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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, January 27, 1906, Image 7

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1906-01-27/ed-1/seq-7/

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THE WEATHER
Forecast.
MinnesotaFairitonight and Sunday
slightly colder in east portion tonight
fresh northwest winds.
TowaFair tonight and Sunday.
slightly cooler tonight fresh northwest
North Dakota and MontanaFair to
night and Sunday.
South DakotaFair tonight -ana Sun
day slightly cooler in east portion to
night.
Upper MichiganFair tonight and
Sunday, except snow flurries near
Lake Superior colder in west portion
tonight fresh northwest winds.
"WisconsinFair tonight and Sunday
slightly colder in south portion tonight
fresh northwest winds.
Weather Conditions.
Cloudy weather is reported this morn
ing in the vicinity of Lakes Superior
and Michigan, along the Atlantic coast,
and in Alabama, Georgia and eastern
Tennessee, with precipitation during the
past twenty-four hours in the states ad
jacent to the south Atlantic coast,'
which in the interior was probably
snow, as snow was still falling this
morning at Atlanta.* .The pressure is
till relatively low in the Lake Winni
peg region, and there is another "low"
overlying Michigan. These "lows"
have caused continued rising temper
atures in nearly the whole Mississippi
valley, the upper and lower lake region
and along the middle Atlantic and New
England coasts. The high over the cen
tral Rocky mountain region is attended
by lower temperatures in Montana and
North Dakota, but the temperatures in
all the northwest are remarkably mild
for the Season. Fair weather is antici-
Say,dwiththis
ate in vicinity tonight and Sun
slightly lower temperature to
night.
T. S. Outram, Section Director.
Weather Now and Then.
Today, maximum 37, minimum 26 de
jfrees a year ago, maximum 15, mini
mum 2 below.
AROUND THE TOWN
Change of Place.The election of of
ficers and Dutch treat'' dinner of the
Minneapolis Homeopathic Medical so
ciety will be held at Dayton's tea
rooms Jan. 30, at 6 p.m.
Douglass Is Appointed.Governor
John A. Johnson has appointed N. M.
Douglass of Minneapolis to succeed
Thomas Bailly of St. Paul on the state
board of examiners of horseshoers.
Girl Forger Waives.Grace Ander
son, the pretty girl forger arrested yes
teday by Detectives Morrissey and
Stavlo, was arraigned in police court
today. She waived examination and
was held to the grand jury with bail
fixed at $700.
Pioneer Photographers Dying.W.
H. Jacoby, one of the old-time photo
graphers of Minneapolis, is lying ser
iously ill in a hospital at Los Angeles,
Cal., with very little hope of his re
covery. A sad coincidence is the se
rious illness of A. H. Beal, another
flour city pioneer photographer, who is
at his home in Pasadena.
Inspecting Rural Delivery.P. L.
Neil of St. Paul, special agent of the
rural free delivery service, is engaged
upon a careful inspection ox the Henne
pin county service. It will take Mr.
Neil about three weeks to complete his
inspection. His report, in addition to
containing an account or the actual con
ditions, will make suggestions as to now
the service can be made better and
cheaper.
Got Into Trouble.W. A. Thomas
found himself in trouble in police court
today when he told Judge Waite that
he was the husband of Lottie Thomas,
who was on trial for vagrancy. He
said that he had lived with the woman
for some time, but he could produce no
court records to substantiate the state
ment, and the court ordered him locked
up also. The case was continued while
the records of the two are investigated.
~NEOOLOGIO
A. B. HUSBANDS DEAD
Prominent Resident of Minneapolis for
Twenty-five Years Passes Away.
A. B. Husbands died yesterday. He
was born in [Rochester, N. Y., in 1848,
where he received his earlv education.
At the age of 17 he engaged in the
civil war and served with distinction
to himself and country. He came to
Minneapolis about twenty-five years
ago and has made his home here ever
since, having been engaged in the
yeast business for twenty years. He
was one of the organizers of the pure
food shows, which were an annual fea
ture of Minneapolis for many years.
Mr. Husbands was a very active
member and officer in the United Cbm
"mercial Travelers, the Citv Salesmen's
association and the Royal Arcanum.
He was treasurer of Minnehaha council
in the latter society for several years.
Besides his*wifc he leaves a son and
three daughters. The funeral will be
held from the residence, 3144 Pleasant
avenue, at 2:30 p.m., Monday. Members
of the societies to which he belonged
are invited.
CHARLES KOSING of the Kosing
Manufacturing company, died yester
day at his residence, 1612 Stevens ave
nue. For more than twenty years he
was in the furniture business at Eau
Claire, Wis. He leaves a widow and*
three daughters. Funeral from resi
dence Sunday at 2:30 p.m., under the
auspices of B'nai Brith lodge. N.o
flowers.
DR. I. L. DRAKE.The funeral of
Dr. I. L. Drake, which was announced
to take place this afternoon, has been
fives
tostponed in order to allow his rela
time to get here. It will take
place Monday at 2 p.m. from the Ma
sonic yhall, 20 University avenue SE,
MRS. CHRISTINA NYHOLM died
last Thursday at the family residence,
1515 Girard avenue N. Funeral from
Free Mission church, Twelfth avenue S
and Seventh street, Sunday, at 1:30
p.m. Interment at Cokato, Minn.
