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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, December 19, 1905, Image 6

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1905-12-19/ed-1/seq-6/

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CITY NEWS
THE WEATHER
I'I*. The Predictions.
Minnesotapartly cloudy tonight
"and Wednesday, with probably snow
flurries in north portion warmer in
north portion tonight variable winds.
WisconsinPartly cloudy tonight and
Wednesday warmer in north portion
tonight variable winds.
Upper MichiganPartly cloudy to
night and Wednesday, with probably
snow flurries in northwest portion
warmer tonight variable winds.
IowaPartly cloudy tonight and
Wednesday warmer in west portion to
night.
North DakotaPartly cloudy tonight
and Wednesday.
South DakotaGenerally fair tonight
and Wednesday warmer in east and
central portions tonight.
MontanaThreatening, with ram or
snow Wednesday and in north and west
portions tonight colder Wednesday.
Weather Conditions.
Cloudy weather is general this morn
ing, except in the Dakotas, Nebraska,
Kansas, Oklahoma and northern Michi
gan. A storm, evidently developing in
the gulf region, is causing rain in Texas
Louisiana and Arkansas. There has
been rain during the past twenty-four
hours near the southern end of Lake
Michigan, and also on the Pacific coast,
with rain still falling this morning at
Chicago and Portland, Ore. The pres
sure over the middle and upper Mis
sissippi valley and thence eastward is
somewhat above normal, but a "low"
over the north Pacific coast is appar
ently increasing in energy. This "low"
has caused no precipitation, except a
little snow at Yellowstone, and rio pre
cipitation is expected from it in this
vicinity tonight or Wednesday. Mod
erate temperatures prevail, the lowest
this morning being 2 degrees at Willis
ton. This morning's temperatures are
lower than they were yesterday morn
ing in Minnesota and Wisconsin, from
the lower Missouri southward into
Texas, and in western North Dakota,
and they are higher in Manitoba, north
western Montana and the eastern states.
Nearly stationary temperature is an
ticipated in this section.
T. S. Outram, Section Director.
Weather Now and Then.
Today, maximum 36, minimum 20 de
grees a year ago, maximum 34, mini
mum, 2 degrees.
AROUND THE TOWN
For Library Assistant.A position a:
library assistant in the department
agriculture will be awarded by the civil
service commission on the results of an
examination to be offered Jan. 10 and
11. The applicant must be able to trans
late from German and French, be fa
miliar with library science and have a
thoro education in the common branches.
The salary attached to this position is
$840 per annum.
Florence Crittenton Home.Dona
tions of food, clothing, furniture, candy
and toys for the Christmas dinner and
tree at the Florence Crittenton home,
may be sent to the home, which is at
i!014 Twenty-sixth avenue S, not Twen
ty-sixth avenue SB, as stated in the
Sunday Journal, or if Mrs. H. A. Wat
son, 2832 Garfield avenue, N. W. phone
S loP-6-J, is notified articles will be
called for.
Saloonkeeper Arrested. Edward
Bloom, saloonkeeper at 1808 Second
street N, was arrested yesterday by
License Inspector Longfellow charged
with selling liquor to Alva Olson, a 16-
year-old boy. Olson was found intoxi
cated on the street Sunday, and when
arraigned in police court yesterday he
agreed to give the name" of the man
who sold him the liquor. Bloom was
arraigned in police court today and
pleaded not guilty. He will be tried
Fridav.
THOUGHT HE WAS A KING
Insane Allen
When
Made Authorities
in His Presence.
Stand
Royal pomp and ceremony have lost
all their charm for Inspector Robert Davia
of the immigration service. He has just
returned from a trip to New York with
Bmil Holmgren, an insane alien*ordered
deported, and is appreciating as never
before the luxury of sitting down.
Holmgren was docile enough, but was
suffering with the illusion that he was
the missing heir to the Swedish throne,
being escorted in-state to his kingdom.
Now, a royal heir is entitled to a certain
amount of ceremonious deference and
Holmgren insisted upon his share. It
wasn't so much calling him sire and
bowing as the standing which wore out
the immigration official. It seems that
it is not good form to sit in the pres
ence of royalty and the government
officials were much relieved when their
charge was aboard the steamer and they
could sit down without incurring a rep
rimand.
