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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, January 13, 1906, Image 5

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1906-01-13/ed-1/seq-5/

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IS TO O
IAST FOR CORBETT
Former Champion Defeated by a
Boxing1
Selling Plater at
fournal Special Service.
Los Angeles, Cal., Jan. 13.Wth three suc
cessive right-hand swings to the Jaw in the mid
dle of the fifth round. Young Corbett, once light
weight champion of the worlfc, came to the end
of ha pnglstc career last nght at the bands
of Aurello Herrera, who showed up the Denver
hasbeen before one of the biggest houses that
ever saw a scrap in this city. It was the
Mexican all the way, and Corbett never had a
chance at any time.
Arena Crowded.
local sports and the visiting eastern horsemen
from Asco crowded the big pavilion of
tbe17
Pacific Athletic club to see the once great Cor
bett come back and make a show of the Mexican,
but they bad hardly warmed their seats before
Corbett waj helpless on the floor. He opened at
10-to-8 favorite three days ago. but last night
the Mexican was a slight favorite because
Corbett had some difficulty in getting down to
the weight of 133 pounds.
He looked good In the ring in the first round,
and at once got busy, rushing Herrera, for
there lay his only hope. The Mexican stalled
off there rushes in the flist and then in the
aecond backed up Corbett and had him gclng
over then. Corbett got in some terrific body
Wows in the first three rounds, but the Mexican
came back strong against this flash in the pan
and had Corbett ready to stop.
In the fourth he made him looke like an
amateur with a right on the jaw that took his
team from him, but it might be said that up to
this time Corbett bad a shade the best of it
on blows struck that did little or no harm appa
rently.
Corbett Started Bushing.
In the fifth Corbett rushed again and they
sparred and clinched and then came to a rush
and a clinch again. In breaking away from this
Herrera caught Corbett a right-hand swing ou
the Jaw that floored him. He Jumped up at
once, altho he was dazed, and then Herrera
feinted and then smashed him again in the
Jaw with a right.
This floored Corbett again, and he came up
helpless and was knocked down again with a
crashing right to the Jaw. This was the finish.
and while on his hands and knees practically out
and unable to rise, Referee Byton gave the
fight to Herrera, who had always had It in his
lap.
Corbett All In.
Much money was wagered on the fight by those
who thought Corbett was hmself agan, but the
result of the fight showed that it was another
case of Fitzsimmons. He had to work hard to
get to weight, and altho he was trained here
for severa\ weeks did not knock off a day In his
road work. His boxing wag all that it once was,
bpt he was not there with the pufich and the
stamina. FITZGERALD AND LEWIS
BATTLE TO A DRAW
San Francisco, Jan. 18.Willie Fitzgerald of
Brooklyn, and Willie Lewis of New York last
night battled twenty-five rounds to a draw at
Colma. The first ten rounds were slow and
uninteresting, with the advantage with Fitz
gerald.
There was a hot rally the eleventh, when
Fitzgerald had Lewis apparently in bad shape.
From that round on until the eighteenth Fitz
gerald was very aggressive and had Lewis con
stantly backing up. From the eighteenth until
the end, Lewis Improved and was more aggress
ive, and about evened up matters.
Referee Graney called the fight a draw at the
and of the twenty-fifth round.
HOLCOMBS VICTORIOUS
Defeated the Drummonds on Their
Own Floor Last Night.
Holcomb hall basket-ball team handed it to
the Drummonds on their own floor last night.
The score was 31 to 15. The game was the
first City league game for either team and
was well attended. Rough play was freely
employed by both teams and many fouls were
called. The Holcombs had the bulge from the
atart and ran away from their opponents.
The teams lined' up as follows:
Holcombs. Position. Drummonds.
Michelsen left forward .Mulr
W^lsel right forward Kruger
Meeker center Svendsen
Arundel right guard Critchfleid
R. Michelsen left guard ..Chute
Field goals, H. Michelsen 4, Weisman 4,
Arundel 2, R. Michelsen 2, Muir 2, Kroger,
Svendsen 2. Goals from foul, H. Michelsen,
Arundel, R. Michelsen, Svendsen, 3. Points,
awarded, Holcomb 1, Drummond 1. Referee,
Williams umpire, Jorgenson.