MATHEW M. SPARROW, aged 59,
vears, died at the family residence, 1845
East Twenty-fifth street. Funeral
Mqnday at 2 p.m. Brooklyn, N. Y., pa
pers please copy.
M. SIVERUNG.Funeral from fam
ily residence,* 1911 Second aveniie S,
Monday at 8:30 a.m. and services at St.
Charles church at 9 a.m.
SatqrH^y Evening!
QUEST OF FOBTUNE
ENDS IN FORGERY
YOUN0 MANITOBAN ADVENTXJB-
EB IS UP AGAINST IT.
He Started Out to See the World, but
the Demand That He ay His Hotel
Bill Found Him Insolvent and Des-
perateSaid to Have Confessed.
LITTLE CITY WANTS TO
BE LIKE MINNEAPOLIS
St. Paul still gives evidence that it
regards Minneapolis as a model city,
and one which it should copy to get
into the cosmopolitan atmosphere of a
twentieth century thriving city. Hav
ing followed the lead of its sister city
in acquiring first a get-together spirit
and then laying the foundations for an
auditorium, it is now reaching out for
other attractions that have made Min
neapolis famous.
The St. Paul Dispatch last night de
voted nearly two columns to exploiting
a long-founded institution in Minne
apolis which St. Paul lacks. A half
column article explains why St. Paul
women are constantly giving social din
ners in Minneapolis. Its solution is
that St. Paul has no tearooms, one of
which has been established seven years
in Minneapolis and, the qther three
years.
A longer article treats of the Minne
apolis roller rinks, which are being pat
ronized very heavily by St. Paul peo
ple, notwithstanding- the annoyance of
the long car rides. It laments the fact
that St. Paul's knocking spirit defeated
the proposal of Minneapolis capitalists
to build a fine roller rink in St. Paul.
In short the burden of the issue is the
lack of the very spirit which has pushed
Minneapolis steadily to the front, and
equipped it with all the advantages of
a metropolis.
ALLEGED BADEB SLAYER
IS BROUGHT TO GITY
Carl Johnson, the alleged murderer of
Charles O. Bader, proprietor of the
Falls hotel, 416 Second street S, ar
rived in the city late afternoon in
the custody of%
PIANOS
"We know you look to us to sell you only a good piano-srantl
you shall not be disappointed. "We represent the following old-
time favoritesHardman, Krakauer, McPhail? Behning, Sterl-
ing, "Crown," Huntington and Lagonda. $10 sends a piano
home* and you can pay the balance $5, $6, $7, $8 or $10 a month.
Bepresentatives for The Knabe-Angelus Piano.*s
Foster & Waldo,-?&
HUMS }S,TS
:r
Henry Shield, HJ years old, is locked
up at Central station charged with at
tempting one of the boldest forgery
schemes that has come to the notice of
the police for sbme time.
The boy is charged with forging two
checks for more thato $200 and trying
to cash them at M. Ravicz 's pawn shop
Washington avenue S.
Shield is said to have run away from
his home in Brandon, Manitoba, and
come to Minneapolis for an ,advepture.
He engaged a room at the? Golden West
hotel three days ago, and yesterday he
was asked to settle his bill. He said
Tie was short of cash, but would pre
sent a check later in the day.
In the afternoon he appeared at Ra
vicz 's pawnshop and telling a stor^
about the banks being closed! asked to
have the checks cashed. The pawn
broker didn't like the appearance of
the checks and notified the police." On
investigation the checks were found to
be worthless and the boy was locked
up. He is said to have broken down
and admitted his guilt to Detectives
Morrissey and Stavlo, who arrested
him.
Charlesthis Brown, who ar
rested him.
He was placed under cover and will
be subjected to a severe examination
before he is turned over to the police.
Johnson persistently denies nis guilt
and says that he will be able to prove
analibi that the police cannot shake.
The police base their case mainly on
thefact that Johnson was "broke" a i their shoes shined
few hours before the furder and bor
found who will swear that he saw the
suspected man running thru the railroad
yards a few minutes after the shooting.
Johnson's arrest is said to be due to
evidence obtained thru Frank Fisher,
who was held for a time at the South
Side station. He was intimate with
Johnson and probably can tell many
things of his movements on that day.
Fisher is now locked up in St. Paul.
ESTATES HELD FOR
THE INHERITANCE TAX
Estates from which inheritance taxes
are to be collected were certified to
the state auditor today by F. G. Har
vey, nudge of probate of Hennepin
county. They include the- estate ot
Mrs. Sarah P.' Brown, owner of a large
part of the stock of the Minneapolis
Gas company. Some lacge bequests in
Minneapolis'will be taxed, A. T. Band,
R. R. Band and Kate A. Ogle being
among the heirs. The other estates
liable to tax are:
Martin Whitcomb, $65,960: George
R. Robinson, $21,600 Peter S. Peabody,
$23,000 Louisa J. Crandall, $22,500
Charles O. Bader, $19,000 Silas D. Hill
man, $21,200 L. H. Barnard, $34,376
Ellen Musgrave, $42,000 William
Lu Amsden, $20,000.
rowed money from the murdered man. a serious thing, and it occurred to me
tl is also possible that a man can be that Minneapolis had more than its
share of cold wood. When 1 nrst read
your call I expected to see that fund
reach $10,000 three days and I De
lieve you did. As time passed and
the pay streak pinched out, I have
reached for my check" book ha a small
way.''
The benefit tendered last night by the
management of the Armory skating
rink netted the Berwin fund $20.60.