Inspector Davis returned directly from
New York but Inspector Stearns went to
Washington where he will spend the holi
days with friends.
PRETTY GIRLS JAILED
Pearl Harris and Margaret Wilbur,
two pretty girls, were arraigned in police
caurt today charged with stealing two
silk waists from a down-town depart
ment store.
Both girls were arrested by Special
Officer Forry. who watched their opera
tions for some time and caught them as
they tried to leave the store with the
goods. They were accompanied by a
third girl who escaped.
The police say they are novices and
were merely trying to get a few Christ
mas presents. Their cases were con
tinued until tomorrow.
WANT A HIGH SCHOOL
A movement for a high school in the
miaway district has been started by the
Hamline Six O'clock club. The sur
roundings of the St. Paul Central high
school are not of a character to tempt
parents to send their children there and
as a result many of them are Sent to the
Minneapolis schools. The midway dis
trict, it is argued, is quite large enough
to support a high school.
WE
"HF^SWPI^PlffBPW^
mm Tuesday Evening^
BLACK CAT CLDE
IN MURDER TRIAL
BRENNAN DEFENSE HAS SOME
THING UP ITS SLEEVE.
Attorney E. S. Cary Intimates that
Mysterious Man Will Figure Prom
inently in Case, hut Refuses to Di
vulge Part Played by Ebony Feline
Fair Defendant Maintains Her
Sangfroid.
TOT? rjf
-3
THE BRENNAN JURY
Selected Today.
Hubert P. AUerton, 715 Twenty
first avenue N, cigars and confec
tionery.
Henry Emmett, 715 Aldrich ave
nue N, clerk Wyman, Partridge &
Co.
W. Thomas Elmer, 1904 Aldrich
avenue S, moulder.
George Kries, 112 Eighth avenue
NE, blacksmith.
Selected Yesterday.
Frank Maxwell, Orono, farmer.
John Hunziker, 2604 Emerson
avenue N, dry goods merchant.
Charles H. Sanborn, 327 Tenth
street S, secretary Russell Miller
Milling company.
Charles A. Olson, 2121 First
street NE, bookkeeper.
Charles H. Waldmann, Maple
Grove, farmer.
LEADING CHARACTERS IN THE BRENNAN
MURDER TRIAL.
A mysterious man and a black cat.
These, according to Attorney E. S.
Carv, are to be the principal elements
of the defense of Mrs. Stella Brennan,
on trial before Judge H. D. Dickinson
on the charge of murdering Elizabeth
Brennan, her 14-year-old stepdaughter.
The attorney refuses to divulge di
rectly more than this., but intimates
that the mysterious man is the would
be robber who is said to have climbecl
up on the shed roof and into the Bren
nan window on the night of the trag
edy. How it will be proved that he
fired the five shots, three of which
proved fatal, remains even more of a
mystery than is the identity of the
man at the present time.
What relation the black cat bears to
the mysterious man, to the murdered
children or to the pretty defendant, is
likewise shrouded in mystery. In fact,
there was never a defense tnat. was
more mysterious.
State in the Dark.
The state is absolutely in the dark as
to what the defendant's lawyer in
tends to prove, but the- black cat
sounds good at least to lovers of mor
bid tales of the Edgar Allen Poe type,
and Mr. Cary says it is an important
part of the sensational testimony that
the defense has "up its sleeve."
Mrs. Brennan's attorney is even mys
terious about his intentions in regard
to the introduction of an insanity plea.
But in this instance it is believed to
be the mysteriousness of uncertainty.
Asked today whether or not he intended
to make an insanity defense, Mr. Cary
said: "To be perfectly frank with
vou, I don't know. I won't know until
I hear the state's case," and the state
believes that Mr. Cary meant what he
said.