CAT.T.AHAN A MAGNATE
White Sox Star Planning for a Strong
Independent Team.
Journal Special Service.
Chicago, Jan. 13.That Jimmy Callahan, the
former star of the white sox, is in real earnest
to become a fullfledged magnate. was shown
today when bis proposed City league baseball
team was given a charter at Springfield. Cal's
organization was incorporated under the name
f "Logan Square baseball club" and the
stockholders named were James J. Callahan,
Thomas G. Mcllllgott and Francis E. Donohue.
Comiskey, former star, expects to make his
new team and go in the northwestern part of
the city, where he has already secured his
grounds, and is now busily engaged trying to
aecure the best possible playing material.
As yet Callahan has been unsuccessful in in
ducing the majority of the other City league
teams to form a new circuit but hopes his labors
will be successful before long.
NEW HOCKEY LEAGUE
Canadian Disbarment to Bring About
Change in the East.
Special to The Journal.
New York, Jan. 13.Following the disbar
ment of Canadian hockey players from the
American Amateur Hockey league, plans are
being made to form another amateur hockey
league that wiU take in several big cities
thru the country.
Aa a Btarter it is probable that anew skating
rink will soon be built in Harlem and this
will be the first of several that are to be put
up in some of the larger cities in different parts
of the country. Plans have been made for a
atructure which will be a wonder In the way
of an ice skating rink.
SKAT FOR CHICAGO.
Special to The Journal.
Chicago, Jan. i3.Tomorrow evening a com
parative skat contest will be played In this Chi
cago Athletic association clubrooms among the
members of the Calumet club of Milwaukee
and the Cherry circle and tbe Germanla clubs.
Ten players will represent each club. The
conteat will be the first of a series of three.
Last year the Germania club players won two
ut of three contests.
IOWA SCHOOL ABANDONS FOOTBALL.
Cedar Foils, Iowa, Jan. 13.The athletic board
of the state normal school yesterday suspended
intercollegiate footbaU for nest season. The
Institution will arrange no schedule nor organize
any football tet m. The attention, of the students
wUl be devoted to other athletics.
SULLIVAN GHTEN DECISION.
Baltimore, Jan. 13.When the bell sounded for
the opening of the twelfth round of what was
to have been a fifteen-round bout between ''Kid"
SuUivau of Washington and Austin Rice of Con
necticut, before the Eureka Athletic club last
night Rice failed to respond and Referee O'Hara
Bave 'Sullivan the decision. "Su.llvan outclassed
and outfought Bice.
I FOUND EASY GAME AX LAST.
Journal Special Service.
Chicago. Jan. 13.The Chllocco Indian five de
feated the Seventh regiment basketball team last
niebt at the latter's armory by the decisive
score of 45 to 0. The Indians had the call on
the soldiers In every phase of the sport and
their team work was superb.
WON AT HOCKEY. I
Houghton, Mich., Jan. 13.In a hockey match
lost evening Portage* Lake defeated the American
Soo the score being 4 to 3. The play was fast
and clean' turnout the whole evening. Petrie and
La Volllete were the stars of the' goo. and Lake"
and Stuart excelled for the Portage Lake team.
LID ON BENTON HARBOR.
Special to The Journal.
St Joseph. Mich., Jan. 13.Mayor Gillette
of Benton Harbor has Issued an order pro
Whiting prize fights. In consequence the
Bauch-Morrisoa bout will be called off.
Saturday1
Evening,
YARSlrtOUINT
WO N FIRST GAM E
Macalester Defeated in First Bas
ketball Game of the
Season.
Starting the season In first class form, the
university basketball team last evening defeated
the Macalester team by a score of 4 to 0.
Remarkable team work and speed were shown
by the varsity players, and with three weeks
wore of practice Coach Leach's basket-tossers
should be able to place the maroon and gold
team In the first division of tbe western inter
collegiate league.
The varsity men started the play with a rush
and scored 32 points in the first half, while the
men from Macalester were held to 4 points.