Tha, Minneapolis Horse Fire Escape
company, and not the Hose Fire Escape
company, as a typographical error made
it appear, has contributed a share of
stock valued at $100 and non-assessable
to Mrs. Berwin and a share to the Fire
men's Relief association.
PIONEER PHYSICIAN,
DR. A. E. JOHNSON, DEAD
k
Dr \Asa Emery Johnson, 'pioneer
physician and half-brother of Albert
Johnson, the eccentrc millionaire who
died last soring, died today"at thes
home
of his daughter, Mrs. A. M. Hunter, 323
Fourth street SE. His death was due
to senile debility, which has confined
him to the house for the past three
years and to his bed for four months.
Beside his daughter, the only surviving
member of his family is a grandson,
Asa Hunter.
The funeral services, which will be
announced later, will be private and
friends arc requested not to send flow
ers. The interment will be at Lake
wood cemetery.
S|r*tB
Two Minneapolis Fire Ftgltters^
LIEUT. PETER OOLMAN,
Promoted to the Lieutenancy Vacated by
Howard's Promotion.
frsM&vv.&tv.&v.v.*v.vxm f.sy.*.-f:je:si.m jf,T.x*. mttxx%XQ,&em**Tnwfc
CRITICIZES THE LACK
OF LIBERALITY HERE
-3
BERWIN MEMORIAL FUND.
For the wife and four young chil
dren of Captain John Berwin, the
fireman who heroically sacrificed his
life in a successful endeavor to
save Mrs. D. B. Barlow at the West
hotel fire. The fund will he a token
of recognition from the city Cap
tain Berwin so faithfully served.
i
SEND MONEY TO
TT E JOURNAL.
The various funds now stand as
follows: Olaf O. Searle 26.00
Previously reported $2,060.00
B. W S
0
0
Fraternal Order of Eagles.. 25.00
Ashby Fire Department.... 10.00
Dr. C. W Drew 5.00
Harry Ryan, BemldJI, Minn. .50
Sympathizer 1.00
Eben S. Martin 1.00.
Armory rink benefit 21.60
Total Journal $2,160.60
OTHER SOURCES.
Chamber of Commerce Com
mittee $2,666.00
City Council Committee.... 586.00
Previously reported 205.00
Salvage Corps 25.00
Total T$3,482.0O
Journal total 2,150.00
Grand total, all sources. $5,632.00
The consolidation of the several
funds that have been raised for the
family of Captain Berwin should not
be understood to mean' that additional
contributions .will not be welcome.
This will be done so that the money
can be placed in trust and begin draw
ing interest at oWce.
Th Journal ftfnd will be kept
open for contributions so long as re
sponses continue. There have been
several expressions to the- effect that
at least $10,000 should be raised for!
Mrs. Berwin and her children, inclusive
of what she receivedl
and the Firemen's Belief association.
The consolidated fund lacks about
$2,000 of that amount at present.
L. T. Boucher, attorney of Eureka,
S. D., writes to The Journal in
sending his contribution, as follows:
"When I read your plea in the Ber
win case day after day and noted the
dearth of individual contribution to a
call which should have gone straight
to the heart of every man, I thought of
the thousands of men there who have
every morning, to
whom the loss even of $5 would not be
MINNEA^LIS 10URNAIJ
Who Have Just Been Promoted
OAPT. PEED HOWARD, K.P.S.,
Promoted from Lieutenancy to Succeed
the Late Oaptahr John Berjvln,
1.
house and called fpt
from insurance
fc
SPECIAL OHUECH
EVENTS TOMORROW
WESLEY M. E.Morning, Dr.
L. GKuld will give an address recon
ciling the Christian belief in mira
cles with the Naturalistic *views
common today.
FOWLER M.' E.Evening, Dr. J.
S. 'Montgomery will deliver his
fourth lecture on Spain, the special
subject being, "The Quaint City of
Cordova."
FIRST BAPTIST.Morning, ad
dress by Dr. Frank Petersen, dis
trict secretary of the American Bap
tist union. Evening, address by
A. J. Frost on "Post-millennial
Questions and Pre-millennial An
swers.
ATJDITORIU5I.Evening, Rev.
G. L. Morrill will speak on "Down
in Dixie^" describing a recent trip
thru the* south.
TRINITY BAPTIST,Evening,
Dr. Crandall will speak on "Spirit
ual Athletes."
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN.
"Evening, address \f Rev. Thomas
Parry, DJ)., late pastor of the larg
est church in Pittsburg, Pa.
Y. M. C. A.Dr. John M. Ful
ton, formerly pastor of the
Central Presbyterian church of
St. Paul, now national secre
tary of the Presbyterian tem
perance movement, will deliver
an address at 3:30 p.m. On "The
^f,
Best Remedy for an'Old Evil.i'
3 Dr. Montgomery Will Lecture on the
City of Cordova Tomorrow Evening.
Dr. J. S. Montgomery preaches at
Fowled church tomorrow morning, oil
the BuBject, A Cowardly Dodge." In
the evening he lectures on The Quaint
City of Cordova." The Sunday evening
lectures are gleaned from the diary of
Dr. Montgomery, which he 'kept while
in Spain a few weeks ago. Cordova is
historic and gives a most interesting
illustration of Spanish life and char
acter. There is great interest mani
fested in these Sunday evening lec
tures by old'and young. Special cara
are promptly on hand Jit 9:15 p.m
.$.**.'.:.:* fwjtim
BURGLAR IN JUST
THE BIGHT DIRECTION
A burglar stood in the vestibule of
Dr. F. B. Kremer's residence last night
whjle upstairs the alarmed household
lit the gas, hunted- "up slippers and re
volvers and planned'trouble generally.