Mrs. Brennan was dressed with her
customary care this morning and thru
out the morning session showed the
same sangfroid that marked her bear
ing yesterday. Her dheeks were a trifle
flushed, but she showed no signs of
nervousness, and several times during
the morning session she chatted affably
with Matron Woodburn and with her
attorney. In talking to outside per
sons the defendant will not ordinarily
discuss her case, but is willing to talk
on the weather or common topics of the
day. In response to questions this
morning, however, she said that she
had never had a revolver in her4 hands
and was" afraid'of firearms. This does
not tally with the statement made a
few days ago when she admitted that
the revolver found in the house and
that with which the children had evi
dently been killed, was hers.
PIANO SALE
fine Christmas piano for a very modest sum. You
can easily save $50 to $150 on a good piano. The list
includes McPhail, Steinway, Hardman, Krakauer,
Behning, "Crown," Sterling, Knabe, Huntington
and other good makes. Easy terms of $5, $6, $7, $8
and $10 a month.
FOSTER &> WALDO
36 5th St. So., Cor. Nicollet Ave.
$P
Father In Court.
:^%WU
W&i&iMifS- ?$sM
James Brennan, father of the mur
dered children, was in court today and
occupied a chair beside the defendant.
He sat very close to his wife and talked
with her in whispers during a large part
of the session. She leaned against his
arm with an apparent wifely devotion'
and if the picture had been planned for
an effect upon the jury it could not
have been better arranged. Mr. Cary
are closing out our entire stock of shop
worn, used and sample pianos at about half
price. This is your opportunity to get a
was further assisted by Private Detec
tive Herbert Chrisman, who sat at the
attorney's right hand and was the
author of numerous suggestions.
The tedious work of examining pros
pective jurors was made interesting for
a few minutes by a clash between
counsel when Mr. Cary raised the point
that he could peremptorily challenge a
venireman after he had passed him over
to the state and the state had accepted
him. Henry Emmett was passed by the
defense, accepted by the state ana was
about to be sworn, when Mr. Cary inter
rupted with a peremptory challenge.
Mr. Smith objected and Mr. Cary en
tered into a lengthy argument, in de
fense of his position.
Mr. Smith's Joke.
"If Mr. Gary's contention is cor-
rect," said the county attornoy, 1
would like permission io read to your
honor a number of supreme court deci*
sions to show how ignorant the supreme
court of Minnesota is on this propnsi-l
tion." The statute wus produced and
some of the decisions were read. Judge
Dickinson held that the defendant had
lost his right to challenge when ho
passed the venireman over to the state.
The juror W as sworn.
The same tactics were repeated iu
the ease of George W. Gibbon. Be
newed arguments followed, but the
court did not change his ruling, and
Mr. Cary made his record of what he
claims is a reversable error. Later, dur
ing a short recess, Mr. Gibbon told the
court that he was prejudiced against
the defendant, and when court recon
vened, the judge called the lawyers to
him and the juror was recalled to the
stand, challenged for actual bias and
excused.
Tho jury will undoubtedly be com
pleted today, and possibly "Mr. Smith
may make, his opening address before
night. It will, be a simple and direct
statement of the crime and the facts
that the state intends to prove, as al
ready outlined in The Journal.
The empaneling of a jury is not
especially attractive to the public, and
the courtroom was only partly filled
during the morning session. The only
interest shown was that in the person
of the pretty defendant herself.
FIVE JURORS SELECTED
Yesterday's Examination of Veniremen
Was Without Unusual Features.
Out of forty-two veniremen examined
yesterday in the Brennan murder trial
before Judge H. D. Dickinson, but live
were selected as .-jurors. Three of these
are men past middle age, while the
other two are young, showing that age
is not a requisite nor a bar to a juror
in the minds of either County Attorney
Al J. Smith or E. S. Cary, attorney for
the defense.
The defendant showed no signs of
weakness and sat quietly thru the long
and tedious afternoon session. There
was nothing out of the ordinary, and
long before the time for adjournment
the crowd had left the courtroom one
by one until only about a dozen people
were present to watch the pretty de
fendant led back to her place of soli
tary confinement in the county jail.
Hoffman's Selections Are Exclusive.
Neckwear, 50e to $5. Mufflers, $1 to $8.
SWEARS OUT WARRANT
AGAINST A POLICEMAN
A warrant for the arrest of Patrolman
Charles A. Morey of the East Side sta
tion was issued today on the complaint of
C. M. Dahlstrom, who alleges that Morey
struck him while trying to make him
move on.