The strenuous game, however, told on the var
sity men, who are not yet in good physical
condition, and during the second period of play
points were scored by the Minnesota team
us against 5 for Macalester.
A large crowd of students watched the game,
and while it was too one-sided to be exciting,
several spectacular plays were made by mem
bers of both teams. In this respect Montgom
ery of Macalester carried ott the honors by
shooting a difficult and almost Impossible goal
from the middle of the floor. Captain McRae
was the star performer for the gophers, and
during the evening he made ten field goals for a
total of 20 points.
The game last evening demonstrated that the
play under the new eastern rules is to be not
only more exciting than in the past, but it is
to afford a better opportunity for. team work
and "passing." The Mne-up:
Minnesota Macalester
L. Larson. Weisel center Bond
McK'ae. Clark right forward Thompson
Deerlng, Greaves left forward Detweiler
Brown, M. Larson right guard......... Rogers
Uzzell, Tierney left guard .Montgomery
CHICAGO TO HAVE A
BIG ATHLETIC MEET
Chicago, Jan. 13.That the coming athletic
meet of the First regiment scheduled for Jan. 20
is to be a good one, .athletes say, is apparent
from the list of entries that are piling'in on
President Dr. D. K. Hermann. A large list
of individual athletes have already sent in their
names for the various events. A majority of
these are unattached men, while quite a few are
from the different athletic organizations. Team
entries have not as' yet started to come, but
Dr. Hermann expects a large, bunch by next
week.
The railway Y. M. C. A. of Milwaukee has
sent in an application for its team to participate
in a majority of the events. Dr. Hermann has
also received an application from an athlete
named ElBWorthy of the Canadian A. A., who
will participate In the long-distance runs. The
man is new to Chicago athletic followers, and is
very apt to prove a surprise when he gets into
competition, it Is said.
Dr. Hermann's athletes of the First regular
are rounding into fine shape for the affair. He
says he has forty-five to fifty men in training
for the meet, and most of them are, he thinks,
going to prove formidable Opponents for any of
the other athletes whom they encounter. The
athletes will take part in the events ranging
from the forty-yard dash to the two-mile run.
Not many will take part in the weight events,
it is said, altho some are working hard to
whip themselves into shape.
APEX AND THONEYS
WON DOUBLE-HEADER
'Honors In the indoor baseball double-header
at Monitor hall last night went to the Apex and
Thonys. The former team defeated tbe S. &
L. by a score of IS to 15, and the latter downed
the Holtzermans 12 to 9.
Both games were closely played and full of
excitement. The inning scores for the two games
follow:
Apex .4 0 2 3 1 0 0 1 818
S. and 1 2 0 0,1 3 2 3 315
BatteriesSmith and Hill Weeks and Rice.
Thonya 6 0 1 1 0 2 1 1 12
Holtzermann's 0 32010 1209
BatteriesDalgren and Dufore Schroeder and
Wassing.
BOTHNER DEFEATED,
New York, Jan. 13.In the lightweight cham
pionship wrestling match at Grand Central hall
last nlaht between George Bothner, the present
holder of the title, and Alexander Swanson, the
two men wrestled "for one hour and a half, when
Bothner hurt his arm in breaking away from a
bemmerlock and was unable to continue, the first
fall being awarded to Swanson. Physicians were
ealle-1 to examine the injury and finally decided
Bothner wae too badly hurt to go on with the
match, which was awarded to Swanson.
50INGM
Herpioide WiU Save it
DON'T CRY FAKE
The mere mention of "hair remedy" throws
aome men into a fit of unreasonable incred
ulity. It is true that before the microblc
origin of baldness waa discovered that most
hair remedies were worthless, but not many
VOEGEL1 BROS.,
Last Victim of the Fighting Mexican
BOWDEN LOOKING FOR
FAST TIME AT ORMOND
Journal Special Service.
New York, Jan. 13.Herman L. Bowden of
Boston, the first man in the world to make a
mile on an automobile inside of 35 seconds,. in
answer to a question W. J. Morgan put to hiiri
recently in Boston, asking If he thought two
miles a minute could be done next month on
the Ormond-Daytona beach, Florida, said:
"Yes, two miles in a minute will be done,
and I will be there to see it done, but I am
sorry that I cannot engage in the battle. with
old Father Time. You remember last winter
I drove my car in 32 4-5 for the mile, and that
in driving that mile I used the smallest of
three special racing sprockets had with me.