Knowing that his game was up, the
marauder debated whether to make
8 a
dash out to the street or run around
the side of the house to the rear. He
chose the* latter course, and thus dodged
the vengeful eye of Dr. Kremer, who
was peering out of an upper f,ront win
dow with a large revolver poised ready
for action.
As the lights began to twinkle in the
Kremer house, a similar illumination
appeared in that of County Attorney
Al J. Smith, next door, at 1771 Irving
avenue S. Members- of the nousehola
had been aroused by the burglar, who
had attempted to gain entrance and
had ahilndoed the work for a more
successful experiment at the neighbors'.
A skeleton key was used at the Kre
mer house, but the front door creaked
as it swung open and gave the alarm.
Just across the street from the scene
of last night's excitement is the home
of Michael Breslauer. which was ran
sacked by burglars just a week ago,
despite the efforts of T. Bi^slauer, the
only member of the family "Ut home.
FAMILY HAS NARROW
ESCAPE FROM DEATH
'Barney Regan, ,weighmaster for the
Western Weighing association, and his
family were nearly suffocated by coal
as at their residence in South Par, St.
aul. Mrs: Regan is still in a preca
rious condition*.
Regan was* awakened by a violent
headaehe at 2 a.m. He discovered that
'the house was fuli of gas and when he
tried to arouse his*wife he found that
she- was unconscious. Carrying her
into the yard, Mr.' Regan returned for
nis children. He found both of }hem,
Harold, 12 years old7 and Charles, 15
years oldy'conscious, buto^unaUle to
move. H4Jraar.ried
tWm from the
jDivtCampbell..
boys were, easily revived, /but M.r
The
Re
gan did not recover for a Jong tyne-.
YJOBIGTOTAKEHP'"1',
FARMERS'COMPLAINT
Attorney General Young is away on
a brief visit to hischome at Appleton,
and will return Monday to his office.
At that time he will probably decide
what action to take on the complaint
of the Farmers' exchange against the
Duluth Board of Trade.
The board is charged with violating
the antitrust law by refusing to allow
grain consigned by the Farmers' ex
change to-be handled by its members,
which shuts it out of the Duluth market.
MAYOR JONES SPEAKS
Men's League of Fifth Presbyterian
Church Addressed by Executive.
Mayor David P. Jones was the prin
cipal speaker at a banquet giveto last
evening bv the Men's League of the
Fifth Presbyterian church, Lyndale and
Fourth avenues N. His theme was
Civic Righteousness'' and his remarks
evoked repeated and hearty applause,
He advocated that municipal questions
should be entirely divorced "rom poli
tics and treated as business affairs.
Principles, rather than individuals and
their political questions, ought to be
considered. The city had reached the
time when the saloon should be entirely
divorced from polities and business. At
the conclusion of the address the fol
lowing resolution was adopted.
"The Men's League of Fifth Pres
byterian church of Minneapolis, having
listened with great pleasure and profit
to oijr mayor on 'Civic
Righteousness,'aneabls"ir
do hereby thank hini f
timely presentation of the subject, and
do furthermore heartily indorse hjis
Sun'day dosing order and promise to
stand by him in the endeavors he is
making for the reform of the public
service of our city."
JUDGES WJELL WATCH4
Contestants for Sewing Prizes at School
of Agriculture Many.
Practical sewing will furnish girl
students at the school of agriculture a
chance to compete for prizes Monday
afternoon. Instead of submitting pre
viously executed specimens, as is the
usual method of such contests, the girls
will' do the work in the presence of
the judges, who will mark on speed,
method, accuracy and neatness.
Mrs. Margaret Blair, instructor' in
sewing and household arts, is the origi
nator of this contest, and says that it
will be the first of the kind, ever held
in the state. The tryout will include
making buttonholes, working initials in
linen, cjitting shirtwaist patterns, dress
designing, stockinet darning and rip
stitches and* patching. The .judges will
Mrs.
.luoge
be Mrs. Paul Doly of St. Paul,
A. W. Abott of Minneapolis and
H. Shellenbergej? of St. Paul.
I'*.* KIIalaKD BY TRAIN
Mrs.
Mons Nelson, Section Hand, Meets
Death Beneath Wheels.
Mons Nelson, a section hand, was
killed in the Great Northern yards at
Bryn Mawr yesterday afternoon. A
freight train backed on him and his
body was horribly mangled. As he fell
he grasped the brakebeam, but the train
could not be stopped and he *lost his
hold and fell under the wheels. The
body was taken to the morgue and later
was claimed by his family,
at 1342 Colfax avenue N^*vj
EXCELSIOR HAS
HOT FIGHT AHEAD
**3*
'WETS" AND "TOYS" Wlli
CLASH IN THE SPRING.
The Trolley Line and the Minneapolis
Lid Furnish New Elemants That As
sure a Strenuous CampaignAlready
'the Opposing Forces Are Girding for
the Fray.
Excelsior is to have the warmest vil
lage campaign of its history next
spring. Beer or no beer is to be the
issue and already the rival u^ttifis are
girding for the fray. The women of
,the village are interested and have al
ready started out to raise a dry cam
paign fui|d.
