essential, es
pecially if he works in an office bent
over a desk all day. These are the
very things that have set the people
to thinking/'
A Pioneer Dealer.
Frederick Roach, who was a
pioneer in the bicycle business in Min
neapolis, seventeen years ago, is still
located at 519 Hennepin avenue,
where he first started in business. Mr.
Roach has seen the bicycle business
grow from two or three high wheels
in Minneapolis to the present, when
in Minneapolis to the pres
ent time, when there are at
least 50,000 bicycles in use.
In spite of the talk about the
decline of bicycle ridings-Mr.-Roach is
firm in. the belief, that the wheel is to
be not only serviceable but very popu
lar for ,yeara Jip come. People look
upon the wheel now not as a luxury,
but as a necessity, ahd the thousands
of wheels that are still in Use and the
splendid bicycle paths of Minneapolis
bear witness to Mr. Roach's belief.
Mr. Roach has received many in
quiries this year for wheels and is
very confident that the season is to be
much better and more profitable
from a dealer's standpoint than it has
been for several years. The bicycle
is being used f6r business and for
exercise and hundreds of Minneapolis
people are to have new wheels this
year.
RAIN PREYENTS CONTEST
MIIiliERS SPEND DAY IN GYMNA-
SIUMHUFF SAYS TEAM IS TOO
WEAK WITH STICK.
Special to The Journal.
Champaign, 111., April 9.The base
ball contest scheduled for yesterday
afternoon between Minneapolis and
the varsity teams, was called off on ac
count of cold weather and rain. The
players of both teams were not sorry,
as it gave them a chance to rest after
their continuous performance of this
week The Illinois players were given
a complete rest, but Captain Fox kept
his men busy at work both morning
and afternoon killing time in the uni
versity gymnasium. The men were
not feeling as well as usual yesterday,
but good weather promises to bring
them around in good shape.
Manager Watkms spent yesterday in
Indianapolis on a business mission, but
was expected to return this morning
in time to accompany some of his
players to Springfield for their two
games with the team of that city to
day and Sunday. No releases were
reported.
Coach Huff of the varsity nine, who
has recommended several of the Chi
cago National league men to Manager
Selee, is well pleased with the manner
in which the millers field their posi
tions and run the bases, but he be
lieves their batting will have to im
prove considerably before they can de
velop into a championship team. For
league players they have been rather
weak with their sticks, but they are
expected to remedy this fault as the
season progresses.
The players hold Manager Watkins
in high esteem. They say that he is a
man who knows whom to blame for a
misplay, and who at the same time
recognizes that the players may have
brains as well as the manager. There
has been no knocking by the players
Against one another and the best of
friendship exists among all the candi
dates.
All indications point to & banner
season for the Northern league. It is
thought that if this year's efforts are
crowned with success, it would not be
a remote possibility that the Northern
would invade Minneapolis and St,
Paul.
Chicago baseball fans will have no
chance of seeing the two rival big
league teams in a post season series
for the local championship this fall.
President Hart, of the National league
club has confided to one of his con
freres that under absolutely no condi
tions will he permit his team to con
test with Comiskey's White Sox.
The National baseball commission
in the case of Skopec has decided
that the Detroit club pay to the St.
Paul club the $100 held out of Sko
pec's salary. Skopec was purchased
by Detroit from St. Paul before the
American association adopted the Na
tional agreement. The matter Is re
ferred back to the two clubs for ad
justment.
Owing to the rain the" University
and North Side high school baseball
teams were unable to get together yes-
*sal 513981 H9
5X^1^1^IfPP^K
terday and the game will be played
Monday.
Edward S Merrill, the former star
athlete of Beloit college and now
coach of the teams of Colorado col
lege, may join the Chicago National
league team. Manager Selee has of
fered Merrill a place. Merrill has not
yet accepted.
COMPANY HAS
A GREAT RECORD
HER MARKSMEN AMONG BEST IN
THE COUNTRY.
Sixty-nine Members of the Company
Last Year Won Honors as Sharp
shooters, Marksmen, or Distin
guished Riflemen Team Wins
State Championship from Com
pany C.
The national guardsmen of Com
pany of Minneapolis have made a
remarkable record as marksmen in
the last two years. This company de
feated the crack Company team of
Brainerd and Winona last year in the
contest for the state championship.
It is claimed that this company can
show more sharpshooters and marks
men than any other company of na
tional guardsmen in the country, if
not in the world
Out of a total of seventy-six men in
the company, one qualified as distin
guished rifleflman, twelve as sharp
shooters and fifty-six as marksmen.
Altho the company has lost a
number of good shots since last year,
the members feel confident of main
taining their place at the head of the
Minnesota national guard, as there is
plenty of good material from which to
choose another team. The records of
the men follow:
DISTINGUISHED SUTEMEN.
Known
Distances.
Artificer 3. Chant 148
SHARPSHOOTERS
APRIL 9, 1904.
Mt)*M*M*M9M*
Skir-
mish,
215
Skir-
mish.
221 20S 202 194 194
186 183
183 183 182
181 181
Known
Distances
Iicut Struchan 145
Private St. Amant 148
Private George biuclair 136
Captain E Luce 134
M. Bergt E Fitchette 138
Corporal E De Lalne 148
Lieutenant McClay 136
Corporal Price 142
Private S 3 Bang 138
Sergeant Major A Allen 130
Major Bowley 132
Lieutenant I Piatt
2
250 is the possible at the 200, 800 and 600
yards, Including skirmish
MABKSMEN.