The other two sprockets were possibly two to
four seconds faster than the one I used, and, as
I had plenty of engine power and had. tested
the sprockets, I therefore feel, sure that I could
have done the even time myself last winter."
Mr. Bowden is a .very, moderate sportsman,'
not given to much talk about his own doings,
so his opinion can be taken as coming from
one who knows what he is talking about.
MECHANIC ARTS DEFEATED
Central High Team Won in a Basket
hall Battle.
The twin city basketball championship now
lies between the Minneapolis schools. Central
Mgh cinched the title for its home city by
defeating Mechanic Arts of St. Paul in a game
played at the Lyndale gymnasium yesterday
afternoon. Thefinalscore was 69 to 16.
The red and blue team walked away from the
visitors from the start and by the end of the
first half the score of 39 to 6 left no room for
doubt as to the final outcome. While the Me
chanics braced in the second period of play and
scored 10 points to their opponents 30. their
cause was hopeless and the honors now go tothis
Minneapolis.
The teams lined UD as follows:
Central, Meehaplc Arts.
Kahaley right forward Robert
Lyford. ...left forward Hayzer
Witter center .B.'ase
Thompson right guard Teseth
Schooley -left guard Gleb
Baskets from fouls, Kahaley 7, Robert 2 bas
kets from field. Kahaley 8, Witter 8, Lyford 7,
Schoolev 5, Thompson 3, Robert 2, Hayzer. 2,
Blase 1. Gleb 1. ScoreCentral high 69, Me
chanic Arts 18. RefereeChase.
CONNIE MACK WORKING.
Philadelphia, Jan. 13.'Manager Mack of the
American league champions has secured Pitcher
"Long Tom" Hughes from the Washington club
and is also reported to have signed Pitcher Baum
of the Los Angeles club.
Dandruff ia a oontagieua disease caused by a microbe,
COOING!! GONE
Herpioide Will Save it. Too Late for Herpiclde.
of them were designedly so. Chronic bald
ness Is Incurable, but its forerunners, dand
ruff. Itching scalp and falling hair, can be
cured by stopping the microblc growth with
Newbro'a Herpiclde. It prevents reinfection.
Money back if unsatisfactory. Delightful
hair dressing. Stops itching of scalp' in
stantly.
Drur Stores. $1. Send lOo, atamna to HERPIOIDE CO., Dept. H. Detroit. Mieh., for sample.
NEWBRO'S HEKPICID E
The ORIGINAL remedy that "kUls the Bandruff Germ.''^
Oor. Hwnopin and Washington Aves, and Cor. Seventh St. and NiooUet Ave,
Applications at prominent barbershops.
All that is best in whiskey
you will find in
Old
Underoof
Rye
It is thoroughly matured,
soft and rich.
CHAS. DENNEHY & COMPANY,
Chicago.
,t
SPECIAL AGENTS.
STAGG'S SCIATICA KEEPS
HIM IN SECLUSION
Journal Special Service.
Chicago, Jan. 13.Athletic Director Alonzo
Stagg of the University. of Chicago, who until
two days ago was supposed to be in the east"
attending the annual meeting of the football
rules committee, is, according to a current
report, at the Midway at his home. No verifies-,
tion of the report that he is confined at a
Chicago hospital can be gathered.
Mrs. Stagg practically
BACK IN SCHOOL
"Shannon of Washington" Returns to
Studies at Notre Dame.
Special to The Journal.
South Bend, Ind., Jan. 13.Francis J.
Shaughnessy, drafted from the K. I. T. league
last spring by the Washington Americans for
the ou,tfleld, resumed his".studies at the law
school of Notre Dame yesterday.
The case created a sensation in college
athletic circles last year. Shaughnessy was
purchased by Washington' under the name of
Shannon, but investigation proved him the
captain of the Notre Dame football team. He
failed to make good with the senators last
year and played in the Eastern league.