The Excelsior "wets and "drys"
have clashed before, when Excelsior
was, so to speak, off the map. This time
there are new influences, namely, the
trolley line that brings the town within
foifty minutes of Minneapolis at any
time of the day or nightand the Min
neapolis lid. The Excelsior drys do
not relish the idea of having the quiet
erstwhile respectable town turned into
a mammoth Sunday beer fesort for
Minneapolis. This they feel would be
the case with an open policy in the
town at the present time.
The dsys are said to have a strong
ally in the street railway company. The
prospects*of beer ad lib at the end of
the line^ would doubtless bring many
shekels into the coffers of the company
on hot Sundays and week-day evenings,
but the company is planning to ojaerate
a recreation and picnic park om Big
Island and does not cafe to have any
influences that may cause trouble on
their grounds.
On Thursday, Friday and Saturday of
next week the women of Excelsior, who
are specially interested in the dry cam
paign will hold a winter carnival, all
proceeds to go to the dry fund for the
spring fight. Invitations have been sent
to lake residents and their friends,
many of whom have promised their .ac-
tive moral and financial support- Spe-
cial cars will be run over the trolley
line for citv visitors, and all fares paid
on them will be turned over to the wo
men's fund. This will mean 50 cents
for the fund for each city visitor who
attends the carnival. Other affairs for
the same-^purpose are planned, and will
be held thru the winter and early
spring.
It is said that the brewing interests
will take no active part in the fight
that they will put no money into the
campaign for the wets and will not try
to direct affairs. If the election goes
to the "wets" tho, six *or eight sa
loons will be established at once.
SYMPTOMS OF RABIES
HAYE NOT DEVELOPED
,2
No symptoms of rabies have been
noted in the rabbits inoculated with^
virus from the dog which bit several
people on First avenue S, a fortnight
ago. Today is the fourteenth day sinae
the# rabbits wehe inoculated and indi
cations might be expected at this time,
but nothing suspicious has been devel
oped. The full period of development
is eighteen days, however, alvd it will
be Wedriesday or Thursday before Dr.
J. F. Corbettj city bacteriologist, cah
definitely decide whether the dog had
rabies or an ordinary and harmless case
of fits.
It was reported that several persons
were bitten in the mad dog scare on
First avenue S, but only one 'name has
been secured by Dr. Corbett. This man
is under treatment. Should'' it prove
that the animal had rabies, as feared,
the people who were bitten have beeD
losing much valuable time by failing to
report the fact to the health authori
ties, so proper precautions could be
taken to arrest the progress fit the mal
ady.
DINEHART A GANDIDATE
FOR STATE TREASURER
C. C. Dinehart, a banker at Slayton,
in Murray county, Minn., is in the city
on a brief visit. He has recently been
brought out as a candidate for the
republican nomination as state treas
urer, and altho the'political season is
yet very young, his friends announce
that he is in the fight to stay. The an
nouncement of Mr. Dinehart's can
didacy was made only after a "most
careful canvass of the second district,
and it is believed not only that he will
have the united support of the second
district, but that there will be no other
candidates for a position on the state
ticket from that part of the state.
The section from which Mr. Dinehart
comes has never had a candidate on the
state ticket.
Mr. Dinehart is a graduate of the
University of Minnesota and the law
department of Harvard university. He
has been engaged for several years in
the banking business, being at the pres
ent time connected with the State Bank
of Slayton, of which his farther is presi
dent.
MAYORALTY TIMBER
St. Paul Republicans Trying to Decide
'on- Strong Man.
Two new mayoralty candidates were
evolved yesterday by St. Paul repub
licans. Grant Van Sant, son o the
former governor, was favored in a
meeting of committees fronjthe Lincoln,
Roosevelt and McKinley clubs, while
the republican good government 'com
mittee, organized last week, met in the
evening and decided to ask L. G. Hoff
man, president of the Commercial club,
to stand as a candidate.
At the meeting of club committees
it was voted to abandon the, idea of.
a mass meeting for selecting* a candi
date, on the ground, that a mass meet
ing would be packed by "the gang."
The candidate is to be picked some
other way, and if a mass meeting is
held, it will be only for ratification.
A vote taken on candidates showed
twelve for Grant "Van Sanfr, nine for
Philip "W. Herzog and eighteen names
receiving one vote each. Mr. Van
Sant urged the selection of Mr. Her
zog, while Dar Reese, H. P. Keller and
W. B. Webster insisted on the Van Sant
candidacy. No decision was reached
and another meeting will be held next
week i
MIDWINTER PICNIC
Minneapolis Market Gardeners Axe
Holding Annual Event Today.
The Minneapolis Market Gardeners*
association is holding its annual mid
winter picnic at the Third Ward Re
publican wigwam, Plymouth and Al
drich avenues N, today. The afternoon
session began at 2 p.m. and was filled
up with a musical and literary pro
gram. Most of the papers read were
technical in character. This evening
the hall, will be turned over to the
He lived younger members, who will entertain
"S3?M$ U"""lve with dancing and C^e*Mgi&g-M-J
METHODIST.
POWLEERer. Jemes S. Montgomery. Morn
tog, "A Cowardly Dodge" evening, "The
Quaint City of CordoTa?* fourth lecture In
aeries on "Spain." Special mualo and a
hearty welcome to the public.
WESTEEH AVENUERey. H. B. CoUlM. Morn
lng. "Is Christ DlTifiedr* erenlng. "The Crowd
and the Man."