Sergeant O Yeats 137
Private J. Staples 135
Private F. C. Bigelow 135
Musician E Youngren 134
Cook 1" Faringer Ml
Private O Peterson 131
Private White 130
Private F. Smith 120
Private Boynton 127
First Sergeant W Weisel 126
Corporal S Kingsley 126
Private Harding 126
Private Terrell 125
Private Mellinger 125
Musician Bajley 124
Private O Nystrom 123
Private S Allen 123
Private Abrams 122
Sergeant Libby 122
Private A Davies 121
Private S McKinley 121
Quartermaster Sergeant A D. Haight.. 12)
Corporal Blackburn 120
Sergeant W Boehmler 120
Private Alsdorf 118
Private A Kjelland 118
Private A Quint 117
Private W. Seba 115
Private Torkelson 114
Corporal A. Lagerstroin 113
Private E. W. Smith lia
Private F. Waleen 112
Private J. F. Carlton Ill
Sergeant A Berglund 110
Private H. Wicklund 110
Private Sudlow 109
Cook E Blagrove 109
Private fL E Gerrish 108
Private J. Shoemaker 108
Private W Schoepf 108
Private E. Chandlee 107
Private Wildey 107
Private F. Bush 107
Private E N. Ekstrom 108
Private O Anderson 106
Private A Hanson 105
Private A W Peterson 105
One hundred and fifty Is the possible at the
known distance
MISCELLANEOUS SPORTS
A team of athletes will be brought
from Ireland to compete in the Olym
pic games at the St. Louis exposition.
They will make the trip under the
auspices of the Greater New York
Irish Athletic team. Among the men
expected to compose the team are Den
nis Horgan, shot-putter with a record
of 48 feet 2 inches, who won the cham
pionship on Manhattan field in 1900
with a put of 46 feet 1% inches Peter
O'Connor, Irish broad jump record
holder, who cleared 24 feet 11% inches
from a board take-off the Leaphy
brothers, also jumpers Dennis Mur
ray, who defeated Arthur Duffy in a
handicap sprint on his tour, the pres
ent 100 and 220 yard dash champion
J. J. Daly, cross country champion.
The Tuxedo second team defeated
the Tasmo second team in an exhibi
tion bowling match last night. The
scores. _^
v. First. Second. OSiirf. Tfctsl.
Tuxedo, Ko. 2 739 855 843 2437
Tasmo, bo. 2 .....105 834 843 2383
tff
**f
^P ^XCVkCX
Chain Model
$40.00
Rambler Indian
AND
Merkel Motorcycles
DON'TTHINK
S3.00 EACH.
J. AUNE,
Bioycte Building
and Repairing...
Secomd-Hand Yfhools
Bought and Sold*
6 Seventh Street South
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.
J. MENARD
703 Central Ave.
BICYCLES REPAIRED AND
BUILT TO ORDER.
Sundries and Supplies. Gasoline for sale.
T. C. 16216.
S
tSJ^B'wi^fW1'
FREDERICK ROACH
519 Hennepin Avenue.
Opposite West Hotel
AGENT FOR
Largest and Best Equipped Repair
Shop in the State.
-Established in 1887-
'^WiPSB
4,
Gm and
That because it has been dis-1
agreeable weather for some'
time that the sun won't shine*
again. Be prepared for riding when the good days come. Is,
your wheel in good repair? If not let us fix it up. Maybe you^
are in need of a new tire, or a coaster brake, or perhaps your?
wheel needs cleaning, or whatever repairs it needs we are cap**
able of doing a good job. We will call for your wheel in any
part of the city and have it ready for you when wanted. Call,
phone or write and we will respond quickly. Or if you are4
thinking about getting a new wheel we would like to show you*
our 1904 Broncho and Ooyote Bicycles, they are beauties,
Peterson's Cycle Hospital Go.
511 First Avenue So. Phone M-2735-J3.
REPAIRING, ENAMEL1NA. \gM
TWIN CITY PHONE 1076
"HSTREET SOUTH
ASK YOUR DEALER FOR
Security Tough Tread
Tires.
The cut tells the story. Take no
substitute. Trade supplied and guar
antee made good by
Hortta Cycle Auto Supply Co-,1
116 8*. 6th St.
IT COSTS N O MORE
To Have Your Wheel Repaired By Experts.
DIAMOND BICYCLES BUILT TO ORDER
0. FENSTERMACHER
Branch at Ne Chamber of Commerce.
-4
It pays to advertise your
"Wants" in The Journal, the
paper with the best circulation in
the Northwest. "Wants" only one
ceht a word. *J
it
iaf Hi
MINNEAPOLIS. /IINK
en*
503
Second Avenue So.
7
1 1 Wil is Cycle Go.
508 Central Avenue.
*s
We are the only exclusire house that man
ufactures our own Bicycles. Our stock Is tql
largest in the city.
$24.0
The best everOur
1904 Bicycles, Gopher,
with brake
Strictly guaranteed through and tbrougrh. it'
Williams Cycle Co. Tires, $2.50
With a guarantee that count*. Jf
POSTOFFICE
CYCLE HOUSI
Manufacturers f the good old
ASNMAKE
Get one and ride THE BEST.
We are also Headquarters for Second Hi
Wheels. AH prices. Call and see them,
WM. B. CLASON,
109 PostoWce Court

xml | txt