THE MINNEAPOLIS^ JOURNAL, January 13 1906.
'admitted today that
the maroon coach is at home. Dr. Joseph E.
Raycroft declared that he. had no knowledge of
the whereabouts of Stagg, adding that his igno
rance of the facts was purposed. It is gen
erally understood that Stagg will decline to see
any Interviewers,, and that he will leave Chi
cago for tht south as soon as his physicians
will permit it.
It was announced that Stagg has been asked
to act as one of the honorary pallbearers at
President Harper's funeral, and that he has
been compelled to refuse. Mrs. Stagg said that
Director Stagg was confined to'his'bed and being
treated for rheumatism.
ECKERSALL HAS NOT
JUMPEBINTITBJIAKE
iitrrUtl" t'i r- v-i-
Detroit, Jan. IS.^haptflp^Vjalter Eckersall,
ihe University of Chlcagoiquarterback. who has
been "visiting-here for a few days, returned to
Chicago last night. He will report at once at
the university for college! work, with the hope
that he may bo able to tak part In athletics
spring.
TheJIavoivolV
p=Twi tot*
-.--v,"*!,-
j^^^^
BADGERS MM
TO TEE DANGE
Students Plan to Put a Check
Upon the Athletic
Knockers.
NEWBREW
1
PASTIMES ISTOAP^rO^THEiFORE
Madison, Wis., Jan. 13.To save football at
Wlscousin university twenty-five representative
students met yesterday afternoon and discussed
plans for organising the student' body so as tophia
effect the purpose in -view. A mass meeting
of students of the university will be held.
From all over Wisconsin and other states are
coming protests by alumni of tbe badger uni
versity against the proposition of the faculty to
suspend Intercollegiate football for two years.
This will not interfere with the vigor with which
Professor F. J. Turner, the leader of the anti
football faculty element here, and the Wiscon
sin delegate to the intercollegiate conference,
will urge the adoption of the suspension resolu
tion when the representatives of the "big nine"
meet in Chicago on Jan.-19. He is opposed to
football, and will make the&nost of bis oppor
tunity in that meeting.
However, the protests of the Wisconsin alumni
and the apparent unanimity of the student body
here in favor of "evolution Instead of revolu-
tion,", as the remedy for. the evils of inter
collegiate football Is popularly phrased, will
show to the representatives of the other uni
versities that tiie University of Wisconsin Is not
of one mind in favor of," laying the game on the
shelf.
Another movement on the part of the faculty
which is meeting with strenuous opposition is
the effort of President Van Hise to restrict the
membership of the board of directors of
theFEW
athletic association to only one member of the
football team and not more ,than four represen
tatives from athletic teams. Heretofore the
popular athletes have monopolised the member
ship of this board. The members were elected
by students in an annual mass meeting. Presi
dent Van Hise, working thru his "student conr
ference committee," proposes a change requir
ing the election of directors from the non
athletic student organizations, such as debating
societies and the Young Men's Christian asso
ciation. The athletes and their friends hold that
this change would reduce the chances of an ath
lete being honored as a director, and would
therefore place a penalty on a man if he enters
athletics And achieves in that way for his alma
mater.
CARLISLE GUARD WINS
HEART OF A MAIDEN
Journal Special Service.
Carlisle, Pa., Jan. 13.At a dinner party
tendered' the Carlisle Indian football players
and their "best girls" last evening by Super
intendent Mercer of the Carlisle school, Miss
Rose La Farge, Blackfoot Inuiaii, a last year's
Carlisle graduate and now assistant matron here,
announced her engagement to Charles Dillon, the
famous Cheyenne guard on the Carlisle football
eleven.
Miss La Farge is 19 years old and the pret
tiest Indian girl who has ever attended the
Carlisle school. Dillon is of the statuesque
redskin type and more than ordinarily intelli
gent. They will be married at the Carlisle
school at 7 p.m., Jan. 22, in the presence of
the 1,000 Indian students and Invited guests.
The ceremony will be followed by a reception
and dance in the gymnasium. The couple will
probably see President Roosevelt during their
honeymoon.