PARK AVENUERer. G. O. Vanentrne. Morn
'tag, "Dead, AUve,. Loosed" evening, pedal
se.-Tlce. special music, special topic.
PROSPECT PARKRer. J. G. Orozier. Mom
ing, "A Swarm ot Beea," a children's sermon
ercnlnsr. "An Invitation to a Wedding." Spe
cial muBlc will be rfn important part of bom
services.
MIDWAY FREEEvangelist. Mrs. Ella M.
Smith, of Greenville, 111. Morning. "The Tqo
Crossings' evening, "Heart Religion"
TRINITYMoinlrg, Ber. J. B. Hlngely, D.D.
evuning. Per. W. A. Shannon.
ST. JAMESPresiding Elder BUT. H. H.Thomp
son will preach at 11 a.m. Rer. R. E. W1U-
son at 3 p.in., at which serrtce the Lords
Supper win be administered. Rer. Thompson
will preach at 7:45 Come early to get a seat.
Yonng People's meeting at 9 p.m. Professor
George H. Wade pastor of church, 315 Eighth
avenue SL
FOREST HEIGHTSRer. Charles S. Davis.
Morning. "Religion and Morals" evening.
"Religion and Recion""The Fundamental
Assumption Reasonable." Sunday evenings the
pastor will preach a series of sermons on "Re-
ligion and Reason"the above is the first of
the series."
THIRTEENTH AVENUERev. O. F. Sharpe
Morning, "Meroz, or a Woman's Ourse" eve
ning, "An Historic Invitation and What Came
of It."
WESLEYRev. L. T. Culld. Morning,, "Miracles
and the Reign of Law" evening, series of
lectures on "Puritan Patriots/' subject,
"Martin Lather the Messiah of Modern Lib-
erty." Special cars at close.
LAKE STREETRev. T. W. Stout. Morning.
"A Little Further" children's prelude, "Old
Iron and Watch Springs" evening, "The
Parable of the Mouse in the Piano." second in
series on "Present Day Parables."
FOBSRev. J. W. Heard. Morning. "The In
terprctation of the Letters- to the Thessaloa
ians" evening, "The Gospel for Today."
MINNEHAHARev. O. M\ Heard Morning,
"Cause and Cure of Inequalities In the Dis
tribution of Wealth" evening. "The Lessons
of a Beautiful Love Story."
HENNEPIN AVENUERev. Fayette L. Thomp
son. Morning. 10-30, "Paul a Slave" eve
ning. "A Message of Accomplishment," the
sixth In a scries of year and messages by the
.pastor.
EIMPSON(Comer Twenty-eighth street and
First avenue S)Rev. John Miner. Morn
ing, "Baptismal Vows" evening, "Profan-
ity," the second in the series on the Ten Com
mandments. Baptism will be administered to
adults after the morning sermon with special
selections by the choir.
FIRSTRev. W. -H Jordan. Morning, "The
Thing Left Undone" evening. "The Sins of
Modem SocietyLeprosy." Song service of
old favorites led by large chorus choir.
CONGREGATIONAL.
COMO AVENUERev. H. K. Painter. Morn
ing, "The Three Good Cheers of Christ" eve
ning, "Having Two Things or Nothing."
LOWRY HILLReV. Henry Holmes. Morning,
"The Measure of That Which Doth Not Yet
Appear," at 10&0 evening Christian Endeavor
at 6.30.
FIFTH AVENUERev. James E. Smith. Morn
ing, "The New Work," third sermon In series
on "New Things In Gosnel Message" eve
ning, "Restatements of Salvation."
FREMONT AVENUERev. C. A. HUton. Morn
ing, "Jesus' Friends" evening, "Other Ex
cuses."
FIRSTRev. Clement O. Clarke. Morning,
preaching by the pastor.
OPEN DOORRev. Walter Carlson. Morning,
"Jesus' Consecration for Sinners" evening,
Mr. Pupl of the Anti-Saloon league will
speak. Special music in the evening.
PILGRIMRev. F. A. Sumner. Morning, "A
Study In Temptation" evening. Rev. W. L.
Tcnney, of Chicago, will speak upon the
theme, "Our Contemporary Ancestors, tha
Southern Highlanders
THIRTY-EIGHTH 8TREETRev. George B.
Albrecut. Morning, "True Worship," In a
series on the Ten Commandments" evening,
"What Is the Bible?"
LINDEN HILLSRev. P. A. Cool. Morning,
"The Threj Best Things, the Best Prayer, the
Best Thinking, and the Best Living" evening.
"Divine Appeal to the Human Consciousness/
PLYMOUTHRev. Leavltt H. Hallock. Morn
ing, "Sources and Uses of Spiritual Power"
evening, Rev. Harold Hunting, "New Light
from An. Old Parable."
PARK AVENUERev. O. S. Rollins. Morning
sermon by Dr. W. L. Tenney of Chicago, on
".Tapen in America" evening. Dr. Rollins "on
"Edward Everett Hale, Jr., Confession of
Christ."
LYNDALERev. C. B. Bmrton. Morning,
"Spiiitual Beggary" evening, "Learning from
Robbers."
VINERev. J. S. Rood. Morning, reception of
members, the Communion, and annual offer
ing for the A. ,M. A." evening. "Use4 of
God-"
PRESBYTERIAN.
WESTMINSTERRev. John E. Bushnell, D.D.