A few days ago- Morey was called to
Central avenue and Fourth street to
quell a disturbance, and on the way he
met a strange''.woman, who began tell
ing him of the affair. While he was talk
ing, Dahlstrom came along and he and
the officer were soon In a quarrel aver
some matter. Morey says that Dahlstrom
refused to move on, whereupon he
grabbed him and threw him to the
ground. Dahlstrom fell against the curb
and broke a rib.
Morey admits he used considerable
force because Dahlstrom seized hold of a
post, but the complainant affirms that
he was struck twice in the face and
kicked. The matter was threshed over
in Mayor D. P. Jones' office .yesterday
and wa sthought to be settled, but the
warrant was Issued today.
Morey has an excellent record on th
force, and his superior officers say that
his onl ytrouble Is that he doesn't know
how strong he really is. The case will
come up In police court tomorrow.
NEOROLOGMC
MRS. H. E. WOLTMAN
Victim of Sad Accident Rest.
Is Laid to
The funeral services of Mrs. H. E.
Woltman, who was killed in an acci
dent last Thursday, took place this af
ternoon at Trinity Lutheran church.
Altho Mrs. Woltman had resided in
the city only a year, she had won many
friends and many followed her to her
resting place in Iiakewood cemetery.
Mrs. Woltman possessed a sweet, wo
manly cha'racter, which will be remem
bered for years to come.
Beside her bereaved husband, Eev.
H. Woltman, she leaves two children,
Mae and Harry Woltman, to survive
her.
JAMBS W. LANGDON, who for
more than a year has been a patient
at the city hospital, died there today.
His home was at 2304 Minnehaha ave
nue. The remains will be taken to
Owatonna, Minn., for burial. The fu
neral will be held tomorrow from the
Sacred Heart church in Owatonna.
SAM STEBNBERG.Owing to the
delay of Mrs. F. Sternberg's arrival
from New York, the funeral of- Sam
Sternberg will take place Wednesday
at 1 p.m. from the residence of his
brother, Charles Sternberg, 521 Ninth
street S, instead of today, as previous
ly announced.
MRS. JENNIE NAPIER KEMP died
Sunday at the hosne of her mother,
Mrs. A. E. Napier, 3244 Humboldt ave
nue S. Funeral from above address
Wednesday at 10 a.r/. and from St.
Thomas' mission at 11 a.m, Interment
at Lakewood.
MRS. OLIVE JOHNSON died Sunl
day at her home, 2640 Tw'enty-ninth
avenue 8, aged 30 years. Her husband
and five children survive her. Funeral
tomorrow at 2r30 p.m. from the resi
dence. Interment at Layman's ceme
tery.
ANNIE WATSON died yesterday at
the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Thomas H. Watson,ili4 Third
avenuea
S, aged 7 years. Funeral Wednesda3r
2:30 p.m. Interment at Lakewood cem,--
etery.
EMILY F. LOCKWOOD, wife of
Stafford C. Loekwood, died at Merriam
Park yesterday, aged 78 years. Funeral
private, from th6 residence, Dec. 20, at
2 p.m.^ Interment at Lakewood ceme
tery.
MRS. RUTH M. SHAW, aged 75.
died at the home of her daughter, Mrs.
M. J. Hurley, 109 East Twenty-seventh
street. Funeral Thursday at 2 p.m.
TAGGART CASE UP AGAIN.
LICENSE FRAUDS*y
BROUGHT TO END
CITY ENFIOHED BY ENFORCE-
MENT OF HE LAW.
Practice of Peddlers in Securing Per
mits Gratis Thru Hard Luck Stories,
Is Limited to Worthy Oases and an
Increase of $20,877.94 in Revenues Is
the Result.
License Inspector George Longfellow
in his annual report to the mayor shows
clearly thai several thousand dollars
that were formerly allowed to slip by
unnoticed have been headed into the
city treasury this year. T,ke total
amount paid to the city for licenses,
not including saloons is $20,877.94, an
increase of $3,800 over last year.