GIRLS TO PLAY
Central High Team to Contest with
Alumni at Basketball.
Tonight the girls' basketball team of Central
high will play an alumni team at the university
armory. This game marks the opening of the
Central season and promises teT*be
a good one
The' girls who will play on the alumni team are
the stars who have put Central to the fore in
girls' basketball in years past andTis the greater
number of them are members of the varsity
squad they are not lacking in practice. An in
formal dance will follow, the game.
The teams will ine up as follows:
Central. Alumni.
Agnes Baker .Forward Pauline Smith
Edna von Ende.. ..Forward. .Rose Marie Schaller
Marion Laurence..Forward.. .Capt. Caro. "Browne
Capt. Edna von
Ende Center Julia Barnes
Eleanor Melln Center Julia Barnes
Kokea Baldwin Guard Geneve .Wales
Winnie Chapman. .Guard Elsa Ueland
Bessie Hofflln
The game will be called at 8 o'clock.
BEYANTS WANT HOCKEY GAMES.
The Bryant hockey team has been organized
for the season and is looking .for games with
teams which average 14 years. The team
lines up as follows: James Comb, cover point:
Leonard Brown, point James Comb, cover point
John Comb, rover Peter Cunningham, center^
Everett Elliott, left wing Robert McBride, right
wing. For games address Harold Bi.lls. 19
Thirty-seventh street S, or telephone Tw|.i
City 7053.
iS??
at-once ciistihguisllessit
firom.alkotherbeersj By
our'perfedt^brewihgjpro-
tce#s, the delicatehop taSey
is retained^and the life,
and &rength*of"the malf
is Shown by^the,thick,
[creamy:foaii& rAt^U bars
THEO. HAMM BREWING CO.
St. Paul Minn:
&?*- jf W .*--3-"Ws,
aSfeM^ feiS^ f'S'WZfWWl
Defective Pa9*
RYA N MUST FIGHT
O BACK WATER
O'Brien Says He Will Give Hart
or Ryan the First
Chance.
w%
Journal Special Service.
NeW York, Jan. 13.Altho a number of pugil
ists have been hurling challenges at Philadel
Jack O'Brien for a fight, there are only
two of this large number who will get tbethe
chance of exchanging wallops with him for the
money. These fighters are Tommy Ryan, tbe
middleweight champion, whom O'Brien is over
anxious to fight for the middleweight title, and
Marvin Hart, the Louisville heavyweight, whom
O'Brien is willing to' meet before one of the
clubs in California for the heavyweight cham
pionship of the world.
Gus Ruhlin, the Akron giant, George Gardner,
Mike Schreck, Jack (Twin) Sullivan and Tommy
Burns, who have challenged O'Brien, had better
look for other fights, as they have not a chance
with Jack.
Since O'Brien fought and defeated Bob Flts
simmons he has been losing weight instead of
taking. In speaking of his weight today O'Brien
said that at present he does not weigh more
than 103 pounds stripped. He further stated
that bis constant boxing at theaters has re
duced him, and he is sure he will have, no
trouble in. making 154 pounds, which is theNetherland,
weight at which Ryan, wants him to fight for
the middleweight championship.
STARS IN THE
MICHIGAN TRACK TEAM
Journal Special Service.
Ann Arbor, Mich., Jan. 13.Eighty-seven as
pirants for track honors handed in their names
to Trainer Fltzpatrick last night, and as this
is the largest number he has ever had to start
the season, he is feeling wtll satisfied. The
men will be divided into classes tomorrow and
work will be begun next week. With the ex
ception of Coe, the weight man, there are no
known stars among the new men, and no line
can be secured on their probable showing until
next week.
Coe did not report at the gymnasium today, but
he is in college and says be will begin training
later in the season. Fltzpatrick had a piece
of bad luck in the failure of Dana, the distance
runner, to run to college after the Christmas
vacation. Dana is a Wisconsin man, and is
said to have entered one of the small colleges
in his own state. He is needed for the four
mile relay team whicb will compete at Phila
delphia.
STILL GROWLING AT
THE LARGE REUBEN
Journal Special^Service.