Morning, "The Sign of the Well" evening,
a praise service of songan evening with
Handel's music, and address by pastor on the
*"gr.'at compter's message.
BETHANY(Corner of Oak and Essex SB
Rev. T. J. McCrossan. Morning, "God's Defi
nition of a Wise Man" evening, "ban Neigh
bor and How We Should Treat Him."
RIVERSIDE CHAPELRev. Benjamin R. Weld.
Evening, "A Call to the Strong," a special
addi ess to young people.
IIFTHRev. William J. Johnson. Morning,
"What Is Eteri-al Life?" Ordination and ln
stalatlon of new elder evening. Rev. C. A.
Parks assistant state superintendent of the
Anti Saloon let*gue, will speak.
STEWART MEMORIALRev R. A. VanderLas.
Morning, "The Greater Gifts" evening, "Les
sons from the Life of Moses."
FIRSTRev. A Marshall. D.D. Morning
sermo-i by Rev. John M. Fulton, D.D., of St.
Paul evening sermon by Rev. Thomas Parry,
of Pittsburg. Pa.
*WLSH(Corner Franklin and Seventeenth ave
nue)-Rer.
SUNDAY^CHURCH SERVICES
H. P. Morgan. Mornintr. 10-30,
"Back to God" evening, 7.30, "How and
When to Seek the Lord." The Christian En
denvor meets at 6-30. with a fine program,
and ill vounr people are welcome.
GRACE-Jlev. Donald D. McKay. Morning. "The
"Influence a/id Operation of the Leaven" eve
ning. "Beheld By All."
VANDERBURGH MEMORIALRev. W. O.
Wallace. Morning. "The Church's Call to
Dutv" evening, "The Intermediate State."
HOPE CHAPELRev Alexander G. Patterson
Evening, "A Disappointed God." Solo, "The
Old Story," Mr. Howard Hare.
BAPTIST.
IMMANUELRev. C. J. Trlgeerson. Morning,
"The Profit of Godliness" evening. "The
Somce of a Sinner's Trouble
TRINITYRev. Lathan A. Crandall. Morning,
"Paul's Estimate of Values" evening, "Spirit
ual Athletics." Music a special feature of
the evening setvice.
CALVARYRev. Dr Fowler. Morning, "The
Inscription of Life" evening, "Rome Not
Built in a Dav." Music at evening service
lei by Calvary chorus. Baptism in evening.
NORWEGIAN DANISHGospel service morning
and evening corducted by the pastor. Rev. G.
Melley, and Rev Moe from Chicago.
NORTH SIDE MISSIONMorning, Rev M. W.
Withers, "The Forgotten Vow" evening, J.
Glllis. "Christian Education
OLIVETRev Frank Cooper. Morning, "The
First Law of the Kingdom": evening, "Vital
Christianity."
FOURTHRev. G. F. Holt. Morning. "Spiritual
Fitted Coats,
Tourist Styles,
Loose Coats
Full Length Coats,
Semi-Fitted Coats,
Velvet Coats
ft
J*
Blessings" evening^ "The Can f. the Matter.**
I CHICAGO AVENUEMorning, Pastor J. E. Con
ant will, preach: the evening service win b
in. charge of the Gideons.
FIRSTMorning, Rer. Dr. Frank Peterson,. dUf
trlct secretary America* Baptist Missionary
union evening. Rev. Df\ A. J. Frost, "The
fiecond Advent of Our Lord or Postmlllewrtat
Questions and Premlllennlal Answers." Deaa
Frost will give this subject by request.
TREERev. R. R. Kinnan. Morning, "The
Leaven of the Kingdom" evening, "Bandlnt
a Christian.1'
EPISCOPAL. 3gp
GETHSEMANERev. Bishop EdsalL on the In
auguration of Gethaemane's Jubilee year eve
fling. Rev. Irving P. Johnson. The new chan
cel tiling in memory of Bishop Knickerbocker
will be dedicated at the 10-30 service.
T| PAUL'S(Corner Franklin and Bryant ave
nhe)Rev. Theodore Payne Thurston. 8 a-m..
Holy Communion 9:45 a.m., Sunday school 11
a service and sermon by the pastor S
p.m., evensong.
HULY XRLNIlxRev. Stuart B. Pervls. Morn
ing, 7.30, Holy Communion 10:80, service and
sermon, evening, 7:46, prayer and sermon.
GRACERev. Andrew D. Stowe. Morning, dV
vine service 10:30 Sunday school/12 noon.
Dorcas society meets Friday, 4 p.m., with Mm
Beck, corner Bloomlngton a venae and Twenty
second street.
CHRIST- Rev. Andrew D. Stowe. Morning, di
vine {"ervice. 10:30 Sunday school 12 noon
evening, divine service. 7:30. Y. P. S. Toes
day at 8p.m.
ALL SAINTSRev. George H. Thomas. Morn
ing, Holy Communion, 8 morning prayer ind
sermon. 10.30, "He That Asketh Flnderh"
Parish school. 12 noon evening* evening prayer
and sermon by the rector. 7.45.
ST. MARK'S PRO-CATHEDRALRev. C. B.
Haupt. Mornlrg, 10:30, morning service and
sermon: evening. 7:46, evensong and sermon.
ST. THOMAS MIBSfONRev. George H. Thom
as. -Er-nirig, 3, Sunday school: 4, evening
prayer and sermon.