The greatest increase is in the wagon
peddling business. For many years
peddlers have misrepresented their fin
ancial conditions to the mayors and
license inspectors and on telling tales of
hardship have been given permits
gratis. These permits would simply
Jicemen.
irotect them from interference by po
When Mr. Longfellow took
the office, he became convinced that the
city was being imposed upon in many
cases. After a conference'with Mayor
Jones it was decided to shut down on
all cases of apparent fraud.
Whesn
ma'n1
asked for a permit his case wa ina
vestigated and" if it was found
that'
could afford to'pay he was1'made
f.
Wooster, Ohio, 'Dec. 19.The hearing of the
motion for a ne wtrial in the Taggart divorce
was started this morning. Captain Taggart
and Mrs. Taggart are not present, and will
i
"Hoffman's Selections Not Ordinary."
Neckwear, 50c to $5. Hose, 25c to $3.
DEFIES COURT'S ORDER
CONTROLLER BROWN TAKES PRO-
CEDURE NECESSARY TO GET SU-
PREME COURT OPINION ON
BOND ISSUE.
Judge John 3a Smith of the district
court has made an order requiring City
Controller Dan C. Brown to present the
recent
issuehiof
the schoo
$UE MINNEAPOLIS JOURNAL. i December^ 19, 1965...
he
to do
so. Permits were given only to cripples
and old soldiers as provided by law.
No hardship was worked in any case
and the result is that the city gains by
$2,214.
Another important feature of the re
port is the gain in pool table licenses.
The rigid enforcement of the wi'nte room
ordinance and the prohibiting of women
in saloons caused many beer halls and
similar places to be converted into pool
rooms. There have been no wine room
fights a'n'd troubles, and the gain from
these licenses is $506.
Secondhand dealers who persistently
refused to take out licenses were jerked
up in justice to the licensed dealers and
$210 was the increase from that source.
There was a 50 per cent increase in the
receipts from the foot peddlers and the
junk peddlers. The latter were more
closely- watched than heretofore and a
gain resulted.
There are nineteen classes of licenses
in all and the report shows that with
the exception of a new theater, there is
no increase in the number of persons
doing business. Those who formerly
dodged the licenses have paid, and the
report is expected to be gratifying to
the business firms of the city that have
met with considerable competition by
the peddlers before the ordinances were
enforced.
bondinstructe
to th
signature,l and
mayor for
ing the city clerk $p affix the great
seal of the city^and afterward
tersign the tebrids? 'Ita4the
eventto ocoun- his
refusal to do so he is ordered to show
cause OB Dec. 29 why he should not
do so
Mr. Brown already has declined to
obey the order and when he appears in
court will produce the opinion of the
eminent attorneys who advised their
clients, E. H. Rollins & Son& of Chicago,
and George A. Fernald & Co. of Boston,
that the bonds in quesetion were of
doubtful legality as the act authorizing
the issue appeared to constitute special
legislation under the constitution of
Minnesota.
I is a bit of legal fiction to allege
that Mr. Brown has refused to obey
the orders of the court, as he is quite
willing to do so but in order to secure
a supreme court decision as to the legal
ity of the bonds, this particular mode
of procedure is followed.
The bonds in question aggregate
$200,000, of which one-half are for
the erection of grade schools and half
for the fifth high school. When of
fered for sale, they were eagerly
joueht, them ton*.almost a .scofe S%S[ d
highest bidders, but on the advice of
their attorneys, demanded a supreme
court decision as to the validity of the
issue before taking them.
SCORES WANT WORK
Crowds of men in search of work fill
the office of the state employment bu
reau at all hours of the day. Most of
them want work in the city, but many
do not care where they go if the terms
are satisfactory. One order today called
for ten men to go to the woods for the'
winter. Within one hour Sperintendent
Louis Levy had ten husky-young fellows
all ready for the journey.
Those having odd jobs at their dis
posal can be supplied in a few moments
by telephoning to the bureau.
How a Murderous Intruder Might
J.
CRACKSMAN TOOK
ACCIDENT POLICY
THEN E BLEW SAFE AND LEFT
STRANGE CLUE.
Man Who Said He Was United States
Marshal Working on Delicate Case by
Special Commission Turns Out to Be
Skillful "Peterman" and Surprises
Insurance Agent.