New York, Jan. 13.The actions of Rube Wad
dell of the Philadelphia team before and during
the world's championship series is likely to be
made the subject of an investigation by the na
tional baseball commission. The American league
magnates, and especially Ban Johnson, presi
dent of the organization, are highly Incensed at
Waddell's antics, and cannot reconcile them
selves to tbe feeling prevalent among supporters
of the American league in Philadelphia that his
innocent peculiarities should cover his behavior
on that occasion.
There was .'-omethlng suspicious, about Wad
dell's conduct at a time when the Athletics re
quired his services most, it is said, and much
condemnation has been heaped upon Connie
Mack, manager of the Athletics, for the leniency
be has shown tbe big twirler. It Is generally
known that Mack permitted Rube to do about as
he pleased last season, and they hold him, in a
measure responsible for "the poor 'showing his
team made in the series with the giants.
CHANGED THE EVENTS
Lake of Isles Card Did Not Fill to
Required Quota.
Lack of entries has forced tbe management of
the Lake of the Isles Driving club to call off the
free-for-all trotting and pacing events scheduled
for this afternoon. Instead a 2:28 pace and a
2:27 trot, have been substituted, with street
blankets for tbe winners.
The fact that certain horses are looked upon
as sure things in tbe free-for-all events has
held down the entries to one pacer and three
trotters. As fcur entries are necessary to make
a race, the event is off for the present. The
rrces substituted for today began at 2 o'clock.
The entries were as follows.
:25 PacePrince, Frank Day Marguerite
Haha. J. H. McConvllIe Belle Porter. C.
B.only
Waddell Mary Glen, Peter McCoy Little Boy,
J. V. McGolrlck Galeson. H. H. Penniman
Rhoderick Dhu, Fred Cbilds.
2:27 TrotRed Alidia. Dr. C. G. Lyford
Lady Belle, W. F. Converse Red Charles, Bd
Best Gem, M. Porter Cheta, Thomas Boocock.
Strong People Are
Full of
Electricity.
DR. MCLAUGHLIN: Chicago, in.
Dear SirIn answer to your letter I must
say that your Electric Belt has cared me. I
will gladly recommend it to anyone who is
run down and nerirons. It is worth its
weight in gold. Tours truly,
J. H. De KIP, 860 Orleans St.
Write Today
Send Coupon
for Free Book.
'$
GOPHER O N MIS
RULES COMMITTEE
*i
Dr. H. L, Williams to Have Hand
in Framing New Football
Code.
32
Journal Special Service. .^-w-
New York, Jan. 13.The original football
rules committee and the newly-organized com
mittee appointed by the sixty coUeges. tbmout
land who were dissatisfied with the game
of football as played now agreed to amalgamate
last night, and held a Joint session at tbe Hotel
Netherlands, where they elected officers for the
ensuing year.
This amalgamation eventually means a radical
change iu the game as played now, aB every
one of the new committee has been instructed to
insist on a change that eliminates tbe roughness
from tbe game.
Dr. H. A. Babbot of Haverford, F. H- Curtis
of the University of Texas, Lieutenant Charles
Dalny of West Point and C. K. Hall of Dart
mouth, all of the new committee, met early in
the evening at the Murray Hill hotel.
So many parents of young children
do* not realize the danger from croup
until they have had the experience or
one severe case in their own home. To
beawakened inthe middle of the night by
the peculiar rough cough and nnd their
little one suffering from a fully devel
oped attack of the croup and nothing
in the house with which to relieve it is
a lesson never to be forgotten. A good
remedy at hand is of incalculable value
in a time like this, and nothing better
can be obtained than Chamberlain's
Cough Remedy. It has been thoroly
tested in hundreds of cases, and not
cures croup, but when given as
soon aB the first symptoms appear, it
will prevent the attack. The fact that
this remedy contains no narcotics makes
it perfectly safe to give to the children.