LUTHBRAN.*
SALEM ENGLISHRev. George H. Trabert.
Morning. "Christ's Nearness In Distress" eve
ning, 'Be Strong and of Good Courage."
AUGUSTANARev. C. J. Petri. Morning,
"Christ Is Our Very Present Helper": eve
ning, "Christ Has Brought Life and Immor
tality to Light Thru the GospeL" Swedish
Sunday school at 12:15 p.m. and English San
day school at 8 a.m.
ST. JOHN'S ENGLISH LUTHERANRev. A,
F. Elmquist. Morning, "Lord, Bid Me Come":
evening, "Why We Should Go to Church.**
Special music morning rnd evening.
ST. JOHN'S GERMANRev. .Paul Dowidat.
Morning "The Word of God Which Glveth
Grace Unto Saltation": Sunday school, 12 M,
German and English classes.
EVANGELICAL. ASSOCIATION.
FIRSTRev. F. R. Plantlkow. Morning,
"Wishing Jerusalem WeU"i evening, "Bx-
ceptance with God."
CATHOLIC.
ST. CHARLESRev. J. M. deary. Morning,
"Owe No Man Anything" no evening service.
Masses at 7:30. 9 and 10:80.
UNITARIAN.
NAZARETH (Norwegian!Rev. Amandns Nor
man. Morning, "On Being Spiritual.
G. A. R. Hall(Twentieth avenue N and Wash
ington)Rev. L. Nagerup-Klssen. Sermon la
Norwegian.
FIRSTRev. B. Stanton Hodgin. Morning.
"The Spirit of Compromise Is It the Corse ot
Our Time?"
UN1VERSALIST.
CHURCH OF THE REDEEMERRev. Joseph
K. Mason. D.D. Morning, 10-30. "The True
Life evenitg. 7:80. "Come and See."
TUTTLERev. John S. Lowe of La Crosse, Win.
Morning and evening.
ALL SOUL'SRev. Wm. H. Rider. Morning,
"Peace After War." Sunday school at 12 m.
DISCIPLES OF CHRIST.
GRAND AVENUE CHRISTIANRev. Dr. Fred
Kline. Morning, "Some Great Lessons: (1)
Fraternal Help" evening, "Christ's CaU torn
Men."
PORTLAND AVENUE CHURCH OF CHRIST
Rev. S G. Fisher. Morning, "The Ministry
of Suffering" evening, "The Ageless prama."
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE.
ALL CHURCLESMorning, "Spirit."
MISCELLANEOUS.
NEW THOUGHT LYCEUMAddress by Both
B. Ridges, "Living the Life."
ADVENT CHRISTIANRev. J. W. Murra.
Morning, "Sin and God's Remedy" evening,
"The Home of the Righteous
THE NEW THOUGHT SPIRITUAL SOCIETY
(McElroy hall, corner Eighth street and Nle
ollat avenue)r-Rev. Dr. Louis Williams. Eve
ning, "Ancestral Ghosts and Modern Spirits
Mrs. Frances D. Wheeler will give spirit mes
sages.
PROGRESSIVE SOCIETY(Masenic Temple)
Evening service S o'clock, lecture by Mrs. Asa
Talcott. greetings by Mrs. Lamb.
SPIRITUAL RESEARCH SOCIETYMiss Alice
Wl-kstrom, speaker. Morning service Ham.
THE CHILDREN'S PROGRESSIVE LYCEUM
(at A. O. U. W. hall, 229 Central avenue)
Afternoon service 2:30 p.m. Come and bring
the children.
fO*VIH SH*E SOCIETY40 Twentieth avenue
N)Lecture by H. Hegdabl. Afternoon service
2-30 mess-ices by Mrs. Beohler.
BAND OF PEACE(229 Central avenue)Eve
ning service 7.30, lecture by Mrs. S. If. Lo
well, me!S. ges by Mrs. Peake.
G. A. R. HALLE. Swenson. 3 p.m., "The
True Israelite."
TALKING FOR JAGOBSOH
MADISON MEN SAY IF NOMI-
NATED, EE MUST EAISE A POOS
MAN'S FUND.
J. F. Rosenwald and P. 6. Jacobson
of'Madison werff in the twin cities to
day. Both are prominent republicans
and strong supporters of their towns
man, J. F. Jacobson, for governor.
"Jacobson is not- looking for the
nomination, and doesn't feel as if he
could afford to make the run," said
Mr. Rosenwald "but I don't believe
he feels able to buy a ticket to Aus
tralia. I don't know any other way
he can get away from it. It looks like
a landslide for him, the way support
is coming in, and the seventh district
will be solid."
Both say that Jacobson is very back
ward about making a campaign, as he
cannot command the necessary funds,
and would not want any contributions
from corporations. If he should be
nominated there would have to be a
poor man's campaign fund raised.
Harsh, purgative remedies are fast
giving way to the gentle action and
mild effects of Carter's Little Livei
Pill*. If you try them, they will cer*
tainly please you.
insb
Established 188)
MERCHANTS. OF FINE CLOTHES.
Final Sale
Women's Coats
Saturday night at 9:30 we shall offer every unsold
winter coat in fine mixtures,regardless of former price,
at $4.95. Spring goods are now arriving and addi
tional room must be obtained. The coats now offered
include mixtures up to $30.
Values up to $3o.
No Exchanges or Refunds.
The Plymouth Clothing House, Nicollet and Sixth

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