An alleged United States marshal, is
missing, under suspicious circumstances.
The man in question was very much
of the far-west type. He was a big
fellow and always carried a big gun in
his hip pocket. One cheek showed two
bullet* scars and u'nde the eye was the
mark of an ugly slash. These, he said,
were scars resulting from encounters
with desperadoes whom he had dealt
with in his capacity as United States
marshal. The man gave the name T. S.
Yelle, and requestea the few to whom'
he revealed nis identity and office,
please to" "keep it quiet" as it might
spoil the "game" he was after iiit
were generally known he was here.
When reminded that the district of
Minnesota had one United States mar?
shal, he said he had a general commis
sion from t&e federal government to fol
low out the work of a marshal in every
section of the United States, where
especially delicate cases were to be in
vestigated and handled. And the in
quirer let it pass at that.
Among other Minneapolis men "Mar
shal" Yelle met, was J. R. Whitaker, a
well-known* insurance man from whom
he desired an accident policy. This he
agreed to pay for in a few days. He
was to send the money to Mr. Whitaker.
So Mr. Whitaker gave Yelle a slip of
paper with his Minneapolis address. Mr.
Yelle failed to reappear, and the next
thing Mr. Whitaker knew a detective
from St. Paul called, presented the lit
tle address slip he had given the 'mar-
shal," asked Mr. Whitaker the history
of it.
"Where did you get itt" asked Mr.
WhitakeT.
"This slip of paper," was the reply,
"was found in front of the strong box
of a safe in the office of the Star Ele
vator & Milling company, St. Paul,
which was blown open by an unknown
burglar who got away with $112,"
The St. Paul police have not yet ar
rested the burglar. Nor has Mr. Yelle
called 4o pay the premium to Whitaker
on the accident policy.
GOOD ROAD FOLK MEET
HENEPIN STRONGLY REPRESENT-
ED AT STATE CONVENTION
WILL SCORES POLITICIANS AS
GOOD ROA DOBSTACLES.
Fifty delegates representiwg good
roads associations, county boards and
other interested bodies from twelve
counties of Minnesota, assembled this
morning in. the senate chamber of the
old capitol building to participate in the
proceedings of the twelfth annual meet
ing of the State Good Roads associa
tion. Hennepin county sent the larg
est contingent of all, a delegation of
fourteen, coming from the Hennepin
County Good Roads association, a'n'd the
Minneapolis Commercial and automobile
clubs.
Colonel Cooley briefly outlined the
work that the convention was to take
up. called particular attention to
the appointment of the highway com
mission in accordance with the act
passed by the last legislature. He re
called the statement that the governor
made a year ago that he would be
pleased to receive suggestions from the
association, when he made his appoint
ments on this commission. The com
mission was allowed $6,000 by the leg
islature for expenses and has a fund
of $75,000 for distribution among the
various counties.
G. A. Will, president of the Hennepin
County Good Roads association, spoke
in severe arraignment of the manner in
which the city officials of Minneapolis
allowed politics to interfere with the
welfare of the communty in the matter
of good roads.
DAIRIES SEND REPORTS
Milk Inspector W. t. McCa.li has re
ceived Inspection from five dairies in the
neighborhood of Monticello, Wright coun-
^^TT
sign of yielding has been noted in Good
hue county, however, and the local health
department is preparing to make an
aggressive campaign as soon as the
case now in the municipal court has been
determined.
NEW INCORPORATORS.
North Fork Lumber company, Minneapolis
capital stock. $30,000: Karl De Laittre. presi
dent George P. Case. Tice president: T. B.
Mercer, secretary and treasurer.
West Side Power, Heat & Light company, St.
Paul capital stock, $50,000 Incorporators, A. B.
ftickney, Oliver Crosby and R. C. Wight.
Charles A. Stickney Realty company, St. Paul
capital stock, $100,000 incorporators, Charles
A. Stickney, A. B. Stickney'and R. C. Wight.
Farrell-Keefe. merchants, North Redwood
capital stack. $15,000.