People, Be Strong
Get Some Life Into Yo 1
What^s the use of dragging your* legs about like a wooden personf
Feel like^a person of spirit. Away with the pains and aches off with this
wnetched feeling as if you were eighty years old and had one foot in the
grave. .Come and let me put life into your nerves let me give you anew
supply of youthful energy. Let me make you feel like throwing your chest
out and your head up and saying to yourself, I AM STRONG AND
HEALTHY!'' Let me give you back that old health of youth. I can do it,
so that in two months you will wonder that you ever felt so slow and
pokey^
as you do now. 'v
A
Gopher Was Absent. -~^y-
Dr. H. L. Williams of Minnesota and Pro
feasor J. T. Lees of Nebraska were absent.
Babbot, for his committee, telephoned to the
eld committee who were In session at tbe Hotel
and suggested amalgamation.
His proposition was that there be chosen three
of the old and two of the new committee to
make up the amalgamated committee. The old
committee would not agree to this plan. Then
the new committee suggested a combination, of
nine members. As this was not satisfactory to
the older association, Walter Camp, chairman
of the latter and Yale's representative, invited
all the newcomers to the ranks of the rulemakers
to join the veterans at the Hotel Netherland
and discuss all proposals.
There they wrangled Jointly and separately
over the details of combined organisation for
more than an hour before they came to a de
clsion. Alonzo A. Stagg of the University of
Chicago was unable to join the old committee
because of the death of President Harper of the
Chicago university.
William T. Reid of Harvard, who wae origi
nally on the older-body, and who had been In
structed to switch over to the new, went1
to the
Murray H1U early In the evening and sent up
his card to Daly, who formerly played on the
Harvard varsity. Daly went into conference
with his committee, and, altho the action waa
unparliamentary, as those in session bad no
right to do so, they accepted Reid as one of
their members and he went to the New Neth
erland with them.
SKI JUMPERS AT RED
WING HILL TOMORROW
Red Wing Minn., Jan.' 13.At the practice
run yesterday excellent jumps were made by
members of the Aurora Sal club. Ole Mangseth
made the longest standing Jump, clearing 100
feet. This is the fifth longest standing jump
made in America.
Another runner, Harris Anderson, made three
successive standing Jumps, 92, 95 and 97 feet.
These three Jumps would have won any tourna
ment that has so far been held in America.
Everything is now ready for the big tourna
ment tomorrow. Forty local entries have thus
far been made, and several skiers will be In
Red Wing from outside cities to participate. Tha
hill is in excellent condition and some very fine
jumps are expected tomorrow.
DELANO BASKET-BALL DATES.
Delano, Minn., Jan. 13.The Delano high
school basket-ball team has scheduled the fol
lowing games: Annandale High on Jan. IS:
Central High of Minneapolis on Jan. 20. and
the Mechanics Art, of St. Paul, on Feb. 22.
The Delano team has won all Its games this
season, and is looking for games with aome
fast city teams.
Experience a Dear
Is Sometimes
Teacher.
Sick
People Are
Lacking in
Electricity.
DR. MCLAUGHLIN: Minneapolis, Minn.
Dear SirIn, answer to your inquiry will
lay that I believe I hare been fully restored
to health and permanently cored of my rheu
matism. I have not worn the Belt for orer a
year. I have neither ache nor pain. Yours
truly.
3836 Portland AT. S. C. LESLIE.
Dr. McLaughlin's Electric Belt Cures
Bheumatlsm, Kidney Troubles, Lame Back, Sciati
Nervousness, and every indication that yon are
You put it on when yon go to bed and sleep peacefully nnder the influence of the warm-
ing, vitalising power. You awake full of ambition, with a healthy desire to tackle your
day's work. Each day you gain new life from it and soon begin to feel strong and healthy.
Each symptom of your trouble gradually disappears, strength takes the place of sickness,
and your life Is made happy by the restoration of your old health.
Address
"ThereIs" an art-In writing a Journal want ad for a servant. Many servants
are already employed but are looking for better positions. Btate the advan-
tages of tbe position you offer wbeD vou advertise.
i
N
-M
,iS
^M
i
Stomach Troubles,
down physically.
1-18-06..
DR. M. J. MCLAUGHLIN 't," $
162 State St., Chicago, 111.:
Dear Sir: Pl#ase send me one of your
Free Books, as advertised in The Min
neapolis Journal.
Name T..

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