Dule-Orth Investment company, Raymond capi
tal stock. ?50.000 incorporators, H. J. Dale,
F. O. Gold ond H. N. Stabeck. Renville, and L.
O. Orth, Raymond.
Have Entered the Brennan Home
This cut of the residence of James Brennan, 1622 Fifth street N, shows with
what ease a man might have entered the room in which Mrs. Brennan and the
children were sleeping and committed the murder of which Mrs. Brennan stands
accused. It is expected that the easy
entrancev
,'shed, will be a stronglohrt in the defense.
*ps^MPJ^pM
afforded the tre-iI'.'hW-S"'
-'V r/'V\'-"
Pane
and the low i vby "v
WASHINGTON NOTES
The" president today sent the following nomi
nations to the senate: Collector of customs, Levi
M. Willicutts, district of Dnluth, Minn. chief
Justice of the court of claims, Stanton J. Peelle,
Indiana Judge of the court of claims. Samuel
S. Barney, Wisconsin.
Mrs. Steenerson, wife of Representative Steen
erson, is ill at Geor*e Wflshinjrton University
hospital, Washington, D. O. She submitted to an
operation on Saturday and is doing well, but will
have to remain in the hospital several weeks.
Appointments in the rural carrier force cm-
Christmas
Jewelry.
Our stockso large, so varied,,
affords an opportunity to please
even the most fastidious
and though we have experienced
the busiest week in the history of our
store, our replenished stock still shows
A Beautiful Array of
Diamonds
Sterling Silver, Watches,
Jewelry Novelties, Cut Glass,
Opera Glasses, Umbrellas, Canes,
Rookwood Pottery.
WELD & SONS, Jewelers
524 Nicollet Avenue.
Xmas Suggestions
"Onr LowYet Uniform
Prices Never Mean Poor
Quality."
1*3
^KODAKS8*Makcs
CAMERA
Ber
Bif0c*l
Lmsibn SPECTACLES
Latort EYj GLASSES
Pattera
Be.t 0PEEA GLASSES
V* NatnraBIRD CLASSES
stud
FIELD CLASSES
Grade
TELESCOPES
GIrl
We*ft
BAROMETERS
Molrtare HYGR0HETERS
Tester
a
Fi.ld and COMPASSES ***u*
Extra Fin. pQCKET KNIVES
QtxMtr
ForAn poDNTAIN PEHS*
Choic*
110
LORCNETTES
Pattera
0rn*menta
uwfai EYECLASS REELS
EYEGLASS CHAIRS
We Invite Comparison of Prices and Quality
T. V. Moreau Co.
OPTICIANS. KODAK DEALERS
616 NICOLLET AVENUE
IIMJ I||
Cft/[jfi
Beautiful China for Christmas at
Anderson's Exclusive China Shop
W have a most attractive assortment of novelties in
French and English China, "^S
Domestic, Bohemian, Gold Decorated and Rock
Us Crystal Glass, Cut Glass, Bric-a-Brac and Brass.
Pay us a visit of inspection and secure numerous suggestions.
ALEX ANDERSON, 614 Nicollet Av.
aenclng Jan. 2: MinnesotaJohn H. Gill, rout
1, Altura Nelson Breed, route 1. Homer Jac
L. Shaffner, route 2, Lamoille Fred Wleck, rout
1, Minnesota City Robert M. Barclay, route
Stockton: Almus II. Smith, route 2. Stockton
Grants Blanchard. route 3, T'tica Augnst Ar
derson. route 1. Argyle Gnstav A. M.-Bensor
route 1. Panvers Albert M. Tbronson. route
Foston. South DakotaWilliam A. Shanlcj
ronte 2. Woonsocket.
Red Wing, Minn., Dec. 19.Charlres Kuel
of this town was struck by a Milwaukee freigl
train while driving across the track at Wf
conta. He died a few hours later.
Via the Gamossi Route!
Buy your friends a first-class ticket for a
trip to the Land .of Merry Christmas over
the Gamossi System.
"Tickets" (Glove Orders) issued for a&
much money as you wish to spend, and
are redeemable at any time at any of
the Gamossi Stores in Minneapolis, Den
ver, San Francisco and Oakland.
Fac-Simile of the ''Tick*.
-3224